Larry

Some of my old sailing photos 2

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Blitzen. O'Brien/Cronin, CYC. G&S 30. IOR Section 6, rated 22.0.

 

 

Blitzen.png

 

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Quill. Navy, GLYC. ILN 34. MHS Section 1, rated 100.0.

 

 

Quill2.png

 

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Larry, this thread has been quite recently but I wanted to say I appreciate you continuing to post these pictures. For someone who is a comparative infant in the sailing community it's great experience to look at and learn about these magnificent boats.

 

Thank you!

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Afternoon Delight. Richard Becker, Col YC. C&C 34. MHS Section 5, rated 623.8.

 

 

Picture7-30.png

 

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Shiftless. Bob Olins, CYC. APHR 33. MHS Section 4, rated 613.1.

 

 

Shiftless.png

 

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Blitzen. O'Brien/Cronin, CYC. G&S 30. IOR Section 6, rated 22.0.

 

 

Picture8-26.png

 

 

Happy New Year, everybody.

 

.

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While I don't have anything to add, old enough but wasn't sailing then, I do appreciate this thread... It fills in a few gaps in my knowledge base.

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Larry,

 

A special Happy New Year to you for this thread. I surely softened last winter for many of us...keep it up!

 

Showtime!

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While I don't have anything to add, old enough but wasn't sailing then, I do appreciate this thread... It fills in a few gaps in my knowledge base.

Here's one for you, Charlie:

 

Strip_Planking.jpg

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Arbitrage. 1987, in Chicago.

 

 

Arbitrage87-1.png

 

 

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Arbitrage is still Arbitrage (or Harbortrash, depending). It went from blue with white letters and bootstripes to white with blue letters and bootstripes. It first raced out of Duluth, and has been on the hard in Bayfield for the last several years, although prior to that a lot of hard work was done to beef up the dodgy build bits. This is all to the best of my knowledge, I know there are others here who know more....

 

Anyway, your typical tweaky, noodle-rigged fracy late IOR yacht....

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While I don't have anything to add, old enough but wasn't sailing then, I do appreciate this thread... It fills in a few gaps in my knowledge base.

Here's one for you, Charlie:

 

Strip_Planking.jpg

 

Only if that plank was bare and i was the framing....:lol: :lol:

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While I don't have anything to add, old enough but wasn't sailing then, I do appreciate this thread... It fills in a few gaps in my knowledge base.

Here's one for you, Charlie:

 

Strip_Planking.jpg

 

Only if that plank was bare and i was the framing....:lol: :lol:

you don't want bare you want at least 1 layer of latex

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Spirit, ex-Stars & Stripes. NM39.

 

 

Picture25-1.png

 

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There are a lot of gorgeous paint jobs in this thread. I can't get owners to step outta the box and let u do a custom color job on their boats.. All I get is white, white and more white... Wazzup wit dat?:(

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There are a lot of gorgeous paint jobs in this thread. I can't get owners to step outta the box and let u do a custom color job on their boats.. All I get is white, white and more white... Wazzup wit dat?:(

 

Could it be that the 70's and 80's are over? I mean just guessing here?

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Hey, gorgeous color is still gorgeous...

 

Piss off, Nat couldn't be wrong!

 

"There are only two colors to paint a boat, black or white, and only a fool would paint a boat black".

-Nathanael G. Herreshoff

 

TOG

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Blue is the new black. :)

 

And Larry, thanks so much for going down memory lane. I was old enough, sailed, but most of the boats are all from the wrong coast.

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Arn't they less beautiful for that ? :)

 

Blue is the new black. :)

 

And Larry, thanks so much for going down memory lane. I was old enough, sailed, but most of the boats are all from the wrong coast.

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This one has some paint on it.

No vinyl decals on Puma. All graphics were air brushed.

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I'm proud to say that my photos were used by a model builder to develop this model of Gauntlet,

now on display at Southern Yacht Club. Thanks to Gerry LaNasa for spearheading the project

and for this nice photo of the finished model.

 

Picture10-25.png

 

GauntletFINAL1024.png

 

 

My photo of Gantlet is from the 1984 SORC, St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

A Kaufman 45, Gauntlet raced in IOR Class C.

 

.

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Pinta. W. Illbruck. West Germany. JUD/VRO 43. 1984 SORC, IOR Class D. Rated 32.4 EST. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

 

Picture18-8.png

 

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Look at the boom .... any trouble ?

 

 

Pinta. W. Illbruck. West Germany. JUD/VRO 43. 1984 SORC, IOR Class D. Rated 32.4 EST. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

 

Picture18-8.png

 

.

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Look at the boom .... any trouble ?

