U20guy2

65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space

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Proving once again that you cannot fit 33,000sqft of bullshit into a 32,000sqft plywood box

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From the above story: Read more here: [/size]http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/01/15/3183795/avast-supreme-court-sinks-florida.html#storylink=cpy

 

 

"Lozman bought his 60-foot-by-12 foot floating home in 2002 and docked it at the Riviera Beach marina after Hurricane Wilma destroyed his former marina. The rectangular structure lacked an engine, bilge pumps, navigation aids, lifeboats or other devices usually found on waterborne vessels."

 

Yes because all 60ft boats have their own lifeboats...

 

It looks like a floating trailer. But as opposed to being a double wide its a double tall.

 

I'd call it a barge, but I'm pretty sure marine law applies to those...

 

 

 

I would think that most 60 foot boats would have a lifeboat (life raft, dinghy, kayak, etc). Any boat large enough will have something, either for fun, landing, or emergency.

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Yeah. but HR built the dinghy, too!

 

Nah, that's just the box the barbeque...

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Yah Sloop I can picture that as being the more reasonable power needed to safely operate a vessel of this size. One must also consider the mount and torque that motors of that size working in a storm will place on the structure of the vessel, the required structural support and the ability to stow that much fuel for engines of that size to make it to say Hawaii.

I see zero accommodation for even a reasonable power level in that thing. Not only that but if its floating on its lines dead empty, whats goign to happen when you load it up with fuel, engines, supplies, spare parts, and all the rest of the equipment.

Doesn't really matter tho cause I'm really not thinking he'll so much as make it out of the harbor, that hull is likely getting soaked even as we're reading this today, and as someone already pointed out, there's no dragging it back up out of the water. Its just not strong enough to withstand the sling, maybe dry dock but I'm doubtful our man Rod Moe could afford that.

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[snip]

Getting adequate luff tension without doing major structural damage will be the next huge challenge. snip

 

Cmon, Maan! Dontcha know that's what the back porch sag is for? When they put the tension on the backstay, that porch roof will perk right up.

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is it a rotating mast ??

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Yah Sloop I can picture that as being the more reasonable power needed to safely operate a vessel of this size. One must also consider the mount and torque that motors of that size working in a storm will place on the structure of the vessel, the required structural support and the ability to stow that much fuel for engines of that size to make it to say Hawaii.

 

I see zero accommodation for even a reasonable power level in that thing. Not only that but if its floating on its lines dead empty, whats goign to happen when you load it up with fuel, engines, supplies, spare parts, and all the rest of the equipment.

 

Doesn't really matter tho cause I'm really not thinking he'll so much as make it out of the harbor, that hull is likely getting soaked even as we're reading this today, and as someone already pointed out, there's no dragging it back up out of the water. Its just not strong enough to withstand the sling, maybe dry dock but I'm doubtful our man Rod Moe could afford that.

Surely you could just lag the motor mounts down to the 3/8" ply?

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OK peeps its F = A x P x CD

 

F is the force in pounds per foot

A is the area

P is the wind pressure in PSF = 0.00256 x V^2 ( V = MPH )

CD is the drag coefficient ( 2 for flat surfaces and 1.2 for a tube )

 

I'll take a stab at the CD and call it 1.2 for the forward section and 1.6 for the side profile. I'm also kinda guessing at the dimensions

 

to go headlong into even just a 15 MPH breeze he's going to need

 

32 x 14 x 0.65 ( my guess as to the block coefficient ) = 291 sg/ft or since that didn't include rigging which is definetly a factor lets call it 300 sq/ft of area

 

A = 300

P = 0.576 at 15 mph and 1.024 at 20 mph ( 3.136 at 35 mph )

CD = 1.2

 

F = 207 lbs of wind pressure at wind speed of 15 mph

F = 369 lbs of wind pressure at wind speed of 20 mph

 

I've got a program to figure out the water resistance so I'll post that eventually but just the wind alone. The trouble with figuring wind loads on a boat is that HP isn't directly comparable to LB thrust. For the sake of argument I've heard it considered as much as 100 lbs per HP and as little as 25 lbs per HP The difference being in the efficiency of the prop and gear box, bla bla bla.

 

My take is to always go conservative, what happens to ole Rod if he's caught out in a squall ( we've all been in that situation no mater how good you think you sail ) call it a nice ugly 35 mph day.

 

F = 1,130 lb of wind pressure at a wind speed of 35 mph

 

So without the water resistance considered any reasonable engineer would put at least 45 HP on that thing. Add the water resistance and I'm betting it takes at least 150 hp to even come close to a safe amount of power to keep this floating wreck out of trouble

 

 

 

Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

 

I haven't seen any discussion of the effect of pitching or hobby-horsing on outboards mounted close to the waterline on a vessel, er, house, of this length. Even with long-shaft obs, which he doesn't appear to have, he'll drown the motors the first time he noses into a moderate wave.

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Hey, Im looking for a converter table 150 hp = how many chihuaha's in a treadmill ?

 

Im sure he thinks that if he parks the dinghy under the bridgedeck and screws it on with the battery drill, he will have all the drive drivel he needs. He only has to drive that sucker to the nearest farmers creek at high tide and park it on top of his shipping container, and he has a three storey swampside condo with motor-in boatshed. The masts and rudders are ornamental to fool authorities into thinking its actually a boat and the sails are just shade sails..

 

He's delaying putting in the windows until he works out where the best swamp view will be from.

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Use a chunk of 2x4 for a backing plate -- AYBC best practice, etc....

Surely you could just lag the motor mounts down to the 3/8" ply?

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OK peeps its F = A x P x CD

 

F is the force in pounds per foot

A is the area

P is the wind pressure in PSF = 0.00256 x V^2 ( V = MPH )

CD is the drag coefficient ( 2 for flat surfaces and 1.2 for a tube )

 

I'll take a stab at the CD and call it 1.2 for the forward section and 1.6 for the side profile. I'm also kinda guessing at the dimensions

 

to go headlong into even just a 15 MPH breeze he's going to need

 

32 x 14 x 0.65 ( my guess as to the block coefficient ) = 291 sg/ft or since that didn't include rigging which is definetly a factor lets call it 300 sq/ft of area

 

A = 300

P = 0.576 at 15 mph and 1.024 at 20 mph ( 3.136 at 35 mph )

CD = 1.2

 

F = 207 lbs of wind pressure at wind speed of 15 mph

F = 369 lbs of wind pressure at wind speed of 20 mph

 

I've got a program to figure out the water resistance so I'll post that eventually but just the wind alone. The trouble with figuring wind loads on a boat is that HP isn't directly comparable to LB thrust. For the sake of argument I've heard it considered as much as 100 lbs per HP and as little as 25 lbs per HP The difference being in the efficiency of the prop and gear box, bla bla bla.

 

My take is to always go conservative, what happens to ole Rod if he's caught out in a squall ( we've all been in that situation no mater how good you think you sail ) call it a nice ugly 35 mph day.

 

F = 1,130 lb of wind pressure at a wind speed of 35 mph

 

So without the water resistance considered any reasonable engineer would put at least 45 HP on that thing. Add the water resistance and I'm betting it takes at least 150 hp to even come close to a safe amount of power to keep this floating wreck out of trouble

 

 

 

Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

 

I haven't seen any discussion of the effect of pitching or hobby-horsing on outboards mounted close to the waterline on a vessel, er, house, of this length. Even with long-shaft obs, which he doesn't appear to have, he'll drown the motors the first time he noses into a moderate wave.

Wouldn't the destruction of the bow areas nosing into that first wave have a dampening effect?

If that were the case (sinking notwithstanding) the motors might survive until the second wave.

 

:rolleyes:

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No actually the bows are not symmetrical, so wave action between the hulls will be exaggerated as each bow tries to scoop water to the side. By the time its exiting the stern, anything on the stern will be well and truly deluged, especially given the absence of stern freeboard, absence of reserve buoyancy and weight in the ends....

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Have a friend on the bay that says it is blowing 40+ right now. Wonder how those screwed in toe rails are holding that thing to the dock?

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OK peeps its F = A x P x CD

 

F is the force in pounds per foot

A is the area

P is the wind pressure in PSF = 0.00256 x V^2 ( V = MPH )

CD is the drag coefficient ( 2 for flat surfaces and 1.2 for a tube )

 

I'll take a stab at the CD and call it 1.2 for the forward section and 1.6 for the side profile. I'm also kinda guessing at the dimensions

 

to go headlong into even just a 15 MPH breeze he's going to need

 

32 x 14 x 0.65 ( my guess as to the block coefficient ) = 291 sg/ft or since that didn't include rigging which is definetly a factor lets call it 300 sq/ft of area

 

A = 300

P = 0.576 at 15 mph and 1.024 at 20 mph ( 3.136 at 35 mph )

CD = 1.2

 

F = 207 lbs of wind pressure at wind speed of 15 mph

F = 369 lbs of wind pressure at wind speed of 20 mph

 

I've got a program to figure out the water resistance so I'll post that eventually but just the wind alone. The trouble with figuring wind loads on a boat is that HP isn't directly comparable to LB thrust. For the sake of argument I've heard it considered as much as 100 lbs per HP and as little as 25 lbs per HP The difference being in the efficiency of the prop and gear box, bla bla bla.

 

My take is to always go conservative, what happens to ole Rod if he's caught out in a squall ( we've all been in that situation no mater how good you think you sail ) call it a nice ugly 35 mph day.

 

F = 1,130 lb of wind pressure at a wind speed of 35 mph

 

So without the water resistance considered any reasonable engineer would put at least 45 HP on that thing. Add the water resistance and I'm betting it takes at least 150 hp to even come close to a safe amount of power to keep this floating wreck out of trouble

 

 

 

Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

 

I haven't seen any discussion of the effect of pitching or hobby-horsing on outboards mounted close to the waterline on a vessel, er, house, of this length. Even with long-shaft obs, which he doesn't appear to have, he'll drown the motors the first time he noses into a moderate wave.

Wouldn't the destruction of the bow areas nosing into that first wave have a dampening effect?

If that were the case (sinking notwithstanding) the motors might survive until the second wave.

 

:rolleyes:

I think in the automotive industry, they're referred to as "crumple zones." I would be worried about the bbq flying though the back door and coming out of the front of the cabin. I'm sure HR has all this worked out.

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Where is Lil Murray with the Romex report? At this rate we won't see pictures of the sinking until 2 weeks later.

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Proving once again that you cannot fit 33,000sqft of bullshit into a 32,000sqft plywood box

 

 

Sorry, but I'm pretty sure that BS is a cubic measure, check your calcs.

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Proving once again that you cannot fit 33,000sqft of bullshit into a 32,000sqft plywood box

 

Sorry, but I'm pretty sure that BS is a cubic measure, check your calcs.

After a complete revision of my calculations utilizing my honorary doctorate in theoretical bullshit, I still stand by my original assertion.

 

There's just too much bullshit to contain with just plywood and screws.

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This boat is screwed?

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Where is Lil Murray with the Romex report? At this rate we won't see pictures of the sinking until 2 weeks later.

 

So hop on a plane with your camera and laptop, you will be on the scene tomorrow.

 

 

 

Wait, Sheboygan Wisconsin...make that three days from now. :P

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yeah, but if you use your master craftsman's ability to compress the bullshit to 17,500 lbs per square cubit (the breaking strain of 3/8 CDX according to Rod), its amazing how much bullshyt he can fit in.

 

Proving once again that you cannot fit 33,000sqft of bullshit into a 32,000sqft plywood box

 

 

Sorry, but I'm pretty sure that BS is a cubic measure, check your calcs.

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Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

He didn't miss that at all.

 

Even though he avoided addressing the power concerns explicitly, his cavalier response to concerns about motive power have been, "It's a SAIL boat."

 

So we can drop the academic exercise of worrying about auxiliary power -- HotRod has -- and focus on sail power. The towering spars of his staysail ketch rig with 30-year-old end-fiting swages for the standing rigging fastened to thin metal chainplates which have been secured with made-in-china Home Depot drywall screws.

 

Let's work on that.

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Wouldn't the destruction of the bow areas nosing into that first wave have a dampening effect?

 

If that were the case (sinking notwithstanding) the motors might survive until the second wave.

 

I'm not sure if you meant "dampening" or "damping".

 

Dampening has been happening since Memorial Day.

