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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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Potter

BP Jules Verne.

1,235 posts in this topic

SO Loick and the team are off: BP site news

 

Is this an ideal window or are the team pushing to make an early attempt for 2 reasons? First one being that they are arly enough to have a second attempt if this does not work. The second one is that Loick has a lot on at the moment...maybe he just wants this out of the way?

 

Good Luck Brian and all on board!

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SO Loick and the team are off: BP site news

 

Is this an ideal window or are the team pushing to make an early attempt for 2 reasons? First one being that they are arly enough to have a second attempt if this does not work. The second one is that Loick has a lot on at the moment...maybe he just wants this out of the way?

 

Good Luck Brian and all on board!

 

I think both of these reasons are right. Peyron wants to be back to his AC project as soon as he can, and he said last week that even until the equator, they can come back to Brest and try again if the weather isn't good enough. and he knows that Bidegorry was fired because he didn't try enough!

small-logo.png

 

The weather may not be perfect, but with Peyron and such an amazing boat, anything can happen!

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Interview with Coville from yesterday going up right now - he is gutted to be missing it but happy for BP crew that they have 'a perfect window' says he. Stand by for the interview.

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Damn!. The weather window has closed, and Peyrion seems not to be going this time! :(

 

on twitter:

#tjv loick peyron : "on ne part pas"

small-logo.png

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Didn't get into BP5 too much with him, but in the few seconds we spend on it, it's clear he is gutted to miss the chance.

 

but this guy is one hell of a character. No wonder the girls scream when he walks by on the docks in France.

 

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/31595329?byline=0&portrait=0" width="551" height="406" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="

Coville, Groupama helmsman, on the Eve of the Volvo Ocean Race Start</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/sailinganarchy">On The Water Anarchy</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

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Notified on facebook that they are finally off on the quest but the web site does not seem to have a tracker feed up yet? Anyone know the link as this is one I do not want to miss! There is also a damn good chance of the first 24 hour 1000NM run! happening during their ccircumnavigation. Oh boy this is going to be somthing very special. Cheers all.

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Notified on facebook that they are finally off on the quest but the web site does not seem to have a tracker feed up yet? Anyone know the link as this is one I do not want to miss! There is also a damn good chance of the first 24 hour 1000NM run! happening during their ccircumnavigation. Oh boy this is going to be somthing very special. Cheers all.

 

According to what I read, BP5 will be leaving Brest before 4 pm UTC (meaning, now) and get close to the starting line, then wait for the wind to fill in. They plan to really start sometime tonight.

 

I hope the tracker will be online as soon as they actually cross the line, and that should be a matter of hours

 

M

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One minute ago via FB: Le Depart est proche! (the start is close!)

Screen shot 2011-11-21 at 11.05.45 AM.png

Screen shot 2011-11-21 at 11.05.08 AM.png

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Great news! BP5 should cross the line this night.

It seems as if Loick Peyron waited until the AC45 races in San Diego, where his team did very well, were over to start his Jules Verne !! ;)

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Anyone have a link to a tracker?

 

Will be in there: website

 

Boat has left the marina 2 hours ago, but will wait the ideal starting time (sometime in the next 10 hours) offshore. Guess the tracker will be up on the website then;

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This will be cool.

 

Last time they fell behind early but I think they had just got in front of the record (theoretically) when disaster struck.

 

This boat can literally fly.

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Anyone have a link to a tracker?

 

Will be in there: website

 

Boat has left the marina 2 hours ago, but will wait the ideal starting time (sometime in the next 10 hours) offshore. Guess the tracker will be up on the website then;

 

Direct link: tracker

 

Started 8.31'.42" GMT on 11/22; time to beat 12/01/09 @ 16.15.34 GMT

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The quietest man in offshore sailing (Brian Thompson) thinks they may have the best slingshot start that they have seen in 3 seasons:

 

audio

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on BPV web page, Corum is the official time watcher of this attempt ;)

 

go go guys!

 

I love the picture above, Brittany is so nice withthis weather!

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Liveskipper Jules Verne Race is showing real time (I think) tracking of BP as well and you get the added bonus of being able to chase her as well!

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Merged threads.

 

Clean this should stay on Ocean Racing Anarchy! It belongs there

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Looks like they picked a great window, although it's a little narrow. Stays very close to shore all the way down to Cap Blanc. Blasting along at 30 knots and already 70 ahead of Groupama. Fun stuff!

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you're right roca. moving now.

 

disagree, first and formost a multi. Systems, set ups and tactic of interest to mutli people

mono sailers will mostly ridicule and judge what is an awesome attempt.

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First audio from Loic Peyron; you can find it here:

 

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/Maxi-Trimaran-Banque-Populaire-V/Jour-0-Le-Maxi-Banque-Populaire-V-dans-le-vif-du-sujet-5617.html#suite

 

Loose translation: (my comments in italic)

 

"A bit rough, from the start; the sea state is not lined up with the wind direction. We are making big jumps, so we calmed down the game a bit, but everything is fine. We are putting together an interesting little average speed above 30 knots (yes, he said LITTLE average speed ABOVE 30 KNOTS...), which is obviously well within the limits of the "baby"... But we must be fast! Because this is not an easy record to break.

 

It was almost ideal starting conditions; we left Brest yesterday night in a beautiful sunset, it was much simpler and the shore crew towed us until midnight, through the "Chenal du Four" (a famous pass in the middle of small islands and rocks, between the continent and Ushant); there was no wind at all. Then they released us, they were getting really cold, the poor guys... Then we waited until 8:00 AM, the wind was a bit late compared to the forecast, we were supposed to leave around 5:00 and we actually started around 8:00 AM Universal Time.

 

A lot of things went through our mind, we looked at each other and we wished ourselves a good trip. It is never "just a detail" to leave for an around the world trip; even less so on a Jules Vernes Trophy start line.

Start line that has been crossed by many great sailors, including my big brother, more than 20 years ago; the first one of a great list.

 

And then, right into it! Big waves, more than 30 knots boat speed, and we may even get some sunshine before the end of the day! But we are not sure about that...

 

Our luck is that a big low system centered itself over Gibraltar, and it is going to push us on the correct side of Madeira and Canary Islands, i.e. West of the islands; this is going to put us in the right spot to catch the Trade Winds. We should have a good angle with the Trade Winds to go towards the Equator.

The South Atlantic, from what Marcel Van Triest, our onshore navigator in the Baleares Island, and Juan Vila, our onboard navigator, can tell, should look pretty conventional. The St Helen high is really big right now, we will have to sail around it without an opportunity to shorten the route (Loic says "couper le fromage", in French sailor slang: "cut the cheese"!!!) but that's OK. It is better to have a conventional weather system with a more "fluid" situation (he means that there should not be sudden wind changes, etc) because we know that we are not lacking horsepower on this boat; we have the necessary power and the necessary boat speed."

