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Black Dog

RejeX

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I have a gelcoat hull and going to a full buff job this spring. I am thinking about using RejeX as the final coat.

What is the story with this stuff. Will I have to remove it next year and be swearing that i put it on?

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First, I must admit that as the manufacturer, I'm highly biased. So now that that's out of the way...

 

There's a reason RejeX was recently named one of the "Top 10 Boat Care Products – Ever" by Do It Yourself Boatowner, which is sort of the Consumer Reports type publication for the boating industry. It was listed #7 in Boating Life magazine's 25 Essential Steps to Your First Launch This Spring. Southern Boating said it keeps boats cleaner, longer and that it lasts longer than any wax job.

 

After exhausting testing, the U.S. Navy is now specifying RejeX to repel saltwater and exhaust stains on destroyers and cruisers outfitted with the AEGIS anti-missile system. They chose it because it actually repels stains, lasts longer, and protects better than any other product made.

 

I know it's not cool to come on SA and stump for one's own products, so I don't say anything unless asked. But if any of you want to try some, visit our site or SA sponsor Vela Sailing Supply and let us know you read SA, and we'll hook you up with a special discount. If it's not the best stuff you ever used, we'll gladly refund your money (which has probably happened 3-4 times in the 7 year history of the product). It's awesome.

 

I should also mention that in aging studies by two major manufacturers of vinyl graphics and protective films, RejeX showed it could extend the life of those materials by almost 50% (it's that good against UV, acids, detergents, chemicals, etc.).

 

Here's my wife and I after washing with Pro Wash RX and one coating of RejeX this past summer. People were literally walking over from all over the marina to admire the finish and to ask what we were using and to feel the ultra-slick surface.

 

If you guys have any questions, feel free to call me (toll free number to my office is on rejex.com). Always happy to talk boat care.

 

P.S. Some of you other guys who have used RejeX, please jump in here and add your feedback. Would be much appreciated.

 

 

second-star-shine.jpg

 

 

 

just-rejexed.jpg

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I think the images speak for themselves. I must add that the pictured boat lives in Texas and the summer down here is brutal.

 

I am posting as a user, not as a dealer of the product.

 

I have used Rejex on Viper 640 hulls, VX One and my motorcycle and it works very well and last long time in good conditions. Depending on the use and abuse you give to the Rejexed (now it is a verb!) you may retouch it, but the protection film and finish is very long lasting.

 

Give it a shot. You don't like it, you'll have your money back...that's a hard one to beat.

 

My two cents.

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I used it on my boat and car. Works as advertised. Better than the teflon based stuff that breaks your wallet. Beyone the polish, This companies Corrosion X is the shit.. Any rusted tools, rigging, parts.. Just spray Corrosion x on and they are working in about an hour.

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Worked very nicely on our Lightning, good looking finish and lasted awhile, I think we did it twice a year (trailer sailed boat used 2-3x per week in Chicago with a few saltwater adventures). We were able to do the whole boat with a small tin leftover from a friends offshore boat!

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What do we need to do to this shit box?

IMAG0233.jpg

 

We spent a day scrubbing the gelcoat, trying to ready it for some obnoxious vinyl graphics. What else needs to be done? We're up for trying Rejex. Sorry for the hijack, but I'll post some after pictures. The idea this weekend is to have this boat spotless.

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I think the images speak for themselves. I must add that the pictured boat lives in Texas and the summer down here is brutal.

 

I am posting as a user, not as a dealer of the product.

 

I have used Rejex on Viper 640 hulls, VX One and my motorcycle and it works very well and last long time in good conditions. Depending on the use and abuse you give to the Rejexed (now it is a verb!) you may retouch it, but the protection film and finish is very long lasting.

 

Give it a shot. You don't like it, you'll have your money back...that's a hard one to beat.

 

My two cents.

 

How much of the stuff does it take to coat a Viper??

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It is excellent for karma....

 

Did not yellow on my dock-bound great lakes boat.

 

I applied twice last year. Two coats at beginning of season, one before our NA's. Put it on the topsides and the bottom over VC17. As impossible as it sounds, it did feel slicker to the touch on the bottom sections when compared to the VC17 sections. It could have been my mind playing tricks, though.

 

Any grime on the topsides wiped off very easily. Same with any algae that was on the bottom. I used it on my oxidized toe rail, and it seemed to minimize any oxidation run-off. OR, it could just have been that any run-off would not stick to the topsides because of the rejex. Either way, there was no oxidation on the topsides.

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Ok, BUT

 

Nobody has addressed the question of if it has to be renewed in a year or so.

 

Does it yellow?

 

Or cause bad karma?

 

RejeX will never yellow. It will remain diamond clear for its entire lifespan.

 

In the photo of our boat above, we RejeXed if just prior to Lakefest in April of 2010, and then that photo was taken in July 2011. Zero oxidation. In most parts of the country (with relatively short sailing seasons), once a year is plenty. For boats that live outdoors in Southern California, Texas and Florida, I would recommend doing it at least once a year. Ideally, I would do it once in the spring and once in the fall.

 

RejeX IS considerably slicker than Teflon. The only magic behind RejeX is that the thin film (approx 1 micron) it forms is really tough, durable and flexible. It is completely non-porous (so nothing gets through to stain) and it's such a slick, high-release surface that while stains will still get on the boat, they can't embed into or stick to the coating... so they just wash off (thus the other poster's comments about reducing streaks).

 

A RejeXed boat is a happy boat. And that always means good karma.

 

 

 

 

I think the images speak for themselves. I must add that the pictured boat lives in Texas and the summer down here is brutal.

 

I am posting as a user, not as a dealer of the product.

 

I have used Rejex on Viper 640 hulls, VX One and my motorcycle and it works very well and last long time in good conditions. Depending on the use and abuse you give to the Rejexed (now it is a verb!) you may retouch it, but the protection film and finish is very long lasting.

 

Give it a shot. You don't like it, you'll have your money back...that's a hard one to beat.

 

My two cents.

 

How much of the stuff does it take to coat a Viper??

Less than a 12 oz bottle. There's probably enough in a 12 oz bottle to do your Viper and the vehicle that tows it.

 

 

 

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What do we need to do to this shit box?

IMAG0233.jpg

 

We spent a day scrubbing the gelcoat, trying to ready it for some obnoxious vinyl graphics. What else needs to be done? We're up for trying Rejex. Sorry for the hijack, but I'll post some after pictures. The idea this weekend is to have this boat spotless.

 

I would clean this boat with a good pre-cleaner like our Xtreme Clean, which would help remove the stains. Then I would polish with a dedicated gel coat polish like 3M's Finesse-It (Perfect-It for marine paints like Awlgrip). After that, RejeX.

 

One coat a year of RejeX should keep your boat GLEAMING for the rest of your boat's life. You shouldn't ever have stains like this if you RejeX in a reasonable timeframe.

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Then I would polish with a dedicated gel coat polish like 3M's Finesse-It (Perfect-It for marine paints like Awlgrip). After that, RejeX.

 

One coat a year of RejeX should keep your boat GLEAMING for the rest of your boat's life. You shouldn't ever have stains like this if you RejeX in a reasonable timeframe.

 

So how you would you apply RejeX to a two part LPU hull, like Perfection? Polish with Perfect-It first?

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As long as the paint / clear coat is clean and without scratches or swirls, just wash with a good quality boat soap and RejeX.

 

If there's some fading / oxidation, swirls or scratches, 1) soap, 2) Perfect-It, 3) RejeX.

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As long as the paint / clear coat is clean and without scratches or swirls, just wash with a good quality boat soap and RejeX.

 

If there's some fading / oxidation, swirls or scratches, 1) soap, 2) Perfect-It, 3) RejeX.

 

Before we bought this house (last week!?!) we were living (camping/existing) in a small apartment up in The Colonies (texas).

Very yuppy expensive place, but ok for a short stay.

 

My boat is on the hard three blocks from the apartment, so I naturally/foolishly decided to buff it out my own bad self.

I'm 62 now, and while I'm not way over weight, I'm still 62. I got one side done.

