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LilMissy

Trimaran choices

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There is a nice Native somewhere down in Central America...

At the high end of the ladder is the PT-11 from Aquidneck Custom. Go for the taller rig version. I race on a Corsair 37 Carbon. I would not recomend it unless you plan to do a lot of after purchase repairs and streangthening to the boat. Too bad as the design and concept are great.

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The final meeting on Friday involving MSQ, Water Police, and officers from both mono and multihull clubs, approved the combined start. Similar to starts in the good all days, the monohulls (and their keels) will start outside a line dividing marker, and 10 minutes later the multihulls will start in close to the jetty in the same direction.

:huh: ?

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The final meeting on Friday involving MSQ, Water Police, and officers from both mono and multihull clubs, approved the combined start. Similar to starts in the good all days, the monohulls (and their keels) will start outside a line dividing marker, and 10 minutes later the multihulls will start in close to the jetty in the same direction.

:huh: ?

 

someone taking the piss, copying other peoples quotes from other threads and pasting them into non-relevant threads. go figure.

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need wwwaaaayyyy more info. do you want folding/demountable or not? looking for new or used? live aboard or not? racing, cruising, both?

 

in the size range you've quoted you can get some big folder/swinger/demountables or you can get full on blue water cruisers or hardcore all out racers.

 

There is a used 40ft Kurt Hughes trimaran kicking around for a nice price, pretty austere inside but very light and fast as a result. Would be my pick for a 40ft tri.

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3 posts?? welcome to SA. please post pictures relative to welcome.

what's your budget?? sailing area? carbon 3 looks nice...good

conducive interests, one will get rid of the other...

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Find an issue of the French Magazine Multihulls World. Or any French multi magazine. Barnes and Nobel usually have it.

 

It will blow your mind.

 

I don't know if you can buy any in the US. I didn't even check to see if you are in the US. Shit. Sorry.

 

Check out New Zealand and Australian sites/ manufacturers/ designers. Cool stuff. What is it, the 8.5 box rule class in NZ? Check it out. All sorts of links to cool bigger designs.

 

Randy Reynolds has some new stuff out that might not raise hackles. And the guys with the hackles know who they are.....

 

Edit- oops! Cat.

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The final meeting on Friday involving MSQ, Water Police, and officers from both mono and multihull clubs, approved the combined start. Similar to starts in the good all days, the monohulls (and their keels) will start outside a line dividing marker, and 10 minutes later the multihulls will start in close to the jetty in the same direction.

:huh: ?

 

someone taking the piss, copying other peoples quotes from other threads and pasting them into non-relevant threads. go figure.

 

Probably not... a number of times I've seen the forum put my post on a different thread than I was replying to, and had to delete it and try again.

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Contour 34, in the SA Classifieds is an option - think Dragonfly without the Danish interior.

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Find an issue of the French Magazine Multihulls World. Or any French multi magazine. Barnes and Nobel usually have it.

 

It will blow your mind.

 

I don't know if you can buy any in the US. I didn't even check to see if you are in the US. Shit. Sorry.

 

West Marine sells that multi-hull mag too! I always pick it up a drool.

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There is a used 40ft Kurt Hughes trimaran kicking around for a nice price, pretty austere inside but very light and fast as a result. Would be my pick for a 40ft tri.

 

 

Please don't buy this one, I'm hoping it is still for sale in 2014 when I finish my masters degree and take it to the Great Lakes!

Tri

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There is a used 40ft Kurt Hughes trimaran kicking around for a nice price, pretty austere inside but very light and fast as a result. Would be my pick for a 40ft tri.

 

 

Please don't buy this one, I'm hoping it is still for sale in 2014 when I finish my masters degree and take it to the Great Lakes!

Tri

 

I think it sold and on its way to Belgium. They actually diassembled it in the water at the dock, and used the small dry dock launch crane to put it on a trailer.

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Bid? That boat (Virgin FIre) is such a steal and the guy has dropped his price so far it is sad. A great boat, I know firsthand and it will need some sails and such but is a very sound boat and worth a look. Big and fast though, we kicked butt all over the Caribbean multihull circuit for years and it has a very spacious if spartan interior. Just don't tell the owner that you are going to put an inboard diesel and generator and airconditioning on it or he won't sell it to you for any price. A very knowlegeable and experienced multihull sailor and he designed the boat so don't f**k with his creation! Some things just need to be left alone, and this boat will deliver in spades.

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Faamu Sami is for sale too, at a silly low price considering what she cost to build. Been on her, sailed next to her, pretty remarkable one-off as well. Set up to singlehand with wife and small kids... at 2x wind speed.

 

Virgin Fire is still sweet, I remember the first time I saw her was going through the CC canal and I almost snapped my neck trying to get a good look.