 

The journalist: "how would you define your crew, the "osmose" (team bonding, you would say in English, I think...)that is forming within the crew and the skills of each crew member?"

 

"The "osmose" is already done, the crew has been together for a long time, for some of them, from the very beginning of the project. For instance, Jean-Baptiste Levaillant, sitting right beside me, made the sails and the sail plan; Kevin Escoffier (yes, he is the son of Franck-Yves Escoffier, the skipper of the Multi 50 "Crepes Whaou") is the on board engineer; (and so on...)

This "baby", with this crew has already broken all the great offshore sailing records, we are missing just one; the Jules Vernes Trophy. And we have just started a few hours ago, to tackle this one too! It is going to be a long road, but there is good spirit on board, even if it started without a "warm up round"! It was a bit stressful, because the boat was doing big wave jumps, we were a bit worried for the boat, but it calmed down a bit now, luckily. The best way to win the trophy, it's to finish the trip! And the best way to end everything quickly, unfortunately, it is to break something... so we have been very cautious, we took a second reef, to "cool off the game a bit". But even when we cool off the game a bit, we are still sailing at 35-36 knots, which is fascinating..."

 

In the video at some point, they are talking about the best choice for the head sail, and they refer to a sail, which I believe is the small genaker as "le petit string".

 

In French, a "petit string", it's this:

 

http://b9.img.v4.skyrock.net/b97/lusiffer/pics/434181483.jpg

 

 

Cheers,

 

Laurent

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Thanks Laurent,

 

Great to have you translating again.......

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Now if they could just catch those volvo boats,if there are any left to catch.:P

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you're right roca. moving now.

 

disagree, first and formost a multi. Systems, set ups and tactic of interest to mutli people

mono sailers will mostly ridicule and judge what is an awesome attempt.

I can't think of any sailors that would ridicule this record attempt. There's plenty of anti-multi sentiment out there, but not when it comes to the fastest truly oceangoing sailboat ever built.

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you're right roca. moving now.

 

disagree, first and formost a multi. Systems, set ups and tactic of interest to mutli people

mono sailers will mostly ridicule and judge what is an awesome attempt.

I can't think of any sailors that would ridicule this record attempt. There's plenty of anti-multi sentiment out there, but not when it comes to the fastest truly oceangoing sailboat ever built.

Green Boat - First and foremost an Offshore boat making an attempt on a Round the World Record. I don't give a toss if it is a multi or mono.

 

This report from Brian THompson late last night:

We are now tearing across the Bay of Biscay, boatspeed consistently above 30 knots since the start.

 

Not far from a gybe into Cape Finisterre, and the first part of the trip completed::

 

Its already starting to get slightly warmer on deck and we are just entering our second night at sea:

 

The first night was more peaceful, being towed around till midnight in a flat calm, and then hove to in light winds waiting for the wind to fill in at dawn.

 

The start was spectacular with rough seas off Ushant Island, the swell breaking on the overfalls and onto the jagged cliffs and outlying rocks.

 

Straight into the record we were doing 35 knots of speed with Loick on the helm, one reef, small gennaker and staysail..The seas were not too pleasant with a large swell on the beam, which gave some rough sailing for the boat and the crew.The seas are starting to line up with the wind now..We have gone to 2 reefs and then back to one reef.

 

The start reminded me of similar weather conditions when Orange1 started from Ushant, and after 10 minutes the top of their mast had broken off; and they had to pull out and repair it in 2 weeks, before restarting again..Florent Chastel, one of our bowman was on that trip, and it was good to chat about it..I also remember following it at the time, and then reading Nick Moloney's book 'Chasing the Dawn' about that adventure..

 

Hope you get this ok

 

Brian

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Let's pray that they can hold it together and not hit anything hard - like last time, like Sanya, like Cam did, etc.

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Hey Laurent, thanks for translating! I was thinking that the sea state was probably dominated by that big SW wind further offshore. It's fun to watch the wind forecast but since they're more limited by sea state than wind speed, it would be nice to see a sea state forecast also. Anybody know where to get that? And do the routers integrate sea state?

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The quietest man in offshore sailing (Brian Thompson) thinks they may have the best slingshot start that they have seen in 3 seasons:

 

audio

 

So far, so good, very good in fact.

 

How cool must it be to calmly consider heading off to average 24.5knots for the next 48 days!! (And that's from a mostly mono sailor)

 

 

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What do you think about Loick P, BP seem to be pinning there hopes on him,

I have been watching him since the ORMA's, he seems to have a "go get em" attitude

He certaintly has a outgoing attitude (good for ther media) for a french offshore sailer.

Can he "control" the power of the big tri and only unleash its power when necessary

 

Is it all a matter of luck (not breaking anything as seen on the Volvo boats in front of him),or management and control of the beast

with so much onshore involvement will he be able to have complete control ?

he also has a lot of experienced crew on board to draw on

40+ days is a lot of time to hold your breath.

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It is great to have Laurent back translating.

 

Thanks

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What do you think about Loick P, BP seem to be pinning there hopes on him,

I have been watching him since the ORMA's, he seems to have a "go get em" attitude

He certaintly has a outgoing attitude (good for ther media) for a french offshore sailer.

Can he "control" the power of the big tri and only unleash its power when necessary

 

Is it all a matter of luck (not breaking anything as seen on the Volvo boats in front of him),or management and control of the beast

with so much onshore involvement will he be able to have complete control ?

he also has a lot of experienced crew on board to draw on

40+ days is a lot of time to hold your breath.

 

IMO Loick is the best offshore multi sailor there is (maybe only Francos Joyon in the same class) and one of the best offshore sailors period. i always bound it a bit strange that they originally entrusted Pascal bidegorry with the project. The big French banks are not easy sponsor because their relationship to the skippers is more like an F1 team in that the skiper is hired to sail the boat rather than the skipper getting together with the sponsor. No less than Francis Joyon got the can by Groupama back in the day because they didn't like how he raced the boat. He had the last laugh tho because the boat (Groupama 1) was his and he came back in the next Transat and did a horizon job on the fleet.

 

Loick will have control for sure but I remember that Stan honey once said about racing on Groupama that the the French navigators are different from him. He spent all his time navigating hile the French guys would nav for a bit then they'd want to sail. So iwouldn't be surprised if they depend on their onshore navigators a lot relative to others. The crew is extremely experienced so that will help. I find it amazing that you can have so many skippers on one boat and there aren't more cock fight but these French sailors seem tres tranquille.

 

As for breaking the record it is all about the weather and not hitting anything i think. The designers and bulders had a lot of time to learn from the problems with Groupaam 3 so the boat should be pretty solid and there is not doubt that it is faster than G3. I reckon this boat is fast enough to jump a system in the south

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New video here.

 

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/multimedia/#/Maxi-Trimaran-Trophee-Jules-Verne-2011-2012-152/Resume-de-la-vacation-video-du-23-11-11-0/

 

Here is a summary of the discussion without all the blah-blah-blah, but still with the light stuff...

