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Te Kooti

Volvo Boats In For a Thrashing

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I need your help here, folks. Somewhere, with regards to the repair stop of Tele, I read that suspending the race only works for 12 hours. So, what's the story behind Camper's stay at Puerto Montt? It will certainly take longer than 12 hours, but AFAIK, they want to re-join the race after the repairs are finished. ???

 

12 hours is the minimum (not maximum) stopping time.

The "12 hr minimum rule" is designed to prevent a quick stop where someone takes on fresh bread, coffee and dry clothing.

 

It is a punishment for stopping.

What makes you think the Camper repair will take more than 12 hours?

 

It might be longer than12 hours. Be but assured Nico et al will want to get out of there ASAP.

 

After a juicy steak!

Haahaahahahaha, thanks for the clarification. Confusing min and max, I shold stay away from that stuff, whatever it is biggrin.gif.

 

You ask "What makes you think the Camper repair will take more than 12 hours?"

 

Because they always talk about a 2 to 4 days stay. That's a bit more than 12 hours. Of course they want to leave ASAP, but they also wanted to not break their boat in the first place. Spes saepe fallit.

 

 

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Because they always talk about a 2 to 4 days stay. That's a bit more than 12 hours. Of course they want to leave ASAP, but they also wanted to not break their boat in the first place. Spes saepe fallit.

 

 

 

 

I think they have deliberately over-stated the length of the stay.

Those shore crew guys will have the offending bit cut away within a few hours of arrival.

 

Prefabricated bits will be glued-in soon thereafter.

 

While waiting for the set-up they will probably survey the rest of the hull. Looking for other potential weak points.

 

I expect they will also go through the rig - from top to bottom.

 

I am predicting no more than 24 hours for the stopover.

 

But what do I know? Might be VERY wrong.

 

What bugs me is the 800 mile haul back to the Horn.

 

I wonder what TNZ thinks about the Telefonica repair model.

 

Anchor up behind an island and open your hatches to a shore crew bursting with energy.

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I need your help here, folks. Somewhere, with regards to the repair stop of Tele, I read that suspending the race only works for 12 hours. So, what's the story behind Camper's stay at Puerto Montt? It will certainly take longer than 12 hours, but AFAIK, they want to re-join the race after the repairs are finished. ???

If they can repair the Fire Engine and manage to finish the race best case they would get 4th place points (15) behind Tele to stay in 3rd overall. If they DNF they drop to 4th behind Puma with 104 points.

 

As it sits, based on current race standings assuming AD suspend racing for repairs and finish 5th;

 

Tele 122 + 20 - 142

Group 107 + 30 - 137

GFE 104 + 15 - 119

Puma 83 + 25 - 108

ADOR 55 + 10 - 65

Sanya 25 + 0 - 25

 

 

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http://www.teamtelefonica.com/en/news/475/

 

"TELEFÓNICA" TO RESUME LEG AT 22:00 UTC

03-31-2012

 

Antonio Cuervas-Mons will make the most of the pit stop to kick off the recovery process following a minor injury suffered on board

 

The “Telefónica” pit stop at Caleta Martial, a cove on Herschel Island (Chile) is going at a good pace and the boat will be fully back in the race at 22:00 UTC. Moored at the cove, the crew are eager to hit the water again, a mood that was made quite clear by the words of skipper Iker Martínez who is anxious to set off: “Let's see if these reinforcements dry quickly and we can shoot out of here”.

 

The Spanish boat suspended racing today, Saturday the 31st of March at 04:37 UTC and since then the shore crew and racing crew have been working to achieve a clear objective: to get “Telefónica” back to 100% in the shortest possible time. Fortunately, as Iker Martínez says: “When we got here the boat was in the best state we could hope for: the exterior of the hull was intact”.

 

For now the situation is looking up, and according to the skipper of the Spanish team: “The reinforcements are going well and now we just need to wait for everything to dry and we'll be ready to go. Once we're happy with the job we'll begin sailing again, first making our exit through the islands to get back to the point where we suspended racing yesterday night, some four miles northeast of Cape Horn. From there we'll be sailing up to Itjaí”.

