opusone

Ker 43 Ptarmigan

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To sleep we have some incredibly, and I am not kidding, comfortable bunks. Four per side aft of the companionway. They are padded, and easily adjustible. I am 6'2 and even the smallest bunk (the aft upper bunks on port and starboard) are still more than comfortable. The glamour bunks are the fwd upper bunks, as on each side there is an opening port to the cockpit and as long as the sailing is "dry" you get a constant flow of air to put you to sleep...

 

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As the aft bunks are fairly far into the carbon cave we have mounted "spare air" cylinders along the centerline in case the boat is ever inverted...which we hope will never be the case...

 

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For those interested the forward end of the bat cave....

 

It is empty except for the rigging needed to support the deck hardware for the tack of the staysails, etc.. The majority of the rigging in the photo is for the jib up/downs.

 

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post-7277-0-24274000-1445699018_thumb.jpgWe have also removed all the floorboards...and have built carbon fiber protection boxes around all the through hulls, endoscope points (for viewing the foils for weeds, debris, etc), and around the mast step. It makes it much easier to get the water out of the boat, which thankfully is not very much.

 

 

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After spending untold thousands on ruggedized laptops that turned out not to be so rugged, we finally found the right answer. The suggestion came from Guiness at Carkeek Design Partners. It is a sealed computer about the size of an apple TV, with a strong wi-fi antenna, SSD hard drive, and works off 5v power. It is running Windows 10 Pro, expedition, and is accessed via a remote desktop. We use both an Ipad and a getac tablet for the remote desktop.. The computer is interfaced to the B&G instruments, AIS, etc.

 

All in cost about $1000 dollars, and such an improvement, I can't believe I didn't find this sooner. It is mounted for the moment in the old garmin plotter hole in the NAV station. It will be moved to the "back wall" with the B&G processor, fast gps, etc soon.

 

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Now for the Middle Sea Race Report...or "To Be Stromboli'ed"

 

We arrived on Tuesday to be able to compete in the Coastal Race, which was held on Wednesday, with a mid-morning start. The race committee selected course 2, which is from the harbor, around Comino island, the back to the harbor. The course length was approximately 30 miles, and with the wind blowing 20-25 knots from the southwest it promised to be a good test of the keel mods at the upper end of the wind band, where the gains are primarily expected when running and reaching.

 

As you know, we won our class and the coastal race overall, but for me the key thing was that the course was nearly a perfect test of boatspeed. It was a beam reach from the start to the fairway bouy, a single gybe run to Comino, and then an almost single tack beat back to the fairway buoy and then another reach to the finish.

 

We took a limited sail inventory and raced with our A2.5 kite (for all intents and purposes our A4) and our J4 heavy weather jib, which is underpowered in anything less than 23 knots. We chose the limited inventory to not expose the sails we expected to use in the RMSR. Downwind the boat is much better behaved, does not nosedive as before, and was sitting on 19-20 knots without surfing for most of the downwind leg. We lost some time to the Cookson 50 Mascalzone Latino as we did a bear away set, sailed or a minute or so and then gybed over while they gybed right at the fairway buoy. The Turkish Ker 40 had started 10 minutes in front of us and we steadily gained on the run, and in the end finished the course about 15 minutes faster elapsed and 3 mintues ahead on corrected. They sailed very well both in the Coastal Race and the RMSR and demonstrated that a well sailed Ker 40 is a formidable competitor.

 

For the main event, we had to make some critical sail choices as the forecast looked very light at the beginning and potentially heavy at the end. The most difficult was to take the mast head Code Zero or the A2.5, which is a 140-145 TWA high speed running kite made of AirX700. If we took the mast head zero we would be exposed if we blew up our A2 running kite in heavy breeze. In the end, we left the mast head zero on the dock, and our four allowed spinnakers were A1.5, A2, A2.5 and the Fractional Zero. We used and needed them all, but I think we suffered for the lack of the mast head zero in the 3-7 knot range where we were forced to use the fractional zero.

 

The start was delayed for 20 minutes to allow some breeze to build in the main harbor, and then we got underway on 3-6 knots of breeze. The RMSR race course is dominated by the interaction of land and wind and you will find a least one if not several parkups along the way. By our count we were parked up no fewer than six times, but more on that later.

 

We were racing in IRC Class 2, and if you see the start picture a few posts above you will see that we are the small boat by a considerable amount. Our rating of 1.277 was 0.02 above the IRC3 class break. Rating the older A2 and the Mh0 would have put us at 1.275 and in the smaller boat class with most the of the 40 footers. In the end it would not have mattered, but not managing the class break was my first mistake for the RMSR. So just to be clear.