Sanding out scratches (it's been in the water for the last 7 years!) and buffing and sanding out scratches again and buffing.

It took a bit over a week to do one side. I'm a LOT stronger now from man handling that thing overhead. But it hurt too.

(same thing about being in a third floor apartment!)

 

I finally figured out that this is a younger man's job and that I'm interfering with him earning his lively-hood.

(Mario - from Honduras - he's 5'5 and solid as a rock - he buffs out boats ever day. And I like him as a person too.)

So, Mario is going to do it for me - bottom too. She will look brand new when he's done.

 

Now, having gone through all this and learned a/my/the appropriate lesson in life, I'd be really happy to keep he looking

like new without all the shoulder pain/expense/more lessons in life?

 

So that's why I ask inane questions sometimes.

 

I'm in Texas and we don't pull out each winter.

Like I said earlier, this is the first time Temptress has been dry in 7 years. (I've only owned her for the last 3)

(and NO blisters. Yea.)

 

So I'm interested, but how does it (RejeX) work - recoating with the boat in the water?

 

Obviously I would be doing the bottom, but topsides and deck?

 

I CAN careen - a little bit - so does the surface have to be bone dry?

 

Anything I should be aware of NOT to do? (that's kind of wide open, but you know what I meant!)

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RejeX DOES work with the boat in the water, although to be candid, depending on your dock setup it can be a little more work. I've done it before by leaning over the gunwales and RejeXing the top half of the hull, then getting the bottom half sitting on a life jacket or noodle. Of course, treating the cockpit and cabin top is easy.

 

That reminds me, RejeX is ga-ga-gorgeous on carbon fiber!!!!!

 

I don't think you'll have much luck doing the bottom when the boat is not on the hard or on a lift. RejeX needs to go on a clean, un-oxidized surface. Because it contains no abrasives, it doesn't scour away oxidized paint like a restorer wax would. Instead, it "puddles" in the pores of the oxidized gel coat and is a royal pain to buff out. RejeX does't break down in UV or detergent like wax does, so it does't just fade away on its own like a wax would over time. So unless the bottom is clean, smooth and dry, I think it'd be a real pain to work with.

 

Our boat's bottom is VC17 offshore and was sprayed on by David Whelan at Gulf Coast Composite, and they polished the crap out of it so it was really smooth. RejeX applied fairly well on top of the VC17 and it lasted all season, but again, VC17 is a hard paint and the bottom was smooth and dry. I wouldn't recommend it on a rolled bottom or any kind of ablative bottom paint.

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I used this on my Lightning last year and it worked great.

 

Question for you. I just had my J/22 Awlgripped. Can this be applied over awlgrip? I also had my bottom done with VC UnderWater Epoxy. Can I use this on the bottom?

 

Thanks for th einfo

 

Cp

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I used this on my Lightning last year and it worked great.

 

Question for you. I just had my J/22 Awlgripped. Can this be applied over awlgrip? I also had my bottom done with VC UnderWater Epoxy. Can I use this on the bottom?

 

Thanks for th einfo

 

Cp

 

Don't put it on your bottom.

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How does the RejeX compare with poliglow. I use poliglow in the past but will have a freshly sanded hulls to work with. What kind of surface does the start need to be to coat with the RejeX

 

post-13343-022762400 1333585665_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

thanks.

 

ed

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1333579007[/url]' post='3658239']

I used this on my Lightning last year and it worked great.

 

Question for you. I just had my J/22 Awlgripped. Can this be applied over awlgrip? I also had my bottom done with VC UnderWater Epoxy. Can I use this on the bottom?

 

Thanks for th einfo

 

Cp

 

RejeX can definitely be used over Awlgrip. Our boat, the navy blue J/boat above, is flag blue Awlgrip with VC17 offshore bottom.

I HIGHLY recommend RejeX for anyone who wants to go fast and stores their boat on a trailer or hoist. RejeX is fast, fast, fast. From what I hear from our offshore powerboat racing brethren, they're gaining 2-3 knots (confirmed by GPS) of top end speed. If that translates to a tenth or two on your sailboat, that's a game changer!!

