Larry

Some of my old sailing photos 2

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Great pic, Larry

Thanks!

 

I have not seen a pic of The Finish of The Race before, looks like DC & Co have given up about 8~9 boat lengths... not much considering how much faster AusII was.

 

For all the subsequent history, I think losing The Cup was good overall. If the NYYC had held onto it, they would probably still want to race it in 12 Meters.

 

FB- Doug

 

You make it sound like that would be a bad thing. ;)

 

P.S. - First time I've seen it as well - that looks like a rather crushing defeat considering how highly developed the 12's were at that point.

 

It was much closer than that, when Dennis realized he couldn't catch the Aussies he sailed into the spectator fleet hoping they would follow him in and get picked off on one of the boats. It didn't work, the Aussies got to a fat layline and tacked away and Dennis had to weave his way out which is why he's reaching to the finish.

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I never liked that stepped transom that S&S came up with - always looked like they were trying too hard just to make something different.

I always thought it looked like they ran out of paper just before they finished the boat, and just stopped drawing!

 

TUBBY

That transom looks like a full diaper, especially when painted white.

 

Just a sharpened-up, squared-off version of what Ron Holland was doing three years earlier.

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Malenkaya, Rick Halprin. Capo 26. LMYA Section 5. (A winner.)

 

malenkaya-w-Spinnaker-1-900-BIC.jpg

 

 

Sorry to hear of the loss of friend Rick. He helped us get our mooring back when rules changed and we did not win in the 'lottery.'

 

We spent a year mooring our boat at River's End (Yacht Club), in the turning basin for the Chicago River.

 

That's where I learned most that I know of sailing anarchy. LOL

 

We had to traverse the Chicago Locks on the way to the lake and return. Yuck.

 

Then I met Rick. RIP

 

 

http://www.suntimes.com/20543460-761/famed-chicago-mob-attorney-dead-at-73.html

 

.

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Malenkaya, Rick Halprin. Capo 26. LMYA Section 5. (A winner.)

 

malenkaya-w-Spinnaker-1-900-BIC.jpg

 

 

Sorry to hear of the loss of friend Rick. He helped us get our mooring back when rules changed and we did not win in the 'lottery.'

 

We spent a year mooring our boat at River's End (Yacht Club), in the turning basin for the Chicago River.

 

That's where I learned most that I know of sailing anarchy. LOL

 

We had to traverse the Chicago Locks on the way to the lake and return. Yuck.

 

Then I met Rick. RIP

 

 

http://www.suntimes.com/20543460-761/famed-chicago-mob-attorney-dead-at-73.html

 

.

Um, San Juan 24

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Oh, you're right. This was an earlier boat.

This one didn't have the stubby, more 'modern' bow.

I have posted photos of the later boat here.

I just found some older slides I suppose.

Thanks, Herbie.

 

Here's the Capo, which I think should be shown here for clarification.

 

2dl6n7r.jpg

 

 

Two different cameras were used, Te San Juan was taken with Nikon and scanned from 35mm slides.

The picture in this post, the Capo 26, was taken with Pentax 6x7 which yielded 54 x 70mm negs.

For both photos, I scanned the negatives.

.

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Two different cameras were used, Te San Juan was taken with Nikon and scanned from 35mm slides.

The picture in this post, the Capo 26, was taken with Pentax 6x7 which yielded 54 x 70mm negs.

For both photos, I scanned the negatives.

.

 

Larry, thanks again (and again) for these continuing trips down memory lane. Lovely stuff.

 

Quick question - what's your recommendation for a good negative scanner? I have a metric shitload of my old sailing pics, but all that's left are the negs (nearly all 35mm). Advice gratefully received.

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Two different cameras were used, Te San Juan was taken with Nikon and scanned from 35mm slides.

The picture in this post, the Capo 26, was taken with Pentax 6x7 which yielded 54 x 70mm negs.

For both photos, I scanned the negatives.

.

 

Larry, thanks again (and again) for these continuing trips down memory lane. Lovely stuff.

 

Quick question - what's your recommendation for a good negative scanner? I have a metric shitload of my old sailing pics, but all that's left are the negs (nearly all 35mm). Advice gratefully received.

 

 

Hi, P_Wop...

 

I use an Epson scanner. Lots of scanners will work.

Negs should be placed in a carrier which suspends them above the scanner glass, or moire patterns can result.

