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Ajax

Ajax's Pearson 30 Rehab Thread

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Ajax, they all use offshore nowadays.

 

try Scott sails. they built my main, and their genoa quote I just got is pretty nice. owned by a semi-well-known annapolis sailor from back in the day.

 

-M

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If you wait until October to order (Boat show), you can get some significant discounts for an "off season" build.

 

Do not use the pure OEM quality offshore lofts (I'll name names in a PM if you like) that don't allow you to spec the cloth or customize the sail. They build workmanlike "white triangles" but you want something better.

 

When I bought my current set, I worked with fX sails, a couple of pure mail order (Cruising direct) and my local Quantum loft (Clarke). Clarke came in about 10% more than the others, measured the boat, customized the build for what I wanted (he and I have raced together in the past so he knows what I know and don't know) and fitted the sails, including changing out some track slides that didn't work out. My sails were sewn in South Africa to my specs out of the cloth I decided on with the roach, battens, etc that I wanted. The finish work and minor adjustments were done locally

 

You'll keep the next main for a number of years. Buy the right engine (dacron is fine for a 30'er) the first time.

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If you wait until October to order (Boat show), you can get some significant discounts for an "off season" build.

 

Do not use the pure OEM quality offshore lofts (I'll name names in a PM if you like) that don't allow you to spec the cloth or customize the sail. They build workmanlike "white triangles" but you want something better.

 

When I bought my current set, I worked with fX sails, a couple of pure mail order (Cruising direct) and my local Quantum loft (Clarke). Clarke came in about 10% more than the others, measured the boat, customized the build for what I wanted (he and I have raced together in the past so he knows what I know and don't know) and fitted the sails, including changing out some track slides that didn't work out. My sails were sewn in South Africa to my specs out of the cloth I decided on with the roach, battens, etc that I wanted. The finish work and minor adjustments were done locally

 

You'll keep the next main for a number of years. Buy the right engine (dacron is fine for a 30'er) the first time.

 

Yes, that's exactly what I want to avoid. I will check with Quantum and the local builders here in Annapolis. I realize that I'll pay more, but 10% is an acceptable mark-up to have a guy come to my boat, and make sure that it fits right.

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Ajax...you are sooo right. Pay a bit more and buy the expertise. It'll a great value for the money.

 

I've never seen a lot of value in high tech main sails. I opted for a mid weight cloth, full length TAPERED battens, loose foot....spend the difference on a Garhauer rigid vang.

 

Doing it this way you don't have to be fussy with your main when cruising. Mylar is a good material, but it needs more attention and care than dacron.

 

IMHO

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Well a while back, HB made a good point- You don't stow a high-tech, plastic sails in a sailboat cabin that reaches 100F + in the summer. I have no place to safely stow special gear like this. I don't have a basement, and my garage gets as hot as my attic, so unfortunately I don't see high tech sails in my near future until I overcome the storage issue.

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They aren't exactly local to you, but they do work for people in Annapolis all the time. The boat I race on has gone exclusively to his sails, and with good results I might add. More importantly, Jerry is a great guy and will treat you like a friend. I am just a crew for the owner who has spent a bunch of $ on the sails, but the guys at the loft treat me as if I was the one who spent the money. I highly reccommend giving them a call.

 

Ullman Sails Virginia

Jerry Latell

804-776-6151

www.latellsails.com

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Update: yard tractor blew a steering hose. They've fixed it and will be putting the boat in shortly.

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Things that occurred during launch and delivery:

 

The stuffing box sealed well. Now that it has been run in for a while, I need to snug it up a hair.

One tapered cone seacock dripped a bit until I tightened it down, and snugged the hose clamp.

The engine raw water seacock wept at the base, and then stopped after a bit. I found that to be odd, and unsettling.

Who the fuck builds a mainsail without a reefing point? Ever? You just don't do that.

The Atomic Bomb started, idled, and ran without missing a tick. No smoke, but an oily smell after a while. No oil was observed in the bilge.

After the engine warmed up, I noticed that oil pressure got lower, around 20 psi. I hope this is ok. Engine temp never exceeded 120F.

The gear shift handle started slipping close to home, and needs to be snugged down so that it will completely move the shift cable on the transmission.

Singlehanding a large, tiller steered boat without a tiller pilot is a PITA.

 

When I had 12-15kts of breeze, sailing her was an almost sexual experience. It was fucking AWESOME!!! The boat is smooth and powerful. It was totally the right choice.

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Good on ya...enjoy the moment because the more you sail her, the more common the experience becomes.

 

The first few sails are magical.

 

 

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Can sense the thrill in your post, what a great experience! The boat is just a dream to sail, glad you had good wind first time out and having that all to yourself you will remember for a long time.

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Happy for you ajax. Big move from the 25 to the 30. Even me going from the 26 (ok a small 26) to the 28 was a big difference in feel. Pretty big rush the first few times you're at the helm, so much more power there.

 

You sure the temp guage is working? Try to match it with an infrared unit if you have one. Assuming my guages are correct, my A4 runs around 170-180, this seems a little more normal right? I'll double check but my oil pressure I think is a steady 30-35psi, don't notice it change much between cold or warm.