 

Destructive forces might be damped as sacrificial parts of the boat break away during heavy weather. (bhyde's "crumple zones")

 

But as to "destruction of the bow areas", perhaps you missed the multiple posts where he craftily added the truck-stop diamond plate to the bows. That should hold her, eh?

 

And about the diamond plate...

In the spirit of "It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission," HotRod's yacht design philosophy has been demonstrated as, "It's easier to kludge up repairs than to design correctly in the first place." While my first guesses about the diamond plate focused on planned bow-first beachings on lovely tropical isles, I have since abandoned that idea as being too forward-thinking to fit to the HotRod school of design. I'm now thinking that the complex multi-planed bow areas were already starting to spring apart on dry land and the diamond plate represents some sort of remedial jock-strap to hold it the junk together.

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Yep, but its probably a whole lot simpler. Like, he had leftover diamondplate from skimping on the cosmetic rudderstocks, and anguished for ages on where he could pimp the boat with maximum effect.

 

Its designed to stop the mud and tree roots from driving between the sheets when he rams it into the muddy creek. Then he will drill holes in the diamond plate, and attach a towrope and use the truck to tow it deep into the swamp, up and over the cargo container, so that everything ends up above the high tide mark. The 3 storey swamp condo with diamond plate tips... Redneck heaven, pimped to the max.

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Have a friend on the bay that says it is blowing 40+ right now. Wonder how those screwed in toe rails are holding that thing to the dock?

 

Which means that Ole Rod Moe has about 1500 lbs of wind pressure working against him. Assuming he's actually facing into the wind. If he's beam on then its more like 3700 lbs. Kinda makes me wonder if that yarn he tied with in those last pictures is holding up. Particularly once you add waves into the mix. Doesn't take to much number crunching to figure out this thing isn't going to make it. All I can say is wow, what a monumental screw up.

 

Say, who is doing the pool for the sinking ? cause I got Tues the 25 this month midnightish assuming that is he makes it past this little bit of weather.

 

Cheers

B

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Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

He didn't miss that at all.

 

Even though he avoided addressing the power concerns explicitly, his cavalier response to concerns about motive power have been, "It's a SAIL boat."

 

So we can drop the academic exercise of worrying about auxiliary power -- HotRod has -- and focus on sail power. The towering spars of his staysail ketch rig with 30-year-old end-fiting swages for the standing rigging fastened to thin metal chainplates which have been secured with made-in-china Home Depot drywall screws.

 

Let's work on that.

OK so whats the projected sail area and whats his target speed and I can tell you how much stress he's got to counter in order to stay in one piece ? In a nut shell its not dissimilar to calculating the static wind pressure and I'd be inclined to ignore the wing effect of the sails and just go with straight resistance. Basically its got to balance with hull resistance anyway so if he's going x speed then I'd just figure out how many lbs thrust he's using on the hull to go that speed and then start going through the rigging dividing up the stress. It'd be kinda fun to figure out how many drywall screws ole Rod Moe figured out would hold, per ton.

 

It'd also be kinda interesting to see some picts of the rigging and how the standing stuff is duct taped to the hull.

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In one of those news reports they quoted HR as having a 53' and a 39' mast, I think. You could guesstimate the sail area from that.

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Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

He didn't miss that at all.

 

Even though he avoided addressing the power concerns explicitly, his cavalier response to concerns about motive power have been, "It's a SAIL boat."

 

So we can drop the academic exercise of worrying about auxiliary power -- HotRod has -- and focus on sail power. The towering spars of his staysail ketch rig with 30-year-old end-fiting swages for the standing rigging fastened to thin metal chainplates which have been secured with made-in-china Home Depot drywall screws.

 

Let's work on that.

Why? Are they inadequate?

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In one of those news reports they quoted HR as having a 53' and a 39' mast, I think. You could guesstimate the sail area from that.

No problem since everything else in this thread is guesstimated...from both sides. Sure has been amusing though, once again from both sides.

 

As I wrote previously, it's all very amusing until the end. No matter how retarded, misguided, or just plain stupid, I get no pleasure or amusement from seeing a man's dream crushed. It's gonna be a sad day, I pity the fool.

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So that could be right Hypnotoad. I already blew my estimate, so I am now down 0-2 to The Hot Rod. I figured less than 48 hours and the FH would be waterlogged and seams opening up.

 

Seems like we may need a whole separate thread for the pool. I figure unless there is some kind of entry fee I am already DQ'd by my bad estimate. UNLESS this is like Price is Right and no one else puts a hard and fast date and time--I sure didn't go OVER.

 

Meanwhile Lilmurray may have been offed by "Friends of the Hotrod" since he is either kidnapped OR holding out for $$$ for the thread rights.

 


 

 

Say, who is doing the pool for the sinking ? cause I got Tues the 25 this month midnightish assuming that is he makes it past this little bit of weather.

Cheers
B

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Production cats that size have TWO X 150 HP diesels. 9.9 OB's are for pushing 25 footers out of harbour. I guess he missed that in his thousand boat research project.

 

He didn't miss that at all.

 

Even though he avoided addressing the power concerns explicitly, his cavalier response to concerns about motive power have been, "It's a SAIL boat."

 

So we can drop the academic exercise of worrying about auxiliary power -- HotRod has -- and focus on sail power. The towering spars of his staysail ketch rig with 30-year-old end-fiting swages for the standing rigging fastened to thin metal chainplates which have been secured with made-in-china Home Depot drywall screws.

 

Let's work on that.

 

Actually he did use lag bolts. He was quoted complaining about their $4 cost each.

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In one of those news reports they quoted HR as having a 53' and a 39' mast, I think. You could guesstimate the sail area from that.

No problem since everything else in this thread is guesstimated...from both sides. Sure has been amusing though, once again from both sides.

 

As I wrote previously, it's all very amusing until the end. No matter how retarded, misguided, or just plain stupid, I get no pleasure or amusement from seeing a man's dream crushed. It's gonna be a sad day, I pity the fool.

 

Yes and no. It will be better for his dream to be crushed at the dock than in the harbor. And it will be better for it to be crushed in the harbor than in the ocean. For his sake I hope it comes sooner than later. The worst case scenario is that he actually built this thing well enough to get it into open water.

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Hey, Im looking for a converter table 150 hp = how many chihuaha's in a treadmill ?

 

150hp * 746watts/hp = 111.9 kW

 

According to the interwebs, you can get 0.45W out of hamster on a wheel running a generator. Let's say a yappy chihuaha can output about 3X a hamster.

 

111.9 kW / 1.35W per chihuaha = 82889 chihuahas at full power.

 

You'd be making those doggies work like a Spartan slave galley, so you'd want to plot your course as efficiently as possible on chihuaha power.

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A decent human can put out about 100W for a long period of time. He'd only need 1000 humans. Maybe that's why they're looking for roommates. They're actually gonna turn them into galley slaves and give them oars. That's why he has so many windows, they're oar ports.

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Has there been any sign or suggestion from Hotrod as to how he is going to fix on these two outboards?

 

I suspect that fitting a couple of lifting brackets on the back of the steps will be plan A.

 

However there is an alternative that is fairly widely used by the big day sail charter cats in the Caribbean. A longish swinging mount pivoted under the centre. This has two 30 to 50 hp motors mounted side by side and which are not normally steered. A simple winch to lift them up on the pivoting bracket is fitted.

 

We need some 2 x 4s and a Home Depot winch for a simple solution.

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Where is Lil Murray with the Romex report? At this rate we won't see pictures of the sinking until 2 weeks later.

So hop on a plane with your camera and laptop, you will be on the scene tomorrow.

 

 

 

Wait, Sheboygan Wisconsin...make that three days from now. :P

Sheboygan? Bring sausages.

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Nowadays you can get Johnsonville Brats in just about every grocery store in the country.

 

Where is Lil Murray with the Romex report? At this rate we won't see pictures of the sinking until 2 weeks later.

So hop on a plane with your camera and laptop, you will be on the scene tomorrow.

 

 

 

Wait, Sheboygan Wisconsin...make that three days from now. :P

Sheboygan? Bring sausages.

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Dear Popular Mechanic website

Master engineer thread,

 

Dear Sir,

I have salvaged a highlift truck motor and lifting forks off a burnt out high lift truck and would like to mount them midships to lift a wheelchair to the deck when necessary. It occurred to me I could use it to also power my high performance offshore mega catamaran.