However, the coating is very thin. Even though it is extremely tough, the coating is not thick enough to be used as a year-around anti-fouling. It will make algae and slime much easier to remove, but you need a thicker, more abrasion resistant coating if you keep your boat in a slip year-around like we do.

We have RejeX on the VX One because it's a go-fast boat that lives on a trailer; i only have RejeX over the bottom paint on the J because we had the boat out of the water this past summer to do some work on her.

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1333585771[/url]' post='3658361']

How does the RejeX compare with poliglow. I use poliglow in the past but will have a freshly sanded hulls to work with. What kind of surface does the start need to be to coat with the RejeX

 

post-13343-022762400 1333585665_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

thanks.

 

ed

You get more shine with RejeX, but the main benefit to RejeX is the protection and rejection of stains. From a durability standpoint, a polymer / PTFE-fortified product like Poliglow is going to outperform carnauba wax products (waxes can't handle the heat to UV). But the tighter, cross linked polymer structure of RejeX is going to offer better protection against things like UV, acid rain, chemicals, detergents, bird and spider poop, diesel soot, mineral deposits, etc.

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So maybe a quick coat of RejeX over the poliglow to get the best of both?

 

How much do you think I would need to do a coat on a 24' tri?

 

thnks

 

Ed

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So maybe a quick coat of RejeX over the poliglow to get the best of both?

 

How much do you think I would need to do a coat on a 24' tri?

 

thnks

 

Ed

 

The best of both worlds would be to put the RejeX directly onto the gel coat. However, RejeX will stick to Poliglow just fine and give you enhanced shine, protection and stain resistance.

 

RejeX on top of Poliglow will last longer than RejeX on top of wax. But you'll get the best and longest performance of all if you put the RejeX directly onto the gel coat. That being said, it would be easier to re-RejeX when the Poliglow fails than to strip the Poliglow. So if I were in your shoes, I'd just clean what you have real well and then RejeX. In the fall or in the spring, I'd just make the switch completely to RejeX.

 

1 12 oz. bottle ought to do it. There's really not that much surface area on a multi. If you get the 16 oz. you'll for sure have enough, and probably have enough leftover for a second coat and/or to do your car or truck as well.

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Unlike waxes, you can't remove RejeX chemically (i.e. the old Dawn Liquid Dishwashing detergent trick doesn't work), you have to remove it mechanically. Use a dedicated polish that doesn't leave a wax residue. Again, on gel coat, I like 3M's Finesse-It.

This has actually happened before. Usually on cars who are getting clear bras installed. And of course I get stuck with fielding the "What the #&@:!! have you done to this car, my film won't stick"?

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Unlike waxes, you can't remove RejeX chemically (i.e. the old Dawn Liquid Dishwashing detergent trick doesn't work), you have to remove it mechanically. Use a dedicated polish that doesn't leave a wax residue. Again, on gel coat, I like 3M's Finesse-It.

This has actually happened before. Usually on cars who are getting clear bras installed. And of course I get stuck with fielding the "What the #&@:!! have you done to this car, my film won't stick"?

 

I've never used Polyglow (and not about to start now) but I recall that it could be removed with an ammonia based remover.

 

Nothing like that for this?

 

 

Remove mechanically? As in SANDING?

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So If I am going to put vinyl lettering on, I should do it before the Rejex?

 

If I plan to paint the boat in the next couple of years is doing Rejex going to be a problem?

 

 

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Correct. Normal paint prep (i.e. cleaning area and sanding) will strip RejeX, as will any abrasive: polish, rubbing compound, restorer wax, sanding, particles in the water and air over time, etc. Abrasion is, what will finally take RejeX off your vehicles. For example, on my 10,000 mile per year daily driver, RejeX will shine and bead water for well over a year on most surfaces, but depending and the environment I'm driving in (airborne sand, dust, etc) usually bugs and stuff start sticking to my front bumper after 6 months or so (airborne particles are slowly scouring RejeX away like a sand blaster in slow motion), which tells me it's time to throw another coat on.