 

First couple times I ran my A4 I had some smoke in the exhaust. I figured it was from fogging the cylinders from the winterization process, and that oil would eventually burn out. I'm guessing that was it because there hasn't been any smoke since then.

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Ajax, If you don't have it, I'd highly recommend the PCV kit from Indigo..I had a layer of sludge inside the boat from years of the "slash tube" as a crankcase breather..the PCV kit is great and eliminates the smell.

 

Oil pressure- 20 PSI is on the low side, but still OK..Don Moyer says one PSI per 100 RPM. There are adjustments for that..patience newbie inboard owning grasshopper! :lol:

 

Water temp - 120 is low for 88F cooling water, but not dangerous...the engine may not have a t-stat in it which could allow temps that low. There are fixes, adjustments and retrofits for this too..too cold is better than too hot in the short term. Too cold for the long term = salt deposits & crap in the water jacket..Raw Water Chessie cooled A-4's typically run 140(idle) to 165(hot) see above....patience! - You will become intimately familiar with muratic acid flushes, vinegar flushes, removing the side plate & digging out Chessie sludge, the "bypass kit", compression tests, cleaning the carb, blah blah blah..& on & on...:P

 

Lots of guys build sails with no reefs..there isn't one on a J/29, Farr30 or Farr40 to name a few. :D ( If it was me, I'd have one in my P-30 though! :unsure:

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Ajax,

 

You are killing it!!! Sailing her home!! Well done. All that stuff about water temp etc... Forget it for now, it's a sail boat. I have a friend who used his main sheet to lift his A4 up and drop it into the Pacific. He just sailed from then on. The motor doesn't matter neatly as much as going sailing. Congrats!!!

 

Beau

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The engine raw water seacock wept at the base, and then stopped after a bit. I found that to be odd, and unsettling.

 

Yeah, I'd say so.

 

Where at the base? I assume you don't mean the end of the hose, so do you mean the valve itself, or water coming in around/under it?

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Singlehanding a large, tiller steered boat without a tiller pilot is a PITA.

 

 

Do you have cleats that you could use to temporarily tie off the tiller with? We used to do that on my friends S2 7.3. If you are heading onto the wind you can balance the tiller with the sails, tie off the tiller, and go down below to take care of business.

 

How did she fit into your new slip? Upwind slip, or down?

 

OBTW: Nothing wrong with posting her delivery pics in this thread as well... We likey piccys! :)

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Ajax,

 

On sailing without an AutoPilot, it's almost always possible to stop a boat if you're in a safe place. pull the jib in hard, ease the mainsail out a lot so the jib backwinds a bunch and most boats will just lay there at an angle of about 70 deg to the wind. The main will flap a little but unless it's blowing really hard, not that much. If you have a small jib up (like 100% or so) you can do a neater job by backwinding the jib and also letting the mainsail luff a bit by easing it a lot. Less flapping this way, but more work.

 

This is a good way of simply stopping while you attend to something.

 

BV

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Ajax,

 

Great first trip and a great day for it. I thought about you while helping a friend with a big Sea Ray :o troubleshoot a dead windlass. I would have rather been out with you. Sounds like a very short "punch list" for the first time on the water in years. Your bottom paint looks great as well.

 

So a tiller pilot is on Santa's list this year? Or maybe an early labor day present? As Beau says, heaving to for a short period in relatively open water isn't a problem but I'm a fan of an AP of some sort for single/shorthanded sailing. Sometimes it's nice to let Oscar drive while you do something else. As to the reefless main? With a working jib and flattening (to the extent possible) the full main, you should be good for most of what the bay will throw at you. October breezes may be a bit dicey but workable. If it's as tired as you say, use the cost of adding a reef point (probably $200 or so) as a down payment on a new main.

 

Again, Congrats on a most successful launch!

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Thanks all. It was exciting, that's for sure.

 

I read the Moyer book this morning, and found the oil pressure adjustment screw. I'll bump it up a bit. When I arrived, the stuffing box was dripping more rapidly after being run in, so I'll need to tighten that down a tad.

Yeah, I could have hove-to, but I just wanted to get home. I was afraid if I dallied, that I'd lose the wind and I wanted to sail as much as possible, and not run the engine much until I was closer to home.

My slip isn't really up or downwind. My cove is so sheltered that it really takes a strong easterly before you feel anything. I need a new traveller line, and a new mainsheet ASAP.

 

The boat needs "stuff", but it seems that none of it is vital and that I can control the rate at which I pour money into it. I'm really looking forward to doing some cosmetic work instead of a shitload of mechanics and stuff.

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Great stuff, Having a couple of niggly issues with the engine at this stage isn't necessarily a bad thing, you will learn about it while you fix them.

 

Did you manage to nick the otto from old shoes?

 

Looks good on the water.

 

Is that boom on a track?

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Great stuff, Having a couple of niggly issues with the engine at this stage isn't necessarily a bad thing, you will learn about it while you fix them.

 

Did you manage to nick the otto from old shoes?

 

Looks good on the water.

 

Is that boom on a track?