 

 

Pinta. W. Illbruck. West Germany. JUD/VRO 43. 1984 SORC, IOR Class D. Rated 32.4 EST. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

 

Picture18-8.png

 

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She must have got a good roll up with the main out like that. No vang possible either.

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Look at the boom .... any trouble ?

 

 

Pinta. W. Illbruck. West Germany. JUD/VRO 43. 1984 SORC, IOR Class D. Rated 32.4 EST. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

 

Picture18-8.png

 

.

She must have got a good roll up with the main out like that. No vang possible either.

To misquote Crocodile Dundee, That's not a roll!

 

That is a bit of a wobble on one of these things, rolls are measured by the number of feet of pole under the water.

 

It wasn't fast but it kept the blood count in your adrenalin/beer mix low!

 

TUBBY

 

 

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Look at the boom .... any trouble ?

 

 

Pinta. W. Illbruck. West Germany. JUD/VRO 43. 1984 SORC, IOR Class D. Rated 32.4 EST. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

 

Picture18-8.png

 

.

She must have got a good roll up with the main out like that. No vang possible either.

To misquote Crocodile Dundee, That's not a roll!

 

That is a bit of a wobble on one of these things, rolls are measured by the number of feet of pole under the water.

 

It wasn't fast but it kept the blood count in your adrenalin/beer mix low!

 

TUBBY

That was probably how the boom got that way.

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Dear Mr Clean,

 

I would like to ask if there is anything SA can do toward recording this thread. It wshould be an international catastrophe if this amazing history of yachting is somehow not preserved, is this possible?

 

Larry, and also to all the contributors, words just don't seem enough thanks.

 

Take a bow Larry (and gentlemen), you've got us standing in the stalls.

 

 

SB

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Celebration. Cook 40. 1983 SORC, Miami to Nassau Race. IOR Class E, rated 30.8.

 

 

Picture10-15.png

 

Here is Celebration as of this April. Seen at Cove Marina in Norwalk CT

 

 

 

Also the Container:

 

3zNNW.jpg

Same guy own the Lotus Esprit too? Dude's living in his own time warp!

 

She was for sale last year on Craigslist for $5000. Friend of mine hopped on board and I guess she was rather trashed.

 

The boat was owned by Bruce and Pat Clark who had the boat built for the Admirals cup. The design brief was for a scaled up version of their very successful New York 36. Have fond memories of this boat as it was the one that got me into racing. Did the block island race on this boat back in the mid 80's and have never been so cold in my life.

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Celebration. Cook 40. 1983 SORC, Miami to Nassau Race. IOR Class E, rated 30.8.

 

 

Picture10-15.png

 

Here is Celebration as of this April. Seen at Cove Marina in Norwalk CT

 

 

 

Also the Container:

 

3zNNW.jpg

Same guy own the Lotus Esprit too? Dude's living in his own time warp!

 

She was for sale last year on Craigslist for $5000. Friend of mine hopped on board and I guess she was rather trashed.

 

The boat was owned by Bruce and Pat Clark who had the boat built for the Admirals cup. The design brief was for a scaled up version of their very successful New York 36. Have fond memories of this boat as it was the one that got me into racing. Did the block island race on this boat back in the mid 80's and have never been so cold in my life.

 

The original Celebration was most definitely NOT a New York 36. It was a Cook One Ton. She and her sistership Firewater were some of the most successful IOR 27.5 Long Island Sound One Tons. The NY 36, as has been already discussed on the first version of this thread, was no where near as successful - though there were some west coast boats that folks here will swear by. Celebration, Firewater, and a Ganbare 35 called Not By Bread Alone blew the doors off the other one tonners of the day on LIS.

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Heritage.

 

 

 

HeritageAbeam.png

 

.

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Heritage.

 

Think the T10 is waving him through?

 

 

 

HeritageAbeam.png

 

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No the standard Douche bag T-10 move is to scream "starboard" and then bitch when they get lee-bowed by a twelve pounder and summarily shot out the back end.

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City Limits. Forney/Wahl, MCYC. SC 33, Chicago to Mackinac Race, 1982. MHS Section 3, rated 594.4.

 

 

CityLimitsNewEdit2-2012.png

 

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Hope. Royce Foley. Col YC, Chicago. Q (50'). MHS Section 1, rated 563.0.

 

 

HOPE1024signed.jpg

 

.

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Hope. Royce Foley. Col YC, Chicago. Q (50'). MHS Section 1, rated 563.0.

 

 

HOPE1024signed.jpg

 

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I know not as fast but I love long overhangs. THAT is a beauty. More info please.

Larry thanks for this thread,I always look forward to it popping up again.

