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re-psycled

3 dead in N2E

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US Sailing made it official that they're doing a N2E accident review panel

 

US Sailing to Conduct Independent Review on 2012 Newport to Ensenada Race

 

 

<<

The members of the Independent Review Panel are

Chairperson, Bruce Brown (Costa Mesa, Calif.),

John Winder (Annisquam, Mass.),

Alan Andrews (Corona del Mar, Calif.),

Ed Adams (Middletown, R.I.), and

Alan McMillan (Pensacola, Fla.).

The Offshore Special Regulations Consultant on the panel is Evans Starzinger (Milford, Conn).

The Safety at Sea Committee Chair and Review Panel Liaison is Chuck Hawley (Santa Cruz, Calif.).

Medical Advisors are Dr. Michael Jacobs (Vineyard Haven, Mass.) and Dr. Kent Benedict (Aptos, Calif.).

Jim Wildey (Annapolis, Md.) will advise on investigation procedures and formats. <br style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 11px; line-height: 15px; ">

>>

There are a couple of overlaps on the advisory side with the Farallones panel.

 

Who is Bruce Brown and is he involved with NOSA? - he is from their neighborhood

 

Olde tyme So Cal surfer?...:

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US Sailing made it official that they're doing a N2E accident review panel

 

US Sailing to Conduct Independent Review on 2012 Newport to Ensenada Race

 

 

<<

The members of the Independent Review Panel are

Chairperson, Bruce Brown (Costa Mesa, Calif.),

John Winder (Annisquam, Mass.),

Alan Andrews (Corona del Mar, Calif.),

Ed Adams (Middletown, R.I.), and

Alan McMillan (Pensacola, Fla.).

The Offshore Special Regulations Consultant on the panel is Evans Starzinger (Milford, Conn).

The Safety at Sea Committee Chair and Review Panel Liaison is Chuck Hawley (Santa Cruz, Calif.).

Medical Advisors are Dr. Michael Jacobs (Vineyard Haven, Mass.) and Dr. Kent Benedict (Aptos, Calif.).

Jim Wildey (Annapolis, Md.) will advise on investigation procedures and formats. <br style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 11px; line-height: 15px; ">

>>

There are a couple of overlaps on the advisory side with the Farallones panel.

 

Who is Bruce Brown and is he involved with NOSA? - he is from their neighborhood

 

Bruce Brown is a very good guy, very knowledgeable.

 

Alan Andrews is also from the NOSA 'hood, in fact is a recent Staff Comm of Balboa YC, which is also the same club that the NOSA President is from.

 

It's a good thing they have some local representation.

 

This is a very good, diverse group. I'm looking forward to their findings.

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1337003235[/url]' post='3712732']

Can't we all just get along?

 

What your Rodney King now?

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Can't we all just get along?

 

What your Rodney King now?

 

you're

 

Edit: should probably have a comma after "What". Maybe a k in front of "now". Change "Rodney" to "Martin Luther", we're getting there.

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US Sailing made it official that they're doing a N2E accident review panel

 

US Sailing to Conduct Independent Review on 2012 Newport to Ensenada Race

 

 

<<

The members of the Independent Review Panel are

Chairperson, Bruce Brown (Costa Mesa, Calif.),

John Winder (Annisquam, Mass.),

Alan Andrews (Corona del Mar, Calif.),

Ed Adams (Middletown, R.I.), and

Alan McMillan (Pensacola, Fla.).

The Offshore Special Regulations Consultant on the panel is Evans Starzinger (Milford, Conn).

The Safety at Sea Committee Chair and Review Panel Liaison is Chuck Hawley (Santa Cruz, Calif.).

Medical Advisors are Dr. Michael Jacobs (Vineyard Haven, Mass.) and Dr. Kent Benedict (Aptos, Calif.).

Jim Wildey (Annapolis, Md.) will advise on investigation procedures and formats. <br style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 11px; line-height: 15px; ">

>>

There are a couple of overlaps on the advisory side with the Farallones panel.

 

Who is Bruce Brown and is he involved with NOSA? - he is from their neighborhood

 

Bruce Brown is a very good guy, very knowledgeable.

 

Alan Andrews is also from the NOSA 'hood, in fact is a recent Staff Comm of Balboa YC, which is also the same club that the NOSA President is from.

 

It's a good thing they have some local representation.

 

This is a very good, diverse group. I'm looking forward to their findings.

 

I hope the findings will soon establish that a boat motoring under auto pilot has nothing to do with a sail race. Spending too many US Sailing funds to satisfy some sea lawyers is misappropriating funds for sailing.

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US Sailing made it official that they're doing a N2E accident review panel

 

US Sailing to Conduct Independent Review on 2012 Newport to Ensenada Race

 

 

<<

The members of the Independent Review Panel are

Chairperson, Bruce Brown (Costa Mesa, Calif.),

John Winder (Annisquam, Mass.),

Alan Andrews (Corona del Mar, Calif.),

Ed Adams (Middletown, R.I.), and

Alan McMillan (Pensacola, Fla.).

The Offshore Special Regulations Consultant on the panel is Evans Starzinger (Milford, Conn).

The Safety at Sea Committee Chair and Review Panel Liaison is Chuck Hawley (Santa Cruz, Calif.).

Medical Advisors are Dr. Michael Jacobs (Vineyard Haven, Mass.) and Dr. Kent Benedict (Aptos, Calif.).