 

Nah, the Otto on the Coronado isn't strong enough to drive the Pearson, so I let it go. I'll need to buy a heavier rated one, new or used.

Yes, the boom "floats" on a track, sort of like the Coronado's did. So there's a downhaul instead of a cunningham to tension the luff.

 

I'll get some photos of it at the dock, it looks great in the water.

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Great stuff, Having a couple of niggly issues with the engine at this stage isn't necessarily a bad thing, you will learn about it while you fix them.

 

Did you manage to nick the otto from old shoes?

 

Looks good on the water.

 

Is that boom on a track?

 

Nah, the Otto on the Coronado isn't strong enough to drive the Pearson, so I let it go. I'll need to buy a heavier rated one, new or used.

Yes, the boom "floats" on a track, sort of like the Coronado's did. So there's a downhaul instead of a cunningham to tension the luff.

 

I'll get some photos of it at the dock, it looks great in the water.

 

 

Make a note to talk to the sailmaker about cunningham vs downhaul for your new main. There are advantages to a fixed boom position.

 

Where are the damn videos?

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Make a note to talk to the sailmaker about cunningham vs downhaul for your new main. There are advantages to a fixed boom position.

 

Where are the damn videos?

 

The only video I took was of the boat being launched, none of sailing. I had my hands full. I'll have to see if my Droid's video format is compatible with Youtube or Facebook. I'll try to upload them tonight. The launching process is neat, and pretty exciting when it's your boat in the slings. And the boat's been out of the water for a year...and you're not sure if you did the stuffing box right...and you're wondering about tapered cone seacocks...and...and...^_^

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Make a note to talk to the sailmaker about cunningham vs downhaul for your new main. There are advantages to a fixed boom position.

 

Where are the damn videos?

 

The only video I took was of the boat being launched, none of sailing. I had my hands full. I'll have to see if my Droid's video format is compatible with Youtube or Facebook. I'll try to upload them tonight. The launching process is neat, and pretty exciting when it's your boat in the slings. And the boat's been out of the water for a year...and you're not sure if you did the stuffing box right...and you're wondering about tapered cone seacocks...and...and...^_^

 

Ooooo.. I know that feeling...

 

Launch day for me this year was very similar.. The day before, I attached a seacock to the bronze sink-drain through-hull I'd sealed myself.. and promptly over-tightened and broke the watertight seal when I twisted the through-hull. DOh! So I scrambled to re-seal it.. Boat had some standing water in it, hadn't been in the water in over 5 years, I was paranoid about my first attempt at installing the knot-meter and depth-sounder throughulls, etc.. Boat sat differently in the water than it did in the cradle, and water in the bilge sloshed forward after the slings came off - I was convinced my shit was leaking and sat there staring at it for two hours before determining that if it was leaking, it was very slow and I could still make it to the club. SWMBO remarked that I looked terrified. I was. If you remember, hauling back out where I was was not an option. I was paranoid for days, going down to the boat almost every day for two weeks just to see if the water I'd cleaned up after getting the boat to the club came back. Turns out no..

 

But yeah, those "first launch" jitters are a bitch, yet strangely exhilarating ;) Can't wait til next year :D

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When close hauled, Rita P doesn't need the autopilot, she just balances out and sails herself. It's a little freaky to watch. Just tweak the main until she holds her course. Have you discovered you need imperceptable way to maintain steerage? Neutral on the engine is just a theory, it's probalby still turning slightly when in neutral, handy for docikng at very slow speed. Lash that tiller tight to the traveller to maximise cockpit space for cocktail hour. I left the traveller line about 5 feet long so the line is always right there, I'll explain that further if you're interested.

 

Sounds like you've got a good one! First day out just put up the sails and go? It doesn't get much better than that!!!

 

Poda is right, those first day jitters are good adreniline boosts.

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Make a note to talk to the sailmaker about cunningham vs downhaul for your new main. There are advantages to a fixed boom position. Where are the damn videos?
I'll have to see if my Droid's video format is compatible with Youtube or Facebook. I'll try to upload them tonight.

 

Yes...it should be. My old Android phone does .3GP files & they work fine on YouTube. I just uploaded one the other day as I am troubleshooting a hot coil not producing enough spark..need to get my sailing skills back up to snuff since my motor is on the fritz. <_<

 

+1 on the fixed boom. If you don't that bitch will drop on you head in the cockpit every time someone drops the sail. :rolleyes: - My boat has the track like your Coronado & Pearson..My boat now has a pin (bolt) drilled thru the back side of the track to lock the gooseneck at the top of the track & a cunni ring was built in (standard issue on most mains) the new sail. If I need it, I can rig a cunningham, but I just go up and add a little main halyard currently.

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Make a note to talk to the sailmaker about cunningham vs downhaul for your new main. There are advantages to a fixed boom position. Where are the damn videos?
I'll have to see if my Droid's video format is compatible with Youtube or Facebook. I'll try to upload them tonight.