 

"

Hello, live from offshore of Portugal. We have a Swiss behind the wheel, and that's good, high precision is on board (tongue in cheek reference to the Swiss watch making tradition...).

 

We had some swells last night. We are sailing at 34-35 knots, mindbloggling speed on this boat. You have to hold on!

 

We had a few small problems this morning...

Jean-Baptiste Levaillant was in the small room at the front, where you go alone... and had some catastrophic problems, because it is moving a lot...

Then, Florent Chastel, preparing the lunch, spilled half of the food on the floor, and finally, Kevin Escoffier, here, holding the camera has been struggling for the past 3 hours so we can talk to you in good conditions. Everything has been solved, all is fine!!"

 

Journalist: "what is your weather forecast?"

 

"Wind is going to get lighter. We had strong wind from the start, 20-25-30 knots, but it is going to slow down. The whole crew is on deck, it is the change of shift, and we are going to take advantage of it to change from the small gennaker, to the medium gennaker. We will carry it until just North of Canary Island and then we will jibe in the beginning of the night, in about 12 hours. And then we will change it again for a bigger sail tomorrow morning.

 

So far, jibes have been OK. First one was in light air, the second one was in pitch dark last night, everything went well. Finally another one at the end of the night. You have to follow a whole procedure; you have to plan it. The main concern is to not damage the battens (he is pointing to the main sail at this point)"

 

Journalist: "we were looking at the video of the start, and you seemed pretty relaxed on the start line, and you still are, right now..."

 

"yeah... it is relaxed but focused, I would say... For instance, Thierry Chabagny, sitting beside me, has the gennaker sheet in his hand. All the time. And when he is not on it, someone else will be on it. You have to trust each other; and we do trust each other; you have to, and because we trust each other, the atmosphere on board is good."

 

Journalist: "do you still discover new things about the boat?"

 

"Not really, and it is good news. We know the boat. We know each other. The only thing that is different is that the boat is really heavy. We have food for 45 days. (45 days?... Hmmmm, is this the target?). So we have to ease a bit, we have to breath with the boat. Simply put, we have to respect the boat."

 

Journalist: "you were part of the comittee that created the Jules Vernes Trophy, so is it a dream come true, today?"

 

"you're right. Really I am too spoiled a kid. I get an already existing toy. Often, you start from a blank sheet of paper, an idea, and then it is years of effort, to build the project, share it with others, and finally get on the water. The preparation aspect is fascinating, by the way... But in this project, I did not participate at all in this phase of the project, but I am very lucky..."

 

Journalist: "what's for lunch?" (hey, French journalist with French crew, we have to talk food at some point...)

 

"Florent prepared lunch, let's ask him. Ha, he is going to the leeside..."

 

Loic turns around to talk to Yvan Ravussin on the wheel "be careful!! someone is on the leeside!!" (relaxed and easygoing, but still, you have to be careful for everything....)

 

"Couscous, chicken" answered Kevin Escoffier.

 

"Give me the camera; I want to show you Kevin, the man behind the camera. Without him, you would not have videos. I am trying to hold the camera; I am his trainee. It is an incredible job..."

 

Blah-blah-blah...

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Wow, now that is a real jump start! off the Canaries allready!!! and doing 30+kts in 15 kts of wind!!! Woops, almost wet my pants just thinking about it. Keep a bloody good lookout Loick,dont hit anything please. We look forward to seeing that dammned elusive 1000NM's in 24 hours and the Jules verne record where it rightly belongs. With you all the way in spirit and online, Cheers to Captain Loick and all the crew from downunder in the Whitsundays Australia.

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The boys on the Volvos are getting excited about gettin a 600 mile day,while the big tri is cruising through 700 and the talk is about maybe a 1000 mile day.Love it.There are going to be some great stories and vids coming up in the next few weeks.Good luck to all involved.

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Many thanks for the translation Laurent!

 

There is no question about the ability of Loick and the rest of crew to get the boat around the world. The success or failure of this attempt, as with pretty much all of the recent ones, will depend on whether or not they hit something.

 

As for the 600nm/day average, that must be a guesstimate based on the distance they are likely to sail, no? G3's average over the course is listed as 18.7 knots. Is the difference between the minimum course distance and the actual distance sailed really 25%?

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From Big Bad Bri:

Hi Guys

 

What a pleasure to be on this speeding machine .Last watch I drove for an hour with speed between 30 to 40 knots and a top speed of 42..Small gennaker, staysail and one reef in the main in26 knots of wind. My top speed everon this boat was 45 knots last year, and the boats top speed is 47 when it did the Transatlantic Record in 3.5 days.

 

Now wind still 23 to 26 knots but sea calning a little so slightly less of a rodeo ride on board, or perhaps we are getting used to it! ..We changed from the small to the medium gennaker at noon, anticipating the wind dropping to 20 knots tonight, as we get closer to the Canaries..

 

Changing clothing as well, am now just wearing Musto light thermals under the Musto foul weather gear, Its still very wet on deck with the bows sending back jets of spray to the cockpit. Have not put on boots yet, just light shoes with Goretex socks, will save my boots for the Southern Ocean!

 

Brian.

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Kevin Escoffier (yes, he is the son of Franck-Yves Escoffier, the skipper of the Multi 50 "Crepes Whaou")

 

On a different note. Are these Escoffiers related to the late, great French chef Auguste Escoffier?

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Many thanks for the translation Laurent!

 

There is no question about the ability of Loick and the rest of crew to get the boat around the world. The success or failure of this attempt, as with pretty much all of the recent ones, will depend on whether or not they hit something.

 

As for the 600nm/day average, that must be a guesstimate based on the distance they are likely to sail, no? G3's average over the course is listed as 18.7 knots. Is the difference between the minimum course distance and the actual distance sailed really 25%?

 

The 600 nm/day that Auscat is referring to is the world 24 hr record for a monohull. Actually it is just shy of 600, and held by one of the VOR 70 from the previous edition of the Volvo Ocean Race; it was done in the same area of the world; South Atlantic, on their way to Cape Town.

 

For multihulls, BP 5 is the holder with 907 nm (iirc). They did that on their successful North Atlantic record, from Ambrose Light to Cap Lizard... in less than 100 hours total...

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Kevin Escoffier (yes, he is the son of Franck-Yves Escoffier, the skipper of the Multi 50 "Crepes Whaou")

 

On a different note. Are these Escoffiers related to the late, great French chef Auguste Escoffier?

 

Don't know!!!

 

I don't think that chicken and couscous would have been part of his menu, anyway...

 

Franck-Yves, Kevin's father, has been very successful with Crepes Wahou. He pretty much single handedly kept the multi 50 class alive for several years, and got others involved and sold his older boats to create a minimum number of participants. It is now reaching a minimal critical mass with Maitre Jacques (his former boat, iirc), Actual, Prince de Bretagne, and his new boat. It is funny to see that most of the sponsors are small to mid-size French company in the food industry (except Actual)...

