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the Story from Low Speed Chase

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Bryan Chong is a surviving crew member of the Sydney 38 Low Speed Chase which lost the lives of five people during the disastrous Full Crew Farallones Race in San Francisco. Here, he tells his story.

 

This letter goes out to a devastated sailing community still confused about the events surrounding the 2012 Full Crew Farallones Race. There have been inaccuracies in the media, mostly stemming from the survivors’ silence as James (“Jay”), Nick and I are still reeling from tragedy and the loss of close friends and loved ones.

 

I’ve chosen to use Sailing Anarchy for distributing this story because they’re of a kindred spirit and were the favorites amongst the crew of Low Speed Chase and those who already know the answer to the question, “Why would you sail in the ocean on a windy day with big swells?”

 

I’ve also included the Marin Independent Journal and The Tiburon Ark, as they’re the hometown newspapers in an area teeming with sailors. Many sailors relocate from around the world to Marin and the Tiburon Peninsula in order to live in proximity to the world’s best sailing. Alan Cahill moved from Cork, Ireland to race sailboats professionally in the Bay Area and the Pacific Ocean. He was the best man in our wedding and will be dearly missed while I journey this planet.

 

This letter does not contain every detail, but my account should provide a basic understanding of our day on the water and what happened after the first wave hit our boat. It is meant both to illustrate how things can look normal until one event changes everything and to begin to address what we can learn. It’s my hope and intention that it will spark a wider dialogue within the sailing community about safety standards and, more importantly, safety practices.

 

 

Why do we sail?

 

A sailor’s mind set is no different from that of any other athlete who chooses to participate in a sport that has some risk. It’s a healthy addiction. Despite the highly publicized deaths of Sonny Bono and Michael Kennedy, skiers all over the world continue to hit the slopes each winter. Sitting on the couch is safer than ripping down a slope, but the reward makes the risk worthwhile. Continued on the front page.

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Thanks for your write-up, Mr. Chong. My condolences to you and the other friends and family of those aboard Low Speed Chase on that terrible day.

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HUGE BALLS to come forward so soon to let us in on what actually happened in the 1st person

 

So Lucky and So Burdened to have Survived

 

THANK YOU !!!!!!!

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Great write up.

 

Answers a lot of questions and dispells a lot of inaccuracies, many of which were never suspected.

 

Thanks for the submission.

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Bryan Chong is a surviving crew member of the Sydney 38 Low Speed Chase which lost the lives of five people during the disastrous Full Crew Farallones Race in San Francisco. Here, he tells his story.

 

This letter goes out to a devastated sailing community still confused about the events surrounding the 2012 Full Crew Farallones Race. There have been inaccuracies in the media, mostly stemming from the survivors’ silence as James (“Jay”), Nick and I are still reeling from tragedy and the loss of close friends and loved ones.

 

I’ve chosen to use Sailing Anarchy for distributing this story because they’re of a kindred spirit and were the favorites amongst the crew of Low Speed Chase and those who already know the answer to the question, “Why would you sail in the ocean on a windy day with big swells?”

 

I’ve also included the Marin Independent Journal and The Tiburon Ark, as they’re the hometown newspapers in an area teeming with sailors. Many sailors relocate from around the world to Marin and the Tiburon Peninsula in order to live in proximity to the world’s best sailing. Alan Cahill moved from Cork, Ireland to race sailboats professionally in the Bay Area and the Pacific Ocean. He was the best man in our wedding and will be dearly missed while I journey this planet.

 

This letter does not contain every detail, but my account should provide a basic understanding of our day on the water and what happened after the first wave hit our boat. It is meant both to illustrate how things can look normal until one event changes everything and to begin to address what we can learn. It’s my hope and intention that it will spark a wider dialogue within the sailing community about safety standards and, more importantly, safety practices.

 

 

Why do we sail?

 

A sailor’s mind set is no different from that of any other athlete who chooses to participate in a sport that has some risk. It’s a healthy addiction. Despite the highly publicized deaths of Sonny Bono and Michael Kennedy, skiers all over the world continue to hit the slopes each winter. Sitting on the couch is safer than ripping down a slope, but the reward makes the risk worthwhile. Continued on the front page.

 

 

Bryan you and other survivors deserve the highest possible respect and support from the Sailing community as you work through this tragedy and share your thoughts with us. All of us no doubt wish to learn from fellow sailors regarding how to handle situations of the worst kind. It is sailors like you who make it possible to help us improve our safety, have the right thought process or as close as we can get regarding what we should be thinking and doing when we find our selves facing similar situations.

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HUGE BALLS to come forward so soon to let us in on what actually happened in the 1st person
Yes, good on him. Even more props for admitting that they were not wearing tethers. A lesson for all of us.

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Great write up.

 

Answers a lot of questions and dispells a lot of inaccuracies, many of which were never suspected.

 

Thanks for the submission.

 

+1

 

Fair play Bryan. I hope you can find the courage to get back out in the water and share your advice with others.

 

Thanks for your write-up

 

 

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Thanks for sharing your story; I could just about feel how terrible your ordeal must have been and can barely imagine the power of the forces that so brutally stopped your race.

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Bryan -

 

Thank you very much for taking the time and showing your courage to put the events of that tragic day in writing. Hope to see you back on the water soon.

 

Cheers,

 

opusone

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Bryan Chong is a surviving crew member of the Sydney 38 Low Speed Chase which lost the lives of five people during the disastrous Full Crew Farallones Race in San Francisco. Here, he tells his story.

 

This letter goes out to a devastated sailing community still confused about the events surrounding the 2012 Full Crew Farallones Race. There have been inaccuracies in the media, mostly stemming from the survivors' silence as James ("Jay"), Nick and I are still reeling from tragedy and the loss of close friends and loved ones.

 

I've chosen to use Sailing Anarchy for distributing this story because they're of a kindred spirit and were the favorites amongst the crew of Low Speed Chase and those who already know the answer to the question, "Why would you sail in the ocean on a windy day with big swells?"

 

I've also included the Marin Independent Journal and The Tiburon Ark, as they're the hometown newspapers in an area teeming with sailors. Many sailors relocate from around the world to Marin and the Tiburon Peninsula in order to live in proximity to the world's best sailing. Alan Cahill moved from Cork, Ireland to race sailboats professionally in the Bay Area and the Pacific Ocean. He was the best man in our wedding and will be dearly missed while I journey this planet.

 

This letter does not contain every detail, but my account should provide a basic understanding of our day on the water and what happened after the first wave hit our boat. It is meant both to illustrate how things can look normal until one event changes everything and to begin to address what we can learn. It's my hope and intention that it will spark a wider dialogue within the sailing community about safety standards and, more importantly, safety practices.

 

 

Why do we sail?

 

A sailor's mind set is no different from that of any other athlete who chooses to participate in a sport that has some risk. It's a healthy addiction. Despite the highly publicized deaths of Sonny Bono and Michael Kennedy, skiers all over the world continue to hit the slopes each winter. Sitting on the couch is safer than ripping down a slope, but the reward makes the risk worthwhile. Continued on the front page.

 

 

Bryan you and other survivors deserve the highest possible respect and support from the Sailing community as you work through this tragedy and share your thoughts with us. All of us no doubt wish to learn from fellow sailors regarding how to handle situations of the worst kind. It is sailors like you who make it possible to help us improve our safety, have the right thought process or as close as we can get regarding what we should be thinking and doing when we find our selves facing similar situations.

 

I'm sorry for your loss, Bryan, and hope you get the support and guidance you need to go forward after such a horrible experience. Years ago I was descending a climb when my buddy fucked up his rappel and fell to his death. Survivor's guilt can last a long, long time. Based on your "reflections," I'd say your head is in the right place.

 

 

 

 

 

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Excellent write up. I know I took a few things away from this, hopefully everyone takes a couple things and actually applies it.

