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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

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Corny Shields

Sumner "Huey" Long

33 posts in this topic

"To appreciate victory," says Huey Long, "a man has to understand defeat."

 

It's worth noting the passing of Sumner "Huey" Long who was profiled in Sports Illustrated in 1961 at the age of 41:

 

 

The Object Is to Win the Race

 

There's always a big wind there, and there's always a big sea running. It's tricky and it's dangerous. A man has his hands full driving up the Molokai Channel."

 

So says Sumner A. Long ("My friends call me Huey") of the waters pictured on the opposite page. Long knows what he is talking about. Twice in the past he has driven up the Molokai at the end of a Trans-Pacific Race, and he probably would be a part of the 31-boat fleet heading out for it once again this week except that he is busy on another ocean. As Long's old rivals start across 2,225 miles from Los Angeles to Hawaii, Long and his 57-foot yawl Ondine are leaving Newport, R.I., bound for England's Eddystone Rock, in a revival of a transatlantic racing classic that has not been run since 1931.

 

Neither Huey Long nor Ondine was around in the 1930s, but in the '60s and late '50s few important ocean races have been sailed without them. In the 1961 Trans-Pacific Race, Long sailed Ondine to a second place on corrected time. The year before that he was Class A winner in the Bermuda-to- Sweden race. He has sailed the famed biennial 635-mile Bermuda Race four times running, races of the Southern Circuit three times. He has sailed in the Annapolis-Newport race, the Block Island race, the Storm Trysail race, has twice raced from Miami to Montego Bay and twice from Buenos Aires to Rio.

 

At one time or another Long and Ondine have raced England's Cowes and around the buoys in Long Island Sound, and Long is the only American ever to have entered Australia's Sydney-Hobart race. Since her launching slightly more than three years ago, the present Ondine has, in fact, sailed more than 77,500 miles, the equivalent of three times around the world or one-third of the way to the moon, traveling at an average speed of three and one-half knots. Her owner has traveled even farther and very considerably faster.

 

Huey Long is a product of middle-class Boston suburbia who looks a little like George Raft and a little more like the grinning cartoon face that asks, "What, me worry?" That very face, in fact, grins from an ashtray on his desk in the offices of Long, Quinn and Boylan, 37 floors above New York's Park Avenue. From there Huey directs 12 different shipping firms and a vast fleet of commercial ships. Keeping a secretary and at least two telephones busy at once, Huey recently answered a reporter's questions, dictated a business letter, held a phone conversation with Ondine,s professional sailing master (who was beset with haul-out problems), challenged an employee's methods in negotiating a deal ("You trying to make us look cheap?") and concluded a deal of his own for $6 million. Then he picked up a gym bag and went off to Vic Tanny's to lift some weights—"just to keep from getting rusty."

 

The rust prevention continued with several vodka Martinis at The Four Seasons, and another after a shower in Long's Sutton Place apartment, which is a comfortable, cluttered blend of sportsman's trophy room and interior-decorator French. To frighten prospective brides away from this bachelor sanctum, a monstrous blue sailfish looms ominously on one wall. After his shower Long was off again double-time across town (no cabs were handy) to pick up a date—who was just as pretty but no brighter than the one he had had the night before—for more Martinis and dinner with a Greek shipping line representative at an expensive East Side restaurant. After that there was a dash downtown for a late show at the Bon Soir, where a false-nosed fellow imitating Rosemary Clooney had him in stitches. At 8:45 the next morning Long was back at his desk, with his motor racing again.

 

Born 41 years ago, Huey Long experienced no special kind of childhood to fan a competitive spirit to flame. "Yet," he says, "competition has been the strongest single force in my life. Winning—winning at anything I undertake—is the goal. Take the firm. People ask me why I'm not satisfied with my fair share of the market. I say because unless we fight to get every last bit of it we won't get our fair share."

 

Long discovered early that his share of life was to come via the sea. As a boy he played hooky from school to wander down through Boston's Faneuil Hall market to the docks on Atlantic Avenue, there to watch the ships come in. "I looked at them," he says, "and I guess I had in mind someday I'd like to own them." He sailed toy boats on the Charles and, he says, "sometimes they would sail right away from me." He collected stamps and coins. "Just looking at them was adventure," he says. "I was fascinated by the origins of stamps, by the figureheads on foreign coins, by the idea that these represented countries I had not even seen." He no longer collects either. "I've seen all the places," he explains.

 

Long got his first lessons in navigation as a cadet at a nautical prep school, went on to the United States Merchant Marine Academy at King's Point and then served for two years aboard an oil tanker and a passenger ship meandering along the northern and eastern coasts of South America. "It gave me a healthy respect for the sea," he says. "In a hurricane off Cape Hatteras, I was 17, standing night watch. I couldn't see for the wind and rain. The storm broke up the life boats, smashed the serving china. The ship was rolling 33 degrees. And for the first time in my life, I was seasick."

 

Read the rest here

Russell Long, Huey's Son, Was Profiled in People in 1980 as He Raced Clipper in the Defender Trials

December 1968 profile of the 73-ft. Tripp designed Ondine

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Wow the loss of 2 great Maxi owners/sailors in a week. What a shame.

Hopefully there's a Maxi circut in heaven :)

Fair Winds and Strong following seas

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I had friends who sailed on Ondine in the late '60's. If you did a good job on watch, you'd be invited to share the sauna...yes, a sauna!

 

RIP indeed.

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A Huey Long story from way back. IIRC it was a Southern Cross Cup year and Ondine was in Sydney as part of the US team. Our crew and the US big boat boys had a pretty big party and everyone was a bit dusty for the race the next day. Ondine beat us to the shore and tacked to port but the lightish wind couldn't wind her up again as we charged in on starboard on collision course. We didn't draw as much, so our tacking point was several boatlengths past theirs. We could see the boys oversheeting like hell, grinding on winches that weren't even loaded, generally making everything worse. We called loudly and Huey started spinning the wheel one way, then the other. Ondine was by now stopped, smack in our path. With 16 tons and 8 knots, it was going to hurt if we hit. The Ondine boys (Huey included) were like deer in the headlights. The late Rolf Mische had one leg over Ondine's rail, ready to jump, when we tacked at the very last minute.

 

After the race, Huey came over to our boat and presented our skipper with a bottle of his specially labelled Ondine Reisling, then took us all to dinner.

 

Huey Long wasn't a physically big man but he was a big man in other ways.

 

RIP Mr Long.

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In the '71 Transpac (IIRC) Ondine lost her skeg and rudder after hitting something not far from the islands. Para-rescue guys from my dads AF rescue squadron were sent out to drop pumps to keep her afloat and get in to Honolulu. Afterwards we went down to see her on the hard and it was at least an 8-10' long gash where the skeg was ripped-off, with mattresses, etc still stuffed in the opening from their attempts to stem the flow.

 

Fair winds.

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As the icons pass, so does an era of sailing.

You've been DEAD as a sailor for years :lol:

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As the icons pass, so does an era of sailing.

You've been DEAD as a sailor for years :lol:

So has his cat.

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I sailed on Ondine in the Cal Cup and Long Beach Race week as a Jib Trimmer on the Beast of a Maxi in the early 80's. Huey would only come up on deck for 30 minutes at a time, a couple times a day. He would read newspapers and nap as we raced around the course. He had a dedicated and loyal crew who moved the boat around the world racing. I later raced with Russel in several Congressional Cups. The Longs are characters for sure.

 

RIP Huey.

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

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"To appreciate victory," says Huey Long, "a man has to understand defeat."

 

It's worth noting the passing of Sumner "Huey" Long who was profiled in Sports Illustrated in 1961 at the age of 41:

 

 

The Object Is to Win the Race

 

There's always a big wind there, and there's always a big sea running. It's tricky and it's dangerous. A man has his hands full driving up the Molokai Channel."

 

So says Sumner A. Long ("My friends call me Huey") of the waters pictured on the opposite page. Long knows what he is talking about. Twice in the past he has driven up the Molokai at the end of a Trans-Pacific Race, and he probably would be a part of the 31-boat fleet heading out for it once again this week except that he is busy on another ocean. As Long's old rivals start across 2,225 miles from Los Angeles to Hawaii, Long and his 57-foot yawl Ondine are leaving Newport, R.I., bound for England's Eddystone Rock, in a revival of a transatlantic racing classic that has not been run since 1931.

