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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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B.J. Porter

Cruising Spares

83 posts in this topic

One of the many things to do this winter before we go is to get a list of spares for key components and likely to fail systems. Prioritization and some cost control measures are important. Although it will be a pain in the arse to get some parts when we are out of North America, I can't have one of everything spare - not enough room on the boat, and the stuff is expensive. So I'm working up a list.

 

What I'm looking for is both feedback and suggestions, whether it's stuff that I've overlooked or stuff I shouldn't bother with.

 

Basic criteria, assuming that failure occurs in a remote anchorage a few days from port, or halfway through a major passage:

 

Priority 1:

Part failure leaves us immobilized or unable to maneuver in close quarters with no wind (e.g. engine failure)

 

Priority 2:

Consumables, spares & refills. I know we will used up/break this stuff so at least one, preferable two or more changes/replacements. Oil filters, etc.

 

Priority 3:

Merely inconvenient and/or if it breaks, but will not be life or boat endangering if things go awry. Somewhere around Priority 2.5 I suppose there are things like refrigeration, where losing a freezer load of food would suck if I can't fix it quickly, but won't kill us.

 

So on this list the entire generator really because a "nice to have" item, because I can do everything except run the A/C (which is a zero priority) with the engine, it just takes longer and uses more diesel. So genset parts - I'll keep consumables supplies on hand but not go nuts with backups except for a couple of items.

 

I know that in some cases I can slim down/get cheaper things such as getting only the starter solenoid (most likely thing to fail) or a raw water pump rebuild kit. But I know for example that in these cases that makes no sense - for example the solenoid costs about 80% of what a new starter does, and that the raw water pump rebuild kit requires a machine press; something I won't have access to unless I'm in a port. So for those things it makes more sense to just get the whole part so I can change it out quickly and not mess around trying to rebuild something while under way. Think "Fix it Right Now!" (engine failure halfway to Tortola) vs. "Tinker With it Later" (rebuild a shower sump pump or a head).

 

List:

Engine Spares:

- Starter

- Raw Water pump

- Fuel lift pump

- Oil pressure & engine temp senders

- Injector (1)

- Valves (one intake, one exhaust)

- Oil pump

- Thermostat

- the usual filters, gaskets, hoses, and belts

- 24V Alternator (I already own a spare)

- 12V Alternator

- A length of fuel line / suitable temporary line

- Spare voltage regulator (preferably one that can do 12V or 24V)

 

Generator Spares (depend on prices...)

- Raw water pump

- Fuel lift pump

- filters, gaskets, hoses & belts

The rest...well I suspect they'd knock the genset out but we can wait it out for parts on anything with that.

 

Other (non engine) things that might be a nuisance to come by or be needed under way:

- Wind generator blades

- LPG Regulator

- Spare pump for refrigeration

- Gaskets & seals, refrigerant for fridge compressors

- Sail Repair / patch / sewing kit

- Spare batten or two

- Bilge pump rebuild kits

- Other pump (water, shower sump, etc.) rebuild kits

- Head rebuild kits

- Things like the water maker have a pretty well defined parts & spares the manufacturer recommends.

- Spare rigging components, pins, shackles, etc.

 

So...what can we add or subtract here? I'm new to this, and as some of you have observed I have a tendency to buy more crap than I really need.

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BJ,

 

Spare AP or vane spares. Particularly on a shorthanded passage, you don't want to find yourself hand steering 24X7. It builds character but you are already a character.

 

I would add a priority 1.5. Something whose loss would significantly degrade your passage or cause you to consider a divert to a closer destination. I would put self steering in some form on that list.

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I didn't see an impeller on your list of engine spares. Also I would add 12v fuses to your list of general spares.

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List:

Engine Spares: (the fact is for common engines, there are engine parts and good diesel guys almost everywhere today, and you can sail/cruise without an engine with some enjoyment)

- Starter (don't have - pretty reliable, unless yours in really old, in case just replace now)

- Raw Water pump (don't have but do carry impellers and o-rings)

- Fuel lift pump (yes have a spare)

- Oil pressure & engine temp senders (have because don't take any space but don;t really need. you can function perfectly fine without)

- Injector (1) (I carry 4, as I find it easier to change all rather than try to find which one is bad, and just take all 4 in to shop to have serviced occasionally)

- Valves (one intake, one exhaust) (don't have, pretty reliable)

- Oil pump (don't have pretty reliable)

- Thermostat (don;t have)

- the usual filters, gaskets, hoses, and belts (yes lots)

- 24V Alternator (I already own a spare) (don;'t have 24vt)

- 12V Alternator (I have two installed and running, so redundancy already there, plus the honda, so don't carry a 'spare')

- A length of fuel line / suitable temporary line (yes)

- Spare voltage regulator (preferably one that can do 12V or 24V) (You can actually rig a perfectly function one from a couple light bulbs!)

 

Zincs

Oil for 3 oil changes (plus transmission oil if different)

Generator Spares (depend on prices...) (don;t have)

- Raw water pump

- Fuel lift pump

- filters, gaskets, hoses & belts

The rest...well I suspect they'd knock the genset out but we can wait it out for parts on anything with that.

 

Other (non engine) things that might be a nuisance to come by or be needed under way:

- Wind generator blades yes

- LPG Regulator yes

- Spare pump for refrigeration don;t have

- Gaskets & seals, refrigerant for fridge compressors don't have

- Sail Repair / patch / sewing kit yes

- Spare batten or two yes - equal to size of longest

- Bilge pump rebuild kits yes

- Other pump (water, shower sump, etc.) rebuild kits yes

- Head rebuild kits yes

- Things like the water maker have a pretty well defined parts & spares the manufacturer recommends.

- Spare rigging components, pins, shackles, etc. yes

 

autopilot spares (ram at least, and oil if its hydraulic)

Spare gps antenna (can die in near lightening strike) plus handhelds

Outboard spares - at least spark plugs

spare batt car

spare halyard

spare deck switch and solenoid for windless

I have a bag of all sorts of plumbing bits - never know when you will need to cobble something together

spare vhf antenna and coax (really more 'emergency' equipment than spare)

big collection of screws and bolts

spool of 5mm spectra for lashing stuff

 

 

Probably a few things I have forgotten

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Personally wouldn't bother with any engine internals that aren't normal maintenance items. Maybe a seal for the crank shaft (each end) and any special/strange gaskets o-rings.

 

LPG stuff- add a solenoid, and a complete length of hose from tank to stove.

 

Running light fixtures, or at minimum spare lens for the bow (needed that at least once so far)

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OK, you have both 12v and 24v systems, plus a generator. What system does your AP run off? 12v I assume. How many ways do you have to charge the 12v system to keep the AP running if short handed during bad weather? Will the failure of just one component in these systems prevent you from charging the 12v batteries or is there some redundancy built in? Or does a very reliable wind vane make this irrelevant?

 

A friend had to eventually abandon his Oyster 50 during horrible weather while on a short handed passage due to a chain of events that started with a broken mounting bracket on the 12v alternator.

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BJ,

 

I think you'll get plenty of specific advice here on items so I won't focus on details.

 

First, I'd suggest you think about a somewhat different strategy. If you're "handy" with tools and have a work bench or at least a vice that you can use well, then you may want to take along various bits of raw material and the tools to make it into what you need. For example, a couple of sheets of gasket material can be cut to fit a wide variety of situations that would require that you haul around dozens of different gaskets for pumps, flanges, etc.... Similarly, a couple of 6' lengths of all-thread in different thicknesses can replace almost any broken or stripped bolt; the same it true of long lengths of hose and pipe. Further, the tools to build the part you need are often what you really need in far away places. Most of the 3rd world has raw metal, rubber, wood, etc... it just isn't in the shape of a particular part. Learn to make the parts, they you bring tools rather than spares for all but the most complex stuff.

 

Second, when I go "out there" for a long trip, I load up a small storage locker at home with all the spare parts that I will probably have to "wait on". Clearly, I take the safety stuff that one would need to keep afloat. But, rather than taking three or four rams for the autopilot I take one spare and when it is deployed due to a failure I sail-mail to a friend back home who launches the next spare to meet me at the next port of call. That way the boat isn't full of specialty stuff that could support multiple years of cruising. In addition, a lot of the various bits and pieces of boats (especially older boats) are hard to get so I find those and put them in the locker as I'm getting ready to cruise. Everything is labeled and stored on shelves. Then, the "friend" simply pulls the part and heads down to DHL or UPS or whomever is headed my way. Having depleted the locker the friend orders the replacement for the locker, information written on the shelf under the part that has been used, and it arrives at some point that is entirely independent of me sailing.