 

Franck-Yves is not even a professional sailor!! His primary job is fisherman... He owns his fishing boat, I believe, based in Saint Malo.

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Many thanks for the translation Laurent!

 

There is no question about the ability of Loick and the rest of crew to get the boat around the world. The success or failure of this attempt, as with pretty much all of the recent ones, will depend on whether or not they hit something.

 

As for the 600nm/day average, that must be a guesstimate based on the distance they are likely to sail, no? G3's average over the course is listed as 18.7 knots. Is the difference between the minimum course distance and the actual distance sailed really 25%?

 

The 600 nm/day that Auscat is referring to is the world 24 hr record for a monohull. Actually it is just shy of 600, and held by one of the VOR 70 from the previous edition of the Volvo Ocean Race; it was done in the same area of the world; South Atlantic, on their way to Cape Town.

 

For multihulls, BP 5 is the holder with 907 nm (iirc). They did that on their successful North Atlantic record, from Ambrose Light to Cap Lizard... in less than 100 hours total...

 

The Brian Thompson audio clip (or maybe it was a blog post of his? not sure) talks about aiming for an average speed of about 24.5 knots, or just under 600nm per day.

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Advantage down from 267.8 at 2:45 to 81.8 at 17:45

Less wind, a very bad cap results in awful vmg

At those speeds 200 miles is (almost) nothing.

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Audio from the 24th of November from Loick.

 

You can find it here.

 

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/multimedia/#/Maxi-Trimaran-Trophee-Jules-Verne-2011-2012-152/Vacation-audio-du-24-11-11-Loick-Peyron-Trophee-Jules-Verne/

 

 

"We are under the sun of Canaries Island, not the trade winds yet but definitely a tropical climate. Wind is going to lighten up, so we will ventilate the boat a bit and clean up ourselves, because it starts to smell funny... We will also check the boat from tip of the mast to bottom of the dagger board, or almost. The boat has been pushed really hard for the past 2 days, maintaining an amazing average speeds.

It is going to slow down and we will loose some of our lead, for the next 4 hours, because we are not heading towards South but West instead. We are investing towards West. We have the Azores High on our NW. We are sailing on its South border. Our goal is to get to a point where the wind is not too light but turns from N to E. Then we will jibe to Port tack and head South, and we hope to avoid as well the dead wind zone on the leeside of the Canaries Island. That is why we avoided to sail through the archipelago.

We should be at the Equator in 3 or 4 days. We might be able to match GP3 time to the Equator, but maybe not the record, but that's OK. That's not our ultimate goal.

On the other hand South Atlantic looks good and Marcel Van Triest thinks that we will be in good shape at the Cape. We should be ontime, without pushing the boat too hard.

We need 3 or 4 more hours of patience, during which we will progress at zero miles towards the goal!!! But don't worry; nothing to worry about...."

 

Cheers,

 

Laurent

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The website seems to be down - can anyone confirm this?

 

42kn boat speed ohmy.gif

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The website seems to be down - can anyone confirm this?

 

42kn boat speed ohmy.gif

The website is up, the advantage dropped to 63Nm, then when they gybed south, they started opening it up slowly.

 

GP3 seemed to have a pretty good run past the Equator, but were pretty far west, almost at the beaches of Brazil through the first bit of the S Atlantic. Maybe an opportunity to increase the lead.

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BP5 is starting to accelerate again! 27 kn this morning and a 127 nm advantage.

 

This is much better than the last day, when their daily average dropped to a measly 520 miles. ;)

 

But seriously, the winds don't seem very strong for the next days. Anyone has done a route simulation to determine the time to equator?

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FromBrian last night:

 

In this first 48 hours of this record attempt, we have made progress that is verging on the ridiculous - 2 days to the Canaries is surreal.. It's already shorts and T shirt weather, the tradewinds are starting to waft us southwards, and puffy white clouds punctuate the bright blue sky..

 

On Cheyenne when we prepared for the record in 2003 (?) our parameters for starting were to take 4 days to the Canaries. Now on Banque Pop our requirement is to be less than 6 days at the equator, and we are already looking ahead at the weather at the Cape of Good Hope..

 

We have made great progress on our phantom ship - Groupama. over the last 2 days, but today as we gybe to the west we will be loosing some of that gain, but no worries, we are all very happy to get down to here so fast, and this is when Groupama were at high speed..

 

Earlier this morning we went past the island of Santa Cruz de la Palma, and it was a bonus to see some land, I was not expecting to see terra firma till Cape Horn..there was a flurry of activity to send texts home, but I was driving at the time so just missed the signal. Does not last long at 25 knots..

 

The wind has, as expected, started to fall as we get close to the High Pressure, so the exciting, powered up, firehouse experience has been replaced with more finesse sailing, trying to coax 25 knots of speed out of 15 knots of wind. We now for the first time have the full main and the big gennaker up..

 

So now it feels like we are out of the North Atlantic and into the tropical, or at least tradewind Atlantic, so should be some holiday sailing until the doldrums..

 

Brian.

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I've been revisiting G3 vs O II ghost at 2010 attempt by Groupama and here are some rough high-lights

 

day 00 : 0

day 06 : + 670

day 11 : 0

day 12 : - 400

day 18 : - 450

day 23 : 0

day 27 : + 560

day 35 : 0

day 41 : - 538

day 44 : 0

day 46 : + 850

day 48: +1480

 

at the end Bruno took it "easy" because of some material issues and a lead of about 10 days over Cheyenne, so gaining 850 miles in 2 days is a bit to much, but never the less there were big changes all along.

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Fun video of a close encounter at 33kts with a condomaran here

 

Great video!

 

I'd love to see the other point of view; from the cruiser, watching the monster passing by...

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Note BP did the polite thing and passed them to leeward :P

 

M - not that it would have made much of a difference, considering...

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Note BP did the polite thing and passed them to leeward :P

 

M - not that it would have made much of a difference, considering...

 

im surprised that they would ever pass any boat to leeward.

 

Joe

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Great video!

BP5 was speeding at 34 kn, and the cat was at what, 5kn? That makes a 29 kn closing speed!! :)

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Looked over the crewlist for this attempt, lots of names I recognize, non for being an asshole :)

3 I know from the past, and thoose ar all guys you would trust your live too (but only onboard, not in the pub...)

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Passing to leeward gives you the freedom to come down if pressure increases.

 

Check out Geant's bear away at 2:50 here. With Orange just where they don't really want them (OK, so there's a certain amount of foreshortening, but still.)

 

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The website seems to be down - can anyone confirm this?

 

42kn boat speed ohmy.gif

This gets pretty close.

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Website up and running. 33knts @ 07.30 UTC and 290 miles ahead.

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Interesting, looks like they air aiming at a fairly Easterly crossing point for the Doldrums. The tracker wind overlay shows them aiming for a fairly decent crossing point opening up in about 18 hours. Anyone with a better weather forecast seeing the same thing? Looks like it will give them a lot of leverage over G3 when they get back into the tradewinds on the the other side if it works out.