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Hope, was one of a number of Qs still racing in the Chicago area in the late 70s and early 80s. Cara Mia and Lively Lady, were others. The Qs took a number of Mack and other races overall not only on the lakes but on both coasts. They were spawned by the same universal rule as spawned the Js and other class boats. Hope was only about 8 foot of beam about 55 ft overall, incredibly deep with a full keel and standing headroom for 6 footers. All wood of course. Very tender, "hopelessly" wet (sorry about the bad pun) and beautiful to watch. On a reach when not overpowered with the entire waterline working they were still a force. I do not know when they were first built.

 

Robin

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Hope. Royce Foley. Col YC, Chicago. Q (50'). MHS Section 1, rated 563.0.

 

 

HOPE1024signed.jpg

 

.

 

Great looking boats, I would add Gracious to the list of former Lake, MI Q's. Thanks Larry, cool pics. Any of American Eagle when on the lake circa Ted Turners famous quote about the lake/mac race or Lynn Williams Dora (3?) the Mull 55 that won the mac and graced the cover of the lands end catalog back in the day when they actually sold marine hardware?

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

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Dora (3?) the Mull 55 that won the mac and graced the cover of the lands end catalog back in the day when they actually sold marine hardware?

 

Is that the boat that went to the west coast and became "safari"? Mull 55, aluminum, masthead rig...?

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

 

 

 

There's Phil Dawg catchin' some rays.

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Tom Blackaller memory.

 

The original photo has a lot of noise, so I applied some noise reduction.

Cropped and enlarged, it's rather blurry, but I still like it.

 

 

Picture9-22.png

 

l'd love to hear some more great stories about Tom.

 

.

 

There is a video interview of Tom Blackaller seated on a sail boat talking about the boats in the current { then} AC , 12s? Something like this "These boats are slow as slugs. We've got fast boats, multi hulled boat going round the world at speeds ..... Id love to see them in the AC." He'd be HAPPY with the AC boats this time around. This video is close but not the one I remember.

 

 

Uploaded by LisaBlackaller on Jan 7, 2011

 

I just had to share

with old friends in the America's Cup world. This video clips and interview were done with my dad prior to his untimely death in 1989. He would certainly be thrilled and amazed that, yes in fact, the America's Cup IS coming to San Francisco Bay, and it IS being sailed in fast catamarans! Too bad he is not alive to share in all the excitement. He would love it all.

 

I raced in the 1988 Prosail finals in Miami and somehow got assigned a seat at Tom Blackaller's table for the awards dinner. He had his family with him and crew and I was honored to be there. The event was sponsored by Salem cigarrettes (RJ Reynolds Tobacco) and Sid Morris the empresario behind the whole circuit got up and started his speech about the event and thanking the tobacco money for making it happen. There was a large bowl at the center of every table with Salem, Kools, Camels, Winston, the whole lineup of their products and Tom casually reached in and grabbed a pack and made a big show of tamping it down and opening and drawing out a cig. He gazed at it with lust, ran it under his nose while inhaling loudly, and finally lit it up. His wife and daughter looked on in surprise as he was not a smoker but his act didn't stop with that. He chose the next brand and went through the same routine and lit that one while still drawing on the first!. He kept adding each brand until the tobacco bigwigs up on stage couldn't help but notice. His crew was used to his shennanigans but I had to bite my lip to keep from laughing out loud...

Tom was a class act, hope the AC cast in SF Bay live up to his dreams of such an event.

 

I found this old photo of Tom and Peter Barrett racing a Star in 40 knots during the 72 Olympic Trials. No Guts, No Glory!!!

post-33902-076250200 1330454305_thumb.jpg

post-33902-031163800 1330454314_thumb.jpg

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Dora (3?) the Mull 55 that won the mac and graced the cover of the lands end catalog back in the day when they actually sold marine hardware?

 

Is that the boat that went to the west coast and became "safari"? Mull 55, aluminum, masthead rig...?

 

It could well be, where did she end up? This is all from memory so apologies if it is not 100% correct but I believe it to be. Lynn Williams, a patent attorney in Chicago owned this Dora which I believe was #3, #4, was an S&S PJ built 61 having a pretty storied history as well with many wins on the lake (macs etc) and then she went on to her next owner-Ted Turner who renamed her Tenacious which he sailed to a corrected time victory in the infamous '79 Fastnet race. The 61 would later be sold to Warren Brown of Bermuda and become War Baby which again under the third owner continued her winning ways. Anyways, back to the Mull 55, IIRC, Dora was again an PJ built aluminum boat designed by Gary Mull and won the very rough 1970 Chicago to Mac race that produced Ted Turners often quoted appraisal of what sailing on the lakes was like. The boat graced the cover of I think it was the 71 or 72 lands end catalog (buried in the basement somewhere I think) with a nice writeup on the boat. The catalog was pretty thick and back in those days (before lands end switch to primarily clothing) contained mostly sailing hardware. The two Dora's had sort of similar looks in that they were both PJ built boats with mostly flush decks and smaller raised cabin houses (with storage at the front for life raft) but of course being from different designers also had many differences too. Sorry to ramble on so long, the effect of getting older I guess........