 

Mail service, even to Tonga, is faster than any "order" for a part I've ever seen. One is, obviously, putting a lot of money into spares that one might not ever need, but if you do need a head gasket kit for the Gen Set (for example) it can be shipped from SF to Tonga in about 4 days. That means that you might have that Gen Set up and running a couple of weeks earlier than if you have to hunt around via the interweb from Tonga for a part to be shipped from NZ or wherever. Most importantly, you know it's the right part because you checked it before you left to go cruising.

 

Just a thought.

 

BV

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Trade out the internal engine parts for a spare fresh water pump. The one engine break down I ever had, not really a break down, was the fresh water pump.

The same trip we sucked up a bunch of crap into the raw water intake line. It may have been original and had to come off in pieces. Even if not all that crap would have been very difficult to remove. So some hose suitable to be used on the raw water system.

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Sail repair kit:

 

Tools;

This book.SailmakersApprentice_lg.jpg

 

1 top quality hand palm, don't go cheap on this, get one like this. ropingpalm.jpg

 

1 tube mixed needles, like these.200_95_csupload_37029160.jpg?u=1426596643

 

A 8" pair of good scissors, keep them in wax paper.tbn_2143260.JPG

2 sailmakers spikes/awls.31-50-200.jpg

 

A block of PTFE.

Mallet with PTFE one side and rubber the other.

Selection of hollow and solid fids.

Gas fuelled mini hot knife

Tape measure

 

Consumables;

 

Spool of good waxed sailmakers hand thread.

10 of what ever slides you may have on your sails.

2 headboard slides.

1Mtr Headsail luff tape if you have that.

12 hanks of whatever type you have.

10Mtrs 1/2" tube webbing

10Mtrs 1" tube webbing

10Mtrs 2" seat belt webbing

1Mtr Kevlar PSA.

2Mtrs Dacron PSA.

20Mtrs 3" 8oz Dacron tape.

20Mtrs 3" Dacron PSA tape.

1/2Mtr Boiler Patch.

1/2Mtr of Sunbrella in your colour, but just one, not all colours you have!

Selection of SS rings of various sizes.

20 plastic rings around 3/4" in dia.

2 lengths of batten as long as the longest batten you have, would suggest OR2 profile or similar.

Spool of 2.5mm Dyneema.

 

That is off the top of my head from what I used to put together for clients. There may be other things of course depending on what sails and type you have.

 

Just remember that a great sail repair kit is warranted for you most used engine, don't scrimp.

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BJ,

 

I think you'll get plenty of specific advice here on items so I won't focus on details.

 

First, I'd suggest you think about a somewhat different strategy.

 

Second, when I go "out there" for a long trip, I load up a small storage locker at home with all the spare parts that I will probably have to "wait on".

 

Mail service, even to Tonga, is faster than any "order" for a part I've ever seen.

Just a thought.

 

BV

You're a pretty smart guy.

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BJ,

 

I think you'll get plenty of specific advice here on items so I won't focus on details.

 

First, I'd suggest you think about a somewhat different strategy.

 

Second, when I go "out there" for a long trip, I load up a small storage locker at home with all the spare parts that I will probably have to "wait on".

 

Mail service, even to Tonga, is faster than any "order" for a part I've ever seen.

Just a thought.

 

BV

You're a pretty smart guy.

 

I think he's done this before.

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...

Mail service, even to Tonga, is faster than any "order" for a part I've ever seen. One is, obviously, putting a lot of money into spares that one might not ever need, but if you do need a head gasket kit for the Gen Set (for example) it can be shipped from SF to Tonga in about 4 days. ...

 

The mails have gotten pretty good but YMMV. They don't really go everywhere. Good luck getting anything from anywhere for any amount of money in 4 days to Niuatoputapu. And in some places that they do go they don't always have the kind of service we take for granted in the developed world. I'm skeptical that you can reliably get parts even to Neiafu from SF in four days. I once spent a month in Apia waiting on a part sent via DHL from New Zealand. According to DHL is was on the plane for the entire time... I spent a week in Rarotonga waiting on a part also sent by express courier service from New Zealand.

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OK, you have both 12v and 24v systems, plus a generator. What system does your AP run off? 12v I assume. How many ways do you have to charge the 12v system to keep the AP running if short handed during bad weather? Will the failure of just one component in these systems prevent you from charging the 12v batteries or is there some redundancy built in? Or does a very reliable wind vane make this irrelevant?

 

A friend had to eventually abandon his Oyster 50 during horrible weather while on a short handed passage due to a chain of events that started with a broken mounting bracket on the 12v alternator.

 

A/P is 24 Volt - all house and electronics are except the really finicky things unavailable in 12V like SSB / VHF. 24 House bank is 600 Ah.

 

I can charge 24V with the following methods:

- Engine alternator (75A...really yields around 45A at cruising RPMs)

- Genset alternator (less...25A?)

- Genset Generator via charger (two - one Victron Phoenix 3000 Watts and a backup Newmar ~45 Amp)

- Wind (Airmarine...200 Watts if it's blowing 20+)

- Solar (260 Watts of panels)

- Shore power via the above chargers in the highly unlikely event I am at a dock.

 

There are two Autopilots, when I am done with the installation they will be completely separate and unconnected. One is a new Furuno system that will be fully connected to the boat's electronics. The other is one of the older Raymarine systems on the boat now which will not talk to anything but itself except via NMEA 0183 over a Seatalk bridge.

 

With a second autopilot I'm less concerned about carrying say, a spare hydraulic ram (@ $2,300 ea) since I can cut over to the backup if I need to. We'd love to do a wind vane but it's not...practical...with our setup.

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List:

Engine Spares: (the fact is for common engines, there are engine parts and good diesel guys almost everywhere today, and you can sail/cruise without an engine with some enjoyment)

- Starter (don't have - pretty reliable, unless yours in really old, in case just replace now)

- Raw Water pump (don't have but do carry impellers and o-rings)

- Fuel lift pump (yes have a spare)

- Oil pressure & engine temp senders (have because don't take any space but don;t really need. you can function perfectly fine without)

- Injector (1) (I carry 4, as I find it easier to change all rather than try to find which one is bad, and just take all 4 in to shop to have serviced occasionally)

- Valves (one intake, one exhaust) (don't have, pretty reliable)

- Oil pump (don't have pretty reliable)

- Thermostat (don;t have)

- the usual filters, gaskets, hoses, and belts (yes lots)

- 24V Alternator (I already own a spare) (don;'t have 24vt)

- 12V Alternator (I have two installed and running, so redundancy already there, plus the honda, so don't carry a 'spare')

- A length of fuel line / suitable temporary line (yes)

- Spare voltage regulator (preferably one that can do 12V or 24V) (You can actually rig a perfectly function one from a couple light bulbs!)

 

Zincs

Oil for 3 oil changes (plus transmission oil if different)

Generator Spares (depend on prices...) (don;t have)

- Raw water pump

- Fuel lift pump

- filters, gaskets, hoses & belts

The rest...well I suspect they'd knock the genset out but we can wait it out for parts on anything with that.

 

Other (non engine) things that might be a nuisance to come by or be needed under way:

- Wind generator blades yes

- LPG Regulator yes

- Spare pump for refrigeration don;t have

- Gaskets & seals, refrigerant for fridge compressors don't have

- Sail Repair / patch / sewing kit yes

- Spare batten or two yes - equal to size of longest

- Bilge pump rebuild kits yes

- Other pump (water, shower sump, etc.) rebuild kits yes

- Head rebuild kits yes

- Things like the water maker have a pretty well defined parts & spares the manufacturer recommends.

- Spare rigging components, pins, shackles, etc. yes

 

autopilot spares (ram at least, and oil if its hydraulic)

Spare gps antenna (can die in near lightening strike) plus handhelds

Outboard spares - at least spark plugs

spare batt car

spare halyard

spare deck switch and solenoid for windless

I have a bag of all sorts of plumbing bits - never know when you will need to cobble something together

spare vhf antenna and coax (really more 'emergency' equipment than spare)

big collection of screws and bolts

spool of 5mm spectra for lashing stuff

 

 

Probably a few things I have forgotten

 

I'm working from the lists in your wife's Handbook for some of this as a starting point.

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BJ,

 

I think you'll get plenty of specific advice here on items so I won't focus on details.