 

Rule #1: Always try to be the fastest boat in your class. (mistake #1)

Rule #2: If you are the slowest boat in your class on a coastal or offshore race, you have only one plan, go where the big boats go. In a race famous for parks up, this becomes a nearly sure win strategy. (mistake #2)

 

On the first night between Malta and Sicily we chased a breeze that the forecast said might fill in from the east while the rest of our class went to the Sicily coast. If you watch the tracker you will see the move east and then the bail out back to the west. This cost us hours and miles, and we lost touch with the bigger boats in the class.

 

I think we sailed really well on Sunday amongst the multiple parkups and at times had closed the gap to B2 to just a few miles. I realized my third mistake at this time. While we had a drifter and a super light J1 we have never spent any time trying practicing sailing in 1-3 knots to find out what are the best modes to get the boat moving. The balance of lift and drag is so important, and in hindsight I think we should have dropped the main a few times to minimize the detrimental effects of flogging while the drifter was filling. We also were using the fractional zero much lower in the range than its heavier membrane construction was suited for.

 

For all of that, as we approached Messina, we were in the mix and less than an hour behind on corrected time to Mascalzone and B2. As we cleared the straights around sundown (and bucking the 2 knot current as we did so) Stromboli was next mark of the course. The wind had set up so that Stromboli was dead downwind from Messina and so we gybed 5 or 6 times in 10-15 knots of breeze (which felt like a miracle breeze after the day of light winds leading to Messina). As the evening progressed the wind was lightening and a choice needed to be made on hour far to sail past Stromboli to avoid the wind shadow of the volcano. Until this point we were doing well and at the Stromboli transit point we were 45 minutes behind Mascalzone Latino and 30 minutes behind B2 on corrected time.

 

And then it happened....I was watching the tracker and looking at Caro and Prospector who were not that far in front, and decided to take the inside line of Caro (which is a Botin 65) that had gotten through less than an hour earlier. My mistake...not taking the dying breeze into account. We sailed into the wind shadow from hell and by the time we emerged we had not lost an hour or two, but 12 hours, put ourselves into a different weather pattern from the boats in front of us, and given up any chance for a good result.

 

Monday was spent on the north Coast of Sicily moving from one windless zone to another while the other boats in our class moved along unobstructed 100 miles down the track.

 

I will say, the run from Lampedusa to the Finish, which we covered in 8 hrs, was a fantastic downwind sleighride. We arrived at Lampedusa behind the Ker 40 who had watched us sail into the whole at Stromboli and wisely sailed wide and right around us. But over the course of the 8 hours we put 1.5 hours on her, which would not have happened pre-modification.

 

At the end, we were sixth in class , 31st overall in IRC, and the 14th boat across the line. We made two mistakes, heading east, which didn't cost us that much as the fleet compressed near Messina, and completely, and I mean completely botching Stromboli which changed everything.

 

No breakages, no issues with the boat. and few good laughs, and as mentally challenging a race course as I have ever seen means that I am still smiling although the result is not what we hoped for.

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 

 

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And for those in the La Jolla/San Diego area....something a bit off topic.

 

My son Josh is having an exhibit of his paintings at UCSD...

 

Reception is on Thursday in the evening. The exhibit is open daily this week.

 

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Otra Vez is currently at Hamble Yacht Services in the Uk. The winter project list is pretty small, with a non-skid respray and moving the jib leads inboard being the majority of the effort. We are hoping to get an effective sheeting angle of 4.5 degrees with the changes to the jib leads.

 

A few photos of the work that is just getting started...

 

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For the more technical minded we are using 200kg/m3 HD core as was originally specified for the boat, then 7 layers of uni-directional carbon and 3 layers of db carbo, which is 2 skins more than the original spec.

 

We hope to finish the jib lead mods by the middle of next week then the painters will take over and shoot the deck.

 

Our first regatta on a Fast40+ startline is the RORC Easter Challenge, March 25-27.

 

Bill

 

 

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Did you consider transverse leads and a coach roof alteration?

Did you look at the photos? Have you seen the boat? They are transverse. I'd also like to see your definition of a coach roof since you inquired about it on this boat.

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I asked the below question before but it was prior to the Middle Sea Race and might have been missed.

 

Getting back to the sail inventory … could you elaborate on the development of the sail inventory, especially with respect to the “tweener” sails – the J1.5, the J3.5 and the A2.5. What is their design brief, wind range, material, etc..