 

If negs are FLAT, it will help. If they are curved, I use a special glass on top of the negative to hold it flat.

I use a special carrier and glass for the 55 x 70mm negs. Glass for both sizes provided by third party.

PM me if you want details on that source.

 

Scanning slides will work, too, and film never touches the glass, so no worries.

 

Scanner software settings can be important, but you should test without any sharpening.

If you use Photoshop or other graphics editor, you can sharpen there.

 

If you don't use Photoshop, etc. you should first experiment with mild, medium, then strong sharpening

by the scanner. Then you can scan all negs at optimal sharpness settings for your needs.

 

In Photoshop, I often sharpen, apply noise reduction, sometimes in selected areas.

It is important to have original image level on scanner if you can't level horizon in an editing program.

 

I can also clone to remove distractions or move boats around, but refuse to move boats up to first place. LOL

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Two different cameras were used, Te San Juan was taken with Nikon and scanned from 35mm slides.

The picture in this post, the Capo 26, was taken with Pentax 6x7 which yielded 54 x 70mm negs.

For both photos, I scanned the negatives.

.

 

Larry, thanks again (and again) for these continuing trips down memory lane. Lovely stuff.

 

Quick question - what's your recommendation for a good negative scanner? I have a metric shitload of my old sailing pics, but all that's left are the negs (nearly all 35mm). Advice gratefully received.

 

 

Hi, P_Wop...

 

I use an Epson scanner. Lots of scanners will work.

Negs should be placed in a carrier which suspends them above the scanner glass, or moire patterns can result.

 

If negs are FLAT, it will help. If they are curved, I use a special glass on top of the negative to hold it flat.

I use a special carrier and glass for the 55 x 70mm negs. Glass for both sizes provided by third party.

PM me if you want details on that source.

 

Scanning slides will work, too, and film never touches the glass, so no worries..

 

Larry.... as always, thanks and kudos. Who knows, I might post some of my own one day. Perhaps leave out the incriminating ones. Oh, wait, that's pretty well all of them....

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T.J. Anderson/Shelgren, MORF. C&C 29. LMYA Section 4 in 1980.

 

In 1983 Chicago to Mackinac Race, T.J. was in MHS Section 6, rated 656.7.

 

 

TJ-1980-900-1.jpg

 

 

.

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I raced against TJ with my Cal3-30 for a number of years. The Cal was, I believe a PHRF 165. We never expected to finish the Mackinac before Tuesday and Wednesday finishes were not that unheard of. Several years before I started racing the Cal, I was foredeck on a Yankey 30 (Good News!) when we won 1st in fleet.

 

Robin

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Seagull. Robin Munden. CAL 30, MORF. This photo is from 1980 or so.

 

Later, In 1983 Chicago to Mackinac Race, Seagull raced in MHS Section 6, rated 643.7.

Seagull raced in several Mac races. Perhaps Robin will tell us how many.

 

 

Seagull-and-4-Mile-Crib-900.jpg

 

.

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Larry, thanks for the photo and the other of Seagull that you posted on the predecessor thread. That is actually me at the helm. I will double check tonight but I think Seagull made the Mackinac during the years 1979 through 1983 (5 years) best we ever did with her was a 4th place although the boat was certainly capable of better. Took me a while to figure out how to get to the Island. We won both Section and Fleet Chicago Boat of the Year with her one year. Boy were those the days. All that white dacron, cross cut sails, big jibs and little tiny mains. The 3-30 was a Bill Lapworth design (Cal 40 fame) and was originally design in the early to mid 70s as a then 3/4 tonner with the west coast boat El Tigre being very successful. Boat so stiff that you carried the #1 with a reef in the Main to 20kn. The 3-30 had more furniture in it than my Sydney 38.

 

Robin

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Victory. Victor J. and Linda Crib. Homestead FL. Frers 48. 1983 SORC Class B, rated IOR 36.1. Miami to Nassau Race.

 

Victory-83-SORC-E-900-ddd.png

 

.

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The C&C Crusader hull #1 lives next to me on the Chesapeake. I am told she came from the Lakes, but moved here to the Chesapeake. She raced for a good long time. Her name is Old Blue now, but this is not original. Does anyone remember this boat? She is very nice.

Patsy

did she race as Old Blue here on the bay?

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Great shot ^^^^^

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Yes, I am fairly sure she did. I think she had a different name on the LAKES.

 

The C&C Crusader hull #1 lives next to me on the Chesapeake. I am told she came from the Lakes, but moved here to the Chesapeake. She raced for a good long time. Her name is Old Blue now, but this is not original. Does anyone remember this boat? She is very nice.
Patsy

did she race as Old Blue here on the bay?

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Classic angle on Victory!!

 

Now for something a little different- any one know the year ?

 

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Without looking anything up, my guess is early 60's. There appears to be at least one glass boat and there is an inflatable (Avon dates from 1959), but the winches are all old and no one has any sideburns or hair.

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Classic angle on Victory!!

 

Now for something a little different- any one know the year ?

 

 

Very cool flic DF, thanks for putting that up.

 

My guess would be mid-60s or possibly up to early 70s considering there might not be any brand-new boats in the fleet. I saw one reversed transom and some nylon shell jackets that don't look like 1950s stuff.

 

Kinda ruins the fun looking for technical stuff instead of just enjoying the scenes.

 

FB- Doug

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Yes, I am fairly sure she did. I think she had a different name on the LAKES.

 

The C&C Crusader hull #1 lives next to me on the Chesapeake. I am told she came from the Lakes, but moved here to the Chesapeake. She raced for a good long time. Her name is Old Blue now, but this is not original. Does anyone remember this boat? She is very nice.

Patsy

did she race as Old Blue here on the bay?

I used to race against her back in the 80's when I crewed on Reprisal. There was another boat in that era called Goldfish.. Heritage or Carter one ton I think.

I wish I'd kept better track of my pictures from back then. Can't find any of em.

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Classic angle on Victory!!

 

Now for something a little different- any one know the year ?

 

 

Very cool flic DF, thanks for putting that up.

 

My guess would be mid-60s or possibly up to early 70s considering there might not be any brand-new boats in the fleet. I saw one reversed transom and some nylon shell jackets that don't look like 1950s stuff.

 

Kinda ruins the fun looking for technical stuff instead of just enjoying the scenes.

 

FB- Doug

Thanks, I enjoyed it immensely, glued for the whole hour! did the Tobermory race in the 1990s with a couple of classics left amongst the fleet. I know a couple of the sailors, all in their 70s / 80s now.

 

I think c1966-7 judging by the cars and the nylon jackets. There is no usual BBC MXMXCCC stuff at the end.

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Yes, I am fairly sure she did. I think she had a different name on the LAKES.

 

The C&C Crusader hull #1 lives next to me on the Chesapeake. I am told she came from the Lakes, but moved here to the Chesapeake. She raced for a good long time. Her name is Old Blue now, but this is not original. Does anyone remember this boat? She is very nice.

Patsy

did she race as Old Blue here on the bay?

I used to race against her back in the 80's when I crewed on Reprisal. There was another boat in that era called Goldfish.. Heritage or Carter one ton I think.

I wish I'd kept better track of my pictures from back then. Can't find any of em.

If I remember correctly, regulars against Reprisal and Old Blue in IOR B in the early 1980s were: Goldfish (orange boat) which was the Heritage one-tonner owned by the Zinns, March Hare (ex-Pipe Dream, yellow boat) was the M36T one tonner owned by Milt Ricketts, McAteer's Immigrant, Bluefish (blue F3), Yellow-jacket (Yellow F3), Intuition (grey Carter 3/4 Ton), Mr. Bill (white Peterson 3/4 Ton), and Auf Ghets (sp) (an white/orange/yellow Peterson 34), Dr. Feelgood (a red Peterson 34) and Contraire (white w/blue-grey slashes, Farr 33).

 

Those were very colorful days.

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Maggie, I wish someone had a picture of Dr Feelgood.. the graphic was fabulous.

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Classic angle on Victory!!

 

Now for something a little different- any one know the year ?

 

 

Very cool flic DF, thanks for putting that up.

 

My guess would be mid-60s or possibly up to early 70s considering there might not be any brand-new boats in the fleet. I saw one reversed transom and some nylon shell jackets that don't look like 1950s stuff.

 

Kinda ruins the fun looking for technical stuff instead of just enjoying the scenes.

 

FB- Doug

Thanks, I enjoyed it immensely, glued for the whole hour! did the Tobermory race in the 1990s with a couple of classics left amongst the fleet. I know a couple of the sailors, all in their 70s / 80s now.

 

I think c1966-7 judging by the cars and the nylon jackets. There is no usual BBC MXMXCCC stuff at the end.

 

Yeah watching those 8-meters especially

And the girls

 

FB- Doug

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Celebration. Bruce and Pat Clark. Norwalk CT. Cook 40.

Celebration-from-Above-Again-900.png

.

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Obsession. James R. Andrew, FL. S&S 46. 1983 SORC Class C, rated IOR 34.43. Miami to Nassau Race.

 

 

Obsession-from-Windward-900.jpg

 

 

.

Wasn't the owner of Obsession Stephen Nichols out of Ct & Andrew from Alabama the owner of "Abracadabra"?

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Obsession. James R. Andrew, FL. S&S 46. 1983 SORC Class C, rated IOR 34.43. Miami to Nassau Race.

 

 

Obsession-from-Windward-900.jpg

 

 

.

Wasn't the owner of Obsession Stephen Nichols out of Ct & Andrew from Alabama the owner of "Abracadabra"?

maybe a charter.

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Dr Andrews did charter her, before he built the Joubert/Nivelt Abracadabra. Interesting memories of racing that one in Sardinia in 86. Not a happy result for the US team.

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Boomerang. George S. Comantaros, NYYC. Kaufman 65. 1983 SORC, Class A, rated IOR 53.4. Miami to Nassau Race.

 

New-Boomerang-Heeling-900TEXT.jpg

 

.

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Lady Be. F. Chalain, France. Frers 46. 1984 SORC, Class C, rated IOR 35.2. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Lady-Be-84-SORC-VIB-900.jpg

 

.

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Dr, Feelgood. Ripley/Garrett, SPYC. Farr 40. 1984 SORC, Class E, rated IOR 30.5 est. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race,

 

 

Dr-Feelgood-Straight-On-FINAL.jpg

 

.

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Vampire. I don't have any information on this boat. Perhaps somebody remembers her and can fill us in. Thanks.

 

Also, if anybody can post scratch sheets for 1981, 1982, 1984 or 1985 Chicago to Mackinac races, I'd appreciate it.

I have only the scratch sheet (booklet) for the 1983 race.

 

 

Vampire900a.jpg

 

.

Here is what I remember: This boat showed up in Detroit in the spring of '83 or '84. It was a "Dreyfus 42" or similar. Along the lines of Detente, Me Culpa or Your Cheating Heart. Not a Serendipity 43. I can't remember the owner's name, a really slick character. Wally or Woody would know. The boat wasn't around for more than 6 months and then disappeared. I always wondered what happened. I heard the owner went broke and then the boat was gone.

 

Does that mean it's a Peterson?

 

I think what happened was Dreyfus modified a Serendipity 43 mold to produce the 3 or 4 four boats like Vampire. So yes, in effect a Peterson design.

Dreyfus sold a S-43 mold & plug in '83 after Mea Culpa. He had a spare mold still in good shape but had signed an agreement not to build any boats within two feet LOA of 43'. He put a plug in the bow, 'blunting' it off and reshaped the transom somewhat and produce the 'New Orleans Marine 41'(40' 9"). Détente, Creole Lady, Vampire and one other. The company bankrupted in ????'85 or '86??? and re-emerged as United States Marine, building fast attack patrol boats. The company is still very successful in Gulfport MS. He and his partner both died of brain cancer, I know of one other person who worked there that died the same way. Always been curious if it was environmental (I worked there too :wacko: ) Probably a combination of the Cobalt Napthenate and Lead Fumes from the keel pours.

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Or maybe too much fu**ing under the waterfall .....

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I need help with identifying this boat. Its 30-year-old negative has some problems but I have managed to correct some of the faults.

Perhaps somebody here can identify the boat. Perhaps somebody here sailed on the boat.

 

North of Bradenton,1984 SORC, Boca Grande and Return. Location approximate.

 

Identity-Not-Known-Yet-900zzz.png

 

.

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

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Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

 

They sure have, but not in looks.

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

 

It even looks like Tom driving...

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Can't see any Schock 41s in the '84 results, perhaps the Norlin 40 Big Foot? Sailed by Per Save, rating 31.0.