 

Im thinking I could either:

(a) lower my mizzen mast into the water with a home made diamond plate propellor on the top or

( b ) run a removable long drive shaft with a home made diamond plate prop out the back, through a set of sliding doors put there especially for that purpose.

 

Can someone tell me which option would perform best in southern ocean conditions, or when foiling at 40 knots.

 

Regards The Rod.

Master at everything.

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Photo resolution may not be good enough, but the MC is on deck, along with a tiny electric OB

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The Harley and the Seagull. Still floating 7 PM PDT June 9, 2013attachicon.gifimage.jpg

 

To what is that generator mounted? Did he just put it on one of the steps?

 

Not for nothing, but the boat looks happy and sturdy in that shot. Shame he can't just keep it in calm water for a few years until it gets moldy.

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Photo resolution may not be good enough, but the MC is on deck, along with a tiny electric OB

How the fuck did he get the H-D there?

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Nowadays you can get Johnsonville Brats in just about every grocery store in the country.

So the brand Johnsonville are actually Sheboygans?

 

I don't know much about them, but one summer after high school I ran a hot dog cart in Downtown Denver, we had a little handwritten sign on the side of the cart that said "Sheboygan Brats and Mady's Mustard"

 

It was unreal how people used to fall over themselves to buy those things. The stoner who owned the cart just cleaned up, usually sold every Sheboygan on that cart at the end of each day. No idea if it was the Brats of the Mustard that was drawing them in. That mustard ... I could eat it plain.

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Photo resolution may not be good enough, but the MC is on deck, along with a tiny electric OB

How the fuck did he get the H-D there?

 

 

Easy. Stand next to the bike, kick it into second with your clutch engaged (first if your throttle is sensitive enough) stand next to it and gently gun it up the steps. I used to have to do that at night when the gate in the parking deck in which I put my bike wouldn't open because there wasn't enough metal in the bike to trigger the buried sensor to open the gate. Had to take it up the steps.

 

I once saw a burnout with an MG Midget who didn't have the money to pay the coin to get out, put his Midget a few yards up the ramp, put it in neutral, jump out of the car, let it slowly roll forward while he held up the gate, then it rolled through, by that point it was probably moving a decent 6 or 8 mph or so, then he let the gate drop, ran after his free-rolling car, jumped in and stopped it before it rolled onto Arapahoe Street.

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Blowing dogs off chains in the Bay Area yesterday afternoon. Any news how his varnished teak cap-rail cleat-substitute and clothesline dockline arrangement held up? Or anything else? How's the hull-to-hull splay angle?

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Dear Popular Mechanic website

Master engineer thread,

 

Dear Sir,

I have salvaged a highlift truck motor and lifting forks off a burnt out high lift truck and would like to mount them midships to lift a wheelchair to the deck when necessary. It occurred to me I could use it to also power my high performance offshore mega catamaran.

 

Im thinking I could either:

(a) lower my mizzen mast into the water with a home made diamond plate propellor on the top or

( b ) run a removable long drive shaft with a home made diamond plate prop out the back, through a set of sliding doors put there especially for that purpose.

 

Can someone tell me which option would perform best in southern ocean conditions, or when foiling at 40 knots.

 

Regards The Rod.

Master at everything.

 

 

maybe he'll mount a klong boat style engine...

 

 

bangkok%20290.jpg

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dirty%2Bminds%2B%25288%2529.jpg

That's just rude!

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Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG



*angle of the photo...

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Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG

 

*angle of the photo...

 

I would attribute it to likely parallax distortion caused by the camera lens.

 

You can see many examples of that here:

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=lens+parallax+distortion&rlz=1C1CHFX_enUS500US500&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=xEG2Uf7AMeOrjAKRzoDoBw&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1523&bih=829

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Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG

 

*angle of the photo...

 

There are a couple new doghouses sticking up out of the hulls.... maybe a pair of elevators to get Mom downstairs?

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I was wondering how long it was going to take the local ace reporters to figure out they were missing a big story.

 

"I've done a lot of things trying to figure out how to make money in America. It was making me crazy trying to figure out a way to get out of the workforce."