 

Neither Huey Long nor Ondine was around in the 1930s, but in the '60s and late '50s few important ocean races have been sailed without them. In the 1961 Trans-Pacific Race, Long sailed Ondine to a second place on corrected time. The year before that he was Class A winner in the Bermuda-to- Sweden race. He has sailed the famed biennial 635-mile Bermuda Race four times running, races of the Southern Circuit three times. He has sailed in the Annapolis-Newport race, the Block Island race, the Storm Trysail race, has twice raced from Miami to Montego Bay and twice from Buenos Aires to Rio.

 

At one time or another Long and Ondine have raced England's Cowes and around the buoys in Long Island Sound, and Long is the only American ever to have entered Australia's Sydney-Hobart race. Since her launching slightly more than three years ago, the present Ondine has, in fact, sailed more than 77,500 miles, the equivalent of three times around the world or one-third of the way to the moon, traveling at an average speed of three and one-half knots. Her owner has traveled even farther and very considerably faster.

 

Huey Long is a product of middle-class Boston suburbia who looks a little like George Raft and a little more like the grinning cartoon face that asks, "What, me worry?" That very face, in fact, grins from an ashtray on his desk in the offices of Long, Quinn and Boylan, 37 floors above New York's Park Avenue. From there Huey directs 12 different shipping firms and a vast fleet of commercial ships. Keeping a secretary and at least two telephones busy at once, Huey recently answered a reporter's questions, dictated a business letter, held a phone conversation with Ondine,s professional sailing master (who was beset with haul-out problems), challenged an employee's methods in negotiating a deal ("You trying to make us look cheap?") and concluded a deal of his own for $6 million. Then he picked up a gym bag and went off to Vic Tanny's to lift some weights—"just to keep from getting rusty."

 

The rust prevention continued with several vodka Martinis at The Four Seasons, and another after a shower in Long's Sutton Place apartment, which is a comfortable, cluttered blend of sportsman's trophy room and interior-decorator French. To frighten prospective brides away from this bachelor sanctum, a monstrous blue sailfish looms ominously on one wall. After his shower Long was off again double-time across town (no cabs were handy) to pick up a date—who was just as pretty but no brighter than the one he had had the night before—for more Martinis and dinner with a Greek shipping line representative at an expensive East Side restaurant. After that there was a dash downtown for a late show at the Bon Soir, where a false-nosed fellow imitating Rosemary Clooney had him in stitches. At 8:45 the next morning Long was back at his desk, with his motor racing again.

 

Born 41 years ago, Huey Long experienced no special kind of childhood to fan a competitive spirit to flame. "Yet," he says, "competition has been the strongest single force in my life. Winning—winning at anything I undertake—is the goal. Take the firm. People ask me why I'm not satisfied with my fair share of the market. I say because unless we fight to get every last bit of it we won't get our fair share."

 

Long discovered early that his share of life was to come via the sea. As a boy he played hooky from school to wander down through Boston's Faneuil Hall market to the docks on Atlantic Avenue, there to watch the ships come in. "I looked at them," he says, "and I guess I had in mind someday I'd like to own them." He sailed toy boats on the Charles and, he says, "sometimes they would sail right away from me." He collected stamps and coins. "Just looking at them was adventure," he says. "I was fascinated by the origins of stamps, by the figureheads on foreign coins, by the idea that these represented countries I had not even seen." He no longer collects either. "I've seen all the places," he explains.

 

Long got his first lessons in navigation as a cadet at a nautical prep school, went on to the United States Merchant Marine Academy at King's Point and then served for two years aboard an oil tanker and a passenger ship meandering along the northern and eastern coasts of South America. "It gave me a healthy respect for the sea," he says. "In a hurricane off Cape Hatteras, I was 17, standing night watch. I couldn't see for the wind and rain. The storm broke up the life boats, smashed the serving china. The ship was rolling 33 degrees. And for the first time in my life, I was seasick."

 

Read the rest here

Russell Long, Huey's Son, Was Profiled in People in 1980 as He Raced Clipper in the Defender Trials

December 1968 profile of the 73-ft. Tripp designed Ondine

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

If he was navigator then he would have been able to find his way off of JT's face. I guess it finally did, didn't it?