 

Yes...it should be. My old Android phone does .3GP files & they work fine on YouTube. I just uploaded one the other day as I am troubleshooting a hot coil not producing enough spark..need to get my sailing skills back up to snuff since my motor is on the fritz. <_<

 

+1 on the fixed boom. If you don't that bitch will drop on you head in the cockpit every time someone drops the sail. :rolleyes: - My boat has the track like your Coronado & Pearson..My boat now has a pin (bolt) drilled thru the back side of the track to lock the gooseneck at the top of the track & a cunni ring was built in (standard issue on most mains) the new sail. If I need it, I can rig a cunningham, but I just go up and add a little main halyard currently.

 

Most of us over 50 learned to not stand under the boom when the sail is coming down. I was thinking more from a sail area/performance aspect. Set the boom at the lower band and the head of the sail at the upper band. Use cunningham to tension the luff/flatten the sail (yeah, the rest of the controls as well). As an added attraction, he can then use a solid vang.

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Congrats buddy! My scariest sail on the MP30 was in 5kts of wind across Naragansett bay with the sun shining and 4 buddys (it was the first sail).

 

My engine was raw water cooled, added a "T" on the engine inlet line and about once a month ran freshwater thru engine - it then sits in the block and keeps stuff clean - the block is where you get a lot of soft silty deposits...

 

PVC valve from Indigo is freakin awesome - Tom Stevens used to be the tech consulant to Westinghouse for their turbines we put on CVNs...

 

I single handed down the bay after a race in Annapolis - if you "need" to do something you can sheet jib in tight let main out about 3/4 of the way and she steers herself 90 from wind all the time! Stickboy is right otherwise on balance - that spade rudder will slow you down evertime...When driving up and down the bay i used to put a 1/4 line around the tiller 2 times and then cleated off to the jib sheet cleats to take the pressure off my arm - never had an autopilot.

 

Don't fix gooseneck on main - keep it floating on the track.

 

New sails would be awesome - had both full batten and 2+2 (top 2 full bottom 2 regular)...liked the 2+2 better. 155% is all you need - the Annapolis boats used to have a 165% - we cured them of that the first day we raced with them..our tacks were a lot faster...

 

If you are around AYC - Pat Nolan owns Art Libby's old boat (Results)...and sailed with Art over 20 years he can fill you in on a lot of performance...tell him Bruce sent ya...

 

 

grin

BTS

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Congrats buddy! My scariest sail on the MP30 was in 5kts of wind across Naragansett bay with the sun shining and 4 buddys (it was the first sail).

 

My engine was raw water cooled, added a "T" on the engine inlet line and about once a month ran freshwater thru engine - it then sits in the block and keeps stuff clean - the block is where you get a lot of soft silty deposits...

 

PVC valve from Indigo is freakin awesome - Tom Stevens used to be the tech consulant to Westinghouse for their turbines we put on CVNs...

 

I single handed down the bay after a race in Annapolis - if you "need" to do something you can sheet jib in tight let main out about 3/4 of the way and she steers herself 90 from wind all the time! Stickboy is right otherwise on balance - that spade rudder will slow you down evertime...When driving up and down the bay i used to put a 1/4 line around the tiller 2 times and then cleated off to the jib sheet cleats to take the pressure off my arm - never had an autopilot.

 

Don't fix gooseneck on main - keep it floating on the track.

 

New sails would be awesome - had both full batten and 2+2 (top 2 full bottom 2 regular)...liked the 2+2 better. 155% is all you need - the Annapolis boats used to have a 165% - we cured them of that the first day we raced with them..our tacks were a lot faster...

 

If you are around AYC - Pat Nolan owns Art Libby's old boat (Results)...and sailed with Art over 20 years he can fill you in on a lot of performance...tell him Bruce sent ya...

 

grin

BTS

 

You know, I was going to ask about flushing fresh water through the engine after running it. I have easy access to fresh water at the dock, and this would be simple for me to do after most outings. It seems that it would go a long way towards preserving the engine.

 

Having has a partial batten sail, and then a full batten sail, I do think I want to go 2+2 this time. 4 full battens seemed to make the sail kind of heavy.

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Flushing the engine with a Vetus style strainer is easy...spin off the lid, pour in fresh water. Shut down engine.

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Having has a partial batten sail, and then a full batten sail, I do think I want to go 2+2 this time. 4 full battens seemed to make the sail kind of heavy.

 

 

Hmmm....

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Ajax, I agree 100% on 2 + 2 battened mainsail (which is what I also have). There is no reason to have full battens down low & they restrict your ability to shape the sail with outhaul tension, makes the sail heavy and less lively too, etc. You control the top with battens, but you already have a big metal batten at the bottom of the sail (the boom!) :lol:

 

One tip on fresh water flushes...do not 'force' water into the engine with water pressure The simple thing to remember here is the only way a water lift muffler can expel water is if the engine is running. Always let the raw water pump pull the water in..I like GK's approach with the strainer..I have a "T" in my intake as well, but I fill a bucket with fresh water/antifreeze/muratic acid/vinegar and then stuff a hose in it from the "T" to let the pump pull it out.

 

here are the issues: You can flood the engine in unwanted areas if you force water in...it is just the opposite, but just as catastrophic as cranking for too long (with the raw water open and the water pump spinning) in a hard start scenario..the raw water pump fills the engine even though the motor is not running and backfills thru the exhaust and dumps in the cylinders..in this case, the fresh water is forced around the water pump impeller and eventually fills up the water jackets and dumps into the crankcase/cylinders thru the exhaust as well.

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Ajax, I agree 100% on 2 + 2 battened mainsail (which is what I also have). There is no reason to have full battens down low & they restrict your ability to shape the sail with outhaul tension, makes the sail heavy and less lively too, etc. You control the top with battens, but you already have a big metal batten at the bottom of the sail (the boom!) :lol:

 

 

For your usage and boat size, I agree with 2 full and 2 "overlength" based on roach size. Full battens down low add some sail life, support an oversized roach and tapered ones aren't too hard to shape. A loose foot is what you want so that "aluminum batten" doesn't do much :)

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Ajax, I agree 100% on 2 + 2 battened mainsail (which is what I also have). There is no reason to have full battens down low & they restrict your ability to shape the sail with outhaul tension, makes the sail heavy and less lively too, etc. You control the top with battens, but you already have a big metal batten at the bottom of the sail (the boom!) :lol:

 

One tip on fresh water flushes...do not 'force' water into the engine with water pressure The simple thing to remember here is the only way a water lift muffler can expel water is if the engine is running. Always let the raw water pump pull the water in..I like GK's approach with the strainer..I have a "T" in my intake as well, but I fill a bucket with fresh water/antifreeze/muratic acid/vinegar and then stuff a hose in it from the "T" to let the pump pull it out.

 

here are the issues: You can flood the engine in unwanted areas if you force water in...it is just the opposite, but just as catastrophic as cranking for too long (with the raw water open and the water pump spinning) in a hard start scenario..the raw water pump fills the engine even though the motor is not running and backfills thru the exhaust and dumps in the cylinders..in this case, the fresh water is forced around the water pump impeller and eventually fills up the water jackets and dumps into the crankcase/cylinders thru the exhaust as well.

 

Oh, I was talking about running the engine not trying to "flush" it like an outboard.

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Oh, I was talking about running the engine not trying to "flush" it like an outboard.

 

The strainer will work great for your needs...the fact that it's very easy means you are likely to do it more often.

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It is a little bit cheaper if you get it on eBay as well..same guy though..search for the "BoaterBits" store. He has lots of cool stuff for our old boats.

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Guys,

 

Thanks for the lead on BoaterBits!! He has the cowl vents (the big 5" ones) that I've been looking for. Thanks again,

 

Beau

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BV,

 

Dave at Boaterbits is great at answering questions too. He seems to know his inventory pretty well & which applications they will fit best. At least for my 4KSB he knows it pretty well. I recently bought a pair of his LED teardrop running lights and they bolted into my C-30 without even picking up a drill. B)

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Oh FWIW, I secured the transmission shifter cable that was slipping yesterday, and I tested out the toilet to see if it works and it does. What the hell is a "joker valve"?

 

I also installed the knotmeter paddlewheel. Holy SHIT! Unlike the poor installation on the Coronado, this transducer is much closer to the centerline so that it'll still give a reading even when the boat is well heeled over, and the transducer is much larger in diamteter. This means that water comes GUSHING in when swapping out the dummy plug. UNCOOL!:blink:

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Um..the joker valve is a cone shaped rubber valve with a slit in the middle, and it keeps all the shit (literally) from flowing back into the toilet..it is located in the housing were the outlet (1.5") hose attaches to the toilet. Mine is 1 1/2 years old now, and it is time to replace it. They are about $8. They aren't quite universal though, so know what your toilet brand & model is so you can get a suitable replacement.

 

When you put the motor in gear (forward) does the cable 'thunk' into a noticeable detent (it should)? There are three little 'fingers' that need to fully engage over the cone in the reversing gear (no actual trans on an A4) to lock all the sun/planetary gears & clutch plates so that you get no slipping and 'direct drive' in forward. If I remember "Atomic 4 reversing gear 101" correctly, when you lean on the gear shift for reverse, a brake band grabs the outer gear, and the smaller inner gears spin inside of it in the opposite direction, giving you reverse (and a high pitched whine!) at a 1.3:1 ratio...i.e., slightly higher RPM is needed in reverse to achieve the same prop RPM..in forward, as mentioned above, it locks (if those fingers engage all the way) at 1:1.

 

Bucket & sponge at the ready...you'll start timing yourself on how quick you can get that paddle wheel in. WATER based antifouling on the paddle wheel (copper eats the transducer plastic.) They sell it in little 6 oz. bottles or something at WM.

 

B)

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Um..the joker valve is a cone shaped rubber valve with a slit in the middle, and it keeps all the shit (literally) from flowing back into the toilet..it is located in the housing were the outlet (1.5") hose attaches to the toilet. Mine is 1 1/2 years old now, and it is time to replace it. They are about $8. They aren't quite universal though, so know what your toilet brand & model is so you can get a suitable replacement.