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I think the Mull boat-PJ built maybe now be owned by a guy I know living in Venezuela on board - kept the name I believe, I don't know much more about it.

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1974 Half Ton N.A.'s Corpus Christi

 

Remember seeing her in La Rochelle '74 Half ton, she was certainly one of the more interesting boats, although the french crews of the time might have been biased towards US West-Coast sailors, sharing the same kind of "philosophy".

Actually, to the contrary of AF , Golden Shamrock totally missed the championships and triggered the most orders, away from established designers in the class.

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Dora (3?) the Mull 55 that won the mac and graced the cover of the lands end catalog back in the day when they actually sold marine hardware?

 

Is that the boat that went to the west coast and became "safari"? Mull 55, aluminum, masthead rig...?

 

It could well be, where did she end up? This is all from memory so apologies if it is not 100% correct but I believe it to be. Lynn Williams, a patent attorney in Chicago owned this Dora which I believe was #3, #4, was an S&S PJ built 61 having a pretty storied history as well with many wins on the lake (macs etc) and then she went on to her next owner-Ted Turner who renamed her Tenacious which he sailed to a corrected time victory in the infamous '79 Fastnet race. The 61 would later be sold to Warren Brown of Bermuda and become War Baby which again under the third owner continued her winning ways. Anyways, back to the Mull 55, IIRC, Dora was again an PJ built aluminum boat designed by Gary Mull and won the very rough 1970 Chicago to Mac race that produced Ted Turners often quoted appraisal of what sailing on the lakes was like. The boat graced the cover of I think it was the 71 or 72 lands end catalog (buried in the basement somewhere I think) with a nice writeup on the boat. The catalog was pretty thick and back in those days (before lands end switch to primarily clothing) contained mostly sailing hardware. The two Dora's had sort of similar looks in that they were both PJ built boats with mostly flush decks and smaller raised cabin houses (with storage at the front for life raft) but of course being from different designers also had many differences too. Sorry to ramble on so long, the effect of getting older I guess........

 

 

Dora IV, owned by Lynn Williams that was later sold to Ted Turner and renamed Tenacious which was in the 79 Fastnet was an S&S design not a Mull.

 

Robin

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Dora (3?) the Mull 55 that won the mac and graced the cover of the lands end catalog back in the day when they actually sold marine hardware?

 

Is that the boat that went to the west coast and became "safari"? Mull 55, aluminum, masthead rig...?

 

It could well be, where did she end up? This is all from memory so apologies if it is not 100% correct but I believe it to be. Lynn Williams, a patent attorney in Chicago owned this Dora which I believe was #3, #4, was an S&S PJ built 61 having a pretty storied history as well with many wins on the lake (macs etc) and then she went on to her next owner-Ted Turner who renamed her Tenacious which he sailed to a corrected time victory in the infamous '79 Fastnet race. The 61 would later be sold to Warren Brown of Bermuda and become War Baby which again under the third owner continued her winning ways. Anyways, back to the Mull 55, IIRC, Dora was again an PJ built aluminum boat designed by Gary Mull and won the very rough 1970 Chicago to Mac race that produced Ted Turners often quoted appraisal of what sailing on the lakes was like. The boat graced the cover of I think it was the 71 or 72 lands end catalog (buried in the basement somewhere I think) with a nice writeup on the boat. The catalog was pretty thick and back in those days (before lands end switch to primarily clothing) contained mostly sailing hardware. The two Dora's had sort of similar looks in that they were both PJ built boats with mostly flush decks and smaller raised cabin houses (with storage at the front for life raft) but of course being from different designers also had many differences too. Sorry to ramble on so long, the effect of getting older I guess........

 

 

Dora IV, owned by Lynn Williams that was later sold to Ted Turner and renamed Tenacious which was in the 79 Fastnet was an S&S design not a Mull.

 

Robin

Correct, as I noted above....#4, was an S&S PJ built 61...really neat boats with a lot of history.

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Dora (3?) the Mull 55 that won the mac and graced the cover of the lands end catalog back in the day when they actually sold marine hardware?

 

Is that the boat that went to the west coast and became "safari"? Mull 55, aluminum, masthead rig...?

 

It could well be, where did she end up? This is all from memory so apologies if it is not 100% correct but I believe it to be. Lynn Williams, a patent attorney in Chicago owned this Dora which I believe was #3, #4, was an S&S PJ built 61 having a pretty storied history as well with many wins on the lake (macs etc) and then she went on to her next owner-Ted Turner who renamed her Tenacious which he sailed to a corrected time victory in the infamous '79 Fastnet race. The 61 would later be sold to Warren Brown of Bermuda and become War Baby which again under the third owner continued her winning ways. Anyways, back to the Mull 55, IIRC, Dora was again an PJ built aluminum boat designed by Gary Mull and won the very rough 1970 Chicago to Mac race that produced Ted Turners often quoted appraisal of what sailing on the lakes was like. The boat graced the cover of I think it was the 71 or 72 lands end catalog (buried in the basement somewhere I think) with a nice writeup on the boat. The catalog was pretty thick and back in those days (before lands end switch to primarily clothing) contained mostly sailing hardware. The two Dora's had sort of similar looks in that they were both PJ built boats with mostly flush decks and smaller raised cabin houses (with storage at the front for life raft) but of course being from different designers also had many differences too. Sorry to ramble on so long, the effect of getting older I guess........

 

 

Dora IV, owned by Lynn Williams that was later sold to Ted Turner and renamed Tenacious which was in the 79 Fastnet was an S&S design not a Mull.

 

Robin

 

Polaris, thanks for the pic, cool old boat(s) with a lot of history.

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Hope. Royce Foley, Col YC. Q 50. MHS Section 1.

 

Picture1-115.png

 

.

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

 

 

 

There's Phil Dawg catchin' some rays.

 

I think there were 3 or 4 G&S's All of them pretty boats. Lobo was the best. In style points that is. Lobo, Chocolate Chips, Discovery 1 and ?. Whatever happened to Discovery 1?

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Celebration. Bruce and Pat Clark. Cook 40. 1983 SORC, Class E. St. Petersburg to Ft. Lauderdale Race.

 

Picture3-72.png

 

.

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

 

 

 

There's Phil Dawg catchin' some rays.

 

I think there were 3 or 4 G&S's All of them pretty boats. Lobo was the best. In style points that is. Lobo, Chocolate Chips, Discovery 1 and ?. Whatever happened to Discovery 1?

 

Footloose was a G&S 3/4 ton built in 1985 in Michigan. Great boat until the rig came down.

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

 

 

 

There's Phil Dawg catchin' some rays.

 

I think there were 3 or 4 G&S's All of them pretty boats. Lobo was the best. In style points that is. Lobo, Chocolate Chips, Discovery 1 and ?. Whatever happened to Discovery 1?

 

? (boat#4) perhaps=Bad Moon Rising?

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

 

 

 

There's Phil Dawg catchin' some rays.

 

I think there were 3 or 4 G&S's All of them pretty boats. Lobo was the best. In style points that is. Lobo, Chocolate Chips, Discovery 1 and ?. Whatever happened to Discovery 1?

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I owned Discovery for about 7 years, purchased in Kingston, Ontario where it was known as Coyote syndrome. Moved boat to Atlantic Canada, spent two years rebuilding hull, basicly rebuilt hull completely below waterline. Sold boat about 7 years ago and saw it last year in Halifax Nova Scotia. I believe Chocolate Chips and Discovery were built by Eric Goetz around the same time, Discovery and Lobo look very similiar more so than Discovery and Chocolate Chips. You hear a lot of bad things about ior boats, but I have not sailed many boats that could point as well as Discovery.

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Malenkaya. Rick Halprin. Capo 36, LMYA Section 5.

 

Malekaya-vertical.jpg

 

.

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Capo 36? Smaller methinks. There is one Capo in Europe, Santana, Capo 30 IRC rating bandit ;) based Hamble. Ahead of its time!

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Capo 36? Smaller methinks. There is one Capo in Europe, Santana, Capo 30 IRC rating bandit ;) based Hamble. Ahead of its time!

 

Pretty sure it's a 26, very cool little boat.

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Malenkaya. Rick Halprin. Capo 36, LMYA Section 5.

 

Malekaya-vertical.jpg

 

.

 

If that is a 36fter then those guys on board her are all about 8ft tall! What 36fters have an outboard bracket on their transom?

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shite

 

can anyone else post a picture of a headsail cut like that ?

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Malenkaya. Rick Halprin. Capo 36, LMYA Section 5.

 

Malekaya-vertical.jpg

 

.

 

If that is a 36fter then those guys on board her are all about 8ft tall! What 36fters have an outboard bracket on their transom?

 

 

Capo 26. MORC boat from early 80's designed by Carl Schumacher (and pretty successful too). The orientation of the jib pannels was to distribute the leach loads with heavier fabric that was unnecessary along the luff.