 

First, I'd suggest you think about a somewhat different strategy. If you're "handy" with tools and have a work bench or at least a vice that you can use well, then you may want to take along various bits of raw material and the tools to make it into what you need. For example, a couple of sheets of gasket material can be cut to fit a wide variety of situations that would require that you haul around dozens of different gaskets for pumps, flanges, etc.... Similarly, a couple of 6' lengths of all-thread in different thicknesses can replace almost any broken or stripped bolt; the same it true of long lengths of hose and pipe. Further, the tools to build the part you need are often what you really need in far away places. Most of the 3rd world has raw metal, rubber, wood, etc... it just isn't in the shape of a particular part. Learn to make the parts, they you bring tools rather than spares for all but the most complex stuff.

 

Second, when I go "out there" for a long trip, I load up a small storage locker at home with all the spare parts that I will probably have to "wait on". Clearly, I take the safety stuff that one would need to keep afloat. But, rather than taking three or four rams for the autopilot I take one spare and when it is deployed due to a failure I sail-mail to a friend back home who launches the next spare to meet me at the next port of call. That way the boat isn't full of specialty stuff that could support multiple years of cruising. In addition, a lot of the various bits and pieces of boats (especially older boats) are hard to get so I find those and put them in the locker as I'm getting ready to cruise. Everything is labeled and stored on shelves. Then, the "friend" simply pulls the part and heads down to DHL or UPS or whomever is headed my way. Having depleted the locker the friend orders the replacement for the locker, information written on the shelf under the part that has been used, and it arrives at some point that is entirely independent of me sailing.

 

Mail service, even to Tonga, is faster than any "order" for a part I've ever seen. One is, obviously, putting a lot of money into spares that one might not ever need, but if you do need a head gasket kit for the Gen Set (for example) it can be shipped from SF to Tonga in about 4 days. That means that you might have that Gen Set up and running a couple of weeks earlier than if you have to hunt around via the interweb from Tonga for a part to be shipped from NZ or wherever. Most importantly, you know it's the right part because you checked it before you left to go cruising.

 

Just a thought.

 

BV

 

It's a good thought. It's a big boat, but space is finite. Enough oil for 3 oil changes of the engine = 9 gallons, just for example. Which takes a different sort of oil than the generator, BTW.

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You've gotten a lot of advice here already, so I'll try to add a bit and confirm a bit.

 

First, if you're going to spend your first season in the East Caribbean, you have less to worry about. Between a few suppliers and FedEx you can get most anything fairly quickly.

 

Here are the big priorities:

 

1) Autopilot

 

Lose this and you've lost one of your best crew. You've got two so you should be good. Does that mean total redundancy with two heading sensors, two computers etc? Know what it takes to switch from one to another, and then do it just for practice. I've had to switch from one unit to another twice (change rams and rewire computer), once in fair conditions, once in shitty conditions. Fortunately the shitty conditions was the second time and I was better prepared. Better to practice when you pick the time, than when the time picks you.

 

2) GPS

 

Have a couple, and include a couple of hand helds; they're cheap.

 

 

3) Windlass

 

Not so much a "carry a spare item" as know how to maintain it and do it regularly. I always have my engine revved up to at least 1,500 - 2,000 when using the windlass. More volts means less current means a cooler and happier windlass. Then have a backup plan. If it dies, how will you hoist the hook? Should be a PITA with a cockpit winch and some configuration of lines but will get it back on board.

 

4) Water maker

 

If you (and your wife) have gotten used to using 20-30 gallons of water a day, losing your watermaker will put a real damper on your cruising. I found we used more filters in the Caribbean than in the Pacific. Even with a good water collection system (do you have one - I don't) cruising season is usually not rainy season in the tropics. Carry plenty of spare filters and know how to bypass all the various sensors in your water maker so it will keep running even when the electronics say "stop".

 

Other random thoughts:

 

** Unless you're really a diesel mechanic, you'll be able to find someone more capable than yourself almost anywhere in the world and having the parts just means less down time. Carrying everything is useful, but so is FedEx (never use UPS or DHL). In practice, diesel engines are pretty reliable. Change the oil as specified and keep salt water out of the places it's not supposed to be. I think the source of Estar's "3 oil changes" suggestion is that sometimes diesels get a salt water enema. I think his was off the coast of Brazil, but I saw it happen to a Farr 56 sitting at anchor in the Galapagos. I've also had oil containers chafe themselves enough to leak which is not pretty. Ideally you'd transfer the oil from the purchased container to a better container. In any case, be sure to carry a container or containers to hold the old oil.

 

** Carry 200' (or maybe 2x 100' depending on your max halyard) of 10mm spectra line (e.g., Warpspeed), 100' of 3/16 Amsteel and 100' of 5/16" yacht braid will probably allow you to solve 99% of your running rigging issues (assuming you have spare shackles, pins, etc.). I also use threads extracted from 1.75mm Samson Zing It for whipping. It's spectra and yellow; great for finding the ends of a line.

 

** I use kevlar sleeves for anti-chafe as needed. I got them from http://hsarmor.com/htm/chafeprice.htm but I'm sure there are other sources.

 

** The wind generator is not critical enough to carry any spares. I would upgrade your primary engine alternator (75a @ 24v) to 100-150a, or upgrade size AND add a second (more challenging mechanically). I have seen many boats paralyzed by the death of the genset. Don't be hostage to your genset, they are much less reliable than the main engine.

 

** Totally agree with Estar re: spare deck switches for any electric items with deck mounted switches (windlass, winches, thruster, etc.). If your windlass has a coiled cord remote switch, carry a spare.

 

** A really good set of tools, with a bunch of specialty tools like picks, punches, clamps, a really big crescent, a medium crescent, a small crescent, all those weird security bits (torx et al), a socket you know will fit your outboard plugs, split ring tool, etc. Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to get the damn thing apart to fix it.

 

** A bunch of cable ties. I like to Cobra ties which don't leave as big a sharp edge. Get medium and long. I use the instead of seizing wire, they last longer.

 

** Some rolls of Rescue tape, or some other brand of self amalgamating tape. Really useful for fixing all kinds of plumbing issues, air hoses, etc. Not good for anything involving chafe.

 

** Spare dinghy pump.

 

** A bundle of those oil absorber sheets and some very heavy plastic bags. I think WM sells a bundle of 100 sheets for about $10. I've stashed them all over the boat and I'm using them up. When you change the oil or fuel filters, where will you put them? Wrap them in the absorber sheets, then place in a heavy plastic bag (that won't melt when diesel hits it) and put it away until you reach a place where you can dispose of it properly.

 

** At least 6x 50' x 3/4" dock lines, 1x 100' and 1x 150'. I prefer Yale Brait to 3 strand. They're not always used for docking.

 

** Boye rigging knives never rust

 

** Consider an anchor light mounted lower on the boat. Dinghies zipping through anchorages don't look up 75', also makes it easier to find your own boat when you're coming back after tipping a few. I use one from Bebi Electronics which I just hang and connect to a deck 12v outlet. They consume essentially no power, are very bright, turn on/off automatically and are much more effective in an anchorage with more than 3-4 boats.

 

Then buy half of all the stuff you need because it will never fit on the boat!

 

Enjoy!

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A spare hose clamp. Or maybe a couple. These.

 

I have a little one and use it for all kinds of things other than hose clamping. The big ones have been used to splice spars.

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Regarding engine spares, one item I'd consider adding, depending somewhat on your current engine hours or when/if it's ever been replaced...

 

An engine exhaust mixing elbow...

 

These can be quite expensive, I wouldn't want to have to locate one in a remote place, and you certainly don't want to pay Volvo's retail price for one... You might shop around this winter, try to locate one at a decent price...

 

On the other hand, a clogged/failed elbow usually can be repaired to a certain extent, if you can find a decent welder... Pack some JB Weld in any event, in case yours develops a pinhole leak, or similar...

 

I also carry a set of high pressure fuel lines from the injector pump to the injectors, and a spare set of glow plugs, and probably a few other items I'm forgetting at the moment...

 

Also, do you currently have an inline electric fuel pump installed in your fuel system? If not, definitely pick up a 12V pump that can be jury-rigged into the system in a pinch, one of those can sometimes be the cure for a LOT of diesel woes... (grin) When I first got started in the delivery business, back before Racors were common on recreational boats, I always packed a 12V pump in my kit bag...

