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U20guy2

Have any of you guys seen this? Footy Box rule?

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http://footy.rcsailing.net/

 

Video

 

 

I'm digging this little rig

http://www.woodenboatstore.com/Footy-BRANDO-plans/productinfo/490-008/

 

 

My almost 3yr old has been swimming in the pool every day after daycare and insisting that I put the junker plastic Fairwind that I inherited from a friend who was moving out of state. The boat is shot but floats long enough to get a few free sail runs across the pool and she loves it. Got me thinking about a small cheap little wood kit that had micro RC potential and bingo I find this! One could have a full blown regatta in their back yard pool during a BBQ! Pretty cool!

 

Now we just need a couple of our favorite big boat designers to throw down a little a little Footy design challenge LOL. Bob? I might drop a note to Jim Antrim see what he says ha ha..

 

All in good fun

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Yah, they suck. Been an AMYA class for years. Goofy little things that don't perform. Cheap though.

Micro Magic's are pretty much the best performing tiny yacht class out there even worth considering. Not cheap.

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That is very interesting. Thanks for posting.

 

When I first saw them, I immedaitely thougth of you.

In fact I thought, "Cool, somebody built a model of Bob's little boat drawings!"

 

-m

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No way in hell Footies suck. Sure they're twitchy and tricky to sail, but with a good design and the proper sized rig for the conditions they sail great. Obviously they struggle in open bodies of water if the chop gets up, but that's because competative boats are down in the 11 oz range.

 

Here's my modified Kittywake. Not really competetive against the newest lightweights but still sails pretty well.

 

post-2619-055023700 1337782390_thumb.jpg

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Yah, they suck. Been an AMYA class for years. Goofy little things that don't perform. Cheap though.

Micro Magic's are pretty much the best performing tiny yacht class out there even worth considering. Not cheap.

 

 

The issue I have with the Micro Magic is that the cost has spun out of control if they had a 21 inch class with rules like the Footy class then it would be even better and 1/4 the price to set one up. As such you have $300 hulls and $200 rigs with 21 inches of water line no thanks I'd rather go sail my real boat for that kind of money.

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That is very interesting. Thanks for posting.

 

Hey Bob this Footy concept is pretty cool the more I read about it the more I think that this idea is on track to generate a future generation of sailors Or engineers and designers? Lots of little kids are able to build these and sounds like some Cub Scout troops are trying to find a kit or design a kit which could be a course build it in a day or two - and have it sailing in a week or less.

 

With the laser cut thin hobby ply capability paired with Cad seems like this idea could be done pretty easily and cheap.

I agree that the 12inch hull length and 6inches wide box rule results in a tub of a boat - but if you look at the Micro Magic class at 21inchs in length they sail pretty well but the class has gone off the rails with carbon hulls pushing $300+ and over the top rigs commanding $200+ which case for that money I'll go sail my real boat LOL.

 

But there is no reason why a 21 inch hull length box rule idea like the Footy could be started. With a good interlocking laser cut Hobby ply kit I don't see why a Cub Scout group wouldn't or couldn't do a build and sail type camp along with many other summer kid programs.

 

I sent a note to Jim Antrim maybe he has an intern that knows cad and Jim could feed them some design ideas and we get a interlocking ply kit going? Every RYC adult and kid would have an Antrim OpenClass 40 if there was a cheap interlocking laser cut ply kit for it HA HA.

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I built a 1:8 Puddle Duck Racer model last year, then got bored and converted it to RC. It likely isn't nearly as fast as a serious (?) footy but it actually performs quite well even with a ton of really bad ideas, model has an off center dagger board (now weighted with a fishing weight), rig is far too flexible and the sail position/size/design lends itself to completely burying the lee bow underwater on a broad reach in higher winds. Basically it looks like a tank and sails like one might, very stable, loses little to leeway and just keeps on trucking along.

 

For all it's faults, it is really fun on the small pond acrossed the street where a larger RC model would not have the room or depth to sail.

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http://footy.rcsailing.net/

 

Video

 

 

I'm digging this little rig

http://www.woodenboa...ctinfo/490-008/

 

 

My almost 3yr old has been swimming in the pool every day after daycare and insisting that I put the junker plastic Fairwind that I inherited from a friend who was moving out of state. The boat is shot but floats long enough to get a few free sail runs across the pool and she loves it. Got me thinking about a small cheap little wood kit that had micro RC potential and bingo I find this! One could have a full blown regatta in their back yard pool during a BBQ! Pretty cool!

 

Now we just need a couple of our favorite big boat designers to throw down a little a little Footy design challenge LOL. Bob? I might drop a note to Jim Antrim see what he says ha ha..

 

All in good fun

 

Those are so damn cute.

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The problem is one of scaling.