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Sailing Tyranny, the website encouraging unfettered discussion on all things sailing has commenced shutting down forum discussions at will. – you might remember it as Sailing Anarchy (SA) from years past. Usually attracting more than 50,000 visitors from Sydney readers and contributors, it was, until recently, the largest community driven sailing discussion site.

 

Such a prestigious site attracts advertisers, media players, photographers and sailors alike, however this week, organizers from SA seemed more interested in getting negative publicity and member criticism than in gaining good exposure for their marquee website. At least that's the lesson learnt from SA officials this week, when they refused to comment on well substantiated claims by insiders of a breakdown in journalistic standards and ethics, and commenced deleting forum topics at will.

 

As a regular reader, and sometime contributor to the forums, I and all other bona fide members of the site (as well as the general public) have been excluded from access to SA's most read and contributed forums of this week.

 

The website has no problem allowing other forum topics to continue, but only if they do not criticize the editorial staff. Despite repeated requests by members, no reasons have been provided for the unilateral decisions taken.

 

SA has also not responded to industry rumours that a leaner budget this week has resulted in smaller capacity within the forum database, the only logical reason for upsetting the forum membership.

 

 

Due to the lack of feedback, this reporter can only draw on information listed in the 'About' page, namely,

 

" Where the hell else are you going to have this much freedom to say what you want? After all, that is ultimately what Anarchy is all about"

 

Officials would not respond to requests for an explanation of how deleting numerous forum topics fits the above commitment.

 

Sailing Anarchy had a long and esteemed partnership with its members, but relations with the members broke down this week. Reasons for the breakdown were never released publicly, but given SA's apparent lack of interest in generating maxium exposure for the much lauded forums, the members probably made the right call.

 

To Secure the vast majority of members for such a large forum is imperative for its quality and longevity, and only maximum attention to journalistic ethics and contributor selection due diligence can convince the large membership to get behind the forums.

 

Journalistic ethics also ensure that the less prominent members – those that haven't abandoned ship yet – get return for their time spent in the forums. After all, deleting numerous forums before less active members have had a chance to complete their reading doesn't bode well for continued membership.

 

SA officials seem to have no idea of these basic tenets, and their lackluster commitment to journalistic integrity and lack of response to member queries may contribute to a substantial fall of daily page visits in the coming weeks.

 

Rumours are rife that SA has been hit hard by a failure to properly vet stories before publishing, and one can't help but wonder if their mismanagement of basic reporting duties isn't just the tip of the iceberg.

 

It has also been reported that members are planning an "Occupy Anarchy" protest, where members will attempt to create as many forum topics related to the questionable reporting ethics as possible, scheduled for 12 noon 3/16/2012 USA EST.

 

Will SA's premier member forum lose another 10 topics tomorrow, and each day onwards? Or will it crash under the unceasing pressure of the members.

 

Will it survive at all?

 

Not like this is won't.

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Trenace, I get it, it's BS, but please leave the Occupy stuff out of the good pictures thread. We don't want this one to go away too.

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Sailing Tyranny, the website encouraging unfettered discussion on all things sailing has commenced shutting down forum discussions at will. – you might remember it as Sailing Anarchy (SA) from years past. Usually attracting more than 50,000 visitors from Sydney readers and contributors, it was, until recently, the largest community driven sailing discussion site.

 

Such a prestigious site attracts advertisers, media players, photographers and sailors alike, however this week, organizers from SA seemed more interested in getting negative publicity and member criticism than in gaining good exposure for their marquee website. At least that's the lesson learnt from SA officials this week, when they refused to comment on well substantiated claims by insiders of a breakdown in journalistic standards and ethics, and commenced deleting forum topics at will.

 

As a regular reader, and sometime contributor to the forums, I and all other bona fide members of the site (as well as the general public) have been excluded from access to SA's most read and contributed forums of this week.

 

The website has no problem allowing other forum topics to continue, but only if they do not criticize the editorial staff. Despite repeated requests by members, no reasons have been provided for the unilateral decisions taken.

 

SA has also not responded to industry rumours that a leaner budget this week has resulted in smaller capacity within the forum database, the only logical reason for upsetting the forum membership.

 

 

Due to the lack of feedback, this reporter can only draw on information listed in the 'About' page, namely,

 

" Where the hell else are you going to have this much freedom to say what you want? After all, that is ultimately what Anarchy is all about"

 

Officials would not respond to requests for an explanation of how deleting numerous forum topics fits the above commitment.

 

Sailing Anarchy had a long and esteemed partnership with its members, but relations with the members broke down this week. Reasons for the breakdown were never released publicly, but given SA's apparent lack of interest in generating maxium exposure for the much lauded forums, the members probably made the right call.