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Thank you Bryan for sharing your story and experience. My condolences and I hope I will learn from this tragedy. Thanks to the whole SA community, this is the best part of this sometimes trying forum.

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Thank You Bryan.

 

Not only did you explain the tragedy in a way which we can relate to, you took the time to share what you learned and passed that knowledge along.

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Bryan your comment about the wave and the force of the water just ripping everything off the boat really confirms my lesson a few years back where I was slapped off the rail on a very similar day doing the same race. Nothing like the wave you faced but the load of green water that blasted me off the rail spun me around the shrouds and sent me skidding across the deck was one hell of a hit and eye opener regarding what that green water can do. I was sore for days and had nice black and blue racing stripes down my back from the shrouds. I too had my tether with me and over my shoulder and was not clipped in. Since that trip I often am the only one on deck not only with a tether but also clipped in.. Feels weird being the only one but as you put it you start to think about what sort of impact and issues does a MOB cause when things go pear shaped etc.

 

When your hit by a wave like that, its just you even when one of your closest friends is nearly sitting in your lap moments before.

 

Thank you soooo much for the letter.

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Thanks for sharing the write-up and insight. Very sorry for your loss. I miss ocean crossings where time stands still, a rythym develops with the wind and waves, no buildings, roads or drive thrus, shifts spent sailing and sleeping marked by the locations of the sun, stars and moon, it is endless..... You are aware of the thin line between society and anarchy.

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Excellent writeup and kudos for the details on safety. It is so easy to become complacent and especially for those who have never experienced a MOB. I hope that none of us ever experience waves like that, it seems a miracle that anyone survived.

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Bryan, thank you for sharing.

 

The shared team risk is of particular note to me as an element I have not spent a lot of time considering.

 

Best

- mark

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Thanks for the write up Bryan and my sincere condolences on your losses.

 

Can you confirm the EPIRB was a GPS type?

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most of that story a lot of us have done and the rest of it we worried about it, thank you

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Bryan, thank you for writing this up so soon after. You have huge balls.

We all will learn a lot from your sharing.

 

P.A.

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That's a very courageous and honest report. The best thing we can do after such a situation is to share what we have learned so others can inform their own decisions.

 

My condolences for your loss and again, my compliments on your honesty.

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Great write-up Bryan. Thanks for the facts - and for reminding us what needs to always be our main focus.

 

I'm sorry for what you've been through dude.

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Bryan - Thank you for excellent essay. I hope we can all learn something from the misfortune of the Low Speed Chase crew. I know I have.

 

God bless the entire crew.

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Thank you.. I wouldn't dare comment

 

Fair winds and following seas, mate.

.

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Thanks, Bryan, for your courageous and clear-headed account. You will help others stay safer in the future, which is probably the best legacy anyone can leave behind.

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Well done. And thank you for sharing it early. Hopefully the pain of your experience will be eased slightly by knowing you may have educated, convinced, and changed the safety behavior of the guy going out sailing tomorow for the better.

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Terrific write up, Bryan. Appreciate your honestly and frankness.

Best to you, your fellow survivors and the grieving families.

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Well done. And thank you for sharing it early. Hopefully the pain of your experience will be eased slightly by knowing you may have educated, convinced, and changed the safety behavior of the guy going out sailing tomorow for the better.

 

In true SA form Fuck yes he has made some of us think about our safety and behavior!

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Thank you. Your courage to come forward so soon with the story and your personal survival lessons will undoubtedly save lives.

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Thank you. Your courage to come forward so soon with the story and your personal survival lessons will undoubtedly save lives.

 

 

+1 What he said!

 

Thank you!

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Bryan,

 

Thanks for your story. I think things will be looked at differently by many of us as we prepare for our next offshore. Good luck to you.

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Thank you. Your courage to come forward so soon with the story and your personal survival lessons will undoubtedly save lives.

Thanks Bryan.