Jim Wildey (Annapolis, Md.) will advise on investigation procedures and formats. <br style="font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica; font-size: 11px; line-height: 15px; ">

>>

There are a couple of overlaps on the advisory side with the Farallones panel.

 

Who is Bruce Brown and is he involved with NOSA? - he is from their neighborhood

 

Bruce Brown is a very good guy, very knowledgeable.

 

Alan Andrews is also from the NOSA 'hood, in fact is a recent Staff Comm of Balboa YC, which is also the same club that the NOSA President is from.

 

It's a good thing they have some local representation.

 

This is a very good, diverse group. I'm looking forward to their findings.

They should diversify it further and add DoRag and The Puss...it would definitely liven things up a bit.

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1337052973[/url]' post='3713876']
1337052945[/url]' post='3713875']
1337003235[/url]' post='3712732']

Can't we all just get along?

 

What your Rodney King now?

 

you're

 

Edit: should probably have a comma after "What". Maybe a k in front of "now". Change "Rodney" to "Martin Luther", we're getting there.

 

What and now we have the English police out again?

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This "investigation" will be interesting.

 

I would guess that US Sailing wishes to be proactive with this investigation and attempt to circumvent any government mandated requirements for yacht racing in the US.

 

However, there could be some unintended consequences if material changes were suggested. That is, any findings that NOSA acted without due care could provide the plaintiff's bar with support for their contention that NOSA, it's officers and directors, joint and several, were culpable in the unfortunate deaths from their event.

 

In the event that US Sailing does not generate any meaningful recommemdations for change, then the "investigation" will be deemed a whitewash and the government is likely to step in and mandate changes. Which, of course, will also help the plaintiffs.

 

Complicating the investigation is the fact that several of the NOSA folks have roles and positions withinin US Sailing. So that might taint the findings of the investigation as a conflict of interest possibly could be alleged.

 

Interesting conundrum, isn't it?

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Article just updated on ESPN about the US Sailing Investigation: http://espn.go.com/o...-accident-april

 

With the investigation, time for just one more speculation. Perhaps the reason Aegean won in cruising class in the past is that they cut the Coronados Islands closer than anyone else.The SPOT track we have is what they actually did. If they were planning to leave just 1/4 mile leeway from the island and their instruments were off just 3/8 of a mile or so from the new engine installation and they thought they would see the light and did not realize they were in the occulted zone...BAM.

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Article just updated on ESPN about the US Sailing Investigation: http://espn.go.com/o...-accident-april

 

With the investigation, time for just one more speculation. Perhaps the reason Aegean won in cruising class in the past is that they cut the Coronados Islands closer than anyone else.The SPOT track we have is what they actually did. If they were planning to leave just 1/4 mile leeway from the island and their instruments were off just 3/8 of a mile or so from the new engine installation and they thought they would see the light and did not realize they were in the occulted zone...BAM.

 

If true, then all the more reason to be on extra alert when nearing the islands.

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Article just updated on ESPN about the US Sailing Investigation: http://espn.go.com/o...-accident-april

 

With the investigation, time for just one more speculation. Perhaps the reason Aegean won in cruising class in the past is that they cut the Coronados Islands closer than anyone else.The SPOT track we have is what they actually did. If they were planning to leave just 1/4 mile leeway from the island and their instruments were off just 3/8 of a mile or so from the new engine installation and they thought they would see the light and did not realize they were in the occulted zone...BAM.

 

If true, then all the more reason to be on extra alert when nearing the islands.

 

Perhaps the crew on watch had orders to do exactly that before they fell asleep.

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Article just updated on ESPN about the US Sailing Investigation: http://espn.go.com/o...-accident-april

 

With the investigation, time for just one more speculation. Perhaps the reason Aegean won in cruising class in the past is that they cut the Coronados Islands closer than anyone else.The SPOT track we have is what they actually did. If they were planning to leave just 1/4 mile leeway from the island and their instruments were off just 3/8 of a mile or so from the new engine installation and they thought they would see the light and did not realize they were in the occulted zone...BAM.

 

If true, then all the more reason to be on extra alert when nearing the islands.

 

Perhaps the crew on watch had orders to do exactly that before they fell asleep.

 

If so, they were too inexperienced or competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

Well, apparently something was risky....

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Everything was fine right up to the point where the front fell off.

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Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

Apparently motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night is risky.

 

Try to keep up.

 

It was postulated that a possible strategy for "winning" the motorboat class is to minimize miles -- cut the islands as close as you are willing to "risk."

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I know i'm late to the party here, but i got bored with the thread - but this is not like a ski area liability issue

 

Got a lawyer pal that represents, or did represent, several so cal ski areas - and at least 20 years ago, when queried what he did about lawsuits - his response was "settle"

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I know i'm late to the party here, but i got bored with the thread - but this is not like a ski area liability issue

 

Got a lawyer pal that represents, or did represent, several so cal ski areas - and at least 20 years ago, when queried what he did about lawsuits - his response was "settle"

 

Of course, but that might get problematic if the NOSA officers and Board doesn't have D & O insurance, including adequate coverage for their own negligence. Then the plaintiffs will go for the deep pockets.

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I know i'm late to the party here, but i got bored with the thread - but this is not like a ski area liability issue

 

Got a lawyer pal that represents, or did represent, several so cal ski areas - and at least 20 years ago, when queried what he did about lawsuits - his response was "settle"

 

Of course, but that might get problematic if the NOSA officers and Board doesn't have D & O insurance, including adequate coverage for their own negligence. Then the plaintiffs will go for the deep pockets.