 

To Secure the vast majority of members for such a large forum is imperative for its quality and longevity, and only maximum attention to journalistic ethics and contributor selection due diligence can convince the large membership to get behind the forums.

 

Journalistic ethics also ensure that the less prominent members – those that haven't abandoned ship yet – get return for their time spent in the forums. After all, deleting numerous forums before less active members have had a chance to complete their reading doesn't bode well for continued membership.

 

SA officials seem to have no idea of these basic tenets, and their lackluster commitment to journalistic integrity and lack of response to member queries may contribute to a substantial fall of daily page visits in the coming weeks.

 

Rumours are rife that SA has been hit hard by a failure to properly vet stories before publishing, and one can't help but wonder if their mismanagement of basic reporting duties isn't just the tip of the iceberg.

 

It has also been reported that members are planning an "Occupy Anarchy" protest, where members will attempt to create as many forum topics related to the questionable reporting ethics as possible, scheduled for 12 noon 3/16/2012 USA EST.

 

Will SA's premier member forum lose another 10 topics tomorrow, and each day onwards? Or will it crash under the unceasing pressure of the members.

 

Will it survive at all?

 

Not like this is won't.

 

+1

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/Ed Freund. Columbia YC. G&S 34, IOR Section 6, rated 24.5.

 

Both owners, and Jamie Lowe and David Kaufman (at the helm here), were friends of ours back in the day.

We saw this boat as much as any except our own. Pretty boat.

 

 

Lobo.png

 

.

 

 

 

There's Phil Dawg catchin' some rays.

 

 

There was a similar boat named Ciao, maybe it was a half-ton? Anyway, cold-molded.

 

Any info on it? It wound up deteriorating in Bayfield....

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Malenkaya. Rick Halprin. Capo 36, LMYA Section 5.

 

Malekaya-vertical.jpg

 

.

 

If that is a 36fter then those guys on board her are all about 8ft tall! What 36fters have an outboard bracket on their transom?

 

 

Capo 26. MORC boat from early 80's designed by Carl Schumacher (and pretty successful too). The orientation of the jib pannels was to distribute the leach loads with heavier fabric that was unnecessary along the luff.

 

Friggin attorneys. Is that Lance down to leeward trimming the headsail?

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NIce sails when brand new.... look at the edge of this genoa :) Fortunately this is not the point they get the power from :(

 

 

 

*

Malenkaya. Rick Halprin. Capo 36, LMYA Section 5.

 

Malekaya-vertical.jpg

 

.

 

If that is a 36fter then those guys on board her are all about 8ft tall! What 36fters have an outboard bracket on their transom?

 

 

Capo 26. MORC boat from early 80's designed by Carl Schumacher (and pretty successful too). The orientation of the jib pannels was to distribute the leach loads with heavier fabric that was unnecessary along the luff.

 

Friggin attorneys. Is that Lance down to leeward trimming the headsail?

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This design looks a bit like J.berret 3/4 and 1/2 Ton... Is not it ?

 

NIce sails when brand new.... look at the edge of this genoa :) Fortunately this is not the point they get the power from :(

 

 

 

*

Malenkaya. Rick Halprin. Capo 36, LMYA Section 5.

 

Malekaya-vertical.jpg

 

.

 

If that is a 36fter then those guys on board her are all about 8ft tall! What 36fters have an outboard bracket on their transom?

 

 

Capo 26. MORC boat from early 80's designed by Carl Schumacher (and pretty successful too). The orientation of the jib pannels was to distribute the leach loads with heavier fabric that was unnecessary along the luff.

 

Friggin attorneys. Is that Lance down to leeward trimming the headsail?

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Toy Boat. Larry Schell, Col YC. G&S 30. IOR Section 6, rated 22.0.

 

This is the type of portrait which I sought to take, generally.

 

If you have an RIB and you fail to take nice photos of your yacht,

I think you are missing the boat.

 

Sure, great candid shots are nice, but portraits can adorn walls for years to come,

even 25 years or more. Folks have always had difficulty finding nice portraits of their boats.

 

1. Use the highest resolution your camera will allow.

2. Don't cramp subject. Leave some room at the edges to allow for leveling horizon in editor later on, then cropping.

3. Plan to show your images online or at your club. This will earn you some friends, for sure, friends.

4. Small 4x6 prints cost only 9¢ each from snapfish, etc. They'll make great samples;

5. Quality prints of larger sizes are available today at a fraction of the cost of 25 years ago.

6. You may want to frame and hang some of your work, or sell it.

7. Lastly, let me suggest that you never plaster SAMPLE across sample images. If you can't trust potential customers,

why should they buy anything from you? There is honor among sailors, for sure. Only a few bad apples here and there.

Don't worry about them; most of them won't be around long.