 

There is a low pressure system shown building at 72 hours but catching it will require stringing together some 800+ mile days, will be interesting to see if they go for it or line up for the next one.

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Here is the audio translation of the 25th of November.

 

"

A lot of sail change this morning. There is more wind than expected, and of an unusual direction, from the SE, coming from Senegal. So we can get a higher speed than expected and that helps us to get towards the West which is a good idea to get away from the wind shadow of the Cabo Verde Islands. We will be offshore those islands in the middle of the night.

We are ahead of our original forecast.We just passed a small cruising catamaran and we must have given them a cold, just by our speed wind blow!

 

The faster we go, the smaller the surface area, we went from full main and medium gennaker at the end of the night, to one reef and only the staysail upfront. We are just now releasing the reef. We are sailing at 35-36 knots, and it is not easy to slow down this magnificent vessel. Having an average speed above 30 knots, I have never seen that before, of course...

We could get to the Equator in less than 5 1/2 days, if everything goes well.Sleeping is not easy; it moves a lot and we have only 3 1/2 hrs off for sleeping; so everybody is doing "flash naps". The simple manouvre requires at least 8 people; so it is busy.

The stress is mostly about braking the boat. We trust each other, but we are worried about hitting something... Knock on wood. There is some wood on this carbon fiber machine!! Around the navigation table...

 

The noise of the water rushing around the hull is not that high, because this boat is so big that we have a floor that isolate us from that noise, with a storage area underneath it...

 

We will be far in the west of Cabo Verde Islands, to avoid wind shadows and to get in the right postion for going to the Equator.

"

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I would also like to say thank you to Laurent for the time taken to run the translations for us. Nice work.

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If you keep thanking me, I'll keep translating!

 

A new audio from today, November 26th, not from Loick this time, but from Florent Chastel, number one on board. (2 Jules Vernes under his belt already...); some interesting details on the layout of the boat (you will notice the number of bunks compared to the number of sailors on board; sounds like a submarine setup of the hot bunk...

 

You can find the audio here:

 

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/Maxi-Trimaran-Banque-Populaire-V/Jour-4-Prets-pour-la-chasse-aux-grains-5709.html#suite

 

 

 

"

We have just decided to change our point of crossing of the Doldrums. The weather gurus found a tiny spot where we should be able to squeeze through, so we are going a little bit more up wind, about 100-110° from the wind, 20 knots of wind, and 33 knots boat speed... Sea state is nice, so the boat does not slam, we are getting to average speeds that are mind boggling. I can't get used to it. As soon as there is a bit of wind, we're off! We sail over 30 knots, without hurting the boat. No need to push the boat like crazy; it's a marathon, after all... It's easy going and a pleasure to sail this way.

 

We start to see clouds, but not too many yet. We are starting to get squalls, so we go from 0-10 knots of wind to 35-40 knots of wind; very unstable. We try to avoid the squalls, and that is where a boat like BP 5 is fabulous, we can play with the squalls and the clouds; head in or bear off to avoid them. We do not get surprised as it was still true a few years ago; we can avoid to get into big winds and accelerations and then get stuck under a big cloud, in the rain, with no wind... So the radars are on 24/7, and Juan is looking at that on the screens and we sail at an exact heading to one degree accuracy for the next few hours.

 

We have got taylor made sound cancelling ear mufflers to sleep (molded to their ears). But you have to find the good compromise to lower the noises so you can sleep, but not completely shut off the noises and not know what is going on with the boat.

 

Our living space is smaller than on the big catamarans. We went from 2 hulls to live in to only one. On top of that, for weight concerns, only a portion of it is usable. From the mast, aft. It's about 20 meters long.

At the front, the daggerboard trunk; with the toilets. Then aft, there is the sleeping area with 4 bunks and complete darkness for good rest; then aft, the kitchen, then the area where you get ready to go on deck with the oilskins, etc... a place where we meet everybody! Then aft the nav' station, and a few bunks for storage, and then completely aft some ballast tankage to lift the boat nose.

"

 

 

Then he explains the difference between true wind and apparent wind; I will not bother you with that...

 

"

We should have a very good timing at the Equator, but this is not our goal; our final goal is Ushant, but everything is fine, and the current progress is quite good.

"

 

Cheers,

 

Laurent

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Oui oui, merci Laurent. You would think that the BP website would be a bit more up to date with more detail quicker! Their english language snippet tells us they have started!!! However it is good french practise. That reminds me, have you heard about the Aussie kiss? It's just like the french kiss but downunder! Cheers all and go BP.

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If you keep thanking me, I'll keep translating!

 

Thank you very much!

 

Merci beaucoup Laurent!

 

It seems that they have slowed a lot recently, in comparison to GP3. The lead has dropped big time, hopefully now they are pretty much through the doldrums and further east with a better angle, they can grind out some miles until Brazil.

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If you keep thanking me, I'll keep translating!

 

Thank you very much!

 

Merci beaucoup Laurent!

 

It seems that they have slowed a lot recently, in comparison to GP3. The lead has dropped big time, hopefully now they are pretty much through the doldrums and further east with a better angle, they can grind out some miles until Brazil.

 

I can't access the multimedia page right now...

 

They seem to be through the Doldrums now. They should have steady wind until at least 25 degree South!

 

There is a good low pressure system showing up in 3 days by 30 South. The big question is: will they be able to catch it? In the past 3 days, they dropped 25 degrees South, knowing that it was not always steady and on one single tack. Can they do 5 more degrees in the same amount of time, in more stable conditions?...

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In the South now and making some time on the ghost of G3 (it certainly is a good race against the reference so far). Any thoughts on the Atlantic from here? Looks to me like they might be able to position themselves in front of the developing low at around 72 hours just looking at the tracker (no idea what wx model that is).

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Le Maxi Banque Populaire V a franchi l'équateur à 23h 26mn 52sec TU soit 00h26mn 52 sec heure française. Après 5j 14h 55mn 10sec, il réalise le record absolu sur la distance depuis Ouessant, sous réserve d'homologation par le WSSRC (World Sailing Speed Record Council).

 

Ushant - Equator in 5d 14h 55' 10''

 

2 years ago G3 made it in 5d 19h 10mn, so about 4h 15' difference.

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Le Maxi Banque Populaire V a franchi l'équateur à 23h 26mn 52sec TU soit 00h26mn 52 sec heure française. Après 5j 14h 55mn 10sec, il réalise le record absolu sur la distance depuis Ouessant, sous réserve d'homologation par le WSSRC (World Sailing Speed Record Council).

 

Ushant - Equator in 5d 14h 55' 10''

 

2 years ago G3 made it in 5d 19h 10mn, so about 4h 15' difference.