 

Ñeti Cuervas-Mons, out of action with a minor injury

Things won't quite be the same on board “Telefónica” after this pit stop at Cape Horn. Firstly the boat will be back to 100%. Secondly, Antonio Cuervas-Mons Ruiloba won't be aboard for the final 2,000 miles to Itjaí (Brazil).

 

“Yesterday I was lucky enough to round legendary Cape Horn for the first time, but unfortunately it was bittersweet as a few days ago when a wave crashed down onto the deck it dragged me along with it causing a lower back injury affecting my sciatic nerve, which has made for some very uncomfortable sailing ever since. I even had to spend a couple of days in a bunk resting. Thankfully, as always, I was wearing my safety harness, so the blow was a lot less serious than it could have been... However, since we're making this stop to repair the bow, together with Iker and our team doctor, Pablo Díaz Munio, we've decided that it would be best for me to disembark here at the cape in order to speed up the recovery process, which would definitely be a lot slower on board and I might even risk not being at 100% for the next leg”, said Ñeti.

 

The main aim now is for the Spaniard to recover as soon as possible from the injury, which with rest could take just a couple of weeks to get over, and as Iker Martínez pointed out: “As always, it takes much longer to get over these things on the boat, and even though he's fairly ok now, we can't risk him getting injured again because he wasn't back up to 100%. Stopping off for these repairs has meant the possibility of him not finishing the leg with us, which is a real shame for us and for him, but looking at where we are on the leg it's best for him to make a complete recovery and be back in shape for the training ahead of the in-port in Itjaí. The doctors say there's no reason he can't be back to full strength in ten days or two weeks, which is how long it'll take us to sail up to Brazil, so we've taken the safest option”.

 

Known as the perpetual optimist on board, the Spaniard has taken a glass-half-full approach, which the Basque skipper also referred to when he spoke about the decision: “Ñeti is doing well and is in good spirits and you can all imagine that he, more than anyone, is really disappointed at not being able to complete the leg, but it's definitely the right choice for the future”.

 

Ñeti Cuervas-Mons will fly directly to Itajaí (Brazil) with the rest of the shore crew to begin treatment as soon as possible, allowing him to get back into the crew routine as swiftly as he can.

 

PROVISIONAL RANKINGS LEG 5*

*Final position report before “Telefónica” suspended racing

 

AUCKLAND (NEW ZEALAND) – ITAJAÍ (BRAZIL): 6,705 miles

Day 14 – 03:00 UTC – 31st March 2012

 

1. Groupama sailing team (Franck Cammas), 1,731.6 miles from finish

2. Puma Ocean Racing (Ken Read), +36.3 miles from leader

3. Team Telefónica (Iker Martínez), +191.1 miles

4. Camper with Emirates Team New Zealand (Chris Nicholson), +1,397.6 miles

5. Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing (Ian Walker), +1,740.4 miles

6. Team Sanya (Mike Sanderson), DNF

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Tele Buzzed by the Chilean Navy

Leg 5 Day 14

 

We only have a few hours left before we go into the pit lane. The boat is still going well, and in fact we're in front of the projected time for the stop. That's a good sign, because if we weren't going so well, we'd have to slow down a lot.

 

We've just had a pleasant communication with the Chilean navy. They have been in contact with us and we didn't know where they were. Well, it was a plane that spotted us. They passed very close to us and even took some photos from the plane! They asked us the typical questions: who we were, where we were going and stopping, the speed of the boat, etc, although I'm sure they had us well under control.

 

As Capey said yesterday, it seems we're going to pass the Cape at night. That's a shame for those of us who have never been there before, because we wanted a photo -- our first rounding of the mythical Cape Horn. We'll see what we can do to reflect the moment.

 

 

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Puma has now closed to within 2.5 miles of Groupama as they head into what appear to be flukey wind patterns.