 

Who are the deep pockets?

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

You can make the most placid situation risky. Assume you have a condo with a third floor deck with a railing. Stay on the floor of the deck - really safe. Get drunk and walk down the railing - not so good. If we assume (remember - we really have not a clue what happened but are trying scenarios that might fit) that they cut the island really close in order to beat the others in their sail awhile/power awhile class. We add risk. In a power boat race, sailing a shorter distance can give you a big leg up. They had better be right on top of their game when approaching the island. Have any of you skippers had a crew member that let you down?

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

You can make the most placid situation risky. Assume you have a condo with a third floor deck with a railing. Stay on the floor of the deck - really safe. Get drunk and walk down the railing - not so good. If we assume (remember - we really have not a clue what happened but are trying scenarios that might fit) that they cut the island really close in order to beat the others in their sail awhile/power awhile class. We add risk. In a power boat race, sailing a shorter distance can give you a big leg up. They had better be right on top of their game when approaching the island. Have any of you skippers had a crew member that let you down?

 

 

If so, that's an epic "let down."

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

You can make the most placid situation risky. Assume you have a condo with a third floor deck with a railing. Stay on the floor of the deck - really safe. Get drunk and walk down the railing - not so good. If we assume (remember - we really have not a clue what happened but are trying scenarios that might fit) that they cut the island really close in order to beat the others in their sail awhile/power awhile class. We add risk. In a power boat race, sailing a shorter distance can give you a big leg up. They had better be right on top of their game when approaching the island. Have any of you skippers had a crew member that let you down?

 

 

If so, that's an epic "let down."

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1337262049[/url]' post='3717176']
1337223797[/url]' post='3716735']
1337195267[/url]' post='3716215']
1337195022[/url]' post='3716206']
1337193868[/url]' post='3716167']

If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

You can make the most placid situation risky. Assume you have a condo with a third floor deck with a railing. Stay on the floor of the deck - really safe. Get drunk and walk down the railing - not so good. If we assume (remember - we really have not a clue what happened but are trying scenarios that might fit) that they cut the island really close in order to beat the others in their sail awhile/power awhile class. We add risk. In a power boat race, sailing a shorter distance can give you a big leg up. They had better be right on top of their game when approaching the island. Have any of you skippers had a crew member that let you down?

 

 

If so, that's an epic "let down."

 

Only Dorag would find that..is that like swallowing?

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This "investigation" will be interesting.

 

I would guess that US Sailing wishes to be proactive with this investigation and attempt to circumvent any government mandated requirements for yacht racing in the US.

 

However, there could be some unintended consequences if material changes were suggested. That is, any findings that NOSA acted without due care could provide the plaintiff's bar with support for their contention that NOSA, it's officers and directors, joint and several, were culpable in the unfortunate deaths from their event.

 

In the event that US Sailing does not generate any meaningful recommemdations for change, then the "investigation" will be deemed a whitewash and the government is likely to step in and mandate changes. Which, of course, will also help the plaintiffs.

 

Complicating the investigation is the fact that several of the NOSA folks have roles and positions withinin US Sailing. So that might taint the findings of the investigation as a conflict of interest possibly could be alleged.

 

Interesting conundrum, isn't it?

 

In the news tonight it was disclosed that the parents of the two Chinese graduate engineering students at USC that were murdered last week, just filed an action against the school. These guys were out in the hood, very late at night, in a new Beamer. Asking for trouble? Now, why would USC be sued for wrongful death?

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t for USC thoise young mn would not have even b

Article just updated on ESPN about the US Sailing Investigation: http://espn.go.com/o...-accident-april

 

 

This "investigation" will be interesting.

 

I would guess that US Sailing wishes to be proactive with this investigation and attempt to circumvent any government mandated requirements for yacht racing in the US.

 

However, there could be some unintended consequences if material changes were suggested. That is, any findings that NOSA acted without due care could provide the plaintiff's bar with support for their contention that NOSA, it's officers and directors, joint and several, were culpable in the unfortunate deaths from their event.

 

In the event that US Sailing does not generate any meaningful recommemdations for change, then the "investigation" will be deemed a whitewash and the government is likely to step in and mandate changes. Which, of course, will also help the plaintiffs.

 

Complicating the investigation is the fact that several of the NOSA folks have roles and positions withinin US Sailing. So that might taint the findings of the investigation as a conflict of interest possibly could be alleged.

 

Interesting conundrum, isn't it?

 

In the news tonight it was disclosed that the parents of the two Chinese graduate engineering students at USC that were murdered last week, just filed an action against the school. These guys were out in the hood, very late at night, in a new Beamer. Asking for trouble? Now, why would USC be sued for wrongful death?

 

Two reasons: But for USC those 2 young men would not have even been in the country. Area around campus has been dangerous for years - perhaps USC failed to warn; 2. USC has deep pockets. I think both theories are bull-shit but it is not up to me to make the call.

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thought south carolina was more gentleman like

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

You can make the most placid situation risky. Assume you have a condo with a third floor deck with a railing. Stay on the floor of the deck - really safe. Get drunk and walk down the railing - not so good. If we assume (remember - we really have not a clue what happened but are trying scenarios that might fit) that they cut the island really close in order to beat the others in their sail awhile/power awhile class. We add risk. In a power boat race, sailing a shorter distance can give you a big leg up. They had better be right on top of their game when approaching the island. Have any of you skippers had a crew member that let you down?