Nah...its not Big Foot, it had white, yellow and blue spinnakers, no stripe on the hull and the name on the hull side. Big Foot is actually for sale (for a dime) lying in southern Sweden. Advert here: http://www.blocket.se/malmo/Norlin_40_one_off__One_ton_83_BIG_FOOT_48523906.htm?ca=15&w=3

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I was on this boat, Magistri, at SORC '83. The boat was a custom, all Kevlar 39' from the skunkworks at C&C. We lost the rig on the Miami Nassau race but the boat went on to participate in the Admirals Cup as part of the all C&C Canadian Admirals Cup team along with Amazing Grace (46') and Charisma (41').

post-769-0-16824900-1381325719_thumb.jpg

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

Kinda looked a little like a Frers to me. The numbers look like UK numbers. Anyone here work at UK in those days? She looks more like 38 or 39 feet - like a slightly stretched Frers 37.

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After the 83 AC I sold Magistri for Peter Farlinger, to Peter & Jacob Wallenberg and she did AC 85 for Sweden as Insdispensible II.

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

 

It even looks like Tom driving...

 

Sure does.

BTW the good ship Defiance is sitting for sale in the Bay Area

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

Kinda looked a little like a Frers to me. The numbers look like UK numbers. Anyone here work at UK in those days? She looks more like 38 or 39 feet - like a slightly stretched Frers 37.

At first glance I thought of Frers too. A production 38. It might have been custom when new. 1984 is about right for the production one.

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

Kinda looked a little like a Frers to me. The numbers look like UK numbers. Anyone here work at UK in those days? She looks more like 38 or 39 feet - like a slightly stretched Frers 37.

At first glance I thought of Frers too. A production 38. It might have been custom when new. 1984 is about right for the production one.

I got it, I got it. Fiji Warrior. A 38 that had some success in the earlyish 80's. Very similar of that boat that's for sure.

 

Larry - I think you have that boat your files here somewhere.

 

Never mind - found it.

 

post-1185-0-14226000-1381423917_thumb.jpg

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Different bow and pulpit than the mystery boat Maxx..

I was just looking at in passing as it has the Frers look and our compadre's thought it might be 37-39. It fits for that. Might be a custom Something aruther 37.5. A lot of race boat makers in those days.

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She does look like a Frers, in which case it would be Momentum (Peter Tong), 4th Class F, 38th overall (38 footer, rating 30.0ft)

Nah. The Momentum was dark green and not UK sails

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I need help with identifying this boat. Its 30-year-old negative has some problems but I have managed to correct some of the faults.

Perhaps somebody here can identify the boat. Perhaps somebody here sailed on the boat.

 

North of Bradenton,1984 SORC, Boca Grande and Return. Location approximate.

 

Identity-Not-Known-Yet-900zzz.png

 

.

Almost has to be the Schock: http://www.wdschock.com/boats/schock41gp/s41gp_index.php

 

The bow pulpit, toe rail treatment, and forehatch all scream Schock 35 to me, and the rest of the boat matches the link above.

 

Below post shows a Cook 41 "Jubilation" DFL in Class D I'm thinking that's it?

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Goody.

 

Thanks to Schnick and for homing in on Jubilation in Class D.

And thanks to Alan Andrews and all others for their help.

Thanks to Richard 4073 for posting results sheets, which I will save for future reference.

 

This Jubilation was also pictured in the older thread, on Page 14 if you show 100 posts per page.

The boat was much easier to identify there, and the photo was much better.

 

Owner was WIllard Emery.

 

2pzmgci.png

 

 

.

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

Kinda looked a little like a Frers to me. The numbers look like UK numbers. Anyone here work at UK in those days? She looks more like 38 or 39 feet - like a slightly stretched Frers 37.

 

 

38 or 39 feet Frers ? :)))))))))))))

Just kiddin !

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Intrepid. John Nedeau.

 

Windancer-Below-900b.png

 

 

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Looks like the Bill Cook designed Schock 41 that sailed that year but not sure. That might give you a way to look up a sail number and see if the it is consistent with the few numbers visible on the main. Race boats have changed for the better since then in a lot of ways!

Kinda looked a little like a Frers to me. The numbers look like UK numbers. Anyone here work at UK in those days? She looks more like 38 or 39 feet - like a slightly stretched Frers 37.

 

 

38 or 39 feet Frers ? :)))))))))))))

Just kiddin !

See, I told you it was the Shock!!

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Rage. Bustamante/Flitman. Holland 40. 1983 SORC, Class E, rated IOR 30.7. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

I don't know the yacht club affiliation for this boat. Does anybody here remember?

I have the scratch sheet, but only a partial 'list of entires.'

 

 

Rage-83-SORC-W-900.jpg

 

 

.

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BAT. Jack Batts, MBYC. Swan 441. 1982 Chicago to Mackinac Race.