 

Hard to say what will pay off for the next 100 or so miles but being East looks promising.

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Puma has now closed to within 2.5 miles of Groupama as they head into what appear to be flukey wind patterns.

 

Hard to say what will pay off for the next 100 or so miles but being East looks promising.

 

Yes, the race up the east coast is rife with potential.

And, if either of the leaders have a problem (known to happen!) Tele slips into 2nd place for this leg.

 

Who would have guessed?

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Puma has now closed to within 2.5 miles of Groupama as they head into what appear to be flukey wind patterns.

 

Hard to say what will pay off for the next 100 or so miles but being East looks promising.

 

Puma has certainly stepped up their game . Go big Cat !

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Puma has certainly stepped up their game . Go big Cat !

 

 

 

Whoops!

 

 

Puma now 9 miles ahead of Groupama.

 

And we have a new leader , for now :) I think there will be quite a few more lead changes in the very near future. Good fun .

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Puma has certainly stepped up their game . Go big Cat !

 

 

 

Whoops!

 

 

Puma now 9 miles ahead of Groupama.

 

And we have a new leader , for now :) I think there will be quite a few more lead changes in the very near future. Good fun .

And we have 2 leaders at this time, not for long...

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Solo sailors onboard Groupama :D

Good rest for 10 guys after Cape Horn.

 

 

 

 

 

Ah, double-bunking on April Fools day.

 

Very French.

 

Vey April Fools day

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So-so April Fool effort by Pierre dry.gif

 

Good one, IMO. Had my hungover ass totally fooled. Tel Aviv stop over. Air lift to Kuwait. Good stuff.

 

WetHog

 

Yea, but for the SF Volvo stopover he forget the BBQ at Larry Ellison's place!

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Richard Gladwell (www.sail-world.com) has today come out with a critical piece on the VOR.

 

60% of the boats not racing etc etc

 

Thinks the old days might have been better.

 

Using elapsed time for sailing around the world.

 

And shows how Camper arriving 4th in Itajai only costs the points acquired by winning the Akld in-port race.

 

Is suggesting the in-port/ocean-leg points ratio might be screwball

 

www.sail-world.com

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The VOR has prizes for everything.

 

Including the video guys.

 

On Camper, the Hamish Hooper reports have been good. His coverage of Dr. Trae stitching Pammenter's lip was very good.

 

And their "cocktail party" - with all the deeply fascinating reading material - very kiwi.

 

But today's Groupama solo watchkeeping/double-bunking video is very funny and French.

Notice Puma in the picture over the shoulder of the helmsman.

 

"Having only one person on deck cuts down windage ....... "

 

Yeah ... right!

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Groupama and Puma will catch a new low pressure soon that will bring them close to the arrival. IMO, Groupama was resting a bit after the Horn, both will now put the turbo until the end...

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Telefonica, 137 miles gained in 24 hh.

We can dream!

 

Given the weather conditions we're sure to see a compression at the front of the fleet and a tactical fight from there on out.

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Telefonica, 137 miles gained in 24 hh.

We can dream!

 

Given the weather conditions we're sure to see a compression at the front of the fleet and a tactical fight from there on out.

 

 

Tele still 9 or 10 knots faster than the blokes up front.

 

Might be time for Groupama to rouse those double bunkers!!!

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So, as they approach Itajai, it will be Ken Read (lot of AC experience with Dennis) versus Cammas (right now, maybe the hotest offshore racer in the world).

 

Over on the other coast Camper have developed confidence in their shoring and are now doing 15k - not the old upper limit of 12 knots.

 

Maybe they can smell the steak at Puerto Montt?

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Rob Salthouse gives a sobering accountof Camper damage and plans - on the TNZ blog.

 

http://etnzblog.com/#!2012/04/video-the-southern-ocean-lived-up-to-its-reputation

 

With 60 to 70 knots forecast for the Horn, he thinks Puerto Montt is the better deal.

Video shows some of the Camper damage.

 

In all his yrs. racing offshore, Rob has not seen seas like those on this leg.