 

Argghhhh -- These are all ASSUMPTIONS again with no basis or evidence that this is what they were doing or what went through their minds

 

Beating-a-dead-horse.gif

 

We might as well go back to the ninja or laser guided dolphins theories then.......

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If so, they were too inexperienced or [in]competent to be in that situation. The consequences (presuming that happened) can be, and were just as harsh as the consequences of falling asleep on watch in the military.

Exactly.

 

I've been in situations where we opted for the riskier of several maneuvers or courses.

The consequences were discussed and everyone put up their best game.

I can assure you, no one was likely to doze off in those situations!

 

When you're in a situation where you stand to gain by making the riskiest, boldest move, you darn well better bring your best milkshake to the yard.

 

Aren't we talking about a boat that was motoring, likely under autopilot, on essentially a calm clear night, and they hit the island?

 

What on earth is risky about that?

 

You can make the most placid situation risky. Assume you have a condo with a third floor deck with a railing. Stay on the floor of the deck - really safe. Get drunk and walk down the railing - not so good. If we assume (remember - we really have not a clue what happened but are trying scenarios that might fit) that they cut the island really close in order to beat the others in their sail awhile/power awhile class. We add risk. In a power boat race, sailing a shorter distance can give you a big leg up. They had better be right on top of their game when approaching the island. Have any of you skippers had a crew member that let you down?

 

Argghhhh -- These are all ASSUMPTIONS again with no basis or evidence that this is what they were doing or what went through their minds

 

Beating-a-dead-horse.gif

 

We might as well go back to the ninja or laser guided dolphins theories then.......

 

+1

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thought south carolina was more gentleman like

 

that is the other USC

 

He knows that.

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Anyone know of any lawsuits as yet, or is it to soon?

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Good to see you back Dorag.

 

 

Well, SA does need a duty pinata to keep everyone focused...

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Anyone know of any lawsuits as yet, or is it to soon?

 

Sorry, Gloria Allred is busy with Johnny Travolta right now!

 

Let's hope that the Coastal Cup racers take heed of those other islands out there on the race course!

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Anyone know of any lawsuits as yet, or is it to soon?

 

Sorry, Gloria Allred is busy with Johnny Travolta right now!

 

Let's hope that the Coastal Cup racers take heed of those other islands out there on the race course!

 

The Points can be a problem too. The US Navy put a whole fleet of destroyers on the rocks at Point Arguello.

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Anyone know of any lawsuits as yet, or is it to soon?

 

Sorry, Gloria Allred is busy with Johnny Travolta right now!

 

Let's hope that the Coastal Cup racers take heed of those other islands out there on the race course!

 

The Points can be a problem too. The US Navy put a whole fleet of destroyers on the rocks at Point Arguello.

 

Honda Point, to be exact. Fleet coming down coast. Lead boat turned too soon in the fog. Several other boats followed and stacked up. Trailing ship tried to warn others, and didn't follow.

 

Honda Point Disaster

 

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Honda Point, to be exact. Fleet coming down coast. Lead boat turned too soon in the fog. Several other boats followed and stacked up. Trailing ship tried to warn others, and didn't follow.

 

Honda Point Disaster

 

 

OH NO ~:o How could they !?! The pre-route committee must not have spent the time and energy before hand ensuring the qualifications of the crews. They were amateurs -- sue everyone ! Time for litigation! This can't happen ... Human error and accidents only happen to "kruisers" not pompous bombastic "racers"-- The REAL reason is becuase they were motoring and not sailing at the time -- god forbid !

 

(in one short paragraph I paraphrased all the pompous bloviating by many on here)

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

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Aegean Crew 'Brave,' 'Tenacious'

A memorial service is held for the four men who perished when the sailboat Aegean crashed during the Newport Beach to Ensenada Yacht Race.

 

By Liz Spear Email the

 

More than 150 people gathered at the Redondo Beach Pier on Tuesday to celebrate the lives of four men who died while sailing in the annual Lexus Newport Beach to Ensenada Yacht Race at the end of April.

 

With warm sunshine and blue skies above, family and friends remembered skipper Theo Mavromatis of Redondo Beach and crewmen Kevin Rudolph of Manhattan Beach, Bill Johnson of Torrance and Joe Stewart of Bradenton, Fla. Three of the men’s bodies were found, along with pieces of Mavromatis’ 37-foot sailboat, the Aegean, in a debris field near the Coronado Islands in Mexico. Mavromatis’ body was found a week later.

 

A fifth crewman, Mike Patton, opted out of the race at the last minute because his mother wasn’t well. He and Mavromatis’ daughter Anna spoke at Tuesday’s service.

 

With tears on the brink, Patton stood at the podium a bell was rung for each of the deceased sailors. "Ringing of the bells is a traditional sailing sounding of souls," he said, later adding, "I believe these guys would really respect this and cherish this."

 

Throughout the memorial, attendees consistently spoke of the adventurous spirit of the four men and their resilience, the attraction of the ocean, and the broader significance of sailing.

 

“All four men won first place in the Newport to Ensenada sailing race last year, and even after winning, with the Aegean placing almost every time it raced, they still weren’t satisfied,” Anna Mavromati said in her tribute. “They still wouldn’t rest. They were always ready to raise the sails and set out on this adventure again.