Soon after the news broke, I received about 25 e-mails from family and friends worrying that I too might have been 'out there' as they all know I live and breathe racing on SF Bay and there abouts. The real pain they all felt made me assess my own practices offshore.

 

Liquid Courage

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Bryan thanks buddy for giving us Anarchists the inside story. You get better now. Some serious family time for you . You scared the shit out of them and us with those details.

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Words can't express how sorry I am that you had to go through that. All the best to you, your family and friends.

 

Thank you very much for sharing.

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Thank you for sharing what was truly a horrifying experience. As I said when I first heard the news; "There but for the grace of God go all of us who muck about in boats." I will definitely be putting safety a little higher on the list of things to consider. Bless you Bryan and all of those on High Speed Chase. Thoughts, positive energy and prayers to you.

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Bryan Chong is a surviving crew member of the Sydney 38 Low Speed Chase which lost the lives of five people during the disastrous Full Crew Farallones Race in San Francisco. Here, he tells his story.

 

This letter goes out to a devastated sailing community still confused about the events surrounding the 2012 Full Crew Farallones Race. There have been inaccuracies in the media, mostly stemming from the survivors' silence as James ("Jay"), Nick and I are still reeling from tragedy and the loss of close friends and loved ones.

 

I've chosen to use Sailing Anarchy for distributing this story because they're of a kindred spirit and were the favorites amongst the crew of Low Speed Chase and those who already know the answer to the question, "Why would you sail in the ocean on a windy day with big swells?"

 

I've also included the Marin Independent Journal and The Tiburon Ark, as they're the hometown newspapers in an area teeming with sailors. Many sailors relocate from around the world to Marin and the Tiburon Peninsula in order to live in proximity to the world's best sailing. Alan Cahill moved from Cork, Ireland to race sailboats professionally in the Bay Area and the Pacific Ocean. He was the best man in our wedding and will be dearly missed while I journey this planet.

 

This letter does not contain every detail, but my account should provide a basic understanding of our day on the water and what happened after the first wave hit our boat. It is meant both to illustrate how things can look normal until one event changes everything and to begin to address what we can learn. It's my hope and intention that it will spark a wider dialogue within the sailing community about safety standards and, more importantly, safety practices.

 

 

Why do we sail?

 

A sailor's mind set is no different from that of any other athlete who chooses to participate in a sport that has some risk. It's a healthy addiction. Despite the highly publicized deaths of Sonny Bono and Michael Kennedy, skiers all over the world continue to hit the slopes each winter. Sitting on the couch is safer than ripping down a slope, but the reward makes the risk worthwhile. Continued on the front page.

 

 

 

It takes a man to write those words. There will likely be legal matters to deal with, such as wrongful-death actions on the part of the victims' families. I am sure Bryan's lawyers told him to sit tight and not make any statements about this accident, at least until the victims' families have it it with his marine insurere. But I am really really glad to have a fellow human being who is willing to cut through bullshit at his own risk.

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Bryan, thanks very much for taking the time and having the courage to share this with us.

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This quote got to me.

 

"Alan, Marc, Jordan, Alexis and Elmer. Keep your rig tuned, your kite full and your foulies dry. We’ll one day finish our race together"

 

damn....so true though.

 

Bryan, you need any help getting through this, you know where we're at. Find some peace.

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Bryan,

 

Thanks for that. Makes you thing about how many times all of us have been "safely" outside the surf line thinking the rounding was essentially done.

 

Peace.

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Thank you Bryan. I can't imagine the pain and the courage you must have. To explain why we sail, and to tell your story so eloquently it is truly a gift.

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Bryan, thank you.... just thank you. Keep well. Beau

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It's a tragedy that it took something like this to get me to pay attention to safety "on par" with race prep like rig tune, current, course, etc. - but I'll bet I'm not alone among SA readers whose priorities have been changed as a result of what you went through and were courageous enough to write about in such an open and honest way. In a way, the people who will benefit the most from your experience and your written comments will be the spouses and kids of people who will change their practices. Good on ya for sharing - my wife and kids thank you without even knowing.