 

But says the damage was caused when dropping off one extra big wave.

 

He looks refreshed and healthy in this post!

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Leaders sailing into a hole and Telefonica is back in it. That team is getting all the breaks this edition.

 

WetHog :ph34r:

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Leaders sailing into a hole and Telefonica is back in it. That team is getting all the breaks this edition.

 

WetHog :ph34r:

 

Sorry hoggie, but I'm really rooting for Telefornicator to get up the front-runners and pip them cool.gif

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^ Why doesn't Camper just do the same?

Camper can collect fourth place points when they finish in Brazil. Do the points math.

Understood, but if they do take 4th then how does that help their overall standings? Can ETNZ still prove they are The Team To Beat, worth huge sponsorship?

 

It may almost be better to just go for the number of individual leg wins / podiums, from that respect. Forget this leg and forget the overall standings; ship to Miami to get in the best shape possible for the remaining legs? They must surely be weighing that option.

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^ Why doesn't Camper just do the same?

Camper can collect fourth place points when they finish in Brazil. Do the points math.

Understood, but if they do take 4th then how does that help their overall standings? Can ETNZ still prove they are The Team To Beat, worth huge sponsorship?

 

It may almost be better to just go for the number of individual leg wins / podiums, from that respect. Forget this leg and forget the overall standings; ship to Miami to get in the best shape possible for the remaining legs? They must surely be weighing that option.

 

That's why you're stuck in front of a keyboard bashing out crap every waking hour, instead of being in charge of a VOR campaign.

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http://etnzblog.com/#!2012/04/puerto-camper-ready-to-roll

 

 

.. Once the ultra sound survey is signed off we will get into in the actual repair job. The process involves turning all of Rob Salthouse’s great work into dust, marking out where the replacement structure will align back into the boat, and then physically fitting in the replacement parts and bonding them to the boat. It will be a 5 stage process trying to rotate work areas so that we are not held up with cure times of glues and resin.

 

We are hoping we can get this all done in three days and will also want to fire some heat into the boat for up to 8 hours to help with any post curing that we can get done. In reality the post cure is not optional.

 

 

 

 

 

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^ Why doesn't Camper just do the same?

Camper can collect fourth place points when they finish in Brazil. Do the points math.

Understood, but if they do take 4th then how does that help their overall standings? Can ETNZ still prove they are The Team To Beat, worth huge sponsorship?

 

It may almost be better to just go for the number of individual leg wins / podiums, from that respect. Forget this leg and forget the overall standings; ship to Miami to get in the best shape possible for the remaining legs? They must surely be weighing that option.

Huh! You want Camper to abandon a certain 15 points for finishing the leg fourth and another potential 6 points for an in-port win in Itajai, plus as many as another potential 30 points up for grabs for the leg to Miami.

 

Assuming Puma wins this leg, Groupama is second and Telefonica third, the overall points standings would be as follows: 1. Telefonica, 142; 2. Groupama, 132; 3. Camper, 119; 4. Puma, 113. So, Camper in third overall, just 24 points out of first place. And that's before the protest hearing over Telefonica's sails which could cost them points.

 

Sure they'll be weighing all the options but the first and abiding option will be getting back in the game ASAP.

 

 

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http://etnzblog.com/...r-ready-to-roll

 

 

.. Once the ultra sound survey is signed off we will get into in the actual repair job. The process involves turning all of Rob Salthouse's great work into dust, marking out where the replacement structure will align back into the boat, and then physically fitting in the replacement parts and bonding them to the boat. It will be a 5 stage process trying to rotate work areas so that we are not held up with cure times of glues and resin.

 

We are hoping we can get this all done in three days and will also want to fire some heat into the boat for up to 8 hours to help with any post curing that we can get done. In reality the post cure is not optional.

Looks as if you've answered your own speculation about abandoning two legs!

 

The big unknown they could trip on is hidden damage that is not yet apparent. But the ultra sound exam should answer that question.