 

“They were brave, and they were tenacious, and I can’t think of any better way to live life than they did.”

 

Mavromatis, 49, discovered his love of sailing at the age of 10 in Greece, when he joined a sailing club, his sister Rallou Mavromati-Rice, 48, told the crowd. By the age of 12, he’d built a catamaran that he and his sister sailed every summer until she left for college at 18.

 

“His wife and his kids were his life,” Mavromati-Rice said. “He lit up every time he shared every accomplishment of his kids with me very, very often. I know he’s at peace wherever he is, and we need to do the same for ourselves and move on. That’s what he would have wanted. I actually had a conversation with him about this; I’m glad I did.

 

“Please live your life the way he did. He enjoyed every minute of it. Do the same.”

 

Attendees remembered Rudolph, 53, as a musician and innovator who was “both infectious and brilliant.”

 

“To me, it was entirely obvious—the light and energy he brought with him wherever he went … I actually shed many tears after hearing of Kevin’s accident, even though I only knew him for about a year,” said Manhattan Beach resident Kelly Dodds, who said he worked with Rudolph at Raytheon over the past year. “I just felt like the world lost a rare beacon of light—one of those people who really makes the world a better place. Even more rare was his innate instinct to draw out the best in people and create opportunity for them, in an almost effortless and (unperceivable) way, make them human beings.”

 

Dodds continued, “So now, etched in my my mind forever, when I think of the word innovation, and the rare combination of attitude and inspiration and personal aura that fosters that creative spark within people, I’ll always think of Kevin and his wry smile standing in my office door at Raytheon.”

 

Johnson, 57, also worked with Mavromatis and Rudolph at Raytheon. According to his LinkedIn profile, Johnson recently left the aerospace corporation to start his own consulting firm. His website says he was certified as a master scuba diver.

 

“I never met Bill Johnson, but I will always remember him, too,” Anna Mavromati said at the service. “I’ve stared at his photo now countless times, standing in the middle of the Aegean crew’s group photo after they won their first-place trophy last year. He’s holding a up pirate doll and looks like he’s laughing at it a little bit, but he’s still holding it up like it’s another member of the crew, like he’s proud.”

 

Stewart, 64, was Mavromatis’ brother-in-law. A retired USDA customs inspector and Vietnam veteran, “he had the same sense of humor” as Mavromatis, Mavromati said after the service. She described the pair as “characters in a buddy comedy.”

 

Others who shared memories of the crew at the service included Jesse McCann of Redondo Beach, Carol Tatsumi of Torrance, Talitha Sherman of Torrance, and Niki Burgan of Calabasas, who continued to look for Mavromatis after the U.S. Coast Guard called off its search.

 

Though some of the speakers said they only knew one of the crewmen or became acquainted with the men’s relatives after the crash, Mavromatis’ other sister, Katerina Mavromati, 42, said the crowd was evidence of the impact the men had on those around them.

 

“It takes a man like Theo and his crew to bring so many people together today under a tragedy and connect us all in remembering them,” she said. “You’re all wonderful, and on behalf of my family, we thank you deeply for being here today.”

 

Both the Coast Guard and the U.S. Sailing Association are conducting investigations into the crash.

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

 

 

I brought up Honda Point back around page 4...

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

 

I mentioned Honda Point as a historical aside. That accident provides no insights into our modern one. There have been huge advances in electronic navigation aids in the last 90 years. The destroyers were using a DR plot advanced from some time before because the overcast prevented a recent sextant sight. We do not navigate that way anymore. And if someone was, the skies were clear the night of he Ensenada race so it would have been easy to get a sextant reading. I have a sextant aboard my boat and take an occasional reading to keep my hand in.

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A crazy thought, but, are there a lot of oil rigs or pumping stations at sea down that way? My wild thought is an escaped gas cloud. This kind of stuff has happened ashore & killed people before. Certainly are examples of gas escaping the sea bed - in fact a rig tender was caught in one & sank off our NW coast years ago. Little or no wind - Asphixyation.

 

short answer No

 

 

But Wait, that's not all .....................................

 

 

you have came up with the only idea that wasn't buried with the dead horse on about page 4

 

so please have your choice of anything from Teaky's Desk (he still has the laptop)

 

or a Cougars number from the Border Run mid-race party (take from the desk - just sayin)

 

 

That laptop went in the post, it's now entirely up to DHL if it reached Solo. The rusky bastard.

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

 

I mentioned Honda Point as a historical aside. That accident provides no insights into our modern one. There have been huge advances in electronic navigation aids in the last 90 years. The destroyers were using a DR plot advanced from some time before because the overcast prevented a recent sextant sight. We do not navigate that way anymore. And if someone was, the skies were clear the night of he Ensenada race so it would have been easy to get a sextant reading. I have a sextant aboard my boat and take an occasional reading to keep my hand in.

Agreed.

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

 

I mentioned Honda Point as a historical aside. That accident provides no insights into our modern one. There have been huge advances in electronic navigation aids in the last 90 years. The destroyers were using a DR plot advanced from some time before because the overcast prevented a recent sextant sight. We do not navigate that way anymore. And if someone was, the skies were clear the night of he Ensenada race so it would have been easy to get a sextant reading. I have a sextant aboard my boat and take an occasional reading to keep my hand in.

 

The most interesting aspect to the Honda Point disaster was the remarkable discipline of the US Navy to stay in formation, despite the ship ahead going down. Tell that to the Marines!

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A crazy thought, but, are there a lot of oil rigs or pumping stations at sea down that way? My wild thought is an escaped gas cloud. This kind of stuff has happened ashore & killed people before. Certainly are examples of gas escaping the sea bed - in fact a rig tender was caught in one & sank off our NW coast years ago. Little or no wind - Asphixyation.

 

short answer No

 

 

But Wait, that's not all .....................................

 

 

you have came up with the only idea that wasn't buried with the dead horse on about page 4

 

so please have your choice of anything from Teaky's Desk (he still has the laptop)

 

or a Cougars number from the Border Run mid-race party (take from the desk - just sayin)

 

 

That laptop went in the post, it's now entirely up to DHL if it reached Solo. The rusky bastard.

 

Noise to see that didn't go over everyone's head

 

where TF you been mate ???

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

 

I mentioned Honda Point as a historical aside. That accident provides no insights into our modern one. There have been huge advances in electronic navigation aids in the last 90 years. The destroyers were using a DR plot advanced from some time before because the overcast prevented a recent sextant sight. We do not navigate that way anymore. And if someone was, the skies were clear the night of he Ensenada race so it would have been easy to get a sextant reading. I have a sextant aboard my boat and take an occasional reading to keep my hand in.

 

What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

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I guess if dead reckoning yielded a fatal navigational error for Navy officers nearly 90 years ago, then that pretty much sums up whether race organizers should do anything to verify or aid crew competency or not.

 

I mean there you have it. Honda Point. 'Nuff said.

 

I mentioned Honda Point as a historical aside. That accident provides no insights into our modern one. There have been huge advances in electronic navigation aids in the last 90 years. The destroyers were using a DR plot advanced from some time before because the overcast prevented a recent sextant sight. We do not navigate that way anymore. And if someone was, the skies were clear the night of he Ensenada race so it would have been easy to get a sextant reading. I have a sextant aboard my boat and take an occasional reading to keep my hand in.

 

What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

 

I think he was above the Artic Circle.....

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

Geez..You forgot Dubhe, Spica, Arcturus..... Well, I wasn't clear. I didn't mean what star you were shooting, but what quality of sight.

 

Using an artificial horizon are you? Maybe I'm just a klutz, but never had much luck pulling in good sights in a decent swell on a moving boat with those. When I did it on Transpacs, etc. back in the day my margin of error was usually bigger than the width of those little islands. Oh well. Out navigated once again.

 

And now, we are we really discussing why four guys on a cruising boat (with all the electronic gizmos in the world and apparently nobody looking-out) hit a friggin' island and didn't whip out their sextant to save the day??

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

exactly what happened ohmy.gif

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

Geez..You forgot Dubhe, Spica, Arcturus..... Well, I wasn't clear. I didn't mean what star you were shooting, but what quality of sight.

 

Using an artificial horizon are you? Maybe I'm just a klutz, but never had much luck pulling in good sights in a decent swell on a moving boat with those. When I did it on Transpacs, etc. back in the day my margin of error was usually bigger than the width of those little islands. Oh well. Out navigated once again.

 

And now, we are we really discussing why four guys on a cruising boat (with all the electronic gizmos in the world and apparently nobody looking-out) hit a friggin' island and didn't whip out their sextant to save the day??

I think he missed your point that one needs a horizon to take sextant sights. And the accuracy of any sights taken from a small boat at sea is insufficient for dodging islands except by a very large margin - like several miles.

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

Geez..You forgot Dubhe, Spica, Arcturus..... Well, I wasn't clear. I didn't mean what star you were shooting, but what quality of sight.

 

Using an artificial horizon are you? Maybe I'm just a klutz, but never had much luck pulling in good sights in a decent swell on a moving boat with those. When I did it on Transpacs, etc. back in the day my margin of error was usually bigger than the width of those little islands. Oh well. Out navigated once again.

 

And now, we are we really discussing why four guys on a cruising boat (with all the electronic gizmos in the world and apparently nobody looking-out) hit a friggin' island and didn't whip out their sextant to save the day??

I think he missed your point that one needs a horizon to take sextant sights. And the accuracy of any sights taken from a small boat at sea is insufficient for dodging islands except by a very large margin - like several miles.

 

however in the case mentioned a set of 1-power eyes on the bow ..............................................................

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OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

exactly what happened ohmy.gif

That's why I love ya, Wood man; you get my puns!

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OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

exactly what happened ohmy.gif

That's why I love ya, Wood man; you get my puns!

 

 

Unfortunately with Dennis, it's usually hit or miss.....

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Actually, that night, there was enough ambient light to get a horizon.

 

Re: getting a good sight in swells: It can be done. This is where the "art" of navigation comes into play. Typically in rough conditions I'll shoot the same body as many as a dozen times or more within a few minutes. When you do it enough you get a sense for when you get a good one -- one with the real horizon, not a wave peak or trough. You put a check-mark next to those "good" ones.

 

Later when you're at the nav station you can spot the outliers. If you want to make a quick and dirty X-Y graph it's even easier to spot the outliers. Then draw a line that best shows the trends, weighted toward your favored sights. It's amazing when you throw out the not-so-good sights how well lined up the good ones are. Then, pretty much any point on that slope will give you a LOP that rivals the accuracy of a dry-land sight. May as well pick a spot with even minutes.

 

I've waited for days 1000 miles from land, for a clear sky in force 9, 10, 11, grabbed a few good sights, advanced older LOPs and been quite confident in the fix. Corroborated later after getting fixes in calmer seas and advancing the fixes from the storms.

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Actually, that night, there was enough ambient light to get a horizon.

 

Re: getting a good sight in swells: It can be done. This is where the "art" of navigation comes into play. Typically in rough conditions I'll shoot the same body as many as a dozen times or more within a few minutes. When you do it enough you get a sense for when you get a good one -- one with the real horizon, not a wave peak or trough. You put a check-mark next to those "good" ones.

 

Later when you're at the nav station you can spot the outliers. If you want to make a quick and dirty X-Y graph it's even easier to spot the outliers. Then draw a line that best shows the trends, weighted toward your favored sights. It's amazing when you throw out the not-so-good sights how well lined up the good ones are. Then, pretty much any point on that slope will give you a LOP that rivals the accuracy of a dry-land sight. May as well pick a spot with even minutes.

 

I've waited for days 1000 miles from land, for a clear sky in force 9, 10, 11, grabbed a few good sights, advanced older LOPs and been quite confident in the fix. Corroborated later after getting fixes in calmer seas and advancing the fixes from the storms.

Sorry. There is NO WAY you can be sure you can see the horizon at night - moonless or full moon.

 

You can't be sure that the horizon you THINK you see is not the top of a swell maybe 1/4 mile away, or just the boundary between an area of no wind/light wind.

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Horse shit, Johnny, utter horse shit.....

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Horse shit, Johnny, utter horse shit.....

 

Tell me, why do you respond to him?

 

He's on more "ignore" lists than I am.

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Horse shit, Johnny, utter horse shit.....

Do you even know what a sextant looks like? let alone having even tried to use one.

 

If you know anything about celestial nav you would know that your statement is "utter horse shit....." Therefore you are just posting that to be a troll.

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Dude, it's the fuking horizon---- not your anus.....

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Dude, it's the fuking horizon---- not your anus.....

 

Mr Booth, why would you respond to a foreigner?

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Dude, it's the fuking horizon---- not your anus.....

 

Mr Booth, why would you respond to a foreigner?

 

 

'Cuz I love Limey penal colonies?....

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Dude, it's the fuking horizon---- not your anus.....

As usual - shooting your big mouth off about a subject you know fuck-all about.

 

Maybe you should think about why Bowditch has this in it. (assuming you know what a Bowditch is)

 

 

post-1322-036449700 1337908430_thumb.png

 

then there is this

 

post-1322-037646300 1337908410_thumb.png

 

 

there is a reason why one takes star sights at twilight you moron - because at night you cannot be sure what you think is the horizon is actually the horizon.

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

Geez..You forgot Dubhe, Spica, Arcturus..... Well, I wasn't clear. I didn't mean what star you were shooting, but what quality of sight.

 

Using an artificial horizon are you? Maybe I'm just a klutz, but never had much luck pulling in good sights in a decent swell on a moving boat with those. When I did it on Transpacs, etc. back in the day my margin of error was usually bigger than the width of those little islands. Oh well. Out navigated once again.

 

And now, we are we really discussing why four guys on a cruising boat (with all the electronic gizmos in the world and apparently nobody looking-out) hit a friggin' island and didn't whip out their sextant to save the day??

I think he missed your point that one needs a horizon to take sextant sights. And the accuracy of any sights taken from a small boat at sea is insufficient for dodging islands except by a very large margin - like several miles.

 

It would be just as easy to suggest that it's really hard to HIT a small island when relying upon celestial navigation. Just sayin'.

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What kind of sextant sight are you taking at 2:00a.m.?

We can start with Aldebaran, Altair, Antares, Fomalhaut, Sirius, Vega... not to mention Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and, oh yeah, that really big one, the moon.

 

OK, OK... the moon had already set by the time Aegean plowed into the northern Coronado. Strike that.

 

Geez..You forgot Dubhe, Spica, Arcturus..... Well, I wasn't clear. I didn't mean what star you were shooting, but what quality of sight.

 

Using an artificial horizon are you? Maybe I'm just a klutz, but never had much luck pulling in good sights in a decent swell on a moving boat with those. When I did it on Transpacs, etc. back in the day my margin of error was usually bigger than the width of those little islands. Oh well. Out navigated once again.

 

And now, we are we really discussing why four guys on a cruising boat (with all the electronic gizmos in the world and apparently nobody looking-out) hit a friggin' island and didn't whip out their sextant to save the day??

I think he missed your point that one needs a horizon to take sextant sights. And the accuracy of any sights taken from a small boat at sea is insufficient for dodging islands except by a very large margin - like several miles.

 

It would be just as easy to suggest that it's really hard to HIT a small island when relying upon celestial navigation. Just sayin'.

 

???????? Quite the opposite. With Celestial nav, a lot of errors can creep in and make any position unreliable, making it EASY to hit an island (unintentionally) because you are not where you think you are.

 

But if you mean "HIT" an island as "finding" an island, then you are correct.

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???????? Quite the opposite. With Celestial nav, a lot of errors can creep in and make any position unreliable, making it EASY to hit an island (unintentionally) because you are not where you think you are.

 

But if you mean "HIT" an island as "finding" an island, then you are correct.

 

Actually, if you average out your observations and have an accurate time clock, the error sources are fairly small, usually within 1-3 nm. It's in the ballpark, CN was never designed to find the pass at Moorea. The rest is addition and subtraction; and if you can't get that right...well welcome ashore...wherever you happen to be.

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Actually, if you average out your observations and have an accurate time clock, the error sources are fairly small, usually within 1-3 nm. It's in the ballpark, CN was never designed to find the pass at Moorea. The rest is addition and subtraction; and if you can't get that right...well welcome ashore...wherever you happen to be.

 

I taught the subject. The best I ever got was 1 mile a side cocked hat (stars @ twilight) in dead flat conditions going to Hobart. Most of the time you will never get that close. The various errors can even each other out, or stack up in one direction & you cannot know which. And if you do a Sun-run-noonsight-run-sun, you never know what any (if any) current is doing to your calcs.

 

Read Bowditch on the subject.

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Anyone know of any lawsuits as yet, or is it to soon?

 

Sorry, Gloria Allred is busy with Johnny Travolta right now!

 

Let's hope that the Coastal Cup racers take heed of those other islands out there on the race course!

 

 

120522_odes_hmed_1005p.photoblog500.jpg

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Ohhh --- This is fun! I love watching grown men see who can pee farther !~ :blink:...... LOL

 

Yeah. I remember when this thread used to be interesting.

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Dude, it's the fuking horizon---- not your anus.....

As usual - shooting your big mouth off about a subject you know fuck-all about.

Maybe you should think about why Bowditch has this in it. (assuming you know what a Bowditch is)

post-1322-036449700 1337908430_thumb.png

then there is this

post-1322-037646300 1337908410_thumb.png

there is a reason why one takes star sights at twilight you moron - because at night you cannot be sure what you think is the horizon is actually the horizon.

American Practical Navigator

Bowditch mentioned online?? STOP THE PRESSES!! Well I guess I can jut look it up!

The American Practical Navigator (35 MB)

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Posted · Hidden by Somebody Else, May 25, 2012 - No reason given
Hidden by Somebody Else, May 25, 2012 - No reason given

With Celestial nav, a lot of errors can creep in and make any position unreliable, making it EASY to hit an island (unintentionally) because you are not where you think you are.

That hasn't been my experience. Celestial Navigation tends smooth out errors. They are not cumulative.

 

Any single sight can be in error, but they usually stand out as such by varying too much from your DR position. In any event, subsequent sights "catch you up" to being accurate again.

 

There are two difficult aspects of CN:

  • Rocking a good site in a seaway. It's a physical difficulty not an intellectual difficulty. Knowing when you have a good sight is sort of cerebral but not intellectual.
  • Adding and subtracting base 60. We are just so used to the decimal system that it is easy to let a math error slip by especially when you're tired.

Other than that it's just performing rote tasks in order.

 

And CN isn't used alone. DR and making visual confirmations of approaching landfalls are used in conjunction with any other tools of navigation one might be using, be it a sextant or a GPS receiver. Every boat I've been on and especially every boat I've navigated has had fairly dependable ETAs at various points along the way. For example, everyone on board would know that we should be able to see the north Coronado Island straight ahead by 1:00 am at the latest, given our speed and bearing.

 

When you're just spitting out numbers, people who don't "get" navigation will never trust your work. That is why supplying lots of confirmations along the way builds confidence in those not of the faith. Tidbits like, "At midnight we should pass close to starboard of a government buoy with a whistle and blinking white light." When you indeed pass that buoy at midnight their confidence grows a tiny bit.

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Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

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We cant stop here -- we are so close to 100 pages ! -- Someone Poke Do Rag or grey pussy

 

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

GHP

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Reads like this thread

 

less 2470 bits of background noise & nonsense

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Following extensive research, the Panel is confident that a grounding on North Coronado Island is the cause of accident.

 

a/k/a

 

They sailed into a rock

 

didnt we know that a few hundred posts ago?

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I hear a name change shall be made beginning next year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New name

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready ???

 

 

 

 

 

The Newport "Safely Around the Coronado Islands One Way or the Other" to Ensenada Yacht Race

 

 

 

 

kinda Catchy ...eh

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The repercussions of this tragic occurrence are echoing up and down the California coast (if not around the world!)

 

bcyc.org/.../Around-the-Islands.aspx

 

CANCELLATION OF THE 2012 AROUND THE ISLANDS RACE

 

We at the Bahia Corinthian Yacht Club are saddened by the recent tragedies that occurred during the Farallones and

Newport to Ensenada races. We extend our deepest sympathies to the families and loved ones of the sailors who perished.

 

BCYC has decided to cancel its 2012 Around the Island's race. This decision was made to allow time to review

the results and recommendations of the U.S. Coast Guard's investigations and U.S. Sailing's independent review. Our highest

concern is for the safety of sailors and we will evaluate the future of the Around the Islands Race based on the results and

recommendations of the investigations and independent review.

 

In addition, the Around the Island's race has had a low number of entrants since its inception in 2010.

Canceling this year's race will also provide time to evaluate the course and the timing of the race.

 

We will issue full refunds for those who have already signed up for the 2012 Around the Islands Race.

 

"In addition"? Really? <cough> <cough>

Completely burned the sponsors in 2011.

Talk about a mad scramble to save face for poor management of a bad idea that no one wanted to support.

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