 

Finally, in an engine room on a long cruise, you can never, EVER, have too large a supply of disposable diapers on board... (grin)

 

One more thing, you really want to research all the possible crossovers for spares and parts for your engine (Volvo, I presume) There may be suitable replacements that don't have to come out of one of those pricey Volvo boxes, my Perkins (Shibuhara block, the same as used on some Volvo series engines) is actually one of the world's most popular tractor/light duty engines, and uses a number of commonly-found components... A bit of research might save you some real money, in the long run...

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I would bring about 10-20 fuel filters, and just as many impellors.

 

Seriously.......

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This is great, goes right along with my "How to get to Maine" question that I asked earlier. Some of this is overkill or doesn't apply to my boat but it's still great stuff.

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Replacement deck spotlight connector (whatever it is called) same for VHF (mike repeater) connection.

 

Bulbs for running lights.

Spare simple windex.

Damage control items (ie. tarp for outside hull that you can slow ingress of H2O)Lord forbid .

 

Wooden bungs for every through hole (inc. rudder post,mabe a nerf football?)

 

Personal EPIRB's ?

Overboard locator?

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You've gotten a lot of advice here already, so I'll try to add a bit and confirm a bit.

 

First, if you're going to spend your first season in the East Caribbean, you have less to worry about. Between a few suppliers and FedEx you can get most anything fairly quickly.

 

Here are the big priorities:

 

1) Autopilot

 

Lose this and you've lost one of your best crew. You've got two so you should be good. Does that mean total redundancy with two heading sensors, two computers etc? Know what it takes to switch from one to another, and then do it just for practice. I've had to switch from one unit to another twice (change rams and rewire computer), once in fair conditions, once in shitty conditions. Fortunately the shitty conditions was the second time and I was better prepared. Better to practice when you pick the time, than when the time picks you.

 

2) GPS

 

Have a couple, and include a couple of hand helds; they're cheap.

 

 

3) Windlass

 

Not so much a "carry a spare item" as know how to maintain it and do it regularly. I always have my engine revved up to at least 1,500 - 2,000 when using the windlass. More volts means less current means a cooler and happier windlass. Then have a backup plan. If it dies, how will you hoist the hook? Should be a PITA with a cockpit winch and some configuration of lines but will get it back on board.

 

4) Water maker

 

If you (and your wife) have gotten used to using 20-30 gallons of water a day, losing your watermaker will put a real damper on your cruising. I found we used more filters in the Caribbean than in the Pacific. Even with a good water collection system (do you have one - I don't) cruising season is usually not rainy season in the tropics. Carry plenty of spare filters and know how to bypass all the various sensors in your water maker so it will keep running even when the electronics say "stop".

 

Other random thoughts:

 

** Unless you're really a diesel mechanic, you'll be able to find someone more capable than yourself almost anywhere in the world and having the parts just means less down time. Carrying everything is useful, but so is FedEx (never use UPS or DHL). In practice, diesel engines are pretty reliable. Change the oil as specified and keep salt water out of the places it's not supposed to be. I think the source of Estar's "3 oil changes" suggestion is that sometimes diesels get a salt water enema. I think his was off the coast of Brazil, but I saw it happen to a Farr 56 sitting at anchor in the Galapagos. I've also had oil containers chafe themselves enough to leak which is not pretty. Ideally you'd transfer the oil from the purchased container to a better container. In any case, be sure to carry a container or containers to hold the old oil.

 

** Carry 200' (or maybe 2x 100' depending on your max halyard) of 10mm spectra line (e.g., Warpspeed), 100' of 3/16 Amsteel and 100' of 5/16" yacht braid will probably allow you to solve 99% of your running rigging issues (assuming you have spare shackles, pins, etc.). I also use threads extracted from 1.75mm Samson Zing It for whipping. It's spectra and yellow; great for finding the ends of a line.

 

** I use kevlar sleeves for anti-chafe as needed. I got them from http://hsarmor.com/htm/chafeprice.htm but I'm sure there are other sources.

 

** The wind generator is not critical enough to carry any spares. I would upgrade your primary engine alternator (75a @ 24v) to 100-150a, or upgrade size AND add a second (more challenging mechanically). I have seen many boats paralyzed by the death of the genset. Don't be hostage to your genset, they are much less reliable than the main engine.

 

** Totally agree with Estar re: spare deck switches for any electric items with deck mounted switches (windlass, winches, thruster, etc.). If your windlass has a coiled cord remote switch, carry a spare.

 

** A really good set of tools, with a bunch of specialty tools like picks, punches, clamps, a really big crescent, a medium crescent, a small crescent, all those weird security bits (torx et al), a socket you know will fit your outboard plugs, split ring tool, etc. Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to get the damn thing apart to fix it.

 

** A bunch of cable ties. I like to Cobra ties which don't leave as big a sharp edge. Get medium and long. I use the instead of seizing wire, they last longer.

 

** Some rolls of Rescue tape, or some other brand of self amalgamating tape. Really useful for fixing all kinds of plumbing issues, air hoses, etc. Not good for anything involving chafe.

 

** Spare dinghy pump.

 

** A bundle of those oil absorber sheets and some very heavy plastic bags. I think WM sells a bundle of 100 sheets for about $10. I've stashed them all over the boat and I'm using them up. When you change the oil or fuel filters, where will you put them? Wrap them in the absorber sheets, then place in a heavy plastic bag (that won't melt when diesel hits it) and put it away until you reach a place where you can dispose of it properly.

 

** At least 6x 50' x 3/4" dock lines, 1x 100' and 1x 150'. I prefer Yale Brait to 3 strand. They're not always used for docking.

 

** Boye rigging knives never rust

 

** Consider an anchor light mounted lower on the boat. Dinghies zipping through anchorages don't look up 75', also makes it easier to find your own boat when you're coming back after tipping a few. I use one from Bebi Electronics which I just hang and connect to a deck 12v outlet. They consume essentially no power, are very bright, turn on/off automatically and are much more effective in an anchorage with more than 3-4 boats.

 

Then buy half of all the stuff you need because it will never fit on the boat!

 

Enjoy!

 

Good stuff. The Autopilots are completely discrete systems, separate drives, CPUs, compasses, etc. Cutting between them is as simple as throwing a switch.

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I'm working from the lists in your wife's Handbook for some of this as a starting point.

 

 

ah well, sometimes Beth and I have different opinions. I just asked her and the list in the book primarily came from a pro captain we know, where everything has to be perfect and run exactly to schedule but there is also an engineer on board - a somewhat different perspective/approach than I have on Hawk.. She did that because we simply don't have a lot of stuff on Hawk (like genset and fridge) and so don't know what sort of spares they need. On Hawk we are actually more along BV's lines and carry less spares and more tools and raw materials.

 

I have now carried Yanmar's 'blue water cruising spares kit' twice round the world and never used a single part from it - love my Yanmar's. My current approach has evolved. We carried more yanmar spares originally. Currently my approach is to carry relatively few spares but at the 10 year point (two years ago) to have all the main 'wear pieces' (starter, turbo, pumps, etc) preemptively taken apart and either replaced or rebuilt. As an aside, don't go overboard on rubber parts (like impellers). The rubber can get brittle over time. I had to throw out a bunch of unused impellers after carrying them for 10 years, I then used one and all the vanes broke off almost immediately.

 

Russ, is right about the 3 oil changes. It's in case you get water in the block. That seems to happen to offshore boats more often than anyone wants to publicly admit. Our experience was sort of funny and I guess telling on spares. We were crossing the doldrums and I had only one oil change on board - one change probably saves the engine but still is milky and I really didn't want to run the engine. While finishing up fussy with the engine I said to Beth "what we need right now is a ship to come over the horizon and drop us 20lts of new oil'. She looked out the hatch as said - 'Evans there is a ship right here'. We called them on the radio and they did drop us 20lts of oil. I did also learn that the best way to fix this problem is to pull the injectors and spin the engine, rather than what is recommended in Nigel's book (turning the crankshaft by hand and forcing the water out of the cylinders). You will use the oil sometime anyway, so unlike some 'spares' its not a waste of money, just stowage space. I agree again with Russ - get a nice strong container - we also had an oil jug break open and had a nicely lubbed bilge for a while :). We have a strong Rubbermaid sealed box that just exactly fits 6 5lt jugs of oil) screwed down to the sole of the sail locker, with sails sitting on top of it - so it does not really take up valuable 'stowage' space rather just raises one sail stack by about a foot.