 

Ushant-Equator overall record was 5d 15h 23' from G3's 2009 aborted attempt (between Equator and Good hope) Only 28' difference there

 

Other records from Ushant to Good Hope, Leeuwin and Tasmania are from G3's 2008 "capsized" attempt, after that it's a mix between Orange II and G3, as it is for "legs" records.

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Did anyone save the data from Geovoile for G3's record, I'd love to get a copy if anyone has it so that I can do some overlays in the graphs.

Thanks :rolleyes:

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Latest BP Video

Sorry could not get it to embed...

 

A bit of footage from Brian's Vimeo page. Nice to see it is not all easy work blasting past cruising cats...

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Did anyone save the data from Geovoile for G3's record, I'd love to get a copy if anyone has it so that I can do some overlays in the graphs.

Thanks :rolleyes:

 

I didn't save any data, but you can try asking Yann Groleau,the guy who created Geovoile.

 

It would be interesting to know how fast G3 is going to be in the next 12 to 24 hours, to compare with BP5. The daily points for G3 on the tracker give an idea, but it's not very precise.

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Latest BP Video
Sorry could not get it to embed...

A bit of footage from Brian's Vimeo page. Nice to see it is not all easy work blasting past cruising cats...

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Did anyone save the data from Geovoile for G3's record, I'd love to get a copy if anyone has it so that I can do some overlays in the graphs.

Thanks :rolleyes:

 

I didn't save any data, but you can try asking Yann Groleau,the guy who created Geovoile.

 

It would be interesting to know how fast G3 is going to be in the next 12 to 24 hours, to compare with BP5. The daily points for G3 on the tracker give an idea, but it's not very precise.

 

Or look in the archive from Geovoile..

http://cammas-groupama.geovoile.com/julesverne/2010/

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Last Audio from Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant; you can find it here:

 

http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/Maxi-Trimaran-Banque-Populaire-V/JOUR-6-On-dirait-le-Sud-5801.html#suite

 

His French last name, would translate in English to "The Valiant One" which seems appropriate...

 

 

"

We passed the Equator just before midnight, we had a small party organized by Xavier, especially for Ronan Lucas mascot, given by his son before the start; it was the only "individual" on board who has not done the around the world trip yet...

 

We were a bit stressed to get the record to the equator, but the clouds helped us; they did not slow us down, on the contrary.

 

We are sailing at 31 knots, everything is fine, we are going to sail around the St Helen High, the wind is going to turn and give us a lift slowly, so it will be easier. Right now, we are sailing about 70-80° from the wind, with the wave in the same direction, so it is not very comfortable. Slowly but surely, it will be easier to sleep.

 

Loick and Juan are telling us that it seems to be a good forecast until Cape of Good Hope.

 

Yesterday, we had a small problem: we broke the reef hook on the main sail clew. So we are fixing it. The people in charge of the sails are making sure that everything is working as best as possible, and that we use all sails properly.

 

As head sails, we have a solent, a staysail, an ORC and 3 gennakers, large (600 sq. m), medium and small (300 m). We call the small one "le string" because at the top, it ends up with a sling line...

 

Everything is fine, but we are not going downwind yet. We are reaching for another 12 hours.

 

The highest speed of the boat? Yvan Ravussin was at the helm, it was during the Atlantic crossing record. We saw 47.5 knots... (47.5 knots!!!).

 

Is it the top speed of the boat? No. Maybe we will see more in the Southern Ocean, with big waves...

 

We took some showers to clean up, during the rainpour in the Doldrums and we will continue to wash. On average, the "desalinisateur" (machine to make fresh water from sea water) produces 3 to 4 liters per day per person; for food and drinks.

 

The mood on board and the health of everybody is good. Just a bit of fatigue, because of the boat motion, it is not easy to sleep; but it should get better in the coming days.

"

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Did anyone save the data from Geovoile for G3's record, I'd love to get a copy if anyone has it so that I can do some overlays in the graphs.

Thanks :rolleyes:

 

I didn't save any data, but you can try asking Yann Groleau,the guy who created Geovoile.

 

It would be interesting to know how fast G3 is going to be in the next 12 to 24 hours, to compare with BP5. The daily points for G3 on the tracker give an idea, but it's not very precise.

 

 

 

 

I have the data from the G3 attempt, but unfortunately I really don't have time to do anything about this, I hope it helps though. The speed is in km/h, sorry for the long post, I would've figured put a better way if I had the time.

 

("The next few days")

 

| 2010-02-06 00:00:00 | 48 |

| 2010-02-06 01:00:00 | 46 |

| 2010-02-06 02:00:00 | 37.4 |

| 2010-02-06 03:00:00 | 25.9 |

| 2010-02-06 04:00:00 | 28.9 |

| 2010-02-06 05:00:00 | 22.4 |

| 2010-02-06 06:00:00 | 22.2 |

| 2010-02-06 07:00:00 | 29.6 |

| 2010-02-06 08:00:00 | 30 |

| 2010-02-06 09:00:00 | 30.2 |

| 2010-02-06 10:00:00 | 39.5 |

| 2010-02-06 11:00:00 | 41.5 |

| 2010-02-06 12:00:00 | 45.4 |

| 2010-02-06 13:00:00 | 39.1 |

| 2010-02-06 14:00:00 | 40 |

| 2010-02-06 15:00:00 | 35.9 |

| 2010-02-06 16:00:00 | 39.5 |

| 2010-02-06 17:00:00 | 43.5 |

| 2010-02-06 18:00:00 | 43.7 |

| 2010-02-06 19:00:00 | 44.5 |

| 2010-02-06 20:00:00 | 39.8 |

| 2010-02-06 21:00:00 | 38.2 |

| 2010-02-06 22:00:00 | 43.2 |

| 2010-02-06 23:00:00 | 39.3 |

| 2010-02-07 00:00:00 | 37.1 |

| 2010-02-07 01:00:00 | 31.3 |

| 2010-02-07 02:00:00 | 37.1 |

| 2010-02-07 03:00:00 | 39.8 |

| 2010-02-07 03:50:00 | 42.2 |

| 2010-02-07 05:00:00 | 41.9 |

| 2010-02-07 06:00:00 | 43.5 |

| 2010-02-07 07:00:00 | 45.2 |

| 2010-02-07 08:00:00 | 38.5 |

| 2010-02-07 09:00:00 | 40 |

| 2010-02-07 10:00:00 | 37.8 |

| 2010-02-07 11:00:00 | 53.7 |

| 2010-02-07 12:00:00 | 50.8 |

| 2010-02-07 13:00:00 | 50.6 |

| 2010-02-07 14:00:00 | 48.2 |

| 2010-02-07 15:00:00 | 51 |

| 2010-02-07 16:00:00 | 48.7 |

| 2010-02-07 17:00:00 | 52.6 |

| 2010-02-07 18:00:00 | 51.9 |

| 2010-02-07 19:00:00 | 41.5 |

| 2010-02-07 20:00:00 | 45.4 |

| 2010-02-07 21:00:00 | 34.8 |

| 2010-02-07 22:00:00 | 32.1 |

| 2010-02-07 23:00:00 | 30.6 |

| 2010-02-08 00:00:00 | 31.7 |

| 2010-02-08 01:00:00 | 33.2 |

| 2010-02-08 02:00:00 | 46.1 |

| 2010-02-08 03:00:00 | 46.9 |

| 2010-02-08 04:00:00 | 52.3 |

| 2010-02-08 05:00:00 | 44.7 |

| 2010-02-08 06:00:00 | 51 |

| 2010-02-08 07:00:00 | 50.4 |

| 2010-02-08 08:00:00 | 46.7 |

| 2010-02-08 09:00:00 | 43 |

| 2010-02-08 10:00:00 | 33 |

| 2010-02-08 11:00:00 | 38.2 |

| 2010-02-08 11:50:00 | 33.4 |

| 2010-02-08 13:00:00 | 33 |

| 2010-02-08 14:00:00 | 36.5 |

| 2010-02-08 15:00:00 | 33.4 |

| 2010-02-08 16:00:00 | 30.8 |

| 2010-02-08 17:00:00 | 30.4 |

| 2010-02-08 18:00:00 | 23.2 |

| 2010-02-08 19:00:00 | 20.2 |

| 2010-02-08 19:50:00 | 28.2 |

| 2010-02-08 21:00:00 | 26.7 |

| 2010-02-08 22:00:00 | 33.4 |

| 2010-02-08 23:00:00 | 33.9 |

| 2010-02-09 00:00:00 | 37.6 |

| 2010-02-09 01:00:00 | 40.6 |

| 2010-02-09 02:00:00 | 42.6 |

| 2010-02-09 03:00:00 | 38 |

| 2010-02-09 04:00:00 | 44.5 |

| 2010-02-09 05:00:00 | 46.3 |

| 2010-02-09 06:00:00 | 48.5 |

| 2010-02-09 07:00:00 | 46.1 |

| 2010-02-09 08:00:00 | 50.8 |

| 2010-02-09 09:00:00 | 50.4 |

| 2010-02-09 10:00:00 | 41.5 |

| 2010-02-09 11:00:00 | 43.5 |

| 2010-02-09 12:00:00 | 44.1 |

| 2010-02-09 13:00:00 | 41.3 |

| 2010-02-09 14:00:00 | 39.1 |

| 2010-02-09 15:00:00 | 44.5 |

| 2010-02-09 16:00:00 | 48.4 |

| 2010-02-09 17:00:00 | 42.8 |

| 2010-02-09 18:00:00 | 46.3 |

| 2010-02-09 19:00:00 | 54.1 |

| 2010-02-09 20:00:00 | 55.8 |

| 2010-02-09 21:00:00 | 59.1 |

| 2010-02-09 22:00:00 | 42.4 |

| 2010-02-09 23:00:00 | 38.7 |

| 2010-02-10 00:00:00 | 43.9 |

| 2010-02-10 01:00:00 | 33.7 |

| 2010-02-10 02:00:00 | 34.5 |

| 2010-02-10 03:00:00 | 41.5 |

| 2010-02-10 04:00:00 | 41.5 |

| 2010-02-10 05:00:00 | 40.2 |

| 2010-02-10 06:00:00 | 44.1 |

| 2010-02-10 07:00:00 | 46.9 |

| 2010-02-10 08:00:00 | 41.3 |

| 2010-02-10 08:30:00 | 39.7 |

| 2010-02-10 09:30:00 | 35.6 |

| 2010-02-10 10:30:00 | 38 |

| 2010-02-10 11:00:00 | 40 |

| 2010-02-10 12:00:00 | 27.1 |

| 2010-02-10 13:00:00 | 21.1 |

| 2010-02-10 14:00:00 | 16.9 |

| 2010-02-10 15:00:00 | 21.7 |

| 2010-02-10 16:00:00 | 16.1 |

| 2010-02-10 17:00:00 | 21.7 |

| 2010-02-10 18:00:00 | 20 |

| 2010-02-10 19:00:00 | 24.6 |

| 2010-02-10 20:00:00 | 27.2 |

| 2010-02-10 21:00:00 | 26.7 |

| 2010-02-10 22:00:00 | 27.6 |

| 2010-02-10 23:00:00 | 28.4 |

| 2010-02-11 00:00:00 | 27.1 |

| 2010-02-11 01:00:00 | 28.5 |

| 2010-02-11 02:00:00 | 28.4 |

| 2010-02-11 03:00:00 | 29.8 |

| 2010-02-11 04:00:00 | 32.4 |

| 2010-02-11 05:00:00 | 30.4 |

| 2010-02-11 06:00:00 | 38.7 |

| 2010-02-11 07:00:00 | 35 |

| 2010-02-11 08:00:00 | 32.8 |

| 2010-02-11 09:00:00 | 15.8 |

| 2010-02-11 10:00:00 | 12.6 |

| 2010-02-11 11:00:00 | 13.2 |

| 2010-02-11 12:00:00 | 17.2 |

| 2010-02-11 13:00:00 | 26.5 |

| 2010-02-11 14:00:00 | 24.3 |

| 2010-02-11 15:00:00 | 11.9 |

| 2010-02-11 15:30:00 | 12.2 |

| 2010-02-11 17:00:00 | 35.2 |

| 2010-02-11 18:00:00 | 21.7 |

| 2010-02-11 19:00:00 | 16.5 |

| 2010-02-11 20:00:00 | 24.3 |

| 2010-02-11 21:00:00 | 30.2 |

| 2010-02-11 22:00:00 | 33.9 |

| 2010-02-11 23:00:00 | 35.4 |

| 2010-02-12 00:00:00 | 39.7 |

| 2010-02-12 01:00:00 | 41 |

| 2010-02-12 02:00:00 | 16.9 |

| 2010-02-12 03:00:00 | 19.3 |

| 2010-02-12 04:00:00 | 23.9 |

| 2010-02-12 05:00:00 | 15.4 |

| 2010-02-12 06:00:00 | 32.2 |

| 2010-02-12 07:00:00 | 22.4 |

| 2010-02-12 08:00:00 | 6.5 |

| 2010-02-12 09:00:00 | 28 |

| 2010-02-12 10:00:00 | 39.5 |

| 2010-02-12 11:00:00 | 44.8 |

| 2010-02-12 12:00:00 | 39.1 |

| 2010-02-12 13:00:00 | 49.5 |

| 2010-02-12 14:00:00 | 51.3 |

| 2010-02-12 15:00:00 | 56.9 |

| 2010-02-12 16:00:00 | 51.5 |

| 2010-02-12 16:30:00 | 48.4 |

| 2010-02-12 18:00:00 | 53.9 |

| 2010-02-12 19:00:00 | 63.6 |

| 2010-02-12 20:00:00 | 64.1 |

| 2010-02-12 21:00:00 | 58.7 |

| 2010-02-12 22:00:00 | 60 |

| 2010-02-12 23:00:00 | 63.4 |

| 2010-02-13 00:00:00 | 64.3 |

| 2010-02-13 01:00:00 | 63.6 |

| 2010-02-13 02:00:00 | 62.1 |

| 2010-02-13 03:00:00 | 61 |

| 2010-02-13 04:00:00 | 60.8 |

| 2010-02-13 05:00:00 | 60.2 |

| 2010-02-13 06:00:00 | 62.1 |

| 2010-02-13 07:00:00 | 61.3 |

| 2010-02-13 08:00:00 | 61.3 |

| 2010-02-13 09:00:00 | 62.1 |

| 2010-02-13 10:00:00 | 63.6 |

| 2010-02-13 11:00:00 | 62.6 |

| 2010-02-13 12:00:00 | 60 |

| 2010-02-13 13:00:00 | 57.8 |

| 2010-02-13 14:00:00 | 60.2 |

| 2010-02-13 15:00:00 | 60.8 |

| 2010-02-13 16:00:00 | 62.8 |

| 2010-02-13 17:00:00 | 60 |

| 2010-02-13 18:00:00 | 60.4 |

| 2010-02-13 19:00:00 | 60 |

| 2010-02-13 20:00:00 | 58 |

| 2010-02-13 21:00:00 | 57.1 |

| 2010-02-13 22:00:00 | 57.6 |

| 2010-02-13 23:00:00 | 59.1 |

| 2010-02-14 00:00:00 | 56 |

| 2010-02-14 01:00:00 | 55.4 |

| 2010-02-14 02:00:00 | 58.6 |

| 2010-02-14 03:00:00 | 58.6 |

| 2010-02-14 04:00:00 | 53 |

| 2010-02-14 05:00:00 | 58.7 |

| 2010-02-14 06:00:00 | 60.6 |

 

 

 