 

 

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I see Camper has suspended racing at the entrance to the long, broad sound that leads to Puerto Montt. They've got 100 miles to go before they hit port. Wonder if the shore team arranged a big fast towboat to reel 'em in as fast as possible and deliver them out there again when repairs complete.

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While the leaders head into very uncertain wind conditions - not sure I agree with their tactics but I also don't have their weather forecasting data to look at.

 

I'd think heading east might provide more favorable conditions to the finish as going up the coast looks light for the next 300 miles and leaves them no other option.

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The big unknown they could trip on is hidden damage that is not yet apparent. But the ultra sound exam should answer that question.

 

 

The other worry would be weather when they make it to the Horn.

 

The other guys got around just in time.

 

Not easy. But not outrageous.

 

Camper will want to reach Itajai in time for the in-port race.

 

So they will be in a bit of a hurry.

 

Long way to motor up (and back down) the fjord.

 

But I like the sound of kiwi expats in Chile lending a hand.

 

Kia kaha!

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Good question, but if they have 3 days scheduled for repairs and they intend to resume racing they certainly need to hustle.

Yup and if they want their South American steak dinners before heading for Miami they may have to settle for Chilean beef instead of Argentinian.

 

Just checked Camper's distance to go. The chart plotter shows it as 143 miles.

 

 

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While the leaders head into very uncertain wind conditions - not sure I agree with their tactics but I also don't have their weather forecasting data to look at.

 

I'd think heading east might provide more favorable conditions to the finish as going up the coast looks light for the next 300 miles and leaves them no other option.

 

Less current maybe

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Just checked Camper's distance to go. The chart plotter shows it as 143 miles.

 

 

 

Compared to the Tele "in-the-water" job, Camper arrangements sound major.

 

Hence, they have acquired containers and set up workshops etc etc.

 

First cut/grind/hack away the Rob Salthouse repair job.

 

Next, fit in new pieces. Err, um, are they an exact fit? Exact?

 

Prepare the bonding material (glue), insert the pieces and bob's your uncle!

 

Before the boat sails for Itajai stash a supply of carbon tube - of different lengths - that, in lieu of 4 x 2s - can be used to hold patching material in place.

 

And give the lads thin plywood cut into different shapes and sizes.

 

And, for god's sake and ours, give Rob Salthouse fishing lures tailored to local (Chilean) conditions. .

 

Recharge batteries on cordless tools, buy some fish and chips and go.

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ANDREW CAPE: "THERE IS PLENTY OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR SOMETHING TO HAPPEN"

04-03-2012 10:00

 

We’ve got to be brutally honest really, it’s just been blind luck really. But we’re back in it, we’re here, and we’re not going to give up. There’s still a long way to go and things are never perfect around here so, there’s plenty of opportunities for something to happen, don’t ask me which way, good or bad, but they’re there.

 

The next 24 hours is not fantastic, it’s just upwind for quite a long way. But once we’re settled in, we’ll just plug away at it. When it lines us, the variability that might come with that means you take one side or the other, getting lucky again or getting the right side could determine who is the winner.

 

I’m sure they’re sailing at 110 per cent, but they are sailing each other because they don’t want to give the other boat a chance, so it does give us an opportunity to sail differently. Being in a different place, with forecasts that aren’t quite perfect means we’re in a pretty good place.

 

It’s certainly easier, the pressure’s not there. It doesn’t matter if we lose 100 miles now, where as if you lose 100 miles when you’re in front its really bad, and it’s really depressing. So we’re in a good position.

 

http://www.teamtelefonica.com/en/logbook

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Dalton Chile-bound for Camper pep talk

 

 

Grant Dalton is on his way to Chile to boost the morale of his Camper sailing team, due to arrive in port tomorrow for significant repairs to their round-the-world boat.

Does it look like he's ready for a pep talk ?

Link

post-24261-077732500 1333468996_thumb.jpg

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Dalton Chile-bound for Camper pep talk

 

 

Grant Dalton is on his way to Chile to boost the morale of his Camper sailing team, due to arrive in port tomorrow for significant repairs to their round-the-world boat.