 

I'm sailing down the coast from Seattle to San Diego next month, and will give a nod to the Farallones as we go by.

 

 

WWing

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Bryan, thank you so much for the real story. I am sorry for your loss.

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Thanks for sharing that Bryan, it was refreshingly honest and hopefully puts the rumors to bed. I have no doubt that your courage and honesty in reporting the facts as well as your own personal reflections will make our sport safer for all who read this.

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Bryan,

 

Thank you very, very much for sharing the Low Speed Chase story with our community. You've done a service for all of us at what must be a very difficult time.

 

David Nabors

Olson 34 TEMERITY

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Reading that story put chills down my spine. Thank you for coming forward and sharing, and my condolences to your lost friends and crewmates.

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Thanks Bryan, a hard story to tell. We also race around rocks like the Farallones down under and have seen waves like that suddenly appear.

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I think it took a lot of guts for Bryan to send his story out and I commend him for it. There are times in life where you just have to get your story out, and this was certainly one of them. His recount of the events helps many of us who lost friends out there, but also helps the greater sailing community understand the situation, to think deeply again about safety, and well explains to those outside sailing why we put ourselves out there in the first place.

Thank you Bryan - tremendous and powerful work. And congratulations on your beautiful baby.

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Hard story to read, even a harder story to write. Huge Balls. I will look differently at safety because of it.

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Bryan,

 

Fair winds to your mates that were lost. Thoughts and prayers to all involved.

 

Like most...I am better informed about what we should all think about relative to safety.

 

Thank you!

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nothing to add except my dearest condolences..........

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

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Bryan,

 

I am without words to describe this tragedy. The courage and insight took some real balls to write down for all to read. It sure has me changing priorities when sailing in the ocean. Fair winds sir.

 

Martin

C&C 27

Motorboater.

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I think it took a lot of guts for Bryan to send his story out and I commend him for it. There are times in life where you just have to get your story out, and this was certainly one of them. His recount of the events helps many of us who lost friends out there, but also helps the greater sailing community understand the situation, to think deeply again about safety, and well explains to those outside sailing why we put ourselves out there in the first place.

Thank you Bryan - tremendous and powerful work. And congratulations on your beautiful baby.

 

Well said Dixie -

 

Bryan,

 

Thanks for getting your story out - it is a great service to put your perspective out there and bring some first hand truth into what so far has been second hand and often inaccurate. I particularly respect your words:

 

Fellow sailors can relate to trimming sails during intense racing or weather conditions. We assimilate data in a series of snapshots taken from within the boat and across the race course. I suspect that's the reason sailors show up to race protest rooms with 5 different accounts of an incident that happened at a speed no faster than a run.

 

So true. What happens during an investigation (especially insurance investigations) is not focused on what the sailors experienced or understand. It's about coming to a determination that 'settles' things from the point of view of the legal parties involved. There are going to be different experiences and the participants with the first hand experience are likely to be left unsettled.

 

I really appreciate your crediting Nick with having a different perspective:

 

As for what happened in that first wave, my head was down and I initially thought we might have pitch-poled. Nick, who broke his leg while it was wrapped around a stanchion and had a better view, tells me the boat surfed backwards with the wave for a stretch then rotated 90 degrees counter-clockwise before the wave finally barrel rolled it.

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

 

+ 1

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Bryan Chong is a surviving crew member of the Sydney 38 Low Speed Chase which lost the lives of five people during the disastrous Full Crew Farallones Race in San Francisco. Here, he tells his story.

 

This letter goes out to a devastated sailing community still confused about the events surrounding the 2012 Full Crew Farallones Race. There have been inaccuracies in the media, mostly stemming from the survivors’ silence as James (“Jay”), Nick and I are still reeling from tragedy and the loss of close friends and loved ones.