 

On a more practical note, I know the owner of a certain Newick Tricia that is eager to sell. I'm quite familiar with the boat and would encourage someone who likes that design to pursue this one in particular.

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Virgin Fire is a great boat but while I also prefer the outboard most cruisers don't like those trade-offs... and then you the have the wood/epoxy construction. At 56 feet she is a lot of boat for a couple cruising. I'm gonna guess the price will have to drop a lot more before she sells.

 

The Kurt Hughes boat is also an outboard with limited tankage. Ten feet shorter and $50K cheaper might be a good thing if going cruising but still, you are up around the price you can find an Atlantic 42 for. I know its a cat but if I was strictly cruising that is the direction I would head.

 

Either one of those tris would be a blast to go casual racing on though.

 

I have always wondered... with already having a propone stove on board, why not use the propane hot water heaters and or fridges? The heck with the weight of the inboards!

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2 condor 40's up for sale at less than $100K. This is my kind of budget, but how are the accommodations for live-aboard? The last tri I was on was a bit spartan in this regard. Of course plenty of deck space to crash on at anchor in the Caribbean. I doubt you can get anything faster and equally offshore capable for less than $150K?

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Condors have a sorted history. They are relatively heavy to begin with (thus slower than you might expect), and more than one of them has had serious wet core issues in the amas. I'm not going to say they are something to steer clear of, but definitely do your research.

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Cruising trimaran for sale on SA this week. 38x24,canted amas,open wing,nice galley,probuilt,epoxy,Airex,double aft,plus 2 sets of bunkbeds,close to the Bahamas. It would cost over $300k to build her today. $77k. post-51040-062774100 1328736602_thumb.jpgsee her on SA classifieds this week.

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Condors have a sorted history. They are relatively heavy to begin with (thus slower than you might expect), and more than one of them has had serious wet core issues in the amas. I'm not going to say they are something to steer clear of, but definitely do your research.

 

There were 3 Super Condors built, they where almost 2000lbs lighter,sat 5' higher in the water and didn't have the core problems. After the first 3 boats were built they were jobed out to two different builders. The core problems were due to a lack of resin on the inside of the hulls and bad hatches.These first 3 boats where built in house for the OSTAR.Notice the light chop,this is about a 6 knot breeze and she flys. The compression posts also need to be reinforced. The super Condors are race boats with two huge berths! they are underpost-51040-027454700 1328806360_thumb.jpgvalued due to the other Condors. Hull # 21 is a one off and I have no inside info on it. Each Condor needs to be valued seperately

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Other than F boats or Dragonflies most everything is going to be custom and many would've had some racing past. having said that that might make for relatively low prices as you can see but you'll have to search far and wide to find something already built. What kind of cruising are you talking about? Coastal, blue water light, blue water with washing machines, island hopping in the Caribbean?

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Why not Sail it? Would be an awesome trip all downhill from there and she looks like

she'd cover the miles fast and easily.

 

 

Thats a lot of boat $100,000 but hardly a cruiser...Shame it would cost over $50,000 to ship to oz

 

 

 

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Why not Sail it? Would be an awesome trip all downhill from there and she looks like

she'd cover the miles fast and easily.

 

 

Thats a lot of boat $100,000 but hardly a cruiser...Shame it would cost over $50,000 to ship to oz

 

 

 

 

If you bought something like that in Europe which way would you sail it back to Aus?

 

Through either canal or sail down the coast of Africa?

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current conversion rate 59,000 Euros is about $72000 AUD and similar in USD not sure about import charges some F40's demount into a 40' container it doesnt look like this one does but could be worth checking. You would have to unsplice and rejoin the mast to fit in the container if you wanted to freight rather than sail it back.

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Why not Sail it? Would be an awesome trip all downhill from there and she looks like

she'd cover the miles fast and easily.

 

 

Thats a lot of boat $100,000 but hardly a cruiser...Shame it would cost over $50,000 to ship to oz

 

 

 

 

If you bought something like that in Europe which way would you sail it back to Aus?

 

Through either canal or sail down the coast of Africa?

 

Canal, and stop at every tropo island group in the south pacific along the way....... Didn't trimaraner just do the same trip?

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1328569400[/url]' post='3575788']
1328568615[/url]' post='3575772']

There is a nice Native somewhere down in Central America...

At the high end of the ladder is the PT-11 from Aquidneck Custom. Go for the taller rig version. I race on a Corsair 37 Carbon. I would not recomend it unless you plan to do a lot of after purchase repairs and streangthening to the boat. Too bad as the design and concept are great.

 

I looked up the PT11 thanks. It is built in the states and looks the part. Really cool blog about the build,( the quality looks to be incredible) linked to the web site www.performancemultuhulls.com the price is not inexpensive but less than a dragonfly and it is a 6000 # boat not a 12000# boat.. Has anyone sailed one yet, or seen one around?

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1328569400[/url]' post='3575788']
1328568615[/url]' post='3575772']

There is a nice Native somewhere down in Central America...

At the high end of the ladder is the PT-11 from Aquidneck Custom. Go for the taller rig version. I race on a Corsair 37 Carbon. I would not recomend it unless you plan to do a lot of after purchase repairs and streangthening to the boat. Too bad as the design and concept are great.

 

I looked up the PT11 thanks. It is built in the states and looks the part. Really cool blog about the build,( the quality looks to be incredible) linked to the web site www.performancemultuhulls.com the price is not inexpensive but less than a dragonfly and it is a 6000 # boat not a 12000# boat.. Has anyone sailed one yet, or seen one around?

 

Was at the Annapolis show this year. Nice boat and nice guys. First tri I thought I might have a chance to get my wife to agree to go cruising on! I like the second generation version.

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Scout a Walter Green 39' trimaran has been for sail and advertised in the New England multihull newslatter. great racer cruiser, composite hulls, carbon mast. Owner moved to the midwest.

Brad Johanson

Formula 40 Northern Rainbow

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For sure the easier route would be from France through to the Caribbean, through the

canal and across the Pacific. It's pretty easy with most of the journey being in the warmer

latitudes and with trade winds found most the way. Need any help drop me a line!

Why not Sail it? Would be an awesome trip all downhill from there and she looks like

she'd cover the miles fast and easily.

 

 

Thats a lot of boat $100,000 but hardly a cruiser...Shame it would cost over $50,000 to ship to oz

 

 

 

 

If you bought something like that in Europe which way would you sail it back to Aus?

 

Through either canal or sail down the coast of Africa?

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1329856573[/url]' post='3594345']
1329854990[/url]' post='3594291']
1328569400[/url]' post='3575788']
1328568615[/url]' post='3575772']

There is a nice Native somewhere down in Central America...

At the high end of the ladder is the PT-11 from Aquidneck Custom. Go for the taller rig version. I race on a Corsair 37 Carbon. I would not recomend it unless you plan to do a lot of after purchase repairs and streangthening to the boat. Too bad as the design and concept are great.

 

I looked up the PT11 thanks. It is built in the states and looks the part. Really cool blog about the build,( the quality looks to be incredible) linked to the web site www.performancemultuhulls.com the price is not inexpensive but less than a dragonfly and it is a 6000 # boat not a 12000# boat.. Has anyone sailed one yet, or seen one around?

 

Was at the Annapolis show this year. Nice boat and nice guys. First tri I thought I might have a chance to get my wife to agree to go cruising on! I like the second generation version.

Are you looking at it? I am going to contact the Company and see if I can visit the yard. On their Facebook page they were offering test sails, at least they were last year.. It seems some other folks have seen the boat around too. I was told It was very fast and has topped 24 knots. Version 2 looks to be even faster, lighter with more rig..

 

 

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1329856573[/url]' post='3594345']
1329854990[/url]' post='3594291']
1328569400[/url]' post='3575788']
1328568615[/url]' post='3575772']

There is a nice Native somewhere down in Central America...

At the high end of the ladder is the PT-11 from Aquidneck Custom. Go for the taller rig version. I race on a Corsair 37 Carbon. I would not recomend it unless you plan to do a lot of after purchase repairs and streangthening to the boat. Too bad as the design and concept are great.

 

I looked up the PT11 thanks. It is built in the states and looks the part. Really cool blog about the build,( the quality looks to be incredible) linked to the web site www.performancemultuhulls.com the price is not inexpensive but less than a dragonfly and it is a 6000 # boat not a 12000# boat.. Has anyone sailed one yet, or seen one around?

 

Was at the Annapolis show this year. Nice boat and nice guys. First tri I thought I might have a chance to get my wife to agree to go cruising on! I like the second generation version.

Are you looking at it? I am going to contact the Company and see if I can visit the yard. On their Facebook page they were offering test sails, at least they were last year.. It seems some other folks have seen the boat around too. I was told It was very fast and has topped 24 knots. Version 2 looks to be even faster, lighter with more rig..

 

More long term than short term. We sold our big cruising boats when the kids went to school and right now they are in middle and high school. So for now we are sticking to our F27 and doing more daysailing and occasional racing. Long term it could be on the list.

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For sure the easier route would be from France through to the Caribbean, through the

canal and across the Pacific. It's pretty easy with most of the journey being in the warmer

latitudes and with trade winds found most the way. Need any help drop me a line!

Why not Sail it? Would be an awesome trip all downhill from there and she looks like

she'd cover the miles fast and easily.

 

 

Thats a lot of boat $100,000 but hardly a cruiser...Shame it would cost over $50,000 to ship to oz

 

 

 

 

If you bought something like that in Europe which way would you sail it back to Aus?

 

Through either canal or sail down the coast of Africa?

I viewed this boat at the weekend. The mast is a two-piece so the whole boat will go into a 40' container.

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Why not Sail it? Would be an awesome trip all downhill from there and she looks like

she'd cover the miles fast and easily.

 

 

Thats a lot of boat $100,000 but hardly a cruiser...Shame it would cost over $50,000 to ship to oz

 

 

 

 

If you bought something like that in Europe which way would you sail it back to Aus?

 

Through either canal or sail down the coast of Africa?

 

Prolly thru the Panama Canal as it's probably the shortest and easiest. Suez leads to Pirate infested waters (and head winds I think) in the Red Sea. Around the Cape of Good Hope would be doable but the roaring 40s are nothing to fuck with and the St Helena high can add a lot of distance.

 

Would a 40ft boat fit in a 40 ft container?

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Normally the formula 40's (if they were demountable) were just a touch under 40' to facilitate container transport you might have to make a shipping cradle to hold the hulls and mast solidly in the container though. Its handy that it has a two piece mast would make the shipping procedure much easier.

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Normally the formula 40's (if they were demountable) were just a touch under 40' to facilitate container transport you might have to make a shipping cradle to hold the hulls and mast solidly in the container though. Its handy that it has a two piece mast would make the shipping procedure much easier.

That seems to be the case here, as it is actually 39'5" long according to the spec.

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There is a nice Native somewhere down in Central America...

At the high end of the ladder is the PT-11 from Aquidneck Custom. Go for the taller rig version. I race on a Corsair 37 Carbon. I would not recomend it unless you plan to do a lot of after purchase repairs and streangthening to the boat. Too bad as the design and concept are great.

 

I looked up the PT11 thanks. It is built in the states and looks the part. Really cool blog about the build,( the quality looks to be incredible) linked to the web site www.performancemultuhulls.com the price is not inexpensive but less than a dragonfly and it is a 6000 # boat not a 12000# boat.. Has anyone sailed one yet, or seen one around?

 

Was at the Annapolis show this year. Nice boat and nice guys. First tri I thought I might have a chance to get my wife to agree to go cruising on! I like the second generation version.

Are you looking at it? I am going to contact the Company and see if I can visit the yard. On their Facebook page they were offering test sails, at least they were last year.. It seems some other folks have seen the boat around too. I was told It was very fast and has topped 24 knots. Version 2 looks to be even faster, lighter with more rig..

 

 

 

Hello,

 

I am the designer of the PT11 and PT11R. Curently Three Little Birds (PT11 #1) is at Aquidneck Custom so readily available for viewing. Unfortunately this means no test sails for a bit. I was just up from St. Croix (where I am based) last weekend (designed a little kit stitch and glue dinghy for TLB and we cut and built the prototype at ACC) and checked her out. She was getting a few mods like any boat, big one is an improved anchor roller that Bill Koffler (owner of Aquidneck Custom) came up with as we found we needed something a bit more than the original setup for short handed cruising.

 

Boat sails fantastic, very balanced. I was on her when we went 24 knots, and multiple times we have hit 20 knots. One of the things she does very well is cruise in the mid to high teens with little effort. When we took her to the Annapolis Boat Show we went the long way around the Cape May shoals, all the way to Lewes, basically where the ferry comes out. 4 hours later we were at the C&D Canal. We made a nice hot lunch along the way, the boat was sailing so well. Three of us brought her down: myself, Bill, and Kevin, one of his work crew who had never been on a long sailing trip. Bill and I brought her back, no problems.

 

The large amas are one of the outstanding features. They give the design both power and safety while pressed hard or in really rough weather.

 

A fast, comfortable cruising tri is exactly what the PT11 design was intended to be. The 11R is developed from what we learned from Three Little Birds. I added the taller rig to help with the light air performance (which is still very good on TLB). The interior was simplified both layout and equipment wise. The boat is one piece, not demountable, which saves weight, cost and allows longer curved mainsheet traveler. The cockpit was redesigned to a more open version, and I took 100mm of freeboard out of the main hull, for weight, windage and cost reasons.

 

Either version can be configured to whatever you need interior wise. Each boat is built to order so within reason whatever changes you desire can be incorporated. The main structure locations (main bulkhead, beams, board trunk) of course are fixed but within them we can move things around as desired.

 

One thing to remember about the diesel inboard versus gas outboard is that the weight of the inboard is much closer to the center of the boat compared to an outboard on the stern. Works much better in a seaway, too. The weight of these new small diesels is not too far away from an outboard, along with the safer fuel and greater range per gallon, there is the better charging capacity and potential for direct hot water heat etc.

 

The owner of Three Little Birds is thrilled with her, which in the end is the most important part.