Remember, RejeX is super-tough, but the coatin is only a micron thick.

 

To be more precise, I should have stated that you can actually strip RejeX chemically. Problem is, that if you use a chemical strong enough to strip RejeX, it will also take off your paint. So just taking it off with a light polish is the practical solution.

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Correct. Normal paint prep (i.e. cleaning area and sanding) will strip RejeX, as will any abrasive: polish, rubbing compound, restorer wax, sanding, particles in the water and air over time, etc.

 

 

Do temp bow numbers (for a race week) stick ok for a couple days? Or would you need to polish off the RejeX in that area first (and then reapply after done racing)?

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Great question. I think the answer is yes, they will stick.

We use those rectangular white vinyl with black numbers for Lakefest, and they are normally a royal pain to take off. They do stick to RejeX but then come off without too much trouble (i.e. they don't rip, they jus basically peel straight off).

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DO you have any national carriers such as auto shops or west marine? $7 to ship a bottle is a bit stiff.

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We are not in any of the national "big box" auto part retailers. CorrosionX is in West Marine through their Manager Buy program, and are in the process of being set up as a vender, so more of,our products should be available at West Marine very shortly.

In the meantime, $7 is pretty cheap if it saves you 10 hours of maintenance time every season.

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I used this on my Lightning last year and it worked great.

 

Question for you. I just had my J/22 Awlgripped. Can this be applied over awlgrip? I also had my bottom done with VC UnderWater Epoxy. Can I use this on the bottom?

 

Thanks for th einfo

 

Cp

 

Don't put it on your bottom.

 

Entropy, Why do you say not to put it on the bottom? Will it affect the epoxy in some way?

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I used this on my Lightning last year and it worked great.

 

Question for you. I just had my J/22 Awlgripped. Can this be applied over awlgrip? I also had my bottom done with VC UnderWater Epoxy. Can I use this on the bottom?

 

Thanks for th einfo

 

Cp

 

Don't put it on your bottom.

 

Entropy, Why do you say not to put it on the bottom? Will it affect the epoxy in some way?

 

 

well, I would guess if you put this over anit-fouling paint, it will seal in the copper / biocides and cause marine growth... now if you dry sail, that wouldn't be an issue...

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Dreaded is 100% correct. That's why I mostly recommend RejeX for bottoms on dry sailed boats. Even if you keep your boat in the water for an extended period (a week or a month), if it goes on a hoist or if you get it back on a trailer, anything that could grow should immediately come off with a good spray from a garden hose.

 

RejeX is not an anti-fouling, nor is it thick enough to be a reliable water barrier. I RejeXed my boat last summer (over VC17 offshore) before the low water conditions in Texas shut down Lake Texoma to swimming due to blue/green algae bloom. Water was also too low to get to any of the travel lifts. So the boat went about 8 months without a good cleaning. When the water level finally came up enough to haul the boat, it had a pretty decent slime coating on it. No beard, per se, because I think significant growth would slough off once the boat was underway for any period of time. But it did have a pretty gnarly coating of black algae. Of course, I also have to consider that the water was stagnant the entire time and over 80-90 degrees for 4+ months. So it was ideal growing conditions for some real nasty stuff.

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Dreaded is 100% correct. That's why I mostly recommend RejeX for bottoms on dry sailed boats. Even if you keep your boat in the water for an extended period (a week or a month), if it goes on a hoist or if you get it back on a trailer, anything that could grow should immediately come off with a good spray from a garden hose.

 

RejeX is not an anti-fouling, nor is it thick enough to be a reliable water barrier. I RejeXed my boat last summer (over VC17 offshore) before the low water conditions in Texas shut down Lake Texoma to swimming due to blue/green algae bloom. Water was also too low to get to any of the travel lifts. So the boat went about 8 months without a good cleaning. When the water level finally came up enough to haul the boat, it had a pretty decent slime coating on it. No beard, per se, because I think significant growth would slough off once the boat was underway for any period of time. But it did have a pretty gnarly coating of black algae. Of course, I also have to consider that the water was stagnant the entire time and over 80-90 degrees for 4+ months. So it was ideal growing conditions for some real nasty stuff.

 

This is what my boat looks like when we hauled her out of in November.

It washed right off with a very wide fan pressure washer.

Actually, it wiped off bay hand, but the guys working there have their ways...

 

That was seven years in Texoma.

And yes, right after the blue green bloom.

 

Interlux Bottom Koat NT was the last bottom put on her.

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Dreaded is 100% correct. That's why I mostly recommend RejeX for bottoms on dry sailed boats. Even if you keep your boat in the water for an extended period (a week or a month), if it goes on a hoist or if you get it back on a trailer, anything that could grow should immediately come off with a good spray from a garden hose.

 

RejeX is not an anti-fouling, nor is it thick enough to be a reliable water barrier. I RejeXed my boat last summer (over VC17 offshore) before the low water conditions in Texas shut down Lake Texoma to swimming due to blue/green algae bloom. Water was also too low to get to any of the travel lifts. So the boat went about 8 months without a good cleaning. When the water level finally came up enough to haul the boat, it had a pretty decent slime coating on it. No beard, per se, because I think significant growth would slough off once the boat was underway for any period of time. But it did have a pretty gnarly coating of black algae. Of course, I also have to consider that the water was stagnant the entire time and over 80-90 degrees for 4+ months. So it was ideal growing conditions for some real nasty stuff.

 

This is what my boat, Temptress, looked like when we hauled her out in November.

Pretty nasty looking, but it washed right off with a very wide fan pressure washer.

Actually, it wiped off by hand, but the guys at Grandpappy have their ways...

 

The sides were still (barely) glossy, but they do still reflect an image.

 

The worst of it was some interesting calcification along the water line.

 

Interlux Bottom Kote NT was the last bottom put on her and she was buffed up real nice,

glazed and waxed before launch back in 2005.

 

Now these pics are after seven years in Lake Texoma.

Taken this last November.

 

Like I said earlier up-thread, I tried to buff her out myself, and got really good results (eventually),

but I'm letting Mario do it. And it will be even better.

Mario gives good buff.

 

Then we'll (he does it - I pay for it) glaze and wax again before she swims Ray Hubbard

(SOON! Oh Please soon?)

 

Maybe miracles happen - maybe chemistry will triumph.

But I think I'll stick with what I know.

It may be a bit more work to get it.

 

But once it's done, it stays done for a long time.

post-36012-089976200 1334025496_thumb.jpg

post-36012-009002300 1334025511_thumb.jpg

post-36012-023253100 1334026185_thumb.jpg

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I orderd two bottles over the weekend. Do you think you can them out today to me? Love to have them for the weekend.

Thanks

 

 

It is wensday and still has not shipped yet.

Thanks for the great service.

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We're all caught up on shipping from the weekend. Can you tell me your order number or last name, so I can check on it for you?

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One of two things:

 

1) if it applies easily and wipes off easily, you're good to go. Also, sometimes if it's light oxidation, just the mechanical action of wiping RejeX on is sufficient to remove light oxidation. And that's fine too. In any case, if it's easy on / easy off, you're good. Just keep RejeXing it going forward, and you'll be happy.

 

2) If RejeX leaves a light haze behind when you try to buff it off, that's because the RejeX liquid is puddling in the pores of the oxidized paint. To remove that and/or to restore the original color, you need to use a polish. For Awlgrip, I like 3M's Perfect-It polish. Polishing it will remove the superficial top layer of oxidized paint and uncover the clean, bright paint underneath. Then RejeX it to make the paint super shiny and prevent it from oxidizing in the future.

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Black Dog,

I'm sorry we were unable to get your order out Monday; we are a small company and we can't always get all the orders received over the weekend out the next day.

We did ship your order on Tuesday, but we don't have any control over what time UPS makes their pick up. Althouh i haven't made it back to my office yet this evening, I was able to go online and see that they came by and picked your order up today.

I am sorry you are upset with the situation. If you would like, I will recall the shipment and refund your money.