 

On autopilots - the only bit that has broken so far was the fluxgate compass - twice. But it sounds like you have two completely independent systems, with separate compasses, which is great. I thought about that approach but decided to keep my autopilot 'spares' in sealed boxes rather that installed and exposed to the elements. There are pros and cons and I am not sure which is the better way to go.

 

Forgive me if this is completely obvious, but on the big picture, you want to focus on reliability so you only have to carry consumables and not 'spares'. My 'repair' rule is to fix gear once (a decade) and make sure the installation is perfectly correct while doing it, and then if it breaks again I trash it (don't replace with same) and either reengineer/replace with a much more reliable system or just live without.

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Speaking of compass failure, the light on your compass won't fail often, but when it does, it's memorable.

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Yeah, and it usually goes just after the autopilot has clapped out.

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Yeah, and it usually goes just after the autopilot has clapped out.

 

The autopilot kept working and could almost steer the boat in the conditions we encountered. Losing the compass light was still memorable. Would have been even more so without a helmbot.

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Pray for a clear night. U hate steering to a wet compass at night.

 

 

..and taping a flashlight to the compass lights it up but makes it point in funny directions.

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Speaking of compass failure, the light on your compass won't fail often, but when it does, it's memorable.

 

For this and many other reasons the head lamp has become one of my favorite bits of kit.

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Just placed a big order with Marine Parts Express. I love those guys, except they don't seem to do Westerbeke parts.

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Red and Green LED flashlights. I'm only partly kidding. I used a small "keychain fob" red LED to illuminate the binnacle compass when the light crapped out, and it served us well for several nights.

 

Once, when sailing home to San Francisco at night, we turned off the masthead tricolor and turned on the deck-level lights only to discover that the starboard (green) bow light was dead. There was heavy fog just off the water, and we were approaching the Gate, so I really didn't want to rely on the tricolor. A crew member had a green flashlight, which we taped to the bow. Problem solved.

 

I suppose that's why the old square-riggers used kerosene lights -- the LEDs kept burning out.

 

OK, fuel filters: Carry *lots*, not just a couple. If your tank has a slime population explosion you can go through a whole bunch of filters before you have a chance to clean it out.

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I'm trying to think of stuff no one has mentioned . . . . .

 

Got plenty of fishing spares ? Lures, trace, swivels, pliers, filleting knives, filleting glove ( just like Michael Jackson's )

 

Got plenty of rat and roach proof food containers ? You want ones with a gasket and lockable lid. Tropical roaches can eat through cardboard and cellophane no problem. They aren't as genteel as your New England types. Sooner or later you will learn how well rats can swim.

 

Got an nice long anchor chain snubber made up ?

 

Got plenty of dinghy repair stuff ?

 

Got a pair of handheld VHFs ? They make a pretty good walkie talkie system.

 

Got a grocery carrying system worked out ? I use a large backpack which can also hold a gerry can.

 

I'll probably think of more later.

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Those foldable aluminum trolleys are the go for shopping and fuel containers.

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A pile of antibiotics is a good idea - at least 100. They have saved me twice. I use Clindomycin but something else might suit you better.

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I don't think anyone has mentioned a spare spouse yet.... they tend to fail at the most inopportune times. That said, the cost of bring along a spare is extremely high - usually about 50% of total personal assets. As a result, this is one item that you really should fly in after the primary has broken down and been removed from the boat. ;-)

 

BV

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I don't think BJ was planning on spending that kind of money. Besides, if the first one breaks down, don't replace, rent...

 

:blink:

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I don't think BJ was planning on spending that kind of money. Besides, if the first one breaks down, don't replace, rent...

 

:blink:

I don't think I'll show my wife this thread after all...

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I don't think BJ was planning on spending that kind of money. Besides, if the first one breaks down, don't replace, rent...

 

:blink:

I don't think I'll show my wife this thread after all...

 

Starting a voyage with "You can be replaced by a bimbo" is probably not an auspicious beginning.

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Here's my abbreviated list. I know I forgot many items but this is food for thought...

 

Boat Essential Tools & Repair Items

 

General Tools:

Wrenches – Assorted and sized for your vessels nuts and bolts

Flare Wrench’s – Very important for any fuel line work

Drills – 1 Corded and 1 Cordless

Wooden Plugs - One for each thru-hull & tethered to it

LED Head lamp & Flashlights

Hole Saw Kit

Screw Drivers – Assorted

Pick Set – Very Handy

Tap/Die Set – Sized accordingly

Heli-Coil repair kit

Hack Saw – With spare blades

Bolt/Wire Cutters – Big enough to cut rigging

Wire Cutters – Big enough to cut battery cable

Blow Torch – Mini butane type and one standard torch head

Socket Set - SAE and Metric

Pipe Wrenches

Pliers - Various sizes

Water Pump Pliers

Needle Nose Vise Grips - For clamping hoses off etc.

Files – Various

Drill Bits – Full Kit

Countersink - At least two sizes

Sandpaper

Dremel

Rigging Knife's

Calipers

 

Rigging:

 

Sewing Kit

Monel & SS Seizing Wire

Sail Repair Tape

1” Nylon Webbing

1" Spectra webbing

Sail Slugs – To fit mast track

Outhaul car

Pre-feder

Sailors Palm, Needles & whipping twine

Clevis Pins – Spares sized for our boat

Cotter Pins – Stainless various sizes

Grommets, Snaps & Twist Locks

Grommet punch and set

Loos Tension Gauge

Dodger fittings

Mechanical rigging fittings

 

Engine/Plumbing:

 

Water pump – Complete spare and rebuild kit

Plumbing Fittings – Assorted to match parts on vessel

Zincs – For heat exchanger

Solenoid – Spare

Fuel Pump -Spare

Fuel Line Hose – Min 6 feet all sizes on vessel

Hose barbs – male/male for splicing all hose sizes on vessel

Impellers – With spare gaskets.

Oil Filters

Oil – for engine 2 gal min

Air filter

Antifreeze - 2 gal

Fuel Filters – Primary and secondary

Fuel Filtering Funnel (Racor)

Hoses – Min 6 feet each size

Oil absorbing bilge pads (min 10)

Alternator Belts - 4

Thermostat & gaskets

Engine service & parts manuals

Mechanics Service Manual – For our engine

Hose Clamps – Stainless AWAB type various sizes

 

Electrical:Inverter – Spare at least 500 watts to power small tools

Electrical Connectors – Assorted marine grade various sizes

Multimeter – Clamp on AC/DC to measure amps, volts and resistance

Heat Shrink – Adhesive lined

Crimper – Ratcheting style for marine grade terminals

Zip Ties

Pyrometer

Hydrometer

Wire – Assorted gauges 12 feet min per size

Jumper Wires 10 ga- With alligator clips on each end

Wire Strippers

Light Bulbs – Spares for each socket on the boat

Wire Snake

Terminal strips

Misc electrical clamps

Fuses - spares for each on-board

Breakers - 1 each size

 

Misc:

Turkey baster

Stainless Steel Bar Stock

Aluminum Bar Stock

Stainless Steel Dodger Tubing – short length

Velcro – Regular and industrial grade

Grease – Water proof winch grease

PB Blaster (NOT WD-40;))

BoeShield

Lanocote

TFF Tef Gel

Silicone Caulk

Butyl Tape

Sika 295UV – Or equivalent

Wet Suit, Mask & Fins, hood

Hook Knife

UV Resistant Duct Tape

Stainless Steel - Screws, nuts, bolts, fender washers, nyloc nuts, etc.

Tape – Electrical plus green painters tapes

JB Weld – Or equivalent

Hose – 6 feet minimum for each size on vessel

C-Clamps

Label maker

Bosuns chair = 2

Spare boat hook = 2

R-134 and charger adapter for refrigeration system

Spare prop, nuts & key

Prop Puller

Emergency tiller

Spare anchors and rodes

Outboard motor fuel line with priming bulb

2 stroke oil

 

I know I missed a lot.....

 

 

A couple of the spare parts bins I carry. They make organizing easy..

 

98191679.jpg

116333538.jpg

116333535.jpg

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Maine sail Dude, I AM IMPRESSED!! BV

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Maine sail Dude, I AM IMPRESSED!! BV

 

 

And my friends wonder why I don't race my own boat........ :D :D

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Nice list MS. I carry spares for the site specific shaped engine hoses as well. Purpose built quick deploy crash mat is pretty space efficient.

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Bolt cutters or something to use to cut the rig the rest of the way off the boat, should that become necessary.

 

Sheet of rubber or something to repair large, jagged holes in hull.