 

Here is the video up Delaware Bay:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUCH7-nvsvQ

 

Off New York the day before, also cooking lunch at the same time (Bill is an excellent cook):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zboF896jf8w

 

 

Best regards, Dave Walworth

 

walworthdesigns.com

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Faamu Sami is for sale too, at a silly low price considering what she cost to build. Been on her, sailed next to her, pretty remarkable one-off as well. Set up to singlehand with wife and small kids... at 2x wind speed.

 

Virgin Fire is still sweet, I remember the first time I saw her was going through the CC canal and I almost snapped my neck trying to get a good look.

 

On a more practical note, I know the owner of a certain Newick Tricia that is eager to sell. I'm quite familiar with the boat and would encourage someone who likes that design to pursue this one in particular.

Was Virgin Fire Joe Colpitt's boat or am I getting mixed up?

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Faamu Sami is for sale too, at a silly low price considering what she cost to build. Been on her, sailed next to her, pretty remarkable one-off as well. Set up to singlehand with wife and small kids... at 2x wind speed.

 

Virgin Fire is still sweet, I remember the first time I saw her was going through the CC canal and I almost snapped my neck trying to get a good look.

 

On a more practical note, I know the owner of a certain Newick Tricia that is eager to sell. I'm quite familiar with the boat and would encourage someone who likes that design to pursue this one in particular.

Was Virgin Fire Joe Colpitt's boat or am I getting mixed up?

 

None other!

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The Corsair 37CR sailing from Stamford Ct to Block Island at a leisurely 16 to 18 knots. The leg took only a little more than 6 hours with bursts of 22knots+ at times in Block Island Sound under jib and reefed main. In this size, speed and cruisablility I only know of this boat and the PT11. The PT11 is vastly superior in build quality, but is more expensive. In long run the PT11 would be a better tradeoff if you can swing it.

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The Corsair 37CR sailing from Stamford Ct to Block Island at a leisurely 16 to 18 knots.

B30-Is this the same Corsair 37CR that is now on San Francisco Bay?

 

 

Cheers!!!

 

-MH

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Looks like a great boat but the price isn't exactly reachable by many of us, myself included :(

 

Thanks, she really is.

 

One thing to remember is the price does include a full set of Quantum laminated sails: main, jib, screacher, asymmetrical chute.

 

Hey, I can't afford one either so come on people, get out there and buy a bunch so I can:)

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Looks like a great boat but the price isn't exactly reachable by many of us, myself included :(

 

Understand and agree, but I've seen the boat and the finish and detailing is absolutely first class- meaning the boat offers good value even if it is not a bargain.

 

 

 

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Looks like a great boat but the price isn't exactly reachable by many of us, myself included :(

 

Understand and agree, but I've seen the boat and the finish and detailing is absolutely first class- meaning the boat offers good value even if it is not a bargain.

Tucks,

 

You talking about the birdie or Faamu Sami, or both? They came came through your neck of the woods so was not sure which one you were referencing.

 

 

Wess

(still west coast dreamin)

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The Corsair 37CR sailing from Stamford Ct to Block Island at a leisurely 16 to 18 knots.

B30-Is this the same Corsair 37CR that is now on San Francisco Bay?

 

 

Cheers!!!

 

-MH

No. It isn't. They both do have those same dumb stripes on the sails though!. The one I sail on, Milk and Honey III, is actualy at WYD_Dave's shop in Brisotl, RI (builder of the PT11) getting some major repairs and modifications. We wil be racing out of the Newport, RI area this summer.

 

If anyone knows the boat in this vid in SF, I would love to get in touch him. PM me.

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Looks like a great boat but the price isn't exactly reachable by many of us, myself included :(

 

Understand and agree, but I've seen the boat and the finish and detailing is absolutely first class- meaning the boat offers good value even if it is not a bargain.

Tucks,

 

You talking about the birdie or Faamu Sami, or both? They came came through your neck of the woods so was not sure which one you were referencing.

 

 

Wess

(still west coast dreamin)

 

Sorry, I was referring to Three Little Birds, which I toured a year ago. I didn't sail her.

 

I have sailed on Faamu Sami. She was built by Maine Cat and is nicely built. Very plain level of finish, actually more my style- "an appliance for sailing". My understanding is she is a cut down Kurt Hughes design, meaning shortened so she is like an ORMA 60- seriously wide and powerful, but not light for her weight. A very strong light air boat but a handful in a breeze- a lot of mast on a short hull . . . . . just like an ORMA 60:-)

 

 

 

 

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Looks like a great boat but the price isn't exactly reachable by many of us, myself included :(

 

Understand and agree, but I've seen the boat and the finish and detailing is absolutely first class- meaning the boat offers good value even if it is not a bargain.

Tucks,

 

You talking about the birdie or Faamu Sami, or both? They came came through your neck of the woods so was not sure which one you were referencing.

 

 

Wess

(still west coast dreamin)

 

Sorry, I was referring to Three Little Birds, which I toured a year ago. I didn't sail her.