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RIP Huey...

I have done Many miles on the Ondine III, now called Atalanta.

Favorite quote from Ted Turner after a 1st to finish in the 1968? Sydney to Hobart...

"Huey, I dont know what it cost, but it was worth it!"

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

He is neither, he is a coat tail rider to Bermuda.

Espo has better things to do at night than sail some stupid crap shoot, guessing game nite race.

Distance racers are some of the worst sailors. Look at some of the boats than clean up at night, they can't sail there way out of a paper bag with both ends open in a day race :D

 

ie:TM :unsure:

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

He is neither, he is a coat tail rider to Bermuda.

Espo has better things to do at night than sail some stupid crap shoot, guessing game nite race.

Distance racers are some of the worst sailors. Look at some of the boats than clean up at night, they can't sail there way out of a paper bag with both ends open in a day race :D

 

ie:TM :unsure:

 

DICK!

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

He is neither, he is a coat tail rider to Bermuda.

Espo has better things to do at night than sail some stupid crap shoot, guessing game nite race.

Distance racers are some of the worst sailors. Look at some of the boats than clean up at night, they can't sail there way out of a paper bag with both ends open in a day race :D

 

ie:TM :unsure:

 

So.. Not even a memorial thread about a true (US) legend can stop you guys wanking on about your petty local schoolkids squabble.

Respect to Huey

RIP

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Actually the cat is still kickin' and will be 20 come May. She has spent more time sailing offshore and at night than espo ever will.

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

He is neither, he is a coat tail rider to Bermuda.

Espo has better things to do at night than sail some stupid crap shoot, guessing game nite race.

Distance racers are some of the worst sailors. Look at some of the boats than clean up at night, they can't sail there way out of a paper bag with both ends open in a day race :D

 

ie:TM :unsure:

 

So.. Not even a memorial thread about a true (US) legend can stop you guys wanking on about your petty local schoolkids squabble.

Respect to Huey

RIP

+1, have not been on in months, look to read about a true sailing legend's sad passing and this takes over. Now I remember why I have been busy with other things.

 

RIP Huey and the era.

 

Regards

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[

 

 

 

And she's probably a better tactician than (5 o'clock)Shadow!!

I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

He is neither, he is a coat tail rider to Bermuda.

Espo has better things to do at night than sail some stupid crap shoot, guessing game nite race.

Distance racers are some of the worst sailors. Look at some of the boats than clean up at night, they can't sail there way out of a paper bag with both ends open in a day race :D

 

ie:TM :unsure:

 

So.. Not even a memorial thread about a true (US) legend can stop you guys wanking on about your petty local schoolkids squabble.

Respect to Huey

RIP

+1, have not been on in months, look to read about a true sailing legend's sad passing and this takes over. Now I remember why I have been busy with other things.

 

RIP Huey and the era.

 

Regards

Good go back to being busy ;)

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I thoughthe was anavigator, not a tactician.

He is neither, he is a coat tail rider to Bermuda.

Espo has better things to do at night than sail some stupid crap shoot, guessing game nite race.

Distance racers are some of the worst sailors. Look at some of the boats than clean up at night, they can't sail there way out of a paper bag with both ends open in a day race :D

 

ie:TM :unsure:

 

So.. Not even a memorial thread about a true (US) legend can stop you guys wanking on about your petty local schoolkids squabble.

Respect to Huey

RIP

+1, have not been on in months, look to read about a true sailing legend's sad passing and this takes over. Now I remember why I have been busy with other things.

 

RIP Huey and the era.

 

Regards

Good go back to being busy ;)

 

 

Good job, John.

 

Stay classy and make sure you keep on shitting on this thread (and Bevin's) since it means something to someone. We can't have that, can we, God of PHRF Class Z.

 

Great jib trim, by the way. You ever going to actually drive or do you have a snappy comeback for that as well?

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ie:TM :unsure:

 

So.. Not even a memorial thread about a true (US) legend can stop you guys wanking on about your petty local schoolkids squabble.

Respect to Huey

RIP

+1, have not been on in months, look to read about a true sailing legend's sad passing and this takes over. Now I remember why I have been busy with other things.