 

 

ToyBoatinSun-1.png

 

.

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I owned Discovery for about 7 years, purchased in Kingston, Ontario where it was known as Coyote syndrome. Moved boat to Atlantic Canada, spent two years rebuilding hull, basicly rebuilt hull completely below waterline. Sold boat about 7 years ago and saw it last year in Halifax Nova Scotia. I believe Chocolate Chips and Discovery were built by Eric Goetz around the same time, Discovery and Lobo look very similiar more so than Discovery and Chocolate Chips. You hear a lot of bad things about ior boats, but I have not sailed many boats that could point as well as Discovery.

 

 

did you buy her from jon gregory? my father raced on her with him for several years. they used to take gregory's sons and i along for the ride during red fox regattas in the early 80's. loved that boat and was wondering what happened to her. good to hear she still floats. dave hall had both discovery 1 and half fast built by goetz, i believe (chocolate chips was goetz build #7, discovery #9, fast half #21). the baby blue masts matched his drilling rigs. i'd say discovery's deck was the best looking of the 3/4s. we've got a great family photo of me being thrown off her transom into the drink at the raft-up in the boyne city marina. i was probably 8. the photo shows the heritage 37s, seredipity 43s, tunas, a rodgers 3/4 ton and other dinos in the background. they used to pack them tight after saturday's race. great times.

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Lobo. Ron Wolfson/ Ed Freund. GS 34. 1983 Navy Cutlass Race, IOR Section 6, rated IOR 24.5.

 

 

 

LoboHorizontal.png

 

 

.

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Toy Boat. Larry Schell, Col YC. G&S 30. IOR Section 6, rated 22.0.

 

This is the type of portrait which I sought to take, generally.

 

If you have an RIB and you fail to take nice photos of your yacht,

I think you are missing the boat.

 

Sure, great candid shots are nice, but portraits can adorn walls for years to come,

even 25 years or more. Folks have always had difficulty finding nice portraits of their boats.

 

1. Use the highest resolution your camera will allow.

2. Don't cramp subject. Leave some room at the edges to allow for leveling horizon in editor later on, then cropping.

3. Plan to show your images online or at your club. This will earn you some friends, for sure, friends.

4. Small 4x6 prints cost only 9¢ each from snapfish, etc. They'll make great samples;

5. Quality prints of larger sizes are available today at a fraction of the cost of 25 years ago.

6. You may want to frame and hang some of your work, or sell it.

7. Lastly, let me suggest that you never plaster SAMPLE across sample images. If you can't trust potential customers,

why should they buy anything from you? There is honor among sailors, for sure. Only a few bad apples here and there.

Don't worry about them; most of them won't be around long.

 

 

ToyBoatinSun-1.png

 

.

Great advice and fantastic images. This has been my favourite thread since you started it. Great way to spend time that should otherwise be spent working!

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I owned Discovery for about 7 years, purchased in Kingston, Ontario where it was known as Coyote syndrome. Moved boat to Atlantic Canada, spent two years rebuilding hull, basicly rebuilt hull completely below waterline. Sold boat about 7 years ago and saw it last year in Halifax Nova Scotia. I believe Chocolate Chips and Discovery were built by Eric Goetz around the same time, Discovery and Lobo look very similiar more so than Discovery and Chocolate Chips. You hear a lot of bad things about ior boats, but I have not sailed many boats that could point as well as Discovery.

 

 

did you buy her from jon gregory? my father raced on her with him for several years. they used to take gregory's sons and i along for the ride during red fox regattas in the early 80's. loved that boat and was wondering what happened to her. good to hear she still floats. dave hall had both discovery 1 and half fast built by goetz, i believe (chocolate chips was goetz build #7, discovery #9, fast half #21). the baby blue masts matched his drilling rigs. i'd say discovery's deck was the best looking of the 3/4s. we've got a great family photo of me being thrown off her transom into the drink at the raft-up in the boyne city marina. i was probably 8. the photo shows the heritage 37s, seredipity 43s, tunas, a rodgers 3/4 ton and other dinos in the background. they used to pack them tight after saturday's race. great times.

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I purchased Discovery from a marina in Kingston Ontario, the owner was having financial difficulty and walked away from the boat and the marina took ownership. Previous to that the boat was in Ottawa, Ontario for a few years owned by a sailing school. When I purchased spar was still light blue in color and all sterns hydraulics were still in place (no leaks). The original bright finished hull had been painted dark blue. The teak decks were in terrible shape, we tryed to match worn areas but the new veneer stuck out like a sore thumb. Loved the boat but the work involved was to time consumming so we sold. During the rebuild spoke to a guy at Goetz called Turtle who actually was involved in the original construction.

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