 

I’ve chosen to use Sailing Anarchy for distributing this story because they’re of a kindred spirit and were the favorites amongst the crew of Low Speed Chase and those who already know the answer to the question, “Why would you sail in the ocean on a windy day with big swells?”

 

I’ve also included the Marin Independent Journal and The Tiburon Ark, as they’re the hometown newspapers in an area teeming with sailors. Many sailors relocate from around the world to Marin and the Tiburon Peninsula in order to live in proximity to the world’s best sailing. Alan Cahill moved from Cork, Ireland to race sailboats professionally in the Bay Area and the Pacific Ocean. He was the best man in our wedding and will be dearly missed while I journey this planet.

 

This letter does not contain every detail, but my account should provide a basic understanding of our day on the water and what happened after the first wave hit our boat. It is meant both to illustrate how things can look normal until one event changes everything and to begin to address what we can learn. It’s my hope and intention that it will spark a wider dialogue within the sailing community about safety standards and, more importantly, safety practices.

 

 

Why do we sail?

 

A sailor’s mind set is no different from that of any other athlete who chooses to participate in a sport that has some risk. It’s a healthy addiction. Despite the highly publicized deaths of Sonny Bono and Michael Kennedy, skiers all over the world continue to hit the slopes each winter. Sitting on the couch is safer than ripping down a slope, but the reward makes the risk worthwhile. Continued on the front page.

 

 

Bryan -- add my thanks to all the others for sharing this with us. You really conveyed how normal everything was . . . until it wasn't.

 

I think you've achieved your goal of sparking a wider dialogue about safety standards and practices. I've shared it with my skipper and crew in the hopes that it starts them thinking about their own safety practices and what we all do and don't do when we're racing, and I will be bringing it up for conversation before we start our next race. I hope many others do the same.

 

What you've shared with us is significant -- on many levels. Fair winds to you.

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Bryan Chong is a surviving crew member of the Sydney 38 Low Speed Chase which lost the lives of five people during the disastrous Full Crew Farallones Race in San Francisco. Here, he tells his story. ... Continued on the front page.

 

Well worth reading, even if it does mean a mythical journey.

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I am sensitive to the loss oflife and the tragic consequences for friends and family, my deepest sympathies.

 

 

I’ve had similar experiences inmy sailing career. I was in THAT race.

 

 

I wish to focus on preventingfuture loss of life/best practices.

 

 

My opinion is: landing onserpentine rock (Farallones/Marin Headlands) with an inflatable PFD leads torapid loss of buoyancy due to wave/rock/body abrasion.

 

 

Non-inflatable (Inherently buoyant)dingystyle PFD’s provide padding, have no mechanical bits to fail and, just float.When in the ocean, the ADDITION of a ‘suspender’ style (inflatable) PFD withharness/ring provides a secondary level of floatation along with an attachmentpoint.

 

 

Harnesses – I’ve been clipped inand washed over wishing I could release and couldn’t (heavy boat smashing downon my head a few times) and have been washed over not wearing a harness beingseparated from the boat wishing I’d have clipped in (when they couldn’tretrieve me soon enough for my comfort). I like the idea of a ‘central’jackline along the midline of a boat rather than two lines along each side but,never see this arrangement used.

 

 

I am interested in learning from marinesafety professionals what harness/pfd strategies are ultimately recommended.

 

 

Fair winds brothers. Be safe.

 

busted

 

 

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Bryan, thank you for surviving this horrible ordeal and sharing the story of the events. Sometimes you can bank on luck when prepared just a little bit and you did.

 

My condolences to family and friends and my highest respect for the other survivors and yourself.

 

Hold the hugs a long time.

 

Rick Nelson

"Mr. Bone"

International Tempest

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Bryan - You are an excellent writer and presented the account very well. Thank you very much for sharing. We will be going offshore in just over a week and will definitely take lessons from your letter.

 

Eric

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

 

+ 1

 

 

Wow - not surprising, unspeakable low, use a tragedy like this to try to promote yourself.