 

Oh yeah. A couple of ways to call for help. ;)

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Bolt cutters or something to use to cut the rig the rest of the way off the boat, should that become necessary.

 

Sheet of rubber or something to repair large, jagged holes in hull.

 

Oh yeah. A couple of ways to call for help. ;)

 

How to cut my rig away is another entire thread...seriously.

 

On the plus side it's decked stepped so it should just go over.

 

On the downside...

- Everything is fracking huge. The standing rigging is bigger around than my thumb. Bolt cutters...not an option except for maybe Superman.

- It's deck stepped so I won't have a stump left to jury rig <_<

 

My rigger and I have discussed two options.

1) An insanely expensive hydraulic press cutter like the one she uses in her shop

2) A much less expensive cordless rotary cutter (e.g. Dewalt) with some cutting blades on it. All batteries to be fully recharged before we pull up the anchor...

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Bolt cutters or something to use to cut the rig the rest of the way off the boat, should that become necessary.

 

Sheet of rubber or something to repair large, jagged holes in hull.

 

Oh yeah. A couple of ways to call for help. ;)

 

How to cut my rig away is another entire thread...seriously.

 

On the plus side it's decked stepped so it should just go over.

 

On the downside...

- Everything is fracking huge. The standing rigging is bigger around than my thumb. Bolt cutters...not an option except for maybe Superman.

- It's deck stepped so I won't have a stump left to jury rig <_<

 

My rigger and I have discussed two options.

1) An insanely expensive hydraulic press cutter like the one she uses in her shop

2) A much less expensive cordless rotary cutter (e.g. Dewalt) with some cutting blades on it. All batteries to be fully recharged before we pull up the anchor...

I keep a small sledgehammer and a punch to knock out clevis pins.

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My rigger and I have discussed two options.

1) An insanely expensive hydraulic press cutter like the one she uses in her shop

2) A much less expensive cordless rotary cutter (e.g. Dewalt) with some cutting blades on it. All batteries to be fully recharged before we pull up the anchor...

 

I like kdh's approach. Attack parts that are supposed to come apart.

 

Trying to envision using a hydraulic cutter or an electric one in conditions that would topple a rig. I envision the hydraulic one bouncing off some part of me on the way overboard and the electric one seizing up after a dramatic display of sparks.

 

If we're going into extremely unlikely but really bad failures.... sometimes rudders don't stay attached to the post, or even the boat. Got some kind of drouge steering in mind?

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That's funny, we just had the same go out on our trip to haul the boat. We have a WH and while heading up river the wheel would give a quick shake. I was was sitting at the helm in the aft cockpit so I wasn't worried about running into anything. At first I though we were crossing electric cables but it was occurring too often. I started watching the the compass and it was steady at 25 degree then suddenly flip out changing 100 degree or so for just a fraction of a second.

 

Turned it off and hand drove the rest of the trip. I spoke with Will at WH and will try a gyro next season. Odd.....maybe a near by lightning strike?

 

Do you know what caused your failures?

 

On autopilots - the only bit that has broken so far was the fluxgate compass - twice. But it sounds like you have two completely independent systems, with separate compasses, which is great. I thought about that approach but decided to keep my autopilot 'spares' in sealed boxes rather that installed and exposed to the elements. There are pros and cons and I am not sure which is the better way to go.

 

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We're set up pretty much like Maine Sail, Rubbermaid bins with the exact same part holders stacked 5 high.. We're lucky to have room to carry pretty extensive tools and supplies. The missus wants her sewing machine on a frame in the forward hatch. The hatch is 4 foot square so a seat can be created for her to fit easily. The placement will allow her to work it much like a pit in a sail loft. The new servo motors are light and small but have good torque. If she's willing to do the sewing I'll keep her rum glass full.

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Do you know what caused your failures?

 

 

 

No, don't know. Pretty sure, not lightening, just some sort of internal breakdown/wear out.

The first time happened coastal, like yours and it was easy to swap in the spare at anchor. But the second happened at sea in the middle of the Tasman. I hooked up the spare and then the display told me I had to calibrate it before it would work - which required 'two 360 degree circles at slow speed in flat water'. There is not so much flat water in the middle of the Tasman and it would just not start working with a 'bumpy circle'. I called the techs on the iridium, and after some long pauses they figured out a work around, paid for the iridium right there as otherwise we would have had to hand steer.

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Bolt cutters or something to use to cut the rig the rest of the way off the boat, should that become necessary.

 

Sheet of rubber or something to repair large, jagged holes in hull.

 

Oh yeah. A couple of ways to call for help. ;)

 

How to cut my rig away is another entire thread...seriously.

 

On the plus side it's decked stepped so it should just go over.

 

On the downside...

- Everything is fracking huge. The standing rigging is bigger around than my thumb. Bolt cutters...not an option except for maybe Superman.

- It's deck stepped so I won't have a stump left to jury rig <_<

 

My rigger and I have discussed two options.

1) An insanely expensive hydraulic press cutter like the one she uses in her shop

2) A much less expensive cordless rotary cutter (e.g. Dewalt) with some cutting blades on it. All batteries to be fully recharged before we pull up the anchor...

I keep a small sledgehammer and a punch to knock out clevis pins.

 

Except when you drive out the pin, the punch *becomes* the pin. (if it's under much tension)

 

DAMHIK ;-)

 

Mike

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We've had this discussion with the spar maker, cut the screws. If the shroud is loose, knock out the pin. Remember: heads face out and don't kill the cotter pin (15 degree).

 

sawzall.jpg

 

Bolt cutters or something to use to cut the rig the rest of the way off the boat, should that become necessary.

 

Sheet of rubber or something to repair large, jagged holes in hull.

 

Oh yeah. A couple of ways to call for help. ;)

 

How to cut my rig away is another entire thread...seriously.

 

On the plus side it's decked stepped so it should just go over.

 

On the downside...

- Everything is fracking huge. The standing rigging is bigger around than my thumb. Bolt cutters...not an option except for maybe Superman.

- It's deck stepped so I won't have a stump left to jury rig <_<

 

My rigger and I have discussed two options.

1) An insanely expensive hydraulic press cutter like the one she uses in her shop

2) A much less expensive cordless rotary cutter (e.g. Dewalt) with some cutting blades on it. All batteries to be fully recharged before we pull up the anchor...

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Great list of spares on this thread. It will help us put our parts list together for the new boat. When we bought our last boat she had just completed a circumnavigation and I would estimate about 80% of spares were on board already. All we had to do was inventory and add where needed. With the new boat all spares will have to be new and I am dreading it especially because the new boat will be in France. Some parts will be shipped over(costly) other we will buy in Europe and may be difficult to order through the cataloges. But at least this thread helps a lot in remembering what will be needed. Thanks

 

One thing those new to stowing parts on cruising vessel is numbering your lockers on the inside and then making a drawing of your boat with the numbered lockers on it. Then have a notebook that says what number locker parts are in. If you don't then in 5 months time you will start ripping through lockers looking for something you need and can't remember what locker you put it in. Seems like the more stuff you have you start putting it in every small nook and obscure locker and finding it means ripping apart your boat or even worse not remembering if you brought that one part you are looking for. The Mason had a total of 94 lockers on board some of them were 3 deep inside another locker, without the numbering system we would have never found half the stuff. The new boat has less stowage and that can be a blessing or a disaster depending on how overboard and paranoid I get for extra parts.

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My rigger and I have discussed two options.

1) An insanely expensive hydraulic press cutter like the one she uses in her shop

2) A much less expensive cordless rotary cutter (e.g. Dewalt) with some cutting blades on it. All batteries to be fully recharged before we pull up the anchor...

 

I like kdh's approach. Attack parts that are supposed to come apart.

 

Trying to envision using a hydraulic cutter or an electric one in conditions that would topple a rig. I envision the hydraulic one bouncing off some part of me on the way overboard and the electric one seizing up after a dramatic display of sparks.

 

If we're going into extremely unlikely but really bad failures.... sometimes rudders don't stay attached to the post, or even the boat. Got some kind of drouge steering in mind?

 

Decided to give the cordless DeWalt cutting tool a try. Went with the 18V because I figured I'd have a need for other tools, and the 36v family was too limited selection and high in price. Results were impressive, I am pretty comfortable this will work.

 

Tests performed on a new battery, freshly 100% charged.