Building a custom inventory is an exercise in building sails with effective cross overs so I am interested in hearing how these sails fit into your overall inventory.

Thanks in advance for sharing your insights.

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Did you consider transverse leads and a coach roof alteration?

Did you look at the photos? Have you seen the boat? They are transverse. I'd also like to see your definition of a coach roof since you inquired about it on this boat.

From the photos above you can't see they are transverse.

 

The boat does have a coach roof. Which is why I assumed they weren't transverse. What's your definition?

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OK Googled a few photos. Can see the setup now.

 

Apologies for asking a question. Didn't realise everyone here had turned into such cunts.

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For the sun glasses, headlamps, etc each crew member as has numbered pouched right behind the companionway...

 

attachicon.gifOVPouchstorage.jpg

Bill, I've totally enjoyed watching what you and Shriner have done with this boat, having spent a season on her in the great lakes before your purchase, when it was Drumbeat. I'm curious about your "pouch storage" solution as it is ideally designed (clear!) and I'd like one for my boat. Who built this for you ?

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Did you consider transverse leads and a coach roof alteration?

Did you look at the photos? Have you seen the boat? They are transverse. I'd also like to see your definition of a coach roof since you inquired about it on this boat.
From the photos above you can't see they are transverse.

 

The boat does have a coach roof. Which is why I assumed they weren't transverse. What's your definition?

No, the photos posted clearly show transverse.

 

Ok,I'm wrong. I guess that's a coach roof.

 

By the way, I've learned first hand, that boat is a weapon. Wish I had the $$ to have made it mine but it seems that it made its way to the correct person!

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Otra Vez is currently at Hamble Yacht Services in the Uk. The winter project list is pretty small, with a non-skid respray and moving the jib leads inboard being the majority of the effort. We are hoping to get an effective sheeting angle of 4.5 degrees with the changes to the jib leads.

 

A few photos of the work that is just getting started...

attachicon.gifjib track work OV 3 guy.jpgattachicon.gifJib track work OV 2 guy.jpgattachicon.gifJib track work OV Guy.jpg

 

 

For the more technical minded we are using 200kg/m3 HD core as was originally specified for the boat, then 7 layers of uni-directional carbon and 3 layers of db carbo, which is 2 skins more than the original spec.

 

We hope to finish the jib lead mods by the middle of next week then the painters will take over and shoot the deck.

 

Our first regatta on a Fast40+ startline is the RORC Easter Challenge, March 25-27.

 

Bill

Not trying to pick a fight in this one, but that isn't one of the better looking composite rework jobs I've seen!

 

Not By a long way!!

 

 

 

 

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Leads are already transverse, idiot

Don't get your knickers in a twist sweet heart. Cunt.

More prozak for you maybe an idea.

 

;)

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Looks good on the water! (Paul Wyeth)

 

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Good to see one crew on the rail for the bareaway

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Team Page on FB is no longer there.. Any updates? Boat still around anywhere?

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Boat was on the hard at HYS on Sunday. Probably being overwintered pre Fastnet qualifiers as a guess?

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It is still on the hard. It was supposed to leave.

 

The owner owes everyone a lot of money.

 

He does that regularly apparently and disappears. Then pays up when he feels like it or needs to go sailing.

 

What a douche bag way to operate.

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It is still on the hard. It was supposed to leave.

 

The owner owes everyone a lot of money.

 

He does that regularly apparently and disappears. Then pays up when he feels like it or needs to go sailing.

 

What a douche bag way to operate.

 

Thanks for the heads up.

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It is still on the hard. It was supposed to leave.

 

The owner owes everyone a lot of money.

 

He does that regularly apparently and disappears. Then pays up when he feels like it or needs to go sailing.

 

What a douche bag way to operate.

That's some pretty ballsy accusations. Good thing you can hide behind the guise of an Internet forum.

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Hey, prozak was so fucking knowledgeable he was telling them they should be looking at transverse leads for the jib six months ago. How dare any of you assume you know better.

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So.... What happened? OV is not listed as a Fast40 team for 2017.

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So.... What happened? OV is not listed as a Fast40 team for 2017.

 

 

Heard that OV no longer fits within the Fast 40 rule, they made an exception for her last year to increase participation. They still had to recut some sails to measure in.

 

Shame since this is such a great boat, not sure what the future plans are.

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Just run through this thread, a good look into a high end program..

Anyone seen or heard of OV in the last year? Was Prozak right?

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