 

For any sort of satisfying sailing experience and performance, life starts at around 1 meter, otherwise even the slightest chop just makes it a hate mission. It's a hate mission unless your idea of fun is bobbing up and down over wind ripples. As such, designs that work to reduce pitching rule the little classes.

 

There are centuries of model designs from which to compare. Models provided the prototypes for most of the modern developments we are seeing in full size yachts now that we are able to build what was previously completely impractical at full size. High-aspect foils, fat-head sails, bulb ballast, minimal overhangs, etc. All done first and proven fast in model boat racing.

 

When designing models, you need to think differently than conventional boats:

  • No crew, thus no moveable ballast, thus wide beam gets you basically nothing but wetted surface area and twitchy handling.
  • With a minimum of hull-form stability (many designs have zero hull-form stability) and the ineffectiveness of ballast keels at low angles of heel, designs which operate efficiently at high angles of heel win. It is not uncommon to operate at 45° of heel.
  • The real-life boats that provide the most inspiration for good R/C designs are the old IACC 25-meter boats like used in San Diego, New Zealand and Valencia. Narrow-beam upwind machines. Downwind flyers rarely beat a design optimized for upwind work.
  • Designs based on Open ocean classes like the broad-beam twin-rudder canting-ballast boats are just plain wrong on R/C boats. If you buid a boat to the same dimensions but substitute a narrow-beam hull, you will lap the fatties.
  • Minimize wetted surface area. Since hull-form stability is all but completely insignificant, straight semi-circular sections are fast. Think one-half of an AC45 cat with a deep bulb.

All you have to do is look at the top R/C development classes to see which hulls are fast. You will not find a single fattie in the lot.

 

The one-design argument is a straw man until you get sufficient numbers into the game, which is unlikely if the design gets spanked by every other boat on the pond. Think Farr 400; Who wants to pony up big cash for a design that struggles to keep up with a 16-year older design from the same board?

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I agree that the 12inch hull length and 6inches wide box rule results in a tub of a boat

 

Many of the newest "double-diagonal" Footies are relatively narrow and don't look very "tubby" to me. Only issue is they sometimes have to have strange looking sail-rigs to clear the top of the box.

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I'm thinking more and more that a footy type idea in the 15-21 inch range and given the popularity of the Micro Magic class it would make sense that a footy class concept in the 21 inch size would generate lots of interest due to the added sailing performance you get.

 

The build time and cost between a 12 inch Footy and a boat with the same general idea in the 21 inch range is nearly the same unless you allow - people to go ultra stupid and get all Carbon fiber - and super complicated on the materials. I think once you hit the 27 inch range the RC sailboats start getting to the size that they aren't easily transported - you need fairly deep water and a large ish pond for any decent sailing fun - and the cost starts to get up there as you look at rigging gear etc to make it all work well.

 

Anything in the 12-21 inch range I can sail in my pool I could even run a decent regatta in my pool. LOL The Fairwind even free sailing with nothing but a beat up old main is far too large for our large pool. The nearly 9ft high keel to mast head thing I have up in the attic is something I will rig up and get some RC gear in when I have time and we have a bring your RC rig to the YC challenge. Then I'll bust out the monster. LOL

 

Thinking - 12-21 inches super cheap basic design that could be laser cut and sold in cheap kits for kids and adults to build and do as they wish regarding how much money within reason they spend etc. Heck if Dumas models can die cut a 17 inch Lightning model and sell them for $40 - a Footy type RC rig with a limited number of laser cut parts should be possible for a similar price. The RC radio stuff these days is soooo Damn cheap you could have a really fun little RC sailboat for $150 or less.

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Had a go in 09 with a double-diagonal, very narrow, blunt but wave "piercing" bow, and a canoe stern. Sailed well, went downwind like a sub with the bow wave back around the mast post but seemed none the slower for it. My amateur attempts at waterproofing the electrics soon made the controls generally unresponsive...

post-4941-087823800 1337798667_thumb.jpgpost-4941-055917100 1337798676_thumb.jpgpost-4941-074856900 1337798677_thumb.jpg

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SoAPieceOfStringWalksIntoABar..., I like your design better then most of those cigar-box/coffin designs on the Footy site. It's much more in line with what is fast in larger classes. How does it handle wind ripples (which scales up to about 2 meter chop in an Etchells)?

 

lol.gif @ "generally unresponsive" controls!

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RG 65 is an already established development class that's a step up in size from the Footy. A lot of the successful Footy designer/builders also dabble in the RG 65.

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Micro Magic's are pretty much the best performing tiny yacht class out there even worth considering. Not cheap.

 

 

If anyone needs a reminder of how IRPCAS in micro magics* work..