When a wealthy friend told him he could escape from all that by building a boat and sailing to the Hawaiian island of Oahu, where the good life awaited him,"

 

Also wondering is this is more of HR's vast imagination again or whether there really is some sick SOB that would put this non-sense into someone's head. I can't help but think it was a rich man's bet for $1 whether or not the village idiot could build a boat and make it to Hawaii alive.

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I definitely see Seacart-style water stays:

 

Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG



*angle of the photo...

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All the more funny/tragic if you figure just how hard it is to find a spot that accepts liveaboards in Hawaii.

$40 a month? Maybe in Iowa.

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Anybody else see something not quite correct with this light?

 

20130607__nmij0609catamaran2_400_zps1de4

(B) A vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre, except a vessel engaged in mine-clearance operations, shall exhibit:

1. three all-round lights in a vertical line where they can best be seen. The highest and lowest of these lights shall be red and the middle light shall be white;

2. three shapes in a vertical line where they can best be seen. The highest and lowest of these shapes shall be balls and the middle one a diamond;

3. when making way through the water, a masthead light or lights, sidelights and a sternlight, in addition to the lights prescribed in sub-paragraph (i);

4. when at anchor, in addition to the lights or shapes prescribed in sub-paragraphs (i) and (ii), the light, lights or shape prescribed in Rule 30.

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Anybody else see something not quite correct with this light?

 

20130607__nmij0609catamaran2_400_zps1de4

And on a real boat, this green starboard light would not meet regulations because it could be visible from the port side

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Well sorta,

 

The port and starboard running lights should only be visible 22.5 degrees abaft the beam. This sucker will be visible 180 degrees abaft the beam!

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All the more funny/tragic if you figure just how hard it is to find a spot that accepts liveaboards in Hawaii.

$40 a month? Maybe in Iowa.

 

 

Yeah, he's definiely been smoking crack again;

 

Ko Olina Marina Slips Overview

Boaters who lease slips have access to water, electricity, cable television hook-up, telephone, laundry and restroom facilities,

picnic area with barbeque and gated entry to the Marina.

 

  • The Ko Olina Marina has slip lengths that go from 30’ to 200’ with prices from $452.36 to $5,991.62 per month including water and state of Hawaii taxes.
  • End Ties start at $29.90 per foot per month, water included and Hawaii tax
  • Water is included in monthly slip fee. Parking is $50 per month
  • Guests rates are $3.00 per/foot/day; Kama’aina rates are $2.50 per/foot/day
  • Liveaboard rates are $315 per month; max 2 associated people, absolutely NO pets accepted with this position.

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All the more funny/tragic if you figure just how hard it is to find a spot that accepts liveaboards in Hawaii.

$40 a month? Maybe in Iowa.

 

 

Seeing as how this boat will NEVER get within 2000 miles of the Hawaiian Islands, it really isn't an issue.

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All the more funny/tragic if you figure just how hard it is to find a spot that accepts liveaboards in Hawaii.

$40 a month? Maybe in Iowa.

 

 

Seeing as how this boat will NEVER get within 2000 miles of the Hawaiian Islands, it really isn't an issue.

 

 

True, but it takes no boatbuilding or Mariner skills to do a simple cost of living comparison between Oahu and anyplace else.

The fact that he is so over-the-top dillusional about what awaits him out there combined with the rest of his fantasies should be

enough to get him fitted for a straight jacket.

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Oahu is a lot less expensive than some of the other Hawaiian Islands, so he has that going for him.

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Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG

 

*angle of the photo...

 

There are a couple new doghouses sticking up out of the hulls.... maybe a pair of elevators to get Mom downstairs?

I am thinking Dock Boxes...

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Oahu is a lot less expensive than some of the other Hawaiian Islands, so he has that going for him.

 

 

My 10 minutes of research indicate that Oahu is the only island in the state that allows liveaboards.

I did not research and compare prices of all of the marinas where liveabord is allowed, but if the

prices of my example above are typical, Hotrod can expect to pay somewhere bewteen $5850 and

$6165 a month based upon his LOA (single hull) and whether or not the liveaboard fee is over and above the

cost of slip rental. Yikes!

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Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG

 

*angle of the photo...