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South Atlantic looks pretty good if that small low off Argentina shows up in 48 hours like the weather model shows. Should keep a pretty good gradient between that and the high so they can cut the corner a little with good speed.

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Remember last time they got stuck off the South American coast for what seemed like forever unable to make the turn. I think you’re right, looks promising now to catch the express to the Southern Ocean.

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2 new videos that are not completely related to the latest news, but interesting to understand some of the crew members.

 

Here is the first one, a "cross-review" between Loick Peyron and Kevin Escoffier.

 

Here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/VoileBanquePop?ob=5#p/u/1/PTqfsIxPtfQ

 

 

Loick about Kevin.

"

He is full of talent; I did not know him; we just started to know each other a few months ago...

A guy who can do anything; he really started to shine on this project. What is interesting is that he is an engineer, a crew member, physically very strong, easy to live with on board. A sailing/maritime culture from his family; the Escoffier family could be called "these gentlemen from Saint-Malo" (an historical reference, I believe, to the XVII and XVIII centuries: this is how the "Corsaires", mostly from Saint-Malo, where called by the French king and his administration. Someone, please correct me if I am wrong).

"

 

 

Kevin about Loick.

"

He has a great experience, a lot of technical experience. It helped him appreciate the boat as is; he did not ask for any big modification on the boat.

"

 

 

Loick about Kevin.

"

He is one of the builders of the boat. I like to talk about technical stuff with him, about the boat. Despite his small number of years of seniority, I have very rich conversations with him.

"

 

 

Kevin about Loick.

"

His main technical input on the boat was not so much about performance but rather about energy management on board. So the boat is a bit heavier, but it is to make sure that we will not have any energy production problem during the trip.

"

 

 

Loick about Kevin.

"

He is fiery. (it is not said with a negative note; I do not know if this is the best translation; it might have a negative tone in English that I think Loick does not want to give here.) You have to calm him down. he is not the youngest on board, but not far from it... maybe he is the youngest on board... He is the last one of the litter, so you have to pamper him a bit sometimes, but mostly, you have to calm him down, a bit... sometimes...

"

 

 

Kevin about... Kevin.

"

At my young age, I have never done an Around The World sailing trip, and around me, a bunch of the guys have done it already, so it is an opportunity for me. You learn a lot working with them. Now, I am trying to bring my knowledge as well to the team. It has to be an exchange, and an exchange is a two way street.

"

 

 

Loick about Kevin.

"

It's absolutely not recklessness; recekless sailors almost never finish their races or their projects. You need just a tiny bit of it... With Kevin, there is just the necessary ardor to make things happen.

"

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Same thing, but this time between Loick Peyron and Florent Chastel.

 

You can find it here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/VoileBanquePop?ob=5#p/u/2/CE0BvEAi2-Y

 

 

Loick about Florent.

"

He is very rigorous. He is a rigger by trade. He is part of that very close craftmanshift society. It is not easy to become one of them.

"

 

 

Florent about Loick

"

It is great to work for a competent sailor who is having fun on the water. So I am having fun.

"

 

 

Loick about Florent.

"

He is a little bit a solitary, so he is just fine being 40 meters above the deck, up in the mast, fiddling with something... But he is always coming back with some ideas.

It is great to see him 10 years later. I worked with him 10 years ago, and it is great to see how he evolved and gained experience. Don't get me wrong, he was already really good back then! But it is great to have him on board now, at the top of his trade.

"

 

 

Florent about Loick

"

It is important for the skipper to be outside the shifts; not just a shift leader. he can keep an outside eye on what is going on, see all crew members, and keep a detached look on what is going on.

"

 

 

Loick about Florent.

"

He is sharing the role of Number One with Ronan (Lucas). And it is a risky role, we all agree on that... They are the acrobats on board. They are obviously the most exposed crew members. They are the ones that we look the most after... There are always at least one or two or thre pairs of eyes on them; it's also a way to communicate with them. So they feel supported, of course. This is critical; a Number One by himself is powerless if there is nobody aft answering to them and vice versa.

But they are exposed, no doubt about that...

"

 

 

Florent about Loick

"

It is always reassuring to look back and see that people are looking after us. You don't feel abandoned, way, way upfront...

"

 

 

Loick about Florent.

"

Rigger, it is a solitary job. It's a bit like knitting! We always spend our time dreaming of sailing... It's while you are preparing stuff, close by the chimney, or not, or at the shop, that you can see yourself sailing...

He is a dreamer.

He is a great dreamer, over there, all the way to the stem...

"

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Laurent,

 

I hope you hear the volume of thanks from this Wonder white bread WASP! Your contributions through the translations bring to life what an amazing adventure we are watching unfold before us.

 

Thank you for who you are in keeping us engaged! :D

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What I posted was indeed from the current record of the G3 round the world. They started 31/01/2010.

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Loick about Kevin.

"

He is fiery. .....

I'd rather translate it by "eager" or "spirited", but as Laurent said it's on a positive connotation of youthful energy :)

 

And thanks for the translations ! My french is getting rusted and I appreciate a double check ;)

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I just write to thank everybody for the contributions in the thread (translations from french and routing)

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