 

Bat-898a.jpg

 

.

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Pinta. W. Illbruck, W. Germany. Judel/Vrolijk 43. 1984 SORC, Class D, rated 32.4est. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Pinta-Horizontal-1024.png

 

.

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"Rage" was entered by Mario Bustamante and Don Flitman, both residents of Miami. Likely they sailed under the Coral Reef Yacht Club flag.

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Rage. Bustamante/Flitman. Holland 40. 1983 SORC, Class E, rated IOR 30.7. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

I don't know the yacht club affiliation for this boat. Does anybody here remember?

I have the scratch sheet, but only a partial 'list of entires.'

 

 

Rage-83-SORC-W-900.jpg

 

 

.

Geez...Haven't seen a pole squared back like that in a couple of decades...good ol' IOR.

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Hey Larry, fabulous shots, as always. I know you have shown a number of great shots of John Thomson's various Infinitys. I was wondering if you had dug around to see if you had any others. I'm sure John probably purchased many from you over the years, so he has likely seen them all. But John is suffering from ALS (Lou Gerhig's disease)and has been for some time now. A tremendous fundraising party for the benefit of the ALS Foundation was held this past Saturday night at Manhasset Bay Yacht Club in honor of John. The party was held in conjunction with the Manhasset Bay Fall Series Regatta which John founded back in the 1970's. One of the biggest auction attractions was a poster of Infinity sailing in the SORC (I'm not sure who the photographer was) shot from a helicopter. This simple dry mounted poster went for $1200 and they decided to make a second poster which went for another $1200. I just thought you may have some images that we have not seen before which John would love to see. Thanks again for all of your work, it is truly mind-blowing to see these old pictures from a time that will likely never be repeated.

 

By the way, I forgot to mention that John and his wife Adrienne were both brave enough to make it to the party. While John had trouble communicating, his face just lit up in seeing all his old friends.

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Pinta. W. Illbruck, W. Germany. Judel/Vrolijk 43. 1984 SORC, Class D, rated 32.4est. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Pinta-Horizontal-1024.png

 

.

Great shot Larry. Full on IOR rolly-polly's going on!

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Hot Flash. John and George Uznis, Bayview YC, Mull 38. IOR Section 4, rated IOR 27.6.

 

 

Hot-Flash-New-Scan-900-SAT.jpg

 

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Freefall. Ted Simpkins. Farr 37. 1983 SORC Class F, rated IOR 28.6. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Freefall-83-SORC-W-900.png

 

.

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Don Quixote. Harlan Schwartz, STBY. Swan 39. 1982 Chicago to Mackinac Race, IOR Section 2, rated 31.2.

 

Don-Quixote-1024-3.jpg

 

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I was on this boat, Magistri, at SORC '83. The boat was a custom, all Kevlar 39' from the skunkworks at C&C. We lost the rig on the Miami Nassau race but the boat went on to participate in the Admirals Cup as part of the all C&C Canadian Admirals Cup team along with Amazing Grace (46') and Charisma (41').

There was a 39' Magistri that came to Seattle in the late 80's that had a similar transom. It had an abstract eagle painted on the side...which could have been left over from a European sojourn..it looked more "tsarist" than most US-style graphics from that era. It seemed to have had some fairly asymmetrical repair work done to the bow, which couldn't have helped.

It raced fairly actively for a while by a very nice couple, never had much speed or success, then it faded away in the 90's. I haven't spotted it for a while.

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Nice pic, I believe the boat is in Chicago now and called Loki

Don Quixote. Harlan Schwartz, STBY. Swan 39. 1982 Chicago to Mackinac Race, IOR Section 2, rated 31.2.

 

Don-Quixote-1024-3.jpg

 

.

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Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

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Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat - can you stand up in it - that freeboard looks pretty low for a flush deck boat.

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Thanks Ed! Wow those are some names I haven't thought of in a while. Does anyone have any links to shots of '84 BBS? There is a particular shot I've seen, I think it was Leutwiler but I could be wrong. I'd love to scroll through some archives and even purchase a print if I could find it.

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Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat - can you stand up in it - that freeboard looks pretty low for a flush deck boat.

 

Well, those things were pretty heavy, I bet it's got a lot of body below the waterline.

Not only is it a gorgeous boat, but they're sailing it with 7 people. That's cool. Shucks I know people who think you need 7 on a J-24

 

FB- Doug

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Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat - can you stand up in it - that freeboard looks pretty low for a flush deck boat.

Yes, standing headroom. At 6', I wasn't in danger of banging my head down below.

 

Should also note that while at rest, the tip of the transom was a bit out of the water.

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Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat - can you stand up in it - that freeboard looks pretty low for a flush deck boat.

 

Well, those things were pretty heavy, I bet it's got a lot of body below the waterline.

Not only is it a gorgeous boat, but they're sailing it with 7 people. That's cool. Shucks I know people who think you need 7 on a J-24

 

FB- Doug

You might need to see your optometrist, cobber...there's more than 7 in plain view

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Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat - can you stand up in it - that freeboard looks pretty low for a flush deck boat.

 

Well, those things were pretty heavy, I bet it's got a lot of body below the waterline.

Not only is it a gorgeous boat, but they're sailing it with 7 people. That's cool. Shucks I know people who think you need 7 on a J-24

 

FB- Doug

You might need to see your optometrist, cobber...there's more than 7 in plain view

 

 

Hey! That 8th guy was below when I counted earlier!

 

FB- Doug

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Christ I wish Tom Leutwiler would pop up on this forum. Not belittle Larry's stuff, which is awesome, but Tom must have a another whole universe of stuff if he didn't trash it all.

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Sorry to say that Tom Leutwiler has passed on.

 

This is from wikipedia. I think it's accurate...

 

The 1980s were the peak years for Leutwiler Photography, as the annual calendar became a bigger staple of the sailboat racing world with each passing year, and his classic and new portraits continued to be a success. But after nearly twenty years of hard work and devotion, Leutwiler lost his passion and drive for sailboat photography and closed down the business in the 1990, selling off his negatives and camera equipment. He moved to Salt Lake City, Utah in the early 1990s and pursued a variety of other interests including real estate ventures. In 1993, he died in Salt Lake City.

 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Leutwiler

 

NOTE: I'm sure there are sailors here that have Leutwiler photos.

I'd be proud if some of his photos became part of this thread.

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BTW, They never raced with less than about 10, and more for buoy races. These boats were NOT designed for shorthanded racing and needed rail meat like any other race boat! I am guessing this was not taken during a race-was more likely a photo shoot.

 

 

 

 

Infinity. John B. Thomson, STC. Holland 47. Boca Grande and Return race, 1984 SORC, IOR Class B.

 

Infinity_edited-location-1024-SR.jpg

 

Gorgeous boat - can you stand up in it - that freeboard looks pretty low for a flush deck boat.

 

Well, those things were pretty heavy, I bet it's got a lot of body below the waterline.

Not only is it a gorgeous boat, but they're sailing it with 7 people. That's cool. Shucks I know people who think you need 7 on a J-24

 

FB- Doug

You might need to see your optometrist, cobber...there's more than 7 in plain view

 

 

Hey! That 8th guy was below when I counted earlier!

 

FB- Doug

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Or while the off watch is below being, well, you know, off watch

BTW, They never raced with less than about 10, and more for buoy races. These boats were NOT designed for shorthanded racing and needed rail meat like any other race boat! I am guessing this was not taken during a race-was more likely a photo shoot.

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Sorry to say that Tom Leutwiler has passed on.

 

This is from wikipedia. I think it's accurate...

 

The 1980s were the peak years for Leutwiler Photography, as the annual calendar became a bigger staple of the sailboat racing world with each passing year, and his classic and new portraits continued to be a success. But after nearly twenty years of hard work and devotion, Leutwiler lost his passion and drive for sailboat photography and closed down the business in the 1990, selling off his negatives and camera equipment. He moved to [/size]Salt Lake City, Utah in the early 1990s and pursued a variety of other interests including real estate ventures. In 1993, he died in Salt Lake City.[/size]

 

Source: [/size]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Leutwiler

 

NOTE: I'm sure there are sailors here that have Leutwiler photos.

I'd be proud if some of his photos became part of this thread.

I wonder who bought the negatives.

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Maybe, but in looking at the pole height, trim and where folks are, I doubt they are racing here. This was a top line program and as I recall from those days they never looked that casual on the race course.

 

Or while the off watch is below being, well, you know, off watch

BTW, They never raced with less than about 10, and more for buoy races. These boats were NOT designed for shorthanded racing and needed rail meat like any other race boat! I am guessing this was not taken during a race-was more likely a photo shoot.

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