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

 

+ 1

Ed might want to do an edit & mea culpa so as to not become a distraction.

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

 

how interesting that you choose to bring up such a petty complaint in the midst of such a serious discussion. seems to me i have the right to edit content as i see fit. and isn't it interesting that i received an e-mail today from the queen of all whiners, craig leweck, complaining about the very same thing. and finally, isn't it interesting that your ip address indicates that you are in san diego, not colorado. don't you have enough to do without reading every word that we publish and bitching like a pussy when you feel slighted? and for the record, bryan sent it to us first, and had no objection to the edits. now back to the real story...

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

 

+ 1

 

 

Wow - not surprising, unspeakable low, use a tragedy like this to try to promote yourself.

 

Really. We knew he was a left coast douchenozzle long before this. Why the surprise?

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Thanks Bryan...your courage on and off the water speaks to your person. Again our thoughts and prayers go out to your crew, family and friends. There's always a bottle of rum on AC for you...

 

AC

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Thanks Bryan for what was clearly a difficult essay to write. And thanks for sharing it across multiple great insider publications, including SA. I can't imagine how tough these past ten days have been for you and the other survivors; I only hope you were able to find at least a little cathartic value in writing and sharing your very well-written and even more cogent insight.

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Well, Scot or whatever the F_ _ _ K his name is has finally stooped to a new low. So he adds THE STORY on his website and very conveniently removes the other sailing publications that the original story from Bryan went to. Scuttlebutt, Latitude 38 and Seahorse were all listed along with SA. But Scot removed those other publication names and made readers think Bryan had sent it to only him.

 

I hope that Bryan chimes in and confirms that his original story went to FOUR PUBLICATIONS, not just SA. And thank you Bryan for the well written, absoulutely critical recap on what happened.

 

Shame on you Scot.

 

From Colorado

 

+ 1

 

 

Wow - not surprising, unspeakable low, use a tragedy like this to try to promote yourself.

 

Bryan's words should Not be edited

 

This is an open window into a Soul coming from Bryan's Heart

 

should Not need the Broom in this thread nor the FP

 

of note the other FP did not edit out SA from their story

 

Sad place to take cheep shots !! sad.gif

 

Sorry Bryan Can't believe that happened !

 

May you (and the other survivors) never get to pay for your Drinks where ever you go for the rest of your Life !

 

And Thank You for taking the chance in sending your story here too - Sorry your words weren't left alone

 

You Have Plenty to Deal with w/o shife like this sad.gifsad.gif

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To begin with my best to Bryan, the crew of Low Speed Chase, their families and friends,

After I read the account, I followed the directions and watched the youtube video of the SC 50 rounding just in front of you. Then reread the account. Many lessons learned.

Thank you for putting it out there in such a public forum.

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Bryan, thanks for having the integrity and courage to tell this difficult tale so soon after the tragedy. Some folks on this site may have been on a Volvo boat or done some other mind-bendingly out there stuff but the majority of us are sailors just like you and your crew and this really hits very close to home. As a skipper who frequently takes younger sailors on their first overnight coastal race, I always emphasize safety but we all get cavalier at times. Your story will definitely be discussed this year and I don't think I am off the mark in agreeing that you undoubtedly are saving lives here with your candor.

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Thanks to Bryan for sharing. That is a fantastic article. I have been searching the web for some closure since it occurred and i think i found it with this article. I hope people take the safety lessons away from this accident, not start a witch hunt for cause. in the end it was a truly tragic accident, no more no less. the reference to the boat that was just ahead that took an outside line, was the boat i was on. We saw it all, were lucky we did not suffer the same fate (a furious few minutes heading up trying to avoid getting pushed in), and unfortunately were powerless to do anything but call it in as quick as possible. God bless those lost and the three survivors as well.

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Bryan, my heart felt apologies the loss of your crew mates and close friends. It must have taken so much courage to come forward and speak so well about the incident.

 

I hope your story goes forward reaches many sailors and makes them think twice about their own safety to save lives.