 

Although I would have preferred a situation where the boat did not break, as a kiwi, I am VERY proud of the guys on Camper.

 

The "delivery" voyage to Chile has been long and frustrating. But, even in the face of adversity, they have maintained their good humour and laconic sense of the absurd.

 

The Salthouse fishing lure, the Dr Trae "cocktail party" (with compelling reading materials) and other "events" all point to an ability to stay stoic and think on the bright side.

 

It would have been very easy to skip this leg and catch a ship to Itajai (or Miami).

But, instead, they will tackle the long (and possibly arduous) haul to the Horn and scamper up the other side.

 

Then, ah hem, they will go out and win the Itajai in-port race.

 

A few days ago I found a mint copy of Ed Hillary's "Nothing Venture, Nothing Win" (London: Travel Book Club, 1975) and re-read it.

 

So often Hillary, Lowe et al were told "it is impossible". But insisted on finding out for themselves.

 

Grant will not be giving pep talks. These guys need a steak, not a pep talk.

 

But he will be on the phone figuring out what comes next.

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Dalton Chile-bound for Camper pep talk

 

 

Grant Dalton is on his way to Chile to boost the morale of his Camper sailing team, due to arrive in port tomorrow for significant repairs to their round-the-world boat.

Does it look like he's ready for a pep talk ?

Link

Boat was 26 miles from the dock at last report nearly three hours ago. Should be alongside now.

 

Pep talk about what, I wonder? One for pushing the boat too hard in the Southern Ocean while leading. That's worth 30 lashes. And another encouraging them to push too hard to get to Itajai on time, along with a promised keel-hauling if they break it again!

 

Just guessing Dalts will be most concerned about other damage that may show up on out-of-the water inspection, ultra sound, etc. If damage is more severe than currently assessed and if they can't get to Itajai on time he will at least be on hand to oversee the latest logistical repair/transport nightmare.

 

 

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Dalton Chile-bound for Camper pep talk

 

 

Grant Dalton is on his way to Chile to boost the morale of his Camper sailing team, due to arrive in port tomorrow for significant repairs to their round-the-world boat.

Does it look like he's ready for a pep talk ?

Link

Boat was 26 miles from the dock at last report nearly three hours ago. Should be alongside now.

 

Pep talk about what, I wonder? One for pushing the boat too hard in the Southern Ocean while leading. That's worth 30 lashes. And another encouraging them to push too hard to get to Itajai on time, along with a promised keel-hauling if they break it again!

 

Just guessing Dalts will be most concerned about other damage that may show up on out-of-the water inspection, ultra sound, etc. If damage is more severe than currently assessed and if they can't get to Itajai on time he will at least be on hand to oversee the latest logistical repair/transport nightmare.

 

Following the race each day it seems like it's taken them forever to get there, and I'm sure they think the same.

 

It will be interesting to get the prognosis on the damage - we have a pretty good idea of ADOR, a little info on Tele, etc. Three days of repairs, if accurate, is a fair amount of work. I'm guessing their was secondary damage of some form if they were blowing longitudinal's given the conditions.

 

The recent report from ADOR was a little concerning - as was the repair itself.

 

 

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The recent report from ADOR was a little concerning - as was the repair itself.

 

Please say more ..... !

"Concerning."

About what?

 

Starting from April 2nd;

 

It’s our third day, since the repair work was finished, of FRO (fractional zero) running. With an average speed of over 17 knots now and a continually worsening sea state, we have begun hearing some new funky sounds coming from the compromised panel. We can only speculate, but many of us believe it is the superfluous glue that is cracking when the panel flexes and others believe that the outer skin may be compressing on the core material more. Either way we remain confident that the repair is strong, but know that constant monitoring is still necessary.