 

When you put the motor in gear (forward) does the cable 'thunk' into a noticeable detent (it should)? There are three little 'fingers' that need to fully engage over the cone in the reversing gear (no actual trans on an A4) to lock all the sun/planetary gears & clutch plates so that you get no slipping and 'direct drive' in forward. If I remember "Atomic 4 reversing gear 101" correctly, when you lean on the gear shift for reverse, a brake band grabs the outer gear, and the smaller inner gears spin inside of it in the opposite direction, giving you reverse (and a high pitched whine!) at a 1.3:1 ratio...i.e., slightly higher RPM is needed in reverse to achieve the same prop RPM..in forward, as mentioned above, it locks (if those fingers engage all the way) at 1:1.

 

Bucket & sponge at the ready...you'll start timing yourself on how quick you can get that paddle wheel in. WATER based antifouling on the paddle wheel (copper eats the transducer plastic.) They sell it in little 6 oz. bottles or something at WM.

 

B)

 

Thanks for the joker valve explanation. I'll take pictures and see if I can locate a manufacturer name on the toilet.

 

Yes, the transmission does thunk into gear with a noticeable detent. It did when I left the boatyard, and then when I got near my dock, it did not and the shifter would fall loosely all the way to the cockpit sole until I secured the shift cable to it's bracket behind the bulkhead.

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OK. sweet on the motor..just making sure...it is entirely possible to go into some sort of forward without the detent, in which case the clutch plates are slipping even though the prop is spinning..the detent you feel into forward insures the fingers have fully engaged and locked all the plates together. :)

 

By the way - the reversing gear uses the motor oil for lubrication, so it is recommended not to use synthetic oil..I don't know shit about motorcycles, but most of them apparently operate on the same principle, but there are special oils available for that too I think. :unsure:

 

At any rate - straight SAE30 seems to be the most common, although some folks use a 10w-30 also.

 

edit - BTW - you will not be able to suck out all of the oil..depending on the aft tilt of the motor it holds somewhere between 4 and 5 quarts..I typically can suck about 3 quarts (that's 2.84 litres for you Aussies & Pommies! :P) out of mine when I change it. Suck out as much as you can, and then put that amount back in until the dipstick level is at "full".

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edit - BTW - you will not be able to suck out all of the oil..depending on the aft tilt of the motor it holds somewhere between 4 and 5 quarts..I typically can suck about 3 quarts (that's 2.84 litres for you Aussies & Pommies! :P) out of mine when I change it. Suck out as much as you can, and then put that amount back in until the dipstick level is at "full".

 

I don't have the PCV adapter but I have the oil change tube. HB, do you have that? I highly recommend it. It goes in the hole between your mechanical fuel pump and the carb and puts a rigid tube right to the optimal spot and it stays there permanently. There is a fitting/hose/fitting that also stays in place providing a nice little brass fitting to screw the pump into. It takes about 10 minutes to change the oil with a hand pump now.

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stickboy, I have just installed the Indigo Oil Filter kit this spring, which has an oil change port on the oil filter housing..I haven't tried to use it yet, but there is a hose from the housing that dumps the oil into the same fitting you are describing in the block/oil pan, with a rigid tube, so, it should perform the same function. I just picked up a $15 drill operated pump that I plan to try this fall. Although I haven't quite engineered it all yet, I think one compression fitting on that port, connected to a tube that fits the drill pump and I should be all set. B)

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Great stuff, Having a couple of niggly issues with the engine at this stage isn't necessarily a bad thing, you will learn about it while you fix them.

 

Did you manage to nick the otto from old shoes?

 

 

Nah, the Otto on the Coronado isn't strong enough to drive the Pearson, so I let it go. I'll need to buy a heavier rated one, new or used.

 

 

Re otto: you may find this interesting. I did a 1200 mile passage using this when my tiller pilot shit itself. (Mine was a much simpler set up than this one)

 

Sheet-to-Tiller Self Steering

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Thanks Grumps! 1200 miles??? Wow

 

Ajax,

 

Hopefully you'll one day get to experience such a passage. Things move more slowly. Do I tack this morning - or this afternoon? Is the wind forecast to back or veer? If so, I can reach "to the new wind" on a more comfortable heading where the boat self steers better. Does my self steering have a long period oscillation 10 degrees either side of course? It'll even out and the boat is happy.

 

You're busy on a passage but in a different way. As some would say, you take the long view.

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I changed the oil today in preparation for our two week cruise :D

It took 10 minutes start to finish. I used to use a drill pump but it's more trouble than it's worth. I use a plastic version of this, straight into an empty gallon jug. Clean and easy.

post-8037-090818100 1313978853_thumb.gif

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I also installed the knotmeter paddlewheel. Holy SHIT! Unlike the poor installation on the Coronado, this transducer is much closer to the centerline so that it'll still give a reading even when the boat is well heeled over, and the transducer is much larger in diamteter. This means that water comes GUSHING in when swapping out the dummy plug. UNCOOL!:blink:

 

:lol:

 

Too, too funny, but that's nothing! Try doing it without a dummy plug! I seem to remember stickboy doing that one or more times when the paddlewheel got gunk on it and needed cleaning. It didn't help that the thru-hull was in a pretty awkward place to get at. IIRC, he became quite good at keeping one hand over the hole and cleaning the paddlewheel out with the other hand. I learned to take 30 degree heel and luffing sails during a reef, but the water gushing in thing was not easy to adjust to. We ended up replacing that unit and have a dummy plug now. B)

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ShamWoW~! :)

Learn to do the whole process by feel and then do it under the cover of a large beach towel. As you get better, you can graduate to smaller towels and eventually sponges.