 

Cutting 5/8" Wire rigging took about 7 seconds to cut clean through. Minimal effort and force applied in this case. The battery could do about 7-8 cuts before it stopped. Not many, but you are doing a lot of damage fast. In theory I'd need to make 8 cuts to remove my rig - six lower shrouds and the stays. I will buy two more batteries and a second charger in the fall before we leave the US, figuring that we want to stagger their ages a bit. I think my standing rigging is a little larger than 5/8"; probably 12mm or the like.

 

 

Rod rigging - similar cutting speeds for what I think was 1/4" rod. I didn't pay it much attention since I don't have any rod, but it was not bothered or slowed bit.

 

I could also cut through 12mm high strength anchor chain in about 10-15 seconds. I didn't time it since I was working in an awkward position and wanted to get it done, but with a fresh blade it zipped through it.

 

Also with a 120 grit sand paper flap disc and some polishing pads I cleaned my prop up better in an hour than I did in a day with a wire wheels and a drill. I think I am becoming unnaturally attached to this tool.

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I might have missed em somewhere else in the thread, so forgive my redundancy if you already have;

 

Spare engine control cables.

Dental tool selection.

Flex shaft 4 prong bolt retrievers in 2 locations.

Lotsa Kanberra gel and H2out. H2out/equiv dessicant in small salt shakers or mesh bags works well.

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Question for those (like Estar) that might have full battened mains: do you carry a spare batten or some sort of repair kit?

 

The usual advice is carry a batten as long as your longest. However, on modern full battened sails that is going to have limited utility. The battens I have are different diameter to go with the different length. about 3/4" diameter solid pulltruded on the main lower, down to about 3/8 on the mizzen top batten. If I did carry a lower main batten it would be 3/4" by 24 feet - not real handy to have in the cabin (or even on deck). And it surely will not fit in more than half of the batt car receptacles.

 

I'm wondering if some short lengths of aluminum tube of the appropriate ID would be sufficient to repair them. What happens when a pulltruded batten breaks? Nice clean thing or 3 feet of shredded fiberglass?

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I am bumping this thread so that it is not lost.

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Question for those (like Estar) that might have full battened mains: do you carry a spare batten or some sort of repair kit?

 

The usual advice is carry a batten as long as your longest. However, on modern full battened sails that is going to have limited utility. The battens I have are different diameter to go with the different length. about 3/4" diameter solid pulltruded on the main lower, down to about 3/8 on the mizzen top batten. If I did carry a lower main batten it would be 3/4" by 24 feet - not real handy to have in the cabin (or even on deck). And it surely will not fit in more than half of the batt car receptacles.

 

I'm wondering if some short lengths of aluminum tube of the appropriate ID would be sufficient to repair them. What happens when a pulltruded batten breaks? Nice clean thing or 3 feet of shredded fiberglass?

 

Could you carry 3 lengths of 3/8" and bind them together for the other battens? Still really long, but easier to handle.

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Question for those (like Estar) that might have full battened mains: do you carry a spare batten or some sort of repair kit?

 

The usual advice is carry a batten as long as your longest. However, on modern full battened sails that is going to have limited utility. The battens I have are different diameter to go with the different length. about 3/4" diameter solid pulltruded on the main lower, down to about 3/8 on the mizzen top batten. If I did carry a lower main batten it would be 3/4" by 24 feet - not real handy to have in the cabin (or even on deck). And it surely will not fit in more than half of the batt car receptacles.

 

I'm wondering if some short lengths of aluminum tube of the appropriate ID would be sufficient to repair them. What happens when a pulltruded batten breaks? Nice clean thing or 3 feet of shredded fiberglass?

 

Could you carry 3 lengths of 3/8" and bind them together for the other battens? Still really long, but easier to handle.

That's not a bad suggestion. I could pick a diameter and length that made sense, along with some tubes to connect them together to deal with the lower mainsail ones. I suppose the most likely to break are the mid to upper ones anyway....

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Store the spare battens in the boom...should be plenty of room and long enough.

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Why spare battens? That's not a survival item. If a batten breaks, so what? I have a batten tool, but that's about it.

Now I just purchased (at exhorbitant cost) a rebuild kit for my electric head. Now that's a survival item. If I had the money, I'd replace the damn thing with a Wilcox Crittenden Skipper or British Lavac. But I don't at the moment, and the admiral likes the electric head.

 

IMHO you have to distinguish between tools and spares. Tools aren't spares. One tool I wouldn't be without is my dremel. Another is the vacuum cleaner.

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Store the spare battens in the boom...should be plenty of room and long enough.

 

Excellent but careful on this one. I recently lost a brand new 8' pigstay stored in the boom. We were caught in a nasty 30-minute squall that shook the boom pretty violently until we got the reefs in. Damn thing vibrated out into the Sound. Dumb me. Trick is to secure it but not so that it interferes with internal outhaul and reefing lines. Sure isn't anywhere else to store it though.

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DDW,

 

Make your sail maker reimburse you for the extra spare battens you'll have to carry; surely it was their idea in the first place, no? The performance benefits of different size battens don't really pay off for a cruising boat - and the drama of having to deal with the spares problems are a really serious consideration, especially with a rig like yours. I'd bet you can't source that materially anywhere but Antigua in the whole Caribean and anywhere but Papeete in all of the South Pacific.

 

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DDW,

 

Make your sail maker reimburse you for the extra spare battens you'll have to carry; surely it was their idea in the first place, no? The performance benefits of different size battens don't really pay off for a cruising boat - and the drama of having to deal with the spares problems are a really serious consideration, especially with a rig like yours. I'd bet you can't source that materially anywhere but Antigua in the whole Caribean and anywhere but Papeete in all of the South Pacific.

I couldn't find good batten stock in Papeete last time I was there.

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DDW,

 

Make your sail maker reimburse you for the extra spare battens you'll have to carry; surely it was their idea in the first place, no? The performance benefits of different size battens don't really pay off for a cruising boat - and the drama of having to deal with the spares problems are a really serious consideration, especially with a rig like yours. I'd bet you can't source that materially anywhere but Antigua in the whole Caribean and anywhere but Papeete in all of the South Pacific.

I couldn't find good batten stock inpapeete last time I was there .

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Store the spare battens in the boom...should be plenty of room and long enough.

 

Excellent but careful on this one. I recently lost a brand new 8' pigstay stored in the boom. We were caught in a nasty 30-minute squall that shook the boom pretty violently until we got the reefs in. Damn thing vibrated out into the Sound. Dumb me. Trick is to secure it but not so that it interferes with internal outhaul and reefing lines. Sure isn't anywhere else to store it though.

 

Yup... A little stick n rip goes a long way...

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Store the spare battens in the boom...should be plenty of room and long enough.

 

Boom is full of reefing gear (shuttle cars and blocks, etc.) - that's where I put 'em when I unbend the sail though. I'd worry about something getting tangled...if there were access to fasten it down maybe...

 

Why spare battens? That's not a survival item. If a batten breaks, so what?

Not a survival item, but on a square head sail (depending on the batten) it will make the sail unusable. No mainsail on my boat means not much sail at all.

 

DDW,

 

Make your sail maker reimburse you for the extra spare battens you'll have to carry; surely it was their idea in the first place, no? The performance benefits of different size battens don't really pay off for a cruising boat -

Well that's water under the bridge, however I am not sure you could rely on a 3/8"dia batten 24' long, and you surely wouldn't want a 3/4" dia batten at the top of the mizzen, hence the different sizes.

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Now I just purchased (at exhorbitant cost) a rebuild kit for my electric head. Now that's a survival item. If I had the money, I'd replace the damn thing with a Wilcox Crittenden Skipper or British Lavac. But I don't at the moment, and the admiral likes the electric head.

I thought about a Wilcox Crittenden Skipper instead of my Vacuflush when I built. Then I realized all that salt water I would be pumping through with my industrial strength toilet would be going into a holding tank rather than outside the boat. The salt water is worse than than the piss and crap.

 

Plus Hinckley said the castings on the WC had been not well done recently.

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Youi can set up the Wilcox Crittenden or Lavac to use fresh water if you want.

 

 

My head (a Sealand Vacuflush) was just rebuilt but I don't trust it. I want something foolproof. Plus, the pump and vacuum tank for the Vacuflush take up too much space.

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Youi can set up the Wilcox Crittenden or Lavac to use fresh water if you want.

 

 

My head (a Sealand Vacuflush) was just rebuilt but I don't trust it. I want something foolproof. Plus, the pump and vacuum tank for the Vacuflush take up too much space.

 

How about a nice seat hanging off the stern?

 

IMG_0204.JPG

 

When you're anchored for a month, what else do you do? I guess a composting toilet would be the only environmentally friendly alternative.

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When it comes to cruising, there is a difference between getting there and getting there in comfort. What you need is food, water, the ability to float, and move in the direction you need to go(of course this only applies when there is wind). I traveled with relatively few spares compared to most, but i always packed plenty of food and water, and a "keep the boat from sinking kit", but my priority was the rig, lots of sails, halyards, sheets, sail repair kit, and a single spare stay, equal to the longest/biggest stay on the rig with appropriate mechanical fittings. engines and electricity are very nice, and certainly make the difference between and enjoyable passage and a shitty one, but they are not necessary(I know this for a fact, having lost both after I got confused about which part of the boat should be pointing at the sky.)

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Spare dinghy?

 

 

My general feeling is that a dinghy can be good at one of these three things: sailing, powering, paddle/rowing. Making a boat good at two of them is going to be a challenge and three is even harder.

 

But I do WANT something that is good at all three and always love to see a new take on it. While not great, that little thing appears to me to be a passable powerboat, a fun little sailboat, and an OK tandem kayak. Tandem kayaks have a tendency to be at least 16 feet long, making any but a foldable a real hassle on a cruising boat.

 

Pretty clever!

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Spare dinghy?

 

 

My general feeling is that a dinghy can be good at one of these three things: sailing, powering, paddle/rowing. Making a boat good at two of them is going to be a challenge and three is even harder.

 

But I do WANT something that is good at all three and always love to see a new take on it. While not great, that little thing appears to me to be a passable powerboat, a fun little sailboat, and an OK tandem kayak. Tandem kayaks have a tendency to be at least 16 feet long, making any but a foldable a real hassle on a cruising boat.

 

Pretty clever!

 

You forgot requirement #4 - Schlepping.

 

That looks cool, and fun. I can't imagine any of those modes where I'd want to carry ten bags of groceries and a case of beer on it.

 

We're thrilled with our Portland Pudgy still.

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Spare dinghy?

 

 

My general feeling is that a dinghy can be good at one of these three things: sailing, powering, paddle/rowing. Making a boat good at two of them is going to be a challenge and three is even harder.

 

But I do WANT something that is good at all three and always love to see a new take on it. While not great, that little thing appears to me to be a passable powerboat, a fun little sailboat, and an OK tandem kayak. Tandem kayaks have a tendency to be at least 16 feet long, making any but a foldable a real hassle on a cruising boat.

 

Pretty clever!

 

Reports from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding are that the nester by Russell Brown rows and sails very well. I don't know about motoring . I haven't heard of anyone putting a Honda 2HP on one yet.

 

http://www.ptwatercr...craft/PT11.html

post-8115-055801800 1341500375_thumb.jpg

post-8115-086092000 1341500398_thumb.jpg

post-8115-043524200 1341500416_thumb.jpg

post-8115-057507700 1341500438_thumb.jpg

post-8115-070980100 1341500458_thumb.jpg

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I'm using the sailing rig for my Dyer a lot more than I thought I would. It makes for a fun way to explore an anchorage and it beats rowing to get ashore.

 

I've never had a motor, the noise isolates people as they buzz around the harbor talking over the motor. Everyone can hear them, but they can't hear anyone. Takes away all the "beautiful day, [insert question about boat here]" as you are out and about rowing or sailing.

 

ink.jpg

 

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I've never had a motor, the noise isolates people as they buzz around the harbor talking over the motor. Everyone can hear them, but they can't hear anyone. Takes away all the "beautiful day, [insert question about boat here]" as you are out and about rowing or sailing.

 

+1

 

Here's my dink, in sailing mode. Sailing or rowing is a delight and she'll schlep me, the dog, groceries and the beer.

post-47517-073955400 1341506567_thumb.jpg

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Reports from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding are that the nester by Russell Brown rows and sails very well. I don't know about motoring . I haven't heard of anyone putting a Honda 2HP on one yet.

 

 

Some nice videos of it available too. Does look good. Pretty easy to join up/take down

 

 

 

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I'm using the sailing rig for my Dyer a lot more than I thought I would. It makes for a fun way to explore an anchorage and it beats rowing to get ashore.

 

I've never had a motor, the noise isolates people as they buzz around the harbor talking over the motor. Everyone can hear them, but they can't hear anyone. Takes away all the "beautiful day, [insert question about boat here]" as you are out and about rowing or sailing.

 

ink.jpg

 

 

And if I had unlimited storage room and not far to go, I'd have one of those too. Running a 10-mile round trip for groceries and milk in Desolation Sound would take about 6 weeks in one, so I'll stick with the kayak for short haul and the Zodiac with motor for longer trips.

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Running a 10-mile round trip for groceries and milk in Desolation Sound would take about 6 weeks in one, so I'll stick with the kayak for short haul and the Zodiac with motor for longer trips.

 

i) 6 weeks? are you rowing one-handed?

 

ii) sheesh, this generation has gone all soft-- why back when I was a boy, I used to row 10 miles one-way just to go to school. Carried a baked potato in the winter to warm up my hands....

 

iii) anchor closer to the store?

smile.gif

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Running a 10-mile round trip for groceries and milk in Desolation Sound would take about 6 weeks in one, so I'll stick with the kayak for short haul and the Zodiac with motor for longer trips.

 

i) 6 weeks? are you rowing one-handed?

 

ii) sheesh, this generation has gone all soft-- why back when I was a boy, I used to row 10 miles one-way just to go to school. Carried a baked potato in the winter to warm up my hands....

 

iii) anchor closer to the store?

smile.gif

 

Presumably that 10-mile row was uphill both ways? You're lucky, you got to go to school.

 

We used to live in a Cardboard Box in the middle of the street.....oooooh we could only dream of a cardboard box............I used to have to get up in the morning half an hour before I went to bed, work 29 hours down at Mill and pay Mill owner for the privilege.........but if you tell that to the young people of today they won't believe a word of it.......

 

You're right, I am soft, but there's no way I'm rowing a Zodiac any further than I have to (15 feet), and I don't have room for a pulling boat. I always wanted to build a Bolger "Victoria" but haven't found the time yet.

 

Usually we take the mothership to the dock at either Squirrel Cove or Refuge Cove, the two stores in Desolation, but sometimes it's nice to stay on the hook and take the dinghy.

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Spare dinghy?

 

 

My general feeling is that a dinghy can be good at one of these three things: sailing, powering, paddle/rowing. Making a boat good at two of them is going to be a challenge and three is even harder.

 

But I do WANT something that is good at all three and always love to see a new take on it. While not great, that little thing appears to me to be a passable powerboat, a fun little sailboat, and an OK tandem kayak. Tandem kayaks have a tendency to be at least 16 feet long, making any but a foldable a real hassle on a cruising boat.

 

Pretty clever!

 

You forgot requirement #4 - Schlepping.

 

That looks cool, and fun. I can't imagine any of those modes where I'd want to carry ten bags of groceries and a case of beer on it.

 

We're thrilled with our Portland Pudgy still.

 

I did not entirely forget. It's only a passable powerboat because it looks to lack the capacity and speed that a powerboat should have. Meaning, it should plane with 4 adults and gear aboard. Oh, and still row and sail well. This might explain why I think it can't be designed. ;)

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I thought about a Wilcox Crittenden Skipper instead of my Vacuflush when I built. Then I realized all that salt water I would be pumping through with my industrial strength toilet would be going into a holding tank rather than outside the boat. The salt water is worse than than the piss and crap.

 

Plus Hinckley said the castings on the WC had been not well done recently.

 

Well, after much deliberation and gnashing of teeth I just ordered a WC skipper (with rebuild kit). The British Lavac (salt water) on my previous boat didn't smell that much worse than the Vacuflush, and I have a pumpout service when I'm on my mooring.

 

If anyone wants to buy a recently rebuilt Sealand Vacuflush (new duckbuill valves, bellows, gaskets etc.) , complete with pump, vacuum tank and electrical stuff, PM me.

 

In any case, a rebuild kit for whatever head you have is an essential cruising spare. The "direct deposit" method (or even a chlorinating macerator) is illegal in too many cruising grounds.

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How did you get hold of a Skipper ? I couldn't find one anywhere and wound up buying a Groco K.

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How did you get hold of a Skipper ? I couldn't find one anywhere and wound up buying a Groco K.

 

A friend of a friend had one in stock in RI. It came with the rebuild kit too.

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