 

RIP Huey and the era.

 

Regards

Good go back to being busy ;)

 

 

Good job, John.

 

Stay classy and make sure you keep on shitting on this thread (and Bevin's) since it means something to someone. We can't have that, can we, God of PHRF Class Z.

 

Great jib trim, by the way. You ever going to actually drive or do you have a snappy comeback for that as well?

Any idiot can drive. So stick your head back in your ass and go away

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Posted · Hidden by Evo, January 5, 2012 - No reason given

Any idiot can drive.

 

maybe...but very few drive well. you will never know

 

nice of you to call your driver an idiot though (Luca Brasi?)

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Any idiot can drive.

 

maybe...but very few drive well. you will never know

 

nice of you to call your driver an idiot though (Luca Brasi?)

Coming from a guy who can't afford to own a car, nevermind own or drive a boat.

Go back to the jewlery store, idiot!

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Posted · Hidden by Evo, January 4, 2012 - No reason given

Any idiot can drive.

 

maybe...but very few drive well. you will never know

 

nice of you to call your driver an idiot though (Luca Brasi?)

Coming from a guy who can't afford to own a car, nevermind own or drive a boat.

Go back to the jewlery store, idiot!

 

hahahaha!

 

whoever told you that was just as nasty and misinformed as you are. Whatcha going to do nasty boy...baseball bat to the knees?

 

crawl back under your rock arsehole....you are a blight on sailing as you have well proved on this thread. Too unco to drive eh jib trimmer john?

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Classic Cayard story I'm reminded of when a jib trimmer thinks anyone can drive.

 

Later that summer, Tom asked me to crew for him in the Star North American’s in Toronto. The deal was that I had to drive the boat out there as he would fly in from Europe and, in fact, he would miss the first race. I was excited and of course agreed. Craig Healy and I drove the boat out there with Craig’s Laser on the roof of Tom’s old blue Chevy Malibu station wagon (aka the blue pig). We got to Toronto one week early. After getting a few reprimands for not wearing our T-shirts in the 100 degree heat while washing the boat in the boat park (very conservative - the Royal Canadian YC/ Paul Henderson), we took the boat out every day and trained against the likes of Durward Knowles, Ding Schoonmaker, Buddy Melges. Not bad for 19 year old kids from San Francisco.

 

Finally Tom showed up and we went out to race the second race. It wasn’t that simple but if I don’t move along here, this will turn into a novel. (Something about not wearing a blazer to get on the club launch that takes you out to the island that the RCYC is on - Henderson again) We were almost out of the regatta that morning thanks to Tom’s language.

 

Anyway, we get out on the race track and around the bottom mark the first time, we are in second. Bill Buchan with Doug Knight crewing are winning, Dennis Conner with Ron Anderson are in third, Buddy with Andreas Josenhans are in fourth, Schoonmaker, Knowles, Driscoll, Wright, Whipple, Allsop, etc. Now for the not-so-nurturing part of Tom:

 

Me to Tom as I slide out over the side into the mini hike, “How is the jib?”

Tom replies,“WHAT!” in a high pitched, almost female voice.

Me a bit more sheepishly now, “How is the jib? Is it on the marks?”

Tom, “Yea, anywhere in there is fine. If that was important, I’d be doing it!”

Me to myself, “Oh.”

 

Nothing said for about 10 minutes as I curled up into a ball and pretended to melt into the topsides.

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Posted · Hidden by Evo, December 27, 2011 - No reason given

JT...have you ever sailed with John? it only takes a few races. he's an organiser. nothing wrong with that but he is fucking clueless about which way the wind is blowing and how that effects the water. relies heavily on being an organiser. nothing wrong with that

 

that said...when he hits the dock it's a whole 'nother story. fucking gigantic blowhard who didn't really understand what happened out there that day but will take all the credit despite being the dumb fuck on the race course calling to go the wrong way for no good reason other than he needed to have something to say. joke

 

while johnny boy deserves credit for his organisational skillz the true irony is the braggadoccio

 

more chips on his shoulder than the average kiwi but twice as dumb

 

to think i once gave him respect galls me....the blokes a cunt. shoulda charged him more like i was told to.