 

There are a couple new doghouses sticking up out of the hulls.... maybe a pair of elevators to get Mom downstairs?

I am thinking Dock Boxes...

Well spotted. I think the Dockmaster better do a count.

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Dear Rod - the marinas around Honolulu are very expensive. There are several nice bays like Waimea you can anchor in on the north shore particularly in winter. Aloha.

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Dear Rod - the marinas around Honolulu are very expensive. There are several nice bays like Waimea you can anchor in on the north shore particularly in winter. Aloha.

 

Just Imagine It...

Anchored up in paradise brah! In her natural home!

The land of Hokulea!

 

waimea-bay-b1.jpg

 

 

 

 

OUTSIDE!

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Well sorta,

 

The port and starboard running lights should only be visible 22.5 degrees abaft the beam. This sucker will be visible 180 degrees abaft the beam!

I think youre last sentince makes know sence.

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Dear Rod - the marinas around Honolulu are very expensive. There are several nice bays like Waimea you can anchor in on the north shore particularly in winter. Aloha.

 

HotRod will need dock space once he gets to Hawaii, to be able to board his charter guests.

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Could just be the angle...but there's something 'off' about that starboard hull...

20130607__nmij0609catamaran~1.JPG

 

*angle of the photo...

 

There are a couple new doghouses sticking up out of the hulls.... maybe a pair of elevators to get Mom downstairs?

I am thinking Dock Boxes...

 

 

that birds thinkin

 

Damn I Got to Dump a Load

 

but I don't want anything that could be traced back to me involved on that 62' X 38' POS

 

 

 

 

 

if ............ lets say it kept floating

 

how long till it's wider then it is long ?????

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Oahu is a lot less expensive than some of the other Hawaiian Islands, so he has that going for him.

 

 

My 10 minutes of research indicate that Oahu is the only island in the state that allows liveaboards.

I did not research and compare prices of all of the marinas where liveabord is allowed, but if the

prices of my example above are typical, Hotrod can expect to pay somewhere bewteen $5850 and

$6165 a month based upon his LOA (single hull) and whether or not the liveaboard fee is over and above the

cost of slip rental. Yikes!

In the unlikely miraculous impossible inconceivable event that this thing makes it to Oahu, I think the honorable thing for those of us who have cast doubt on this project would be for us to kick in towards his first month's fee... I'm in for $100...

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Good golly... Ok, so the blind shall lead the blind and they shall all blah, blah, blah.... I love to watch you all suffer as your dire predictions fail one by one... Go the Rod! Anarchy rules... He'll hang or sink himself at his own pace... We all will... Geez, you all make me scratch my head and wonder why you ain't on SailNet or some other geriatric site like WWW.cruisersoutpost.com

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So despite being a certified Pilot, Meteorologist, long-haul truck driver and a master craftsman he was barely making ends meet doing contract labour and his son was working at Wal-Mart. With their home depot death trap in the water they are now broke, are begging for money to help pay for their dream, are looking for people to pay to live on board and are getting kicked out of the marina. Now apparently they are going to sail to Hawaii, set up a charter business, and start a boat building company on some land they are somehow going to buy at Diamond Head, before setting sail to NZ, visiting 100's of tropical islands on the way. Fuck me dead - You can make this shit up.

This just keeps getting better!

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So despite being a certified Pilot, Meteorologist, long-haul truck driver and a master craftsman he was barely making ends meet doing contract labour and his son was working at Wal-Mart. With their home depot death trap in the water they are now broke, are begging for money to help pay for their dream, are looking for people to pay to live on board and are getting kicked out of the marina. Now apparently they are going to sail to Hawaii, set up a charter business, and start a boat building company on some land they are somehow going to buy at Diamond Head, before setting sail to NZ, visiting 100's of tropical islands on the way. Fuck me dead - You can make this shit up.

This just keeps getting better!

 

 

Logic is clearly not the man's forte'.

 

"I've done a lot of things trying to figure out how to make money in America. It was making me crazy trying to figure out a way to get out of the workforce."

 

How to make more money? Obviously by doing nothing. Every fool can tell you that. Good thing he will not need judgement and analytical skills at sea.

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Hot rod will soon learn that you can't bullshit the sea, err, estuary.

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