 

 

April 3rd;

In order to further test our repairs we have gybed over, placing the compromised side in the water and exposing it to more flexing. The sounds have been a bit different to say the least, but most of them are coming from the support beams that are still settling into their anchor points. It is clear however that the flexing is significantly different from the starboard side of the boat. We are also not sure if the damage has spread any further or affected the outer skin. Calmer seas should allow us to have more a tap around tomorrow.

 

April 3rd;

On starboard the damaged area is fully immersed and subject to far higher slamming loads which put far more load on the damaged area and its supporting struts. The cracking noises are quite unnerving when the boat does slam, but I console myself with the belief that the noise is coming from the struts and not the hull itself.

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April 3rd;

On starboard the damaged area is fully immersed and subject to far higher slamming loads which put far more load on the damaged area and its supporting struts. The cracking noises are quite unnerving when the boat does slam, but I console myself with the belief that the noise is coming from the struts and not the hull itself.

 

Thank you.

 

Yes, it is a worry.

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Dalton Chile-bound for Camper pep talk

 

 

Grant Dalton is on his way to Chile to boost the morale of his Camper sailing team, due to arrive in port tomorrow for significant repairs to their round-the-world boat.

Does it look like he's ready for a pep talk ?

Link

Boat was 26 miles from the dock at last report nearly three hours ago. Should be alongside now.

 

Pep talk about what, I wonder? One for pushing the boat too hard in the Southern Ocean while leading. That's worth 30 lashes. And another encouraging them to push too hard to get to Itajai on time, along with a promised keel-hauling if they break it again!

 

Just guessing Dalts will be most concerned about other damage that may show up on out-of-the water inspection, ultra sound, etc. If damage is more severe than currently assessed and if they can't get to Itajai on time he will at least be on hand to oversee the latest logistical repair/transport nightmare.

 

Following the race each day it seems like it's taken them forever to get there, and I'm sure they think the same.

 

It will be interesting to get the prognosis on the damage - we have a pretty good idea of ADOR, a little info on Tele, etc. Three days of repairs, if accurate, is a fair amount of work. I'm guessing their was secondary damage of some form if they were blowing longitudinal's given the conditions.

 

The recent report from ADOR was a little concerning - as was the repair itself.

Agreed. However ETNZ seems pretty good with its reporting so we should hear more soon. Current tracker report shows 'em alongside.

 

I can't imagine how Abu Dhabi can make the next leg start, given the extent of the damage they reporting. Spectacular job on the temporary repair of the delam but clearly only temporary. Sounds like they may be facing a rebuild of a good chunk of the bow. Best option may be a boat ride to Miami and some serious work in a well-equipped yard.

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339 miles gained in 3 days.

73 miles to leaders, and very interesting routes to finish!

 

Very good sailors but incredibly lucky with the weather.

We could think they will now be in the same weather system, but it is not even the case so, even if the the 2 first seem better positioned, Tele could pass them with their eastern route.

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^ Yes, very nice

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Team New Zealand's damaged round the world entry Camper has arrived in Chile and work has begun on repairs to get it back into the race.

 

Camper finally reached Puerto Montt this morning after diverting there on March 25 when it suffered significant damage to its bow while leading leg five of the Volvo Ocean Race in huge seas in the Southern Ocean.

 

Skipper Chris Nicholson and his crew were met by a six-man shore crew headed by Neil Cox. Ultrasound technician Stefano Beltrando was also there to head a deep look at the damage to the hull.

 

Camper was immediately lifted out of the water for the inspection to begin. The repairs will start with replacing the bow.

contd http://i.stuff.co.nz/sport/other-sports/6692959/Camper-arrives-in-Chile-for-repairs-to-bow

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fresh

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It is very chilly in Chile.

 

We have had a very cold day on deck motoring up the Gulfo De Ancud, on our way to Puerto Montt.

 

Now we are here, I accept Will’s argument they aren’t fjord but rather some very nice sounds flanked on one side by the dramatic Andes mountains, with a few snow capped peaks which are responsible for the freezing wind coming down off them.

... http://etnzblog.com/#!2012/04/a-warm-welcome-in-chilly-chile

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