 

oh...and Mr Sumner...vale...you almost killed me...twice

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Any idiot can drive.

 

maybe...but very few drive well. you will never know

 

nice of you to call your driver an idiot though (Luca Brasi?)

Coming from a guy who can't afford to own a car, nevermind own or drive a boat.

Go back to the jewlery store, idiot!

How old is that peice of shit floating house you live on.

Anytime you would like to have a drive off let me know, because I have tactated against you and you suck at that. Plus you where paid a $100 per Wed nite by a friend of mine who did worse with you on board than he did the year before

hahahaha!

 

whoever told you that was just as nasty and misinformed as you are. Whatcha going to do nasty boy...baseball bat to the knees?

 

crawl back under your rock arsehole....you are a blight on sailing as you have well proved on this thread. Too unco to drive eh jib trimmer john?

Oh the irony coming from a guy who sails his dad's 25+ year old boat, can't drive for shit, and has to have his friends buy him sails. You just can't make this stuff up!

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Please join us to remember and celebrate the life of Huey Long

~

Saturday, 7 January, 2012

2 PM

~

The Chapel

King's Point Merchant Marine Academy

King's Point, NY

~

 

We look forward to your presence, and your reminiscences of Huey's life .

 

Please let us know if you would like to speak informally at the service, and share some of your memories of Huey, on and off the Ondine. We welcome your participation .

 

Thank you for being part of Huey's amazing life, and thank you for reaching out to us now.

 

Russell, Jack, Harry, and Suzanne

 

RSVP

There is security at the entrance of the Academy (to keep Espo out).

 

Please let us know if you are attending , so that we have your name.

 

Travel via Automobile

• From Points South and West: I-95/New Jersey Turnpike North or I-80 East to George Washington Bridge. Continue straight and follow signs for Cross Bronx Expressway; DO NOT exit in Manhattan. Follow signs to either the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge or the Throgs Neck Bridge; you may take either Bridge.

• From New England and Points North: I-95/New England Thruway South to Exit 7A in New York (I-695 to I-295/Throgs Neck Bridge). Follow to Throgs Neck Bridge.

• From the Throgs Neck Bridge: Stay to the right across bridge and take exit from the right-hand lane(s) about ¾ the way across bridge span for the Cross Island Parkway. Follow the Parkway to Exit 31E (Northern Blvd/25A); follow directions from Northern Blvd below.

• From the Bronx-Whitestone Bridge: Stay to the left across bridge and take exit from the left-hand lane(s) for the Cross Island Parkway; follow to Exit 31E (Northern Blvd/25A).

• From Manhattan: Take 34th Street East to Queens Midtown Tunnel. Follow Long Island Expressway I-495 East to Exit 32 (Little Neck Parkway). Left/North on Little Neck Parkway about ¾ mile to Northern Blvd/25A. Turn right on Northern Blvd/25A.

• From Northern Blvd/25A: Proceed east (1.4 miles from the Cross Island Parkway; 0.3 mile from Little Neck Parkway) through village of Little Neck and many traffic lights to intersection with Great Neck Road. After you pass an Exxon gas station and a four-story, brown office building on the left, you want to be in the two (2) left turn lanes here. Turn left (or North) on Great Neck Road and continue straight at second traffic light (Great Neck Road bears to the right here). Continuing northwest, the road is now Bayview Avenue/West Shore Road. At end of West Shore Road (distance from Northern Blvd/25A to end is about 2.5 miles), turn right onto Kings Point Road and then left at the next stop sign onto Steamboat Road to Academy front gate.

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Posted · Hidden by Evo, January 4, 2012 - No reason given

all this from an insurance selling parasite? really?

 

you certainly do have that giant nose of yours all bent out of shape don't you johnny boy....whatever skills i have was enough to make a profit out of you. nothing easier than selling to a know nothing blowhard

 

cheers parasite. get back under your rock :)

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I wish the admistrators would flick the both of you. This thread isn't about your bromance. Please fuck off.

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I wish the admistrators would flick the both of you. This thread isn't about your bromance. Please fuck off.

 

Well put.

But you are giving the administrators too much credit. They haven't the slightest idea who Huey Long was (except to think a bridge was named after him).

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