 

 

*and everything else

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RG 65 is an already established development class that's a step up in size from the Footy. A lot of the successful Footy designer/builders also dabble in the RG 65.

 

This is getting better they seem to sail pretty decent at 25 inches.

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SoAPieceOfStringWalksIntoABar..., I like your design better then most of those cigar-box/coffin designs on the Footy site. It's much more in line with what is fast in larger classes. How does it handle wind ripples (which scales up to about 2 meter chop in an Etchells)?

 

lol.gif @ "generally unresponsive" controls!

Only ever sailed it in a local duck pond, maybe 50 yards across (fetch), in winds about 12 and under. Waves maybe a couple inches high, max. It handled them well, didn't pitch much, very stable heel angle, good directional stability. Never lined it up against another footy though.

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I think that when it comes to making Footy class boats sail well we need to abandon the idea of using a tradition sloop rig. Swing rigs have been used with some success, but by far the best rig for Footies is the "McCormack Rig" or "Equibilbrium rig". This rig twists off in the gusts and you can literally sail the boat hands off upwind. Size the rig right and you can pretty much set up the boat for any wind condition. And the best part is that the rigs only take a few inches of 3/32" stainless steel wire, some 1/8" carbon tube, and some florist wrap. So for about $10 you have a rig.

 

If you want to get into RC sailing really cheap, I wouldn't hesitate to point anyone towards a footy. The Razor 3, or Cobra Footy designs by Bill Hagerup are really good performers and very easy for a novice to build. Combine Hagerup's hulls with Roger Stollery's cassette radio board system and you have a winning combo.

 

Have fun out there.

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Wow nice info! Thx! Seems the challenge has been upped by a fellow sailor. Whats my target weight vs keel weight? Im not a novice builder. I've turned out competitive planes far more complex than these rigs with major weight reductions in the build. ;~)

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My name is Flavio.

 

Flavio Faloci.

 

 

I'm the designer of the wooden Footy that U20guy2 is looking to steer during his BBQ regattas ( Brando )

 

See below the drydocked "coffin", as well same cigar box "don't performing" during a footy race in Mystic.

 

WoodenBoat Magazine –as pointed out - is currently selling plans of this semiscale catboat footy ( as well other footy plans, a footy kitbox and even a book )

 

Even if my there are few hundreds of my "spirit of tradidion" footies around the world, the vast majority of footy enthusiast are currently designing, building and steering really "micro" modern sailing machines.

 

Footies are able to tack, jibe and to manage breezes exceeding 30 knots.

 

Micro magic are almost "one design" – expensive – models .

RG65 are pretty small sailers, but their set of rules leave you a very reduced degree of freedom from design point of view.

 

Most probably the most remarkable point to underline about these racing sailing toys is the unbelievable difference between existing fastest designs.

 

Last but not least, I am the person in charge for the organization of the next international footy championship ( Footy Gold Cup 2012 ), on a small alpine lake in the northern Italy.

 

So far we have registered 30 skippers from 8 different countries ( Italy, Germany, France, Slowenia, Portugal, Sweden, Great Britain, Switzerland ).

 

See us at

 

Flavio for the Italian footy tribe

 

 

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As one of the founders of the Footy Class Association, I'm pleased to see the interest in our little boats. I'm a bit frustrated, though, with the misconceptions I see.

 

Footys do not suck. The misconception that they can't sail is a result of old wive's tales and some unfortunate early experiences with poorly designed or built boats. Because of their short LWL, balance is critical with a Footy. Rig placement needs to be carefully tuned.

 

Once properly balanced (like any boat needs to be) a well-designed Footy sails very well in a wider variety of conditions than most larger models. They sail hands-off upwind and tack on a dime. They are cheap and easy to build. They've been raced in wind over 25mph and waves a foot high...can your boat race in waves as high as your hull length?

 

Sure they dive on a run in heavy air. But that's because of the outrageous amounts of sail we put on them. The ratio of sail area to LWL is higher than any boat since the Balmain Bug. If you don't want a Footy to dive, just change down to a smaller rig...but then I might beat you upwind :-)

 

The box rule offers a great deal of design flexibility combined with the need for interesting tradeoffs, and it has resulted in a wide variety of competitive hulls. Roger Stollery prefers to use a wider beam for stability, allowing large rigs to be used as long as possible and minimizing diving. I prefer narrow, lighter boats that still go straight when the bow goes under. No design has yet dominated the class. Boats typically weigh between 300 and 500 grams. My latest is 350 grams with a 210 gram bulb.

 

I challenge anyone who thinks Footys suck to build one of Roger's, Flavio's, or my designs and get out on the pond...I guarantee it will change your perception. Build a Footy and go have fun!

 

Bill

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Good feed back guys thank you! Flavio I'm tempted to pick up your traditional looking plans assuming