 

I have sailed on Faamu Sami. She was built by Maine Cat and is nicely built. Very plain level of finish, actually more my style- "an appliance for sailing". My understanding is she is a cut down Kurt Hughes design, meaning shortened so she is like an ORMA 60- seriously wide and powerful, but not light for her weight. A very strong light air boat but a handful in a breeze- a lot of mast on a short hull . . . . . just like an ORMA 60:-)

 

 

I agree w you on birds. Saw her at the show. Nice build quality

 

But what are you sipping on up there? FS being "not light for her weight." Got a smile from me on that one. I like Kurt's boats, Dick and the other folks that handles the build are respected and my wife would actually be OK with the level of the finish, and it would be fin in the Chesapeake air but still... a bit racey for this old man, and pricey for what she can do.

 

I am starting to think when I am done with the F27, I need an Atlantic 42 with a Snipe in the davits.

 

Wess

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Condors have a sorted history. They are relatively heavy to begin with (thus slower than you might expect), and more than one of them has had serious wet core issues in the amas. I'm not going to say they are something to steer clear of, but definitely do your research.

 

There were 3 Super Condors built, they where almost 2000lbs lighter,sat 5' higher in the water and didn't have the core problems. After the first 3 boats were built they were jobed out to two different builders. The core problems were due to a lack of resin on the inside of the hulls and bad hatches.These first 3 boats where built in house for the OSTAR.Notice the light chop,this is about a 6 knot breeze and she flys. The compression posts also need to be reinforced. The super Condors are race boats with two huge berths! they are underpost-51040-027454700 1328806360_thumb.jpgvalued due to the other Condors. Hull # 21 is a one off and I have no inside info on it. Each Condor needs to be valued seperately

 

As a very happy, longtime Condor 40 owner, I'd like to clear up a few mis-perceptions on the Condor 40's. First, there is no such thing as a "Super Condor." All the boats are pretty much the same, with some minor variations in weight because 4 different builders built the boats (Condor Limited assembled them). Only 2 boats had ama core issues, because the boats sat for several years with condensation, etc. causing the amas to have a lot of standing water.

 

Also, for a racing boat built in the mid-80's, Condors are not "heavy" boats. They were all built with vinylester resin. They will do 9 kts upwind in 12 knts of breeze. Crack off a bit and you're flying. I've routinely hit low to mid 20's when it's blowing 30-35, with full sail, no surfing, no spinn. And the boat's as stable as a sidewalk.

 

Cruising: 2 people or 2 peeps with small kids can comfortably cruise the boat (we cruised to the Exumas). There's not a ton of room below, it's like a roomy loft space. But you spend all your time outside once you're down-island anyways. And there are 2 berths that are as big as a double-bed. You sleep really well.

 

Sailing: I did a double-handed transat on a Condor 40 -- 6 months after the boat had just crossed to Europe. 30 days, 6000 miles, and we didn't break anything. The boats are solid, fun, fast, affordable boats.

 

And, 25 years later, they still look damned cool. You don't see ordinary people taking photos of Corsairs or Gunboats, but you'll see a lot of people whipping out camera phones when they see a Condor -- even when the boats are sitting at the dock :)

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There,s the perfect boat for sale Victoria. F9RX "SKIPS" Sail the oceans, trailer to the Tropics and reasonably priced. Has a toilet,shower and goes fast if you want.

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Condors have a sorted history. They are relatively heavy to begin with (thus slower than you might expect), and more than one of them has had serious wet core issues in the amas. I'm not going to say they are something to steer clear of, but definitely do your research.

 

There were 3 Super Condors built, they where almost 2000lbs lighter,sat 5' higher in the water and didn't have the core problems. After the first 3 boats were built they were jobed out to two different builders. The core problems were due to a lack of resin on the inside of the hulls and bad hatches.These first 3 boats where built in house for the OSTAR.Notice the light chop,this is about a 6 knot breeze and she flys. The compression posts also need to be reinforced. The super Condors are race boats with two huge berths! they are underpost-51040-027454700 1328806360_thumb.jpgvalued due to the other Condors. Hull # 21 is a one off and I have no inside info on it. Each Condor needs to be valued seperately

 

As a very happy, longtime Condor 40 owner, I'd like to clear up a few mis-perceptions on the Condor 40's. First, there is no such thing as a "Super Condor." All the boats are pretty much the same, with some minor variations in weight because 4 different builders built the boats (Condor Limited assembled them). Only 2 boats had ama core issues, because the boats sat for several years with condensation, etc. causing the amas to have a lot of standing water.

 

Also, for a racing boat built in the mid-80's, Condors are not "heavy" boats. They were all built with vinylester resin. They will do 9 kts upwind in 12 knts of breeze. Crack off a bit and you're flying. I've routinely hit low to mid 20's when it's blowing 30-35, with full sail, no surfing, no spinn. And the boat's as stable as a sidewalk.