And just to set the record straight, my company is both a former SA advertiser and On-The-Water Anarchy regatta sponsor. I am also involved with two other organizations, both of which are current SA advertisers. I was asked by the owner of one of those companies to personally respond to this thread, which I wanted to do out my loyalty to this site and it's readers.

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I have used both Rejex and Corrosion X on and off for a few years. I would use it all the time if it was easier to get. For a while my local True Value stocked it

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CorosionX,

I have used RejeX on a car before, but not a boat.

I am about to get a new boat that has colored gelcoat. I am interested in delaying the inevitable fade of the color. I don't believe that RejeX has any UV inhibitors. I know that RejeX is superior to waxes from the standpoint of shine and ease of cleaning, but what about protecting against UV fade?

Thanks.

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Unlike wax, RejeX does not need specific UV inhibitors because it is faaaaar superior to waxes in that regard. Two of North America's largest vinyl graphics manufacturers tested RejeX in UV aging studies on their materials. Their conclusion was that RejeX can increase the life of these materials by as much as 50%.

 

My belief is that 2 coats, even in Texas and Florida, every year will eliminate all UV damage. I do know for a fact that two coats will eliminate 100% of harmful UV in our lab tests.

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Unlike wax, RejeX does not need specific UV inhibitors because it is faaaaar superior to waxes in that regard. Two of North America's largest vinyl graphics manufacturers tested RejeX in UV aging studies on their materials. Their conclusion was that RejeX can increase the life of these materials by as much as 50%.

 

My belief is that 2 coats, even in Texas and Florida, every year will eliminate all UV damage. I do know for a fact that two coats will eliminate 100% of harmful UV in our lab tests.

 

 

 

So will this ... http://www.walmart.com/ip/Turtle-Wax-Super-Protectant-Spray-10.4oz/16888973

 

Maybe this stuff would be better suited to the power boat crowd. Instant gratification and quick results go well there.

 

 

This has been a commercial thread from the very start.

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It is spec'd for use on AEGIS cruisers and destroyers, so I guess that would qualify as powerboats.

 

You got a GSA stock number, what are they using on cruisers and destroyers for?

They certainly don't wax those hulls. :lol:

 

Technical Details for NSN: 8030-01-593-8208

MRC Requirement Reply

FEAT SPECIAL FEATURES PETROLEUM DISTILLATE/SILOXANE MATERIAL; THIN FILM POLYMER COATING DESIGNED TO PROVIDE A HIGH RELEASE SURFACE

ARSD CONTENT WITHIN EACH UNIT PACKAGE TWELVE 16 OUNCE BOTTLES

ALXZ SPECIFIC USAGE DESIGN FOR SEALING PAINTED SURFACES TO PROTECT AGAINST STAINING AND ADHESION OF MOST COMMON CONTAMINANTS

HUES COLOR WHITE

AGXW PHYSICAL FORM LIQUID

 

Congrats, you're the government version of Pledge.

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Yeah, the NSN in the post above is the GSA National

Stock Number.

 

Evidently salt crystals from sea spray and the engine exhaust get on the satellite domes and antennas and diminishes their effectiveness. Also, I think rain and sea spray leave water that puddles on this equipment and also reduces range/accuracy.

 

RejeX keeps all that crap from sticking, and unlike Pledge, lasts a long time and won't screw up your paint.

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I still want to know if you have an Australian distributor.

 

Just for the hell of it, I went onto Vela's site and filled my cart with a bottle of the rust remover, a bottle of the CorrosionX and a big bottle of RejeX. Cost came to c USD49. I filled in my delivery details and UPS cost was >USD60!!

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In years past we would machine polish the hull with 3M finess-it before using star bright ptef. We'd re apply the ptef 2 more times throughout the season. The boat is dry sailed and gets about 30 days a year on the water.

 

This year I'm out of time.. Can I apply rejex over whatever ptef is left over from last year? I'd still do the full polish and reapply mid season.

 

What's your preferred treatment for non skid? I've used woody wax. It's supposed to keep blood from staining the floor of fishing boats. I still get this funky sunscreen and sweat haze that only comes off with acetone though. it's a sand texture not a heavy waffle pattern.

 

Fretz

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