 

My thoughts are with the friends and family of the lost men.

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Editing this man's words is disgusting.

 

Editors edit. And the animosity between these two is and always has been palpable. Take note that in this incredible story, only the introduction was edited in the SB and SA publications (the Ed only edited out names of the other publications, SB left them in, but the only bolded word in the entire story relates to SB rather than the importance of the message at hand). Could they have explained their edits? Sure.

 

Whatever.

 

Move on and let's talk about the story. Way way way more important.

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Editing this man's words is disgusting.

 

Editors edit. And the animosity between these two is and always has been palpable. Take note that in this incredible story, only the introduction was edited in the SB and SA publications the Ed only edited out names of the other publications, SB left them in, but the only bolded word in the entire story relates to SB rather than the importance of the message at hand). Could they have explained their edits? Sure.

 

Whatever.

 

Move on and let's talk about the story. Way way way more important.

 

 

+1

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Bryan, my heart felt apologies the loss of your crew mates and close friends. It must have taken so much courage to come forward and speak so well about the incident.

 

I hope your story goes forward reaches many sailors and makes them think twice about their own safety to save lives.

 

My thoughts are with the friends and family of the lost men.

 

 

And woman. ;)

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Thank you Brian for the account of events - I greatly appreciate hearing the facts of the day and your views on the matters at hand - I know it could not have been easy to write.

 

The passage

the boat surfed backwards with the wave for a stretch then rotated 90 degrees counter-clockwise before the wave finally barrel rolled it.
was the key to my understanding of the event - other combinations of roll/pitch/yaw didn't make sense to me - that one does. I have sent a smaller boat up a wave so large, steep & beginning to pitch that I wondered if we would be overcome in a similar fashion - but we were lucky and 'punched through' with nearly all forward momentum expended. I can definately see how this would sweep any crew from the deck.

 

There but for the grace of God, I suppose.

 

You honored your shipmates by setting the record straight. My appreciation of your effort and sincere condolences.

 

Lastly, immaterial edits and your indignation are not the point, folks give it a rest.

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Editing this man's words is disgusting.

 

Editors edit. And the animosity between these two is and always has been palpable. Take note that in this incredible story, only the introduction was edited in the SB and SA publications (the Ed only edited out names of the other publications, SB left them in, but the only bolded word in the entire story relates to SB rather than the importance of the message at hand). Could they have explained their edits? Sure.

 

Whatever.

 

Move on and let's talk about the story. Way way way more important.

 

Dixie- I am sorry but you are wrong. We all know what a horrible story this is. To take Bryan's piece and change it so readers THINK that it was some exclusive SA story is just pathetic. I encourage everyone to read Scuttlebutt tonight and see what Bryan had written to the FOUR publications. Again, shame on Scot. Scot-----have an answer?

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Bryan, my heart felt apologies the loss of your crew mates and close friends. It must have taken so much courage to come forward and speak so well about the incident.

 

I hope your story goes forward reaches many sailors and makes them think twice about their own safety to save lives.

 

My thoughts are with the friends and family of the lost men.

 

 

And woman. ;)

 

my bad... and woman.

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Thank you for taking some time out of your life to write this article..Finally those that are Monday morning quarterbacks will now be silenced as you were there..not starting rumors and we think this happened ..we all now need to learn what went wrong and learn from it...it was a terrible accident, and at that time everybody was doing the right thing...Like the old saying " Oh God my boat is so small and the ocean so big". I am truly sorry for the loss of your friends and crew mates...may their demise not go unnoticed and may we learn from it..Sailors RIP...

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Bryan,

 

thank you for sharing.

 

very interesting points.

 

I used to always avoid reading stories like this and accident reports but I must say this past few months (including the MAIB report on Lion) have made me re-evaluate the way I sail and prepare.

 

I will readily admit your points will probably save my life or someone I sail with one day.

 

Thank you.

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Thank you Bryon for the story.

Condolences.

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