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Can you provide a link to this drill pump? I'd like to get one.

 

I got rid of my drill pump as it was so loud, I couldn't hear when the business end of the tube was sucking air. The opposite end was not easily removed to see if the oil was done coming out. I then made it so I could see the oil coming out the tube and, of course, I bumped it and oil went on the floor. Grrrr!

+1 on the hand pumps

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I like a hand pump just because I can feel whether I'm sucking oil or air better. Toward the end, as oil is slowly dripping down and the pump is sucking some air but still getting oil, it is hard to tell wtf is going on with the drill thingy. Also, I never successfully did it without fully oiling the exterior of my drill.

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Oh FWIW, I secured the transmission shifter cable that was slipping yesterday, and I tested out the toilet to see if it works and it does. What the hell is a "joker valve"?

 

I also installed the knotmeter paddlewheel. Holy SHIT! Unlike the poor installation on the Coronado, this transducer is much closer to the centerline so that it'll still give a reading even when the boat is well heeled over, and the transducer is much larger in diamteter. This means that water comes GUSHING in when swapping out the dummy plug. UNCOOL!:blink:

 

HA ! Great story.

 

On my first time at that job I got an Old Faithful sized geyser right in the face. It went a long way to explaining why all the old guys in the crew said I was the best man for the job. Back then such subtleties were lost on me. I was a ripe old 19.

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OK. sweet on the motor..just making sure...it is entirely possible to go into some sort of forward without the detent, in which case the clutch plates are slipping even though the prop is spinning..the detent you feel into forward insures the fingers have fully engaged and locked all the plates together. :)

 

By the way - the reversing gear uses the motor oil for lubrication, so it is recommended not to use synthetic oil..I don't know shit about motorcycles, but most of them apparently operate on the same principle, but there are special oils available for that too I think. :unsure:

 

At any rate - straight SAE30 seems to be the most common, although some folks use a 10w-30 also.

 

edit - BTW - you will not be able to suck out all of the oil..depending on the aft tilt of the motor it holds somewhere between 4 and 5 quarts..I typically can suck about 3 quarts (that's 2.84 litres for you Aussies & Pommies! :P) out of mine when I change it. Suck out as much as you can, and then put that amount back in until the dipstick level is at "full".

 

 

I am a motorcycle guy. You don't need to avoid synthetics. You need to avoid the friction reducers that are in a lot of auto motor oils. The friction reducers make wet clutches slip.

 

Synthetic are mostly over kill for boat motors. Symthetics are useful in high performance motors. They don't break down as easily with the more extreme conditions in high performance motors. How ever in a marine environment where contamination is a bigger issue the longer useful life of a synthetic isn't as useful.

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Hope your new baby survived the ravages of that bitch Irene down the Rhode way.

Engine oil for the Atomic 4 seems to be the current drift.

I am very happy with using Rotella T 30W oil in our A4. Rotella T is good for both gasoline and diesel engines. It costs a little more but it is one of the higher quality oils out there. Check the API (American Petroleum Institute) seal which shows how the oil is rated. 'Cx' ratings are for combustion engines and 'Sx' ratings are for spark ignition. Compare this rating to any cheap automobile oil.

I'm hoping to be looking at the ass end of Irene come Sunday night knowing my old boat is still afloat.

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Hey Q,

All is well. I hope to get some sailing in after work this week.

 

Does anyone recognize this brand of traveler track or the system? It's an "X" track...

post-42428-046034700 1314639251_thumb.jpg

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Doesn't look familiar at all, but I'm willing to bet it isn't ball bearing. That's the one thing that I really dislike about mine. While going upwind in some breeze and a decent puff comes along, uncleat the traveller and nothing happens. boo.

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Hey Q,

All is well. I hope to get some sailing in after work this week.

 

Does anyone recognize this brand of traveler track or the system? It's an "X" track...

 

Oh oh oh....I'll think of it. Our CS27 had the same track. Some British hardware long since forgotten It worked like crap. The Lewmar Ocean 1 was a big improvement.

 

Now I really want Harken windward sheeting...

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Hey Q,

All is well. I hope to get some sailing in after work this week.

 

Does anyone recognize this brand of traveler track or the system? It's an "X" track...

 

Oh oh oh....I'll think of it. Our CS27 had the same track. Some British hardware long since forgotten It worked like crap. The Lewmar Ocean 1 was a big improvement.

 

Now I really want Harken windward sheeting...

 

So the vote is in. It's that "I need new gear for the boat" brand. It looks like the "no replacement parts available" brand, but there were not many sold on the East coast, so that's unlikely. Time for a trip to the used gear store for an upgrade. Glad you made it through OK.

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Hey Q,

All is well. I hope to get some sailing in after work this week.

 

Does anyone recognize this brand of traveler track or the system? It's an "X" track...

 

Looks VERY familiar to me.

 

Beyond that ... I got nuthin'.

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Nicro Marine was bought out by Ronstan and through the 90's they started phasing out Nicro branded products. These guys stock some Nicro products so try them if you want parts.

 

http://www.rigrite.com/travellers/nf_travellers/NFtraveler.html

 

If you want something more modern, which is not necessarily better, I recommend the Ronstan I beam 32 series. With I beam you don't have to mess with any circulating balls going flat.

 

http://www.ronstan.com/marine/range.asp?RnID=047

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Hey Q,

All is well. I hope to get some sailing in after work this week.

 

Does anyone recognize this brand of traveler track or the system? It's an "X" track...

 

Oh oh oh....I'll think of it. Our CS27 had the same track. Some British hardware long since forgotten It worked like crap. The Lewmar Ocean 1 was a big improvement.

 

Now I really want Harken windward sheeting...

Windward sheeting is fine if the traveller is at your level. If the traveller is down on cockpit floor or well below a coaming you sit up on, you lose the last bit of travel when the geometry is wrong for trimming then cleating. Check your geometry. If your old traveller is toast, just about any new traveller properly sized will be a joy.

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Hey Q,

All is well. I hope to get some sailing in after work this week.

 

Does anyone recognize this brand of traveler track or the system? It's an "X" track...

 

Oh oh oh....I'll think of it. Our CS27 had the same track. Some British hardware long since forgotten It worked like crap. The Lewmar Ocean 1 was a big improvement.

 

Now I really want Harken windward sheeting...

 

Good job, Gate. It appears to be IYE brand. Parts are available. The IYE label is missing from the traveler car, but this appears to be it. I have the 4-wheel car:

 

IYE

 

They still sell parts. This style of car does not bind up under load, so I'm keeping it. All I need are control stops with single sheaves, so why not? I'll measure the track to verify if I have the "C" or "K" series track.

 

More good news: I went sailing yesterday, and I observed that the lower 1/4 of the luff of the main has this crazy 3-strand, bolt rope type of affair that attaches the track slugs to the luff. I feel that it's original to the sail and not some cobbled-together shit from the PO. Well, this rope was set very loose, allowing a lot of slack in the luff of the sail even if the downhaul was on tight. I took a lot of slack out of this bolt rope, put on the downhaul and the outhaul, and sail shape improved immensely. The sail is definitely very tired, it's very thin, but the shape actually decent. This removes some of the urgency for a new main and will let me put my dollars into other systems early on.

 

Since the breeze started off at 10-12 kts, I got to try out one of my genoas. This boat seems set up in the manner that Beau was explaining in another thread- It came with a heavy 150% genoa, a lightweight 150% genoa, and a little mule jib. I chose the heavy jib, which is an old mitre-cut sail with the little "racing window" in it, so that you can see both tell tales.

Tacking that bitch around, single-handed, with bowlines tied in the sheets that hang up on the shrouds, is real work. I called for my bowman to skirt the genoa, but alas, no one was there. ;) I haven't tried my brand-new genoa yet, maybe I should get on that...

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Hey Ajax, when you make up your cool pennant/strop whatever thingie for the clew, please make two. I need one for mine as I have no bowman to help the jib around either & it is always hanging up. :P

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More good news: I went sailing yesterday, and I observed that the lower 1/4 of the luff of the main has this crazy 3-strand, bolt rope type of affair that attaches the track slugs to the luff. I feel that it's original to the sail and not some cobbled-together shit from the PO. Well, this rope was set very loose, allowing a lot of slack in the luff of the sail even if the downhaul was on tight. I took a lot of slack out of this bolt rope, put on the downhaul and the outhaul, and sail shape improved immensely. The sail is definitely very tired, it's very thin, but the shape actually decent. This removes some of the urgency for a new main and will let me put my dollars into other systems early on.

 

You may appreciate this when you reef the main -- the slugs stay in the track.

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Correct... no reef points added when this sail was built, and it's too old and worn to add them now. I'd rather just save up for a new main.

 

 

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Oh, Bitches asked about the launching video. I only took a few seconds' worth, and I'm sure you've all seen this sort of thing before. It was pretty exciting for me though.

 

 

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Good job, Gate. It appears to be IYE brand. Parts are available. The IYE label is missing from the traveler car, but this appears to be it. I have the 4-wheel car:

 

IYE

 

They still sell parts. This style of car does not bind up under load, so I'm keeping it. All I need are control stops with single sheaves, so why not? I'll measure the track to verify if I have the "C" or "K" series track.

 

.......

 

??? The bolded comment seems odd. I was never happy with the old X track trav. Not sure if it was the same brand, but action was not in any way smooth. Much happier with the Garhauer replacement.

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Well...it's been smooth for me if I haul on the part of the line not jammed in the cam cleat. I need end blocks to turn the direction of effort, then it'll be smooth.

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Well...it's been smooth for me if I haul on the part of the line not jammed in the cam cleat. I need end blocks to turn the direction of effort, then it'll be smooth.

 

 

Assume you're testing this under loaded conditions. If not don't be surprised if :angry:

+1 on turning blocks

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