• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Chet

AwlGrip Guide Coat

Recommended Posts

Trying to finally get topsides right. Well primed with 545 and sanded out with 320 on a long board. Now I'd like to spray on a guide coat and sand it down with my longboard before taking the plunge with final finish.

 

What's the best stuff to use?

 

Is there something shiny that makes it easy to spot ripples?

 

Can I ignore this last step with good conscience?

 

aa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What color is the 545? I use grey. It goes from a semigloss dark grey to a matte light grey when sanded. No guide coat needed.

Fred

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What color is the 545? I use grey. It goes from a semigloss dark grey to a matte light grey when sanded. No guide coat needed.

Fred

 

The gloss sort of does go away.

 

Aren't there two colors of 545? Go with another coat of white or whatever you don't have underneath?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Matte black automotive rattle can. Stand back and wave the can at the surface, splattered dots not zebra lines. Try to avoid heavy coverage. Take the guess work out of the effort, guide coating is an excellent idea. Some use Dupont or similar Tire Black, won't clog the paper.

Thick, straight, high quality paint stir sticks make great "blocking" tools. Wrap an entire sheet of paper carefully around the stick and tear used sections as needed. Works wet or dry.

Do guide coat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3M make a powder guide coat you dust across the surface. No waiting for paint to dry. Automotive refinishing suppliers will have this.

International paints also make a liquid guide coat, funny blue green colour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3M make a powder guide coat you dust across the surface. No waiting for paint to dry. Automotive refinishing suppliers will have this.

International paints also make a liquid guide coat, funny blue green colour.

 

ok .thanks a lot .g.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the original poster, and thought I'd give an update.

 

I did initial sanding using primer gloss as a rough guide, then continued with a dusting of graphite (3M mystery powder). This revealed several holidays I missed with my first effort, and also some dimples on the order of 3" diameter, one or two coats of paint deep.

 

Conclusion - use a guide coat.

 

aa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This page will attempt to answer these common questions about guide coat use in boat refinishing.

 

 

Can I do without using a guide coating?

 

Guide coat is a tool, and not required for ant kind of pre-paint set up.

 

guide coat tells you when to stop sanding, not using it causes you to do 3 things:

 

1. not sand enough

 

2. sand just right

 

3. sand too much

 

You won't know which of the three pertain to you until you start painting, you'll know if something is wrong right away on the first coat, and then it's too late. To be clear ,we are talking about proper block sanding, not just roaming around with sand paper in a random pattern,

 

 

what is it?, "why should I use it?. " Is one type better than another?" "

 

1.What is it?

 

Guide coat is a film of contrasting color that when applied over a repaired area, will get in to all the scratches, pinholes and flaws in the surfaces that that are being repaired . As the guide coat is block sanded it will make the high and low areas stand out and be easily seen, and also tell you weather or not the surface is flat and straight and that any contours are the proper shape. If a whole boat is primed it will insure that when the final sanding is done , any missed areas can easily be seen.

 

 

 

2.Why should I use it.

 

Guide coat is the simplest and most inexpensive way to insure a high quality finished paint job, it will speed up the straightening and set up time on any refinishing project. If you have ever seen a beautiful classic boat with a great looking custom paint job , then you looked a little closer and down the side to see what resembles a wavy washboard with sanding scratches and pin holes, you will understand why you should use guide coat.

 

 

 

3. Why is one type better than another?

 

 

 

Guide coat usually comes in aerosol cans or in dry powder form. You can make your own by spraying a thin coat of a different color primer or paint over the boat. Making your own is the least desirable method, As it is messy, time consuming and can cause problems like clogged sandpaper , over spray. and worst of all paint reactions. Unless you are a pro and know which paints are compatible , Do not make your own!. Take this advice from someone who has painted hundreds of cars , boats and trucks over the past 35 years. since homemade guide coat is sprayed and therefore is in the seams and all the hard to reach places everywhere on the boat, if it reacts, it's hell to fix, a horrible nightmare!. The aerosol guide coat comes in different colors will not react and is the least expensive way to go, however the can nozzle tends to clog , the surrounding areas need to be masked, the cans spray an uneven pattern (especially when trying to spray on an overall job) and some brands will actually clog sandpaper , leak and run out of propellent. Dry powder works the best , it is wiped on with an applicator and can be sanded right away with wet or dry sandpaper. Masking is not required. and the dry powder forms a very thin and even film that will never clog sandpaper, effect adhesion or react with any paint system known. The powder goes a long way and can be used freely over large areas, quick and easy. The powder is safe to use and washes off with soapy water. Guide coat varys in price ,I have found the best prices on ebay and amazon. These are some of the manufactures of guide coating. blackjack guide coat , 3M, Sem, Upol, PPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites