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alex88delgado

Issues with college sailing in the US

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I want to hear the community's issues with College Sailing in the US. I'm from the North East and raced in MAISA with some great programs, though after moving to Texas and coaching college sailing down here, I've realized more than ever that there is a huge gap between the colleges in SEISA compared to the colleges in MAISA. Lack of resources, funding, motivation, public knowledge, and even yacht club support. So I'm putting together a business plan of sorts to help fill the gap and make college sailing in the South, just as competitive with college sailing in the North. A bold goal but one thats necessary I believe.

 

You have your issues with college sailing, and I want to hear them. If you have ideas or solutions that go along with it, that would be just a helpful. If not, I won't say anything.

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If you want to donate about 100,000 dollars to the school I coach at (for free) here in oklahoma I am sure I could turn the kids into better sailors. For now they learn, fund raising, budget management, boat repair, and many other needed skills with some sailing sprinkled in.

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I want to hear the community's issues with College Sailing in the US. I'm from the North East and raced in MAISA with some great programs, though after moving to Texas and coaching college sailing down here, I've realized more than ever that there is a huge gap between the colleges in SEISA compared to the colleges in MAISA. Lack of resources, funding, motivation, public knowledge, and even yacht club support. So I'm putting together a business plan of sorts to help fill the gap and make college sailing in the South, just as competitive with college sailing in the North. A bold goal but one thats necessary I believe.

 

You have your issues with college sailing, and I want to hear them. If you have ideas or solutions that go along with it, that would be just a helpful. If not, I won't say anything.

 

With one of your "Interests" being BOOBS, then show us yours or your GF's ones and then, fuck off, newb

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Texas - look at the top of the list of what is really important.

 

http://www.ensbsn.com/2011/11/college-sports-revenue-2011-the-list/

 

I want to hear the community's issues with College Sailing in the US. I'm from the North East and raced in MAISA with some great programs, though after moving to Texas and coaching college sailing down here, I've realized more than ever that there is a huge gap between the colleges in SEISA compared to the colleges in MAISA. Lack of resources, funding, motivation, public knowledge, and even yacht club support. So I'm putting together a business plan of sorts to help fill the gap and make college sailing in the South, just as competitive with college sailing in the North. A bold goal but one thats necessary I believe.

 

You have your issues with college sailing, and I want to hear them. If you have ideas or solutions that go along with it, that would be just a helpful. If not, I won't say anything.

 

With one of your "Interests" being BOOBS, then show us yours or your GF's ones and then, fuck off, newb

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Its equivalent to the disparity between college football in the SEC vs the Ivy League. Good luck changing that!

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and I thought SA has lost it's edge....

 

with that being said,

 

Blame Obama......

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If you think theres a gap between maisa and seisa, take a walk up north from texas and check out the mcsa. Its tons of fun, but there are some pretty small programs even at some of the country's largest schools

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My issues with college sailing are extensive and well documented. Besides that I'll tell you that setting up a well funded sailing team in Texas is going to be just as likely as starting a ski team at the University of Death Valley.

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and I thought SA has lost it's edge....

 

with that being said,

 

Blame Obama......

 

Nope. He said W did it.

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I want to hear the community's issues with College Sailing in the US. I'm from the North East and raced in MAISA with some great programs, though after moving to Texas and coaching college sailing down here, I've realized more than ever that there is a huge gap between the colleges in SEISA compared to the colleges in MAISA. Lack of resources, funding, motivation, public knowledge, and even yacht club support. So I'm putting together a business plan of sorts to help fill the gap and make college sailing in the South, just as competitive with college sailing in the North. A bold goal but one thats necessary I believe.

 

You have your issues with college sailing, and I want to hear them. If you have ideas or solutions that go along with it, that would be just a helpful. If not, I won't say anything.

 

College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time and resources for the general sailing audience. because of the boats that are used, college sailing body types and then very much towards the small end. kids travel incessantly in vans. the season never really ends for many. that is all if someone intends to compete at the highest levels. there are probably less restrictions on practice time for sailors than exist for Div 1 football.

 

Keep it at the club level, and have fun. unless of course this is all you just getting a bigger paycheck from coaching. if that is the case, then your business plan is very simple, find an alum who sails, has a couple of hundred million, and who you can talk into giving you $250k per year for your program. it's really very simple. there is no business model for college sailing, it is just a donation model

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I. So I'm putting together a business plan of sorts to help fill the gap and make college sailing in the South, just as competitive with college sailing in the North. A bold goal but one thats necessary I believe.

 

 

 

First ,off you will need to slice out all those massive chunks of land between the various colleges so the kids won't have to travel five to ten hours each way to have a regatta.

 

 

 

The way Texas' population is growing, the college sailing programs should be as plentiful and close together as those in the North East by sometime around 2100 but the problem with that is the residents will need all the water for drinking and the lakes will mostly be empty..

 

 

 

The mens and co-ed nationals will be back in Texas again in a few weeks. As teh kids around here are mostly self funded and self coached, they are not likely to win the event, but one think the kids here do have is fabulous support from the local Yacht club...except for the fact it is an hour's drive from school to the club.

 

 

 

College sailing around here has only one thing standing in the way of its success.

 

 

 

Distance.

 

 

 

U Texas may be the most centrally located school in SEISA:

 

 

 

600 MIles from Oklahoma and Oklahoma State

100 miles from Baylor

 

100 miles from Texas A & M

 

'250 miles from North Texas State

 

250 miles from TCU

 

220 miles from U of Houston'

 

250 MIles from Texas A & M Galveston

 

250 miles from Texas A & M Corpus

 

500 miles from LSU

 

 

 

600 m iles from UT El Paso.

 

500 miles from Texas Tech

 

550 miles from Tulane

 

700 miles from West Florida

 

600 miles from Kansas and Missouri

 

 

KIds from far away schools commonly show up at my shop at 2 am saturday morning, sleep in my office , then sail on short rest, party saturday night an hour's drive from the lake and then drive back to the lake, race for a few more hours and drive back to a late night arrival back at school....not good for the grades.

 

 

The primary reason sailing in this part of the world is different fromk the North East is the distances are huge.

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Considering this thread I'm surprised that college sailing isn't banned.

 

No one will say it should be banned, coaches just shouldn't expect an easy time begging for money. And guys who sail in college to get laid ought to think about how much bigger the talent pool is everywhere else on campus.

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Another problem besides distance is that colleges in this part of the world don't have much historical connection or interest in sailing or don't see it as a particularly promising path to rich alumnni. So, not much money comes from the colleges.

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The issues should be addressed by the kids, that's the beauty of where I went to school, Western Michigan. In the MCSA the programs are student ran and it's up to the kids to solve their own problems. Not enough kids who sail at your school? No problem, recruit and make your own. I gained organizational skills just as much as sailing skills.

 

Also why do people think college sailing is the only option for kids 18-22(ok, 30 in some cases :ph34r: )? There are keel boat programs in the summer, dinghy series from coast to coast. I can see how people are thinking, they are think sailing is like other sports, it is not. They think that a kid 18-22 has to go to college and has to compete on a college sailing team to gain experience at that age or the sport suffers, why?

 

If a young man or woman wants a competitive and structured college sailing experience, they should choose a school accordingly after they consider academics. Go to a east coast school and not one in the plains.

 

As for distance, I have nothing on that, I drove all over the eastern half of the US when I was in college to go sailing because I wanted to. Distance didn't stop me, if I had something important like an exam I didn't go that weekend.

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

So... Racing, sailing, drinking, and travelling is a waste of time? Go back to work.

 

All of our olympic talent is being bred there. I had fun driving all over the country in a van and sailing my ass off. Thanks to some folks at Wisco, east coast ass has been losing to a MCSA team. Minnesota had no money either, and we got to throw it around at every nationals but team race.

 

That being said, college sailing is politics like all other sailing. Unless you're on a team, keep your ass out of it. If you are, recruit some kids who care. Its not the system, its how you're working in it. There is a reason why there's already been a bunch of pro college sailing posts in here. And look - there is a huge undercurrent of MCSA already floating up. We love sailing. Relax folks.

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

All of our olympic talent is being bred there.

 

That seems like a stupid system... why would anyone fund college sailing.... If you want elite Olympic sailors... Train them directly.

 

Most sports federations have decided that the NCAA is a waste of time...(see soccer, swimming gymnastics, etc etc)

 

College sailing... good for drinking and fun... not medals

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

All of our olympic talent is being bred there.

 

That seems like a stupid system... why would anyone fund college sailing.... If you want elite Olympic sailors... Train them directly.

 

Most sports federations have decided that the NCAA is a waste of time...(see soccer, swimming gymnastics, etc etc)

 

College sailing... good for drinking and fun... not medals

 

Why fund? Its one of the few truly Co-Ed college sports.

 

 

I got to take a chance and decide my own balance. I alone had the freedom to choose, instead of being in a track. I put the pressure on myself to make the events I wanted to. It was great, I know great people, some of them are doing great things.

 

Ask tunnicliffe, read, t-hutch -> then come back and talk. USA college sailors are among the top in the world. Something is working - its not a training program, we just got a real chance to fall in love with the sport.

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

So... Racing, sailing, drinking, and travelling is a waste of time? Go back to work.

 

Um...considering college costs mommy and daddy 50k a year for you to sail drink and travel while you should be focusing on academics, yes, it is a complete waste of time (and money).

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

So... Racing, sailing, drinking, and travelling is a waste of time? Go back to work.

 

All of our olympic talent is being bred there. I had fun driving all over the country in a van and sailing my ass off. Thanks to some folks at Wisco, east coast ass has been losing to a MCSA team. Minnesota had no money either, and we got to throw it around at every nationals but team race.

 

That being said, college sailing is politics like all other sailing. Unless you're on a team, keep your ass out of it. If you are, recruit some kids who care. Its not the system, its how you're working in it. There is a reason why there's already been a bunch of pro college sailing posts in here. And look - there is a huge undercurrent of MCSA already floating up. We love sailing. Relax folks.

 

drinking? In college sailing? You just admitted to that? not that anyone is ever going to accuse me of being in favor of prohibition but seriously, the good college programs i know frown on that sort of thing ALOT. interesting that you didn't add sex into the equation. sorry that wasn't happening for you.

 

"all of our olympic team is being bred there", not really. how much did the railey's sail in college? rob crane, nice kid, not a medal contender. sure the match race girls all sailed in college, but seriously, you think college is what made them what they are? hardly, they were good before they got there.

 

kite sailors being trained in college for '16? huh? how about our windsurfers, when was the last time we were a threat in that discipline.

 

how come the americas cup defender has one american sailing on the team and both 45's are helmed by aussies?

 

college sailing is fun for what it is, but mostly it is a way for coaches to get paid, and a couple of kids to make a name for themselves so they can end up with low paying jobs in the sail making world. glad you enjoyed your time, and hope others do to, but let's have some perspective here.

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

So... Racing, sailing, drinking, and travelling is a waste of time? Go back to work.

 

Um...considering college costs mommy and daddy 50k a year for you to sail drink and travel while you should be focusing on academics, yes, it is a complete waste of time (and money).

 

It will be interesting to see what kind of job he finds. Food stamps are now issued to 30 million "Americans." A number attended college and sailed.

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

All of our olympic talent is being bred there.

 

That seems like a stupid system... why would anyone fund college sailing.... If you want elite Olympic sailors... Train them directly.

 

Most sports federations have decided that the NCAA is a waste of time...(see soccer, swimming gymnastics, etc etc)

 

College sailing... good for drinking and fun... not medals

 

Why fund? Its one of the few truly Co-Ed college sports. (

Title IX needs woman's sports to balance Football)

 

 

I got to take a chance and decide my own balance. I alone had the freedom to choose, instead of being in a track. I put the pressure on myself to make the events I wanted to. It was great, I know great people, some of them are doing great things.

 

Ask tunnicliffe, read, t-hutch -> then come back and talk. USA college sailors are among the top in the world. Something is working - its not a training program, we just got a real chance to fall in love with the sport.

USA college sailors are among the top in the world

 

Not quite...US college sailors have gone on to train and become Olympic sailors... This does not mean that US college sailing is critical, essential, or at all valuable to world class sailing. More the point...Lasers and 4twinkies prepare you for .... Kites? Cats? Skiffs? How exactly? (not to mention keel boats and boards.)

 

Why not take sailing out of college and put it back into yacht and sailing clubs... (you learn to sail in a club... then you head off to school and step away from the club... So... after school... you are somehow supposed to find a club again and reconnect... Stupid system in my book....

 

But... ID another country that matches sailing with university and show me their record of success? make your argument!

 

Do you really want to say that "you fell in love with sailing through College Sailing?" cough cough..... you were hooked long before college..

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All of our olympic talent is being bred there.

 

 

That is simply not true. while many of our future olympic hopefuls do sail in college they aren't olympic hopefuls because of college sailing, most of them were on that path sailing in various JO and youth national events that, you know, more closely mimic the style of racing you do at the olympic level. it's a pretty big leap to say learning how to roll tack a 420 around a 15 minute course is helping you become a better 49er sailor. I even attended a talk by Zach Raily where he pretty much bashed college sailing and said you didn't need to do it and isn't neccesary as a path to success at the international level.

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...

 

Um...considering college costs mommy and daddy 50k a year for you to sail drink and travel while you should be focusing on academics, yes, it is a complete waste of time (and money).

 

Most of the college sailors I had any familiarity with were maintaining 3.5 and up GPAs.

 

In the future, please address such bitter & spiteful comments to college sailors whom you know to be flunking out.

 

FB- Doug

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As stated earlier, the problems with the south is the distance. Travelling those long distances takes lots of time and money. This means that a competitive team can only really afford to send 1 team around to events every weekend. This makes it harder to grow talent and depth on a team. NEISA and MAISA have the advantage of have a high concentration of schools close together, this means that even your C and D teams are sailing every weekend. This makes for a deeper talent pool and better sailors. College sailing is breeding Olympic sailors as there is no way to get the same rapid improvement. Practicing 4 days a week, with 12-18 other boats, doing 20+ starts a practice means you get very good at starting and starting strategies. Along with boat on boat tactics and mark rounding, you don't get that kind of training anywhere else. With the simplicity of the boats, you focus more on what is going on around you rather than trying to squeeze everything out of the boat gives you a better base to jump into other classes. There are not many Olympic programs with the same amount of training time, with other boats that a good college team provides.

 

Back to Texas, it all comes down to fundraising. We functioned on a modest budget (for Neisa) that was 70% fundraising. The vast majority of this was from alumni donations. We have a very large and generous alumni group that wants to see the team succeed. This has taken years to grow. Having a team with 40+ members for an extended period of time also helps. There are very few teams that are well funded by their schools. Most are club teams that generate their own funds in one way or another. We also happen to have a very strong recreation and club sports department at our school, consisting of 13 teams, and over 400 members, (5th in the country). This helps as while the teams is run by the coach and the students, it is very nice to have someone to fall back on for some support when you need it. So all you have to is generate some interest, get some results and start bugging the crap out of your alumni. Most of the big teams have large alumni regattas where people come back as a reunion every year and go sailing. This keeps everyone in touch and supporting your team.

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I admire your idea. Go for it and I wish you the best of luck. Prove us asshats wrong.

 

As a kid that grew up sailing in Texas, and went to college for sailing on the East Coast, I can state with some authority that most of the local talent will do just that if they're any good. Great athletes come to UT or OU to play football. Great sailors leave SEISA to enjoy real competition. There are exceptions--there always are--but when it comes down to it, you need a big pool of good sailors to make both your practices and your regattas hard, and good sailors want hard competition. Which is why they go to the East Coast.

 

That said, the fun and comradierie/teamwork that comes out of those small club teams is awesome. They learn more of real value in life than I did racing for a major school, with coaches to coddle me, cash from the school, and a maitenence guy to fix the boats. Don't try to make the program into a 'major' program if that's not what the kids want. Plus, they get to actually go to parties at regattas, which is kind of taboo among top schools at major events. I'm still jealous.

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Can I just say that it's astounding to me that people are actually choosing which college they go to for their education based on the merits of the sailing team?

 

Go where you feel you'll succeed and where you'll be prepared to land a good paying job when you graduate. You have the rest of your life to sail and compete but where you go to school and what you prepare yourself for can make a huge difference as to whether you you're sailng a beat up old laser or your own brand new I-14 that you bought with your bonus check.

 

My .02.

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Who gets a good paying job straight out of college? College is just prep for graduate school; might as well sail while you're there, and work hard at the skills you need to kick ass on the MCAT/GMAT/LSAT...

 

Then once you're 200k in the hole, discover you can't stand your chosen profession and become a sailboat racing writer/editor/video producer. Now that's a fucking business plan!

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Who gets a good paying job straight out of college?

do well in finance or econ at an ivy or stanford and you might have a chance at being some hedgefund d-bag right outta undergrad... if you have connections... but you sure as shit aint gonna be sailing much for a few years

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I don't think there is any issue with college sailing. I graduated from a NWISCA school couple years ago and I bsolutely loved it. Yes, the traveling gets old. But once you get to the regatta site, it's awesome. You're hanging out with all your friends, sailing in cool places and it's a great learning experience.

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College sailing is for the most part a complete waste of time...

 

 

 

So... Racing, sailing, drinking, and travelling is a waste of time? Go back to work.

 

Um...considering college costs mommy and daddy 50k a year for you to sail drink and travel while you should be focusing on academics, yes, it is a complete waste of time (and money).

 

Tell that to my 3.7 and instate tuition. I did my work so I could have fun. We raised our money. I don't see anything wrong with the situation.

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I'm a member of the Texas A&M Galveston team. We are funded as a varsity sport and receive outside donations. We have a coach, and we practice up to five days a week (depends on what people's class schedule looks like).

 

College Sailing DOES NOT make you flunk out of school. A sizable portion of our active roster is also honors candidates with a GPA greater than 3.5.

 

College Sailing DOES NOT mean you drink. ICSA rules, school rules, and team rules state that you're not supposed to. At all. It is college though, and everyone reacts differently and has different experiences.

 

College Sailing IS important for the sport. The large majority of our team had not sailed competitively or had not sailed AT ALL prior to college.

 

So I'm supposed to sit in my room and study 24 hours a day with a little sleep and food scattered here and there? School/work first, Sailing second, social life third. That's how we do it, and we're pretty competitive. See y'all in semi-finals...

 

 

Now for actual constructive responses here...

 

More teams need coaches. We're lucky to have a coach, and most schools in SEISA don't have that opportunity. We need more funding. I'm not saying that we need a million dollars, I'm just saying it'd be nice to know that we actually have the money TO TRAVEL to the next regatta. Finally, more SEISA schools have to start interacting with schools in other districts. It's the only way we can size up teams from around the country. TAMUG was lucky enough to get to go to events like Charleston Spring regatta, and our week-long practice over spring break at St. Petersburg. Yeah. That's right. Our team gave up our free time and beaches to go train with other schools.

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Look at some of the other college sport governing bodies. All of the college sailing I did (Western Michigan) was at a club level, mostly kids that didn't have a clue going out and playing bumper boats for a while, and then getting drunk. Fun, but had no organization at all.

 

I also did horse jumping in college through the IHSA and the experience was the complete opposite. Every participant from the clubs at backwater schools to the ivy leagues had the same level of organization and the opportunity to advance throughout the year and win a spot at the regional, zone, and national championships. I couldn't even tell you how you would advance with college sailing, or if they even have a regional or national championships.

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Well, the world needs ditch diggers too...

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If you think theres a gap between maisa and seisa, take a walk up north from texas and check out the mcsa. Its tons of fun, but there are some pretty small programs even at some of the country's largest schools

 

100% agreed.

 

In the MCSA, it's even harder for start-ups considering universities don't understand the costs of a "sailing team." They like the idea, throw $200 at it per year, and wonder why it's failing. The kids work their asses off for that $200 check. The universities also drop the ball on large dollar donations (one $10k donation was neglected and dropped despite weekly calls). Then you have the yacht clubs that want more money from the kids, themselves. The yacht club we were based at required each team member to be a yacht club member. While that cost was nominal, it doesn't help in the scheme of things.

 

I could go on for days about the disparities between just the MCSA schools! I'll never forget hearing a school that won't be named, "We only get $6000 a year." The things my team could've done with $6k!!!!

 

So you want to shape things up between the North and South? Start with the Middle ground.

 

 

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Congratulations; I will be your boss someday.

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Congratulations; I will be your boss someday.

 

I would have thought that you have higher career aspirations than being a manager at McDonalds. You disappoint me Wesley.

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Congratulations; I will be your boss someday.

 

I would have thought that you have higher career aspirations than being a manager at McDonalds. You disappoint me Wesley.

 

Job security, there'll always be fat bastards like you and cliffy coming in to pick up a hamburger. ;)

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Did someone actually write that? This makes NtY look like a Rhodes Scholar.

 

I wonder how this kid plans to finance his retirement, or raise any kids (in the event his gene pool isn't stopped).

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1336664054[/url]' post='3707743']
1336658546[/url]' post='3707578']

As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Did someone actually write that? This makes NtY look like a Rhodes Scholar.

 

I wonder how this kid plans to finance his retirement, or raise any kids (in the event his gene pool isn't stopped).

 

If the post was tounge-in-cheek, it was almost clever.

 

If the post was serious, kitkat is wasting space -- and more.

 

Given the run-away costs of private colleges and the struggle of public insitutions to maintain academic programs, it is hard to view the financial struggles of college sailing programs or the disparities between the haves and have not schools as serious issues.

 

Have fun kids but don't forget why you are there.

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how many people here coming out against college sailing actually sailed in college? If you didnt sail in college, did you take 15credits or 18credits?

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I sailed in college (all four years) and it was a great way to learn how to manage a tougher schedule while still having a good time. Also, though some college sailors go onto become a waste of space, most of my good friends that sailed in college with me have gone on to demanding careers:

 

Investment Banking (3)

Hedge Fund (2)

Private Equity (3)

Trading (3)

Law (3)

Currently in Business School (3)

 

To the best of my knowledge Lee G is employed, but he sailed big boats in college so will give him a pass.

 

With that said, I would prefer that they all stopped working so I could put my big boat crew back together.

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how many people here coming out against college sailing actually sailed in college? If you didnt sail in college, did you take 15credits or 18credits?

 

 

I sailed in college (all four years) and it was a great way to learn how to manage a tougher schedule while still having a good time. Also, though some college sailors go onto become a waste of space, most of my good friends that sailed in college with me have gone on to demanding careers:

 

Investment Banking (3)

Hedge Fund (2)

Private Equity (3)

Trading (3)

Law (3)

Currently in Business School (3)

 

To the best of my knowledge Lee G is employed, but he sailed big boats in college so will give him a pass.

 

With that said, I would prefer that they all stopped working so I could put my big boat crew back together.

 

I did sail in college, however it was well understood that academics came first, and there was absolutely no discussion if you had to miss practice or a regatta for academics. As an engineering major who typically carried 18-20 credits, I definitely missed my fair share. One night a week we did not practice, they were optional boat maintenance days and if you had to study you did.

 

I'm not taking issue with college sailing in general, what I take issue with are the posters in this thread that have the attitude that sailing/drinking and partying come before academics.

 

That, and I just kind of feel like being a dick today.... :D

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1336669135[/url]' post='3707867']

I sailed in college (all four years) and it was a great way to learn how to manage a tougher schedule while still having a good time. Also, though some college sailors go onto become a waste of space, most of my good friends that sailed in college with me have gone on to demanding careers:

 

Investment Banking (3)

Hedge Fund (2)

Private Equity (3)

Trading (3)

Law (3)

Currently in Business School (3)

 

To the best of my knowledge Lee G is employed, but he sailed big boats in college so will give him a pass.

 

With that said, I would prefer that they all stopped working so I could put my big boat crew back together.

 

While some might debate whether teammates are contributing much to society (where are the engineers, scientists, physicians and entrepreneurs?), their careers are demanding and more power to them.

 

The point of the apathy about college sailing is a little different. Your friends aren't successful in their chosen careers because they sailed in college or despite the fact they sailed in college. The seeds of their success are self-discipline, intelligence, intellectual curiosity, industry, etc. They would likely be as successful if they had rowed crew, played club soccer, acted in college plays or participated in several IM sports while in school. The corollary is likely also true with respect to the space wasters who are now unemployed or underemployed despite a bachelors degree earned over 5-6 years at a good (or bad) school. They would have squandered their opportunities even if they hadn't sailed.

 

So, the real question that none of college sailing's supporters have answered is why I as a taxpayer and philanthropist should care about the state of college sailing when colleges and universities have so many other issues?

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I'm a member of the Texas A&M Galveston team. We are funded as a varsity sport and receive outside donations. We have a coach, and we practice up to five days a week (depends on what people's class schedule looks like).

 

College Sailing DOES NOT make you flunk out of school. A sizable portion of our active roster is also honors candidates with a GPA greater than 3.5.

College Sailing DOES NOT mean you drink. ICSA rules, school rules, and team rules state that you're not supposed to. At all. It is college though, and everyone reacts differently and has different experiences.

 

College Sailing IS important for the sport. The large majority of our team had not sailed competitively or had not sailed AT ALL prior to college.

 

So I'm supposed to sit in my room and study 24 hours a day with a little sleep and food scattered here and there? School/work first, Sailing second, social life third. That's how we do it, and we're pretty competitive. See y'all in semi-finals...

 

 

Now for actual constructive responses here...

 

More teams need coaches. We're lucky to have a coach, and most schools in SEISA don't have that opportunity. We need more funding. I'm not saying that we need a million dollars, I'm just saying it'd be nice to know that we actually have the money TO TRAVEL to the next regatta. Finally, more SEISA schools have to start interacting with schools in other districts. It's the only way we can size up teams from around the country. TAMUG was lucky enough to get to go to events like Charleston Spring regatta, and our week-long practice over spring break at St. Petersburg. Yeah. That's right. Our team gave up our free time and beaches to go train with other schools.

 

Well, it appears that you are not one of those "honors students."

 

And, being an "honors" student, at other than a top tier institution, just doesn't cut it anymore.

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Who gets a good paying job straight out of college? College is just prep for graduate school; might as well sail while you're there, and work hard at the skills you need to kick ass on the MCAT/GMAT/LSAT...

 

Then once you're 200k in the hole, discover you can't stand your chosen profession and become a sailboat racing writer/editor/video producer. Now that's a fucking business plan!

 

This says it all!

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Can I just say that it's astounding to me that people are actually choosing which college they go to for their education based on the merits of the sailing team?

 

Go where you feel you'll succeed and where you'll be prepared to land a good paying job when you graduate. You have the rest of your life to sail and compete but where you go to school and what you prepare yourself for can make a huge difference as to whether you you're sailng a beat up old laser or your own brand new I-14 that you bought with your bonus check.

 

My .02.

 

You know, you are a very good poster (yeah, I know, a kiss of death is a compliment from D'Rag). My guess would be that you will go on to be a great success in whatever career path you choose.

 

Why is it that you understand the issues and your contemporaries largely do not?

 

Good on ya, laddie!

 

WTF?

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Considering this thread I'm surprised that college sailing isn't banned.

 

I knew someone would link to that thread as soon as I clicked on this post.

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As far as I can tell Americans care too much for their Grades. As long as you can feed yourself and get on a boat through merit of sailing what does it matter how well school went? I'm currently maintaining a lowly 2.4. While it'd be nice to blame the MCSA for mediocre grades I'm the one who is to blame. College sailing is just to much fun; Getting to the regatta Friday night, partying with everyone, waking early to get stupid cold, sail fast and make left hand turns, Party all night, and Sail some more before going home after a cracking sleep deprived weekend.

 

Having fun might be too important to me but I'd rather be having fun than sailing a desk in the library all year.

 

If I'd just stayed in one place all year I think I would have gone absolutely mad. The traveling might not have been cheap, the funding for the club fairly low (seriously if anyone has line for halyards to spare and maybe an FJ to put them on) but we made the most of what we had. College is hard in this country, the constant pressure grinds people down and sailing is a great release. I've met awesome people and had a fantastic time, I remain very jealous of those who get to stay here on a more permanent basis and wish them good luck with the fall season. I've not partied nor sailed so hard in all my life.

 

Regatta fees are just about doubling next year. The ICSA is pricing out the smaller teams/universitys and fundraising is becoming an even bigger issue.

 

This truly is the arsehole of the sailing community hahaha, no offense.

 

Congratulations; I will be your boss someday.

 

I would have thought that you have higher career aspirations than being a manager at McDonalds. You disappoint me Wesley.

 

Job security, there'll always be fat bastards like you and cliffy coming in to pick up a cheesburger ore three. ;)

fixt :)

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Considering this thread I'm surprised that college sailing isn't banned.

 

I knew someone would link to that thread as soon as I clicked on this post.

 

You are a like a bright light in the wilderness, aren't you?

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Considering this thread I'm surprised that college sailing isn't banned.

 

 

 

I knew someone would link to that thread as soon as I clicked on this post.

 

People will be pointing to that thread for the rest of your life.

 

It is part of what will disqualify you from a good job out of school.

 

I surely hope the three months of attention are worth the future misery.

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How about having a boat where a.) you can be competitive as a bigger guy b.) you can actually play with the rig/sail shape throughout a race. C.) have courses long enough that tactics make a difference, instead of Excessive kinetics. ( this is from my mcsa experience so don't hate if things are done differently out on the coasts)

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Do you really want to say that "you fell in love with sailing through College Sailing?" cough cough..... you were hooked long before college..

I also sail in the MCSA and we have well over 50 people on our team. Out of any given freshman class we take, maybe 4 (maybe) have competitive sailing experience. And a good 50% have never stepped on a boat before. The top crews from this year's senior class had no racing experience and most of them hadn't sailed at all before college. They're all very enthusiastic about the sport and practice as much as anyone else on the team.

 

But yeah, they were definitely hooked long before college. We don't teach anyone to love the sport. :rolleyes:

 

 

On the subject of funding, our team is well off as far as the district goes, but we still spent a good bit more money just on nationals last year than we got from the school. We still have to fundraise more than 90% of our annual budget. We've been fortunate to have a coach for the last few years, but we don't have the budget to make our coaching position a full time job, so they always have to work part-time somewhere else, or leave after a year for a more stable position. So we spend a few months every couple of years on a coaching search also.

 

I spend on average 2-3 weekends at home once the spring season starts up in March, along with 12+ hours a week at practice, but I wouldn't trade it for the world.

 

 

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I was a college sailor in the Pacific Northwest. I loved it and it really set the course for the rest of my life. The Northwest district isn't the biggest or the strongest. It's difficult because most school sailing programs up here are considered a club sport and funded around $2,000 a year. We travel and compete against teams whose coaches are making 20 times that amount. College sailing introduces the sport to lots of new people, most of our team had never sailed before joining. It also teaches great skills like sportsmanship and boat repair. I graduated with a degree in Graphic Design and have been able to us it in the sailing industry to combine my two loves. I was even blessed with the opportunity of designing the 2011 college sailing nationals logo and apparel. I can honestly say that I probably would not be sailing today if it weren't for my college sailing team. The traveling was difficult sometimes but it taught me a lot and took me to some amazing places. College sailors are on the water 3 times a week and every weekend. They rack up more sailing and boat time than anyone I know and are extremely dedicated.

 

Yes there are some problems with the current system:

-Type of boats (no spinnaker, too expensive)

-Funding

-Travel (what can you really do about this?)

 

Overall it's a great experience and I learned way more bout life, leadership, sportsmanship, competition and dedication on the water than I did in the classroom.

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I was one of the privileged few (or at least a silent minority on this thread) who sailed for a 'powerhouse program.' Sailing for four years in a fully-funded, expertly coached, and very structured program at good academic institution was a great opportunity that was too good to pass up.

 

Rather than deal with the mechanics of running a team, fundraising, planning, etc. we were able to focus on sailing. The amount of improvement I made over my four years with the program is astounding and will keep me in the sport for the rest of my life.

 

College sailing is what you make of it. There are lots of opportunities for 'like vs. like' competition regardless of the quality of your program. From the newest and smallest teams to the ones ranked in the top 5 nationally, everyone has the opportunity to get on the water and race more than any other point in their lives. Sure, the boats are dumbed down and slow, but it's the quality of competition that makes the racing what it is. What's wrong with that?

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Do you really want to say that "you fell in love with sailing through College Sailing?" cough cough..... you were hooked long before college..

I also sail in the MCSA and we have well over 50 people on our team. Out of any given freshman class we take, maybe 4 (maybe) have competitive sailing experience. And a good 50% have never stepped on a boat before. The top crews from this year's senior class had no racing experience and most of them hadn't sailed at all before college. They're all very enthusiastic about the sport and practice as much as anyone else on the team.

 

But yeah, they were definitely hooked long before college. We don't teach anyone to love the sport. :rolleyes:

 

Terrific ... but the follow up data on these sailors from the industry and US Sailing suggest that most of those new sailors don't continue with the sport after college... Fact is... they make jokes about helms cruising freshman orientation to find woman who will fit the boat and crew for them...

 

The real question asked above in this thread of college sailors is... Why should the state or philanthropic donors fund college sailing? Make your case! (Testimonials on how much you personally benefited are nice anecdotes but the students in college radio say the same thing, as do students who study abroad for a semester)

My other question is... Why should the activity be college focused and not yacht club focused?

If College sailing did not exist ... would you participate in a YC's program?

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No one's commented on the use of sailing as an entry to a good academic experience. I think many of the parents pushing their kids through my club's junior program are having nightly wet dreams about little Junior or Chelsea getting a ticket to Brown. One senior on my son's high school team told me he made it into Boston College with a 2.3 GPA. 'Course he was a helluva prospect in an FJ and he's making an Olympic Trials bid right now.

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No one's commented on the use of sailing as an entry to a good academic experience. I think many of the parents pushing their kids through my club's junior program are having nightly wet dreams about little Junior or Chelsea getting a ticket to Brown. One senior on my son's high school team told me he made it into Boston College with a 2.3 GPA. 'Course he was a helluva prospect in an FJ and he's making an Olympic Trials bid right now.

 

That's the most depressing thing I've read all day.

 

Tell us at least that his grandfather is worth $500 million and promised to fund a chemistry lab or something.

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Having sailed in SEISA in the late 90's, I can tell you that it is a long road to hoe in order to be a top team. You will get the one anomaly that will chose a SEISA school and do well at a few inter-sectionals or even a nationals. But, those are few and far between. Looking back on my college sailing experience, I wish I would have promoted the sport of sailing in a way that new members would continue to sail the rest of their lives. Instead, we were always looking for the next skinny, good-looking crew to train and win our district events. Through the years, we only had one non-sailor on our team stick with the sport after college. Be different.

 

But whoever decided to field the J/24 with UNT sailor and have a lot of other UNT sailors out at DCYC Leukemia Cup crewing, I highly commend them. This is the best way to build your team and keep them sailing forever.

 

If you are interested in getting some them out on a Melges 24, feel free to PM me.

 

Ryan

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No one's commented on the use of sailing as an entry to a good academic experience. I think many of the parents pushing their kids through my club's junior program are having nightly wet dreams about little Junior or Chelsea getting a ticket to Brown. One senior on my son's high school team told me he made it into Boston College with a 2.3 GPA. 'Course he was a helluva prospect in an FJ and he's making an Olympic Trials bid right now.

 

That's the most depressing thing I've read all day.

 

Tell us at least that his grandfather is worth $500 million and promised to fund a chemistry lab or something.

Why is that depressing.... (you actually buy the bullshit about merit and elite academic institutions) Basically the kids scholarship is a discounting mechanism.... The school maximizes profit by discounting to some and charging a full ride to others. The marketing Bull Shit is that Boston College is a "good" school which is fostered by the sports teams being successful and so discounting is needed for success.!

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No one's commented on the use of sailing as an entry to a good academic experience. I think many of the parents pushing their kids through my club's junior program are having nightly wet dreams about little Junior or Chelsea getting a ticket to Brown. One senior on my son's high school team told me he made it into Boston College with a 2.3 GPA. 'Course he was a helluva prospect in an FJ and he's making an Olympic Trials bid right now.

 

That's the most depressing thing I've read all day.

 

Tell us at least that his grandfather is worth $500 million and promised to fund a chemistry lab or something.

Why is that depressing.... (you actually buy the bullshit about merit and elite academic institutions) Basically the kids scholarship is a discounting mechanism.... The school maximizes profit by discounting to some and charging a full ride to others. The marketing Bull Shit is that Boston College is a "good" school which is fostered by the sports teams being successful and so discounting is needed for success.!

 

Tell me, which of the teams at BC are considered "successful?"

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Having sailed in SEISA in the late 90's, I can tell you that it is a long road to hoe in order to be a top team. You will get the one anomaly that will chose a SEISA school and do well at a few inter-sectionals or even a nationals. But, those are few and far between. Looking back on my college sailing experience, I wish I would have promoted the sport of sailing in a way that new members would continue to sail the rest of their lives. Instead, we were always looking for the next skinny, good-looking crew to train and win our district events. Through the years, we only had one non-sailor on our team stick with the sport after college. Be different.

 

But whoever decided to field the J/24 with UNT sailor and have a lot of other UNT sailors out at DCYC Leukemia Cup crewing, I highly commend them. This is the best way to build your team and keep them sailing forever.

 

If you are interested in getting some them out on a Melges 24, feel free to PM me.

 

Ryan

 

I've sailed against the J/24 guys from UNT on the Texas Circuit. They are a great group and everyone on the Texas Circuit is trying to help them out in anyway they can. I would nice if there are some other old boats around so other schools in the vicinity of the Texas Circuit could get teams going. Ask anybody on the UNT J/24 team and they will tell you it beats they hell out of sailing FJs!!!

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Having sailed in SEISA in the late 90's, I can tell you that it is a long road to hoe in order to be a top team. You will get the one anomaly that will chose a SEISA school and do well at a few inter-sectionals or even a nationals. But, those are few and far between. Looking back on my college sailing experience, I wish I would have promoted the sport of sailing in a way that new members would continue to sail the rest of their lives. Instead, we were always looking for the next skinny, good-looking crew to train and win our district events. Through the years, we only had one non-sailor on our team stick with the sport after college. Be different.

 

But whoever decided to field the J/24 with UNT sailor and have a lot of other UNT sailors out at DCYC Leukemia Cup crewing, I highly commend them. This is the best way to build your team and keep them sailing forever.

 

If you are interested in getting some them out on a Melges 24, feel free to PM me.

 

Ryan

 

I've sailed against the J/24 guys from UNT on the Texas Circuit. They are a great group and everyone on the Texas Circuit is trying to help them out in anyway they can. I would nice if there are some other old boats around so other schools in the vicinity of the Texas Circuit could get teams going. Ask anybody on the UNT J/24 team and they will tell you it beats they hell out of sailing FJs!!!

 

WTF is this "UNT?"

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Having sailed in SEISA in the late 90's, I can tell you that it is a long road to hoe in order to be a top team. You will get the one anomaly that will chose a SEISA school and do well at a few inter-sectionals or even a nationals. But, those are few and far between. Looking back on my college sailing experience, I wish I would have promoted the sport of sailing in a way that new members would continue to sail the rest of their lives. Instead, we were always looking for the next skinny, good-looking crew to train and win our district events. Through the years, we only had one non-sailor on our team stick with the sport after college. Be different.

 

But whoever decided to field the J/24 with UNT sailor and have a lot of other UNT sailors out at DCYC Leukemia Cup crewing, I highly commend them. This is the best way to build your team and keep them sailing forever.

 

If you are interested in getting some them out on a Melges 24, feel free to PM me.

 

Ryan

 

I've sailed against the J/24 guys from UNT on the Texas Circuit. They are a great group and everyone on the Texas Circuit is trying to help them out in anyway they can. I would nice if there are some other old boats around so other schools in the vicinity of the Texas Circuit could get teams going. Ask anybody on the UNT J/24 team and they will tell you it beats they hell out of sailing FJs!!!

 

WTF is this "UNT?"

 

University of North Texas

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Having sailed in SEISA in the late 90's, I can tell you that it is a long road to hoe in order to be a top team. You will get the one anomaly that will chose a SEISA school and do well at a few inter-sectionals or even a nationals. But, those are few and far between. Looking back on my college sailing experience, I wish I would have promoted the sport of sailing in a way that new members would continue to sail the rest of their lives. Instead, we were always looking for the next skinny, good-looking crew to train and win our district events. Through the years, we only had one non-sailor on our team stick with the sport after college. Be different.

 

But whoever decided to field the J/24 with UNT sailor and have a lot of other UNT sailors out at DCYC Leukemia Cup crewing, I highly commend them. This is the best way to build your team and keep them sailing forever.

 

If you are interested in getting some them out on a Melges 24, feel free to PM me.

 

Ryan

 

I've sailed against the J/24 guys from UNT on the Texas Circuit. They are a great group and everyone on the Texas Circuit is trying to help them out in anyway they can. I would nice if there are some other old boats around so other schools in the vicinity of the Texas Circuit could get teams going. Ask anybody on the UNT J/24 team and they will tell you it beats they hell out of sailing FJs!!!

 

WTF is this "UNT?"

 

University of North Texas

 

Huh?

 

What is that? And where is it?

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To be correct, I did not say or imply there was a scholarship to BC for the kid. As I understand it, that's verboten. But he was quite candid that his sailing abilities, which were considerable, got him into the school. He wouldn't have been eligible for San Diego State on academic merit alone.

 

A corollary to the question posed by the original poster is why are colleges so slow to promote intercollegiate sailing programs? My alma mater (UCLA) fields a club team that's frankly a joke, even among the mostly second and third tier programs that make up the PCCSC (apologies to USC and Stanford). When a couple of our club's juniors expressed disappointment to me that one of their top choices for academics had such a dismal sailing program to offer, I thought; "Hey, in this day and age when Title IX impacts virtually every athletic department budget, how can you afford to not promote a program that requires so little in terms of capital outlay, is about evenly divided between coed and women only boats and doesn't eat up your scholarships?" I even wrote a letter to the AD and the Director of Athletic Development pointing out that recruits from So Cal yacht club junior programs, mostly college ready offspring of well heeled parents, were ready and waiting in the wings.

 

Didn't even get a blown kiss brush off. I guess when football and basketball are struggling, nothing else grabs your attention.

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Having sailed in SEISA in the late 90's, I can tell you that it is a long road to hoe in order to be a top team. You will get the one anomaly that will chose a SEISA school and do well at a few inter-sectionals or even a nationals. But, those are few and far between. Looking back on my college sailing experience, I wish I would have promoted the sport of sailing in a way that new members would continue to sail the rest of their lives. Instead, we were always looking for the next skinny, good-looking crew to train and win our district events. Through the years, we only had one non-sailor on our team stick with the sport after college. Be different.

 

But whoever decided to field the J/24 with UNT sailor and have a lot of other UNT sailors out at DCYC Leukemia Cup crewing, I highly commend them. This is the best way to build your team and keep them sailing forever.

 

If you are interested in getting some them out on a Melges 24, feel free to PM me.

 

Ryan

 

I've sailed against the J/24 guys from UNT on the Texas Circuit. They are a great group and everyone on the Texas Circuit is trying to help them out in anyway they can. I would nice if there are some other old boats around so other schools in the vicinity of the Texas Circuit could get teams going. Ask anybody on the UNT J/24 team and they will tell you it beats they hell out of sailing FJs!!!

 

WTF is this "UNT?"

 

University of North Texas

 

Huh?

 

What is that? And where is it?

 

http://lmgtfy.com/?q...+of+North+Texas

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I looked this "UNT" up in the US News and found that they declined to rate this miserable excuse for an institution of higher learning. They suggested a correspondence course rather than Denton, Texas.

 

WTF?

 

Is your school mascot a rattlesnake? A spider?

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I looked this "UNT" up in the US News and found that they declined to rate this miserable excuse for an institution of higher learning. They suggested a correspondence course rather than Denton, Texas.

 

WTF?

 

Is your school mascot a rattlesnake? A spider?

 

And what institution of higher learning did you attend?

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I looked this "UNT" up in the US News and found that they declined to rate this miserable excuse for an institution of higher learning. They suggested a correspondence course rather than Denton, Texas.

 

WTF?

 

Is your school mascot a rattlesnake? A spider?

 

And what institution of higher learning did you attend?

 

UT

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I looked this "UNT" up in the US News and found that they declined to rate this miserable excuse for an institution of higher learning. They suggested a correspondence course rather than Denton, Texas.

 

WTF?

 

Is your school mascot a rattlesnake? A spider?

 

And what institution of higher learning did you attend?

 

UT

 

UT as in:

University of Texas

University of Tampa

University of Tennessee

or

University of Toledo

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I looked this "UNT" up in the US News and found that they declined to rate this miserable excuse for an institution of higher learning. They suggested a correspondence course rather than Denton, Texas.

 

WTF?

 

Is your school mascot a rattlesnake? A spider?

 

And what institution of higher learning did you attend?

 

UT

 

UT as in:

University of Texas

University of Tampa

University of Tennessee

or

University of Toledo

 

I think you know.

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WTF is this "UNT?"

 

University of North Texas

Some smaller, little-known schools have names such as this. For example, the University of Southern North Ohio at Sandusky, infamous for its Political Science department.

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I looked this "UNT" up in the US News and found that they declined to rate this miserable excuse for an institution of higher learning. They suggested a correspondence course rather than Denton, Texas.

 

WTF?

 

Is your school mascot a rattlesnake? A spider?

 

And what institution of higher learning did you attend?

 

UT

 

UT as in:

University of Texas

University of Tampa

University of Tennessee

or

University of Toledo

 

I think you know.

 

I am afraid not.

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Yeah and the University of North Teaxas is infamous for their Herbetology departmnet. World class.

 

Try and get a job with that degree!

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Womens division readies women's teams for the Olympics, Mens...wait there are no men's division. The boats are for little kids and on the same starting line you have all americans and kids who don't know how to sail upwind. RETARDED

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Who gets a good paying job straight out of college? College is just prep for graduate school; might as well sail while you're there, and work hard at the skills you need to kick ass on the MCAT/GMAT/LSAT...

 

Then once you're 200k in the hole, discover you can't stand your chosen profession and become a sailboat racing writer/editor/video producer. Now that's a fucking business plan!

 

This says it all!

I was making over 200k when I quit to write for SA. I didnt sail at undergrad, but I sure as shit didn't study either. Fortunately, i can score in the top 1 percent on almost any standardized test, its a bit of a gift with little relationship to outright intelligence, so I was able to get into a good law school and leverage relationships to make a good salary. I was also fortunate to learn after a few years that money is a lousy measure of anything but money, and i know far too many folks that die with a lot of money but not a lot else. "one size fits all" advice like you give to kids is intellectually lazy. These days, real money is far more likely to come to good test takers that know how to build relationships or the very creative who might not even be able to spell creative But know how to market or adapt to constantly shifting new biz practices than it is to those whose greatest skill is workong hard. Its a different world than it was even 20 years ago, and getting good undergrad grades is a mostly useless and outdated measure of future success. Everyone ha their own path: Follow your own and don't listen to people who live in the past.

 

Typing on a phone, typos are expected.

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I sailed in SEISA where we organized our own team. We recurited, organized regattas and ran practices. We raised funds and figured out housing/floor space at regattas.

 

It better prepared us for post collegiate sailing where we have to manage our own sailing program. Do those kids that have always been part of a coached/managed program from junior sailing through college have that same ability?

 

 

 

 

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I sailed in SEISA where we organized our own team. We recurited, organized regattas and ran practices. We raised funds and figured out housing/floor space at regattas.

 

It better prepared us for post collegiate sailing where we have to manage our own sailing program. Do those kids that have always been part of a coached/managed program from junior sailing through college have that same ability?

 

 

 

 

 

considering that ive been organizing my travel and housing for the past five years anyway (junior in college now)....id say yes, yes i do have that ability. And, thats with coming out of a coached jr program as well.

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