 

Cruising: 2 people or 2 peeps with small kids can comfortably cruise the boat (we cruised to the Exumas). There's not a ton of room below, it's like a roomy loft space. But you spend all your time outside once you're down-island anyways. And there are 2 berths that are as big as a double-bed. You sleep really well.

 

Sailing: I did a double-handed transat on a Condor 40 -- 6 months after the boat had just crossed to Europe. 30 days, 6000 miles, and we didn't break anything. The boats are solid, fun, fast, affordable boats.

 

And, 25 years later, they still look damned cool. You don't see ordinary people taking photos of Corsairs or Gunboats, but you'll see a lot of people whipping out camera phones when they see a Condor -- even when the boats are sitting at the dock :)

 

Is your boat Trident that resides in Miami?

 

Joe

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Multihulls Direct (www.mulithullsdirect.com) will build you a brand new quality an F-32 (trimaran) or F-44 (catamaran). If you ask them real nicely they might even build F-39 even though it not listed on there website.

I have an F-85 under construction and I am very happy so far.

CheersGlynn

 

 

 

 

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there's a condor40 for sale here

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Condors have a sorted history. They are relatively heavy to begin with (thus slower than you might expect), and more than one of them has had serious wet core issues in the amas. I'm not going to say they are something to steer clear of, but definitely do your research.

 

There were 3 Super Condors built, they where almost 2000lbs lighter,sat 5' higher in the water and didn't have the core problems. After the first 3 boats were built they were jobed out to two different builders. The core problems were due to a lack of resin on the inside of the hulls and bad hatches.These first 3 boats where built in house for the OSTAR.Notice the light chop,this is about a 6 knot breeze and she flys. The compression posts also need to be reinforced. The super Condors are race boats with two huge berths! they are underpost-51040-027454700 1328806360_thumb.jpgvalued due to the other Condors. Hull # 21 is a one off and I have no inside info on it. Each Condor needs to be valued seperately

 

As a very happy, longtime Condor 40 owner, I'd like to clear up a few mis-perceptions on the Condor 40's. First, there is no such thing as a "Super Condor." All the boats are pretty much the same, with some minor variations in weight because 4 different builders built the boats (Condor Limited assembled them). Only 2 boats had ama core issues, because the boats sat for several years with condensation, etc. causing the amas to have a lot of standing water.

 

Also, for a racing boat built in the mid-80's, Condors are not "heavy" boats. They were all built with vinylester resin. They will do 9 kts upwind in 12 knts of breeze. Crack off a bit and you're flying. I've routinely hit low to mid 20's when it's blowing 30-35, with full sail, no surfing, no spinn. And the boat's as stable as a sidewalk.

 

Cruising: 2 people or 2 peeps with small kids can comfortably cruise the boat (we cruised to the Exumas). There's not a ton of room below, it's like a roomy loft space. But you spend all your time outside once you're down-island anyways. And there are 2 berths that are as big as a double-bed. You sleep really well.

 

Sailing: I did a double-handed transat on a Condor 40 -- 6 months after the boat had just crossed to Europe. 30 days, 6000 miles, and we didn't break anything. The boats are solid, fun, fast, affordable boats.

 

And, 25 years later, they still look damned cool. You don't see ordinary people taking photos of Corsairs or Gunboats, but you'll see a lot of people whipping out camera phones when they see a Condor -- even when the boats are sitting at the dock :)

e

First off Condors other than the few defects are the best deal out there,with 28' beam I can leave the headsail out,take down the main and sail 8knots while I sleep. I have opened up the front beam on 2 Condors and the web holding the mast up was built wrong, a easy fix but the mast needs to come off and I have seen 3 that had core problems in the amas, all three were from the north where freezing added to the problem,it isn't a hard fix but to remove the core is not fun. The Super Condors were referring to the three that sat over 5" higher in the water, a Condor is fun to sail but a lightweight is (funner)

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I am South African so will suggest this just recently launched 40ft Tri designed and built in Cape Town. I had a quick tour of it 2 weeks ago and it looked very good. Light and fast with some comforts down below but emphasis on above deck living and performance. Contact the owner / designer Danie, he is an enthusiast and i am sure will reply with more info

 

http://www.sailinganarchy.com/article.php?get=9025

 

http://smarttri40.com/

 

http://www.google.co.za/search?q=smart+tri+40&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari

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I've been doing research on the Condor 40s, they look like good boats. How do they handle open ocean conditions? I'm looking at doing some major cruising down the road and I am one to do mass amounts if research before deciding on which route to take. The Contour 50s look nice but may be out if the budget. However, a Cobdor 40 with some small re-fits interior wise could do the trick for me, the girl and possibly a few kids.

 

Looking for info on how seaworthy they really are, or perhaps other tris I should be looking at for future blue water cruising in the 40-45 foot range.

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I am South African so will suggest this just recently launched 40ft Tri designed and built in Cape Town. I had a quick tour of it 2 weeks ago and it looked very good. Light and fast with some comforts down below but emphasis on above deck living and performance. Contact the owner / designer Danie, he is an enthusiast and i am sure will reply with more info

 

http://www.sailinganarchy.com/article.php?get=9025

 

http://smarttri40.com/

 

http://www.google.co.za/search?q=smart+tri+40&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari

 

There are a number of features that I really like, but the aesthetics... :huh: All those squared shapes and hard edges, that's one unattractive boat...

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I've been doing research on the Condor 40s, they look like good boats. How do they handle open ocean conditions? I'm looking at doing some major cruising down the road and I am one to do mass amounts if research before deciding on which route to take. The Contour 50s look nice but may be out if the budget. However, a Cobdor 40 with some small re-fits interior wise could do the trick for me, the girl and possibly a few kids.

 

Looking for info on how seaworthy they really are, or perhaps other tris I should be looking at for future blue water cruising in the 40-45 foot range.

. Go charter one and see for yourself

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there is a new posting on you tube for a Condor 40 under sail, look up ( Condor trimaran partnership) Nothing will outsail it for the money at $65k I will post on SA

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65 for the partnership ( any details ) while 75 get's the whole boat without any strings attached - not sure what is the better deal ....?

there is a new posting on you tube for a Condor 40 under sail, look up ( Condor trimaran partnership) Nothing will outsail it for the money at $65k I will post on SA

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The first two T-29, folding all carbon tris with comfortable interior have now started building. First boat will be sailing end of spring.

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The first two T-29, folding all carbon tris with comfortable interior have now started building. First boat will be sailing end of spring.

 

?? MOre info please. Maybe a link?

 

Does not seem to have been mentioned in this thread, and all Google could find searching for carbon t-29 trimaran was the changmei ripoff 29...

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You're absolutely correct. Progress reports will appear, web site not operational until the first two boats have been test sailed. T stands for Törnblom, Swedish multihull designer (Seaon 96 and others). Stay tuned!

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Condors have a sorted history. They are relatively heavy to begin with (thus slower than you might expect), and more than one of them has had serious wet core issues in the amas. I'm not going to say they are something to steer clear of, but definitely do your research.

 

There were 3 Super Condors built, they where almost 2000lbs lighter,sat 5' higher in the water and didn't have the core problems. After the first 3 boats were built they were jobed out to two different builders. The core problems were due to a lack of resin on the inside of the hulls and bad hatches.These first 3 boats where built in house for the OSTAR.Notice the light chop,this is about a 6 knot breeze and she flys. The compression posts also need to be reinforced. The super Condors are race boats with two huge berths! they are underpost-51040-027454700 1328806360_thumb.jpgvalued due to the other Condors. Hull # 21 is a one off and I have no inside info on it. Each Condor needs to be valued seperately

 

As a very happy, longtime Condor 40 owner, I'd like to clear up a few mis-perceptions on the Condor 40's. First, there is no such thing as a "Super Condor." All the boats are pretty much the same, with some minor variations in weight because 4 different builders built the boats (Condor Limited assembled them). Only 2 boats had ama core issues, because the boats sat for several years with condensation, etc. causing the amas to have a lot of standing water.

 

Also, for a racing boat built in the mid-80's, Condors are not "heavy" boats. They were all built with vinylester resin. They will do 9 kts upwind in 12 knts of breeze. Crack off a bit and you're flying. I've routinely hit low to mid 20's when it's blowing 30-35, with full sail, no surfing, no spinn. And the boat's as stable as a sidewalk.

 

Cruising: 2 people or 2 peeps with small kids can comfortably cruise the boat (we cruised to the Exumas). There's not a ton of room below, it's like a roomy loft space. But you spend all your time outside once you're down-island anyways. And there are 2 berths that are as big as a double-bed. You sleep really well.

 

Sailing: I did a double-handed transat on a Condor 40 -- 6 months after the boat had just crossed to Europe. 30 days, 6000 miles, and we didn't break anything. The boats are solid, fun, fast, affordable boats.

 

And, 25 years later, they still look damned cool. You don't see ordinary people taking photos of Corsairs or Gunboats, but you'll see a lot of people whipping out camera phones when they see a Condor -- even when the boats are sitting at the dock smile.gif

 

Nice writeup... These were the first tri's I ever lusted after as I was sailing my J/105...

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You're absolutely correct. Progress reports will appear, web site not operational until the first two boats have been test sailed. T stands for Törnblom, Swedish multihull designer (Seaon 96 and others). Stay tuned!

 

I always liked the Seaon 96, a lot.

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If you liked the Seaon you will love the T-29. Lighter, roomier and easier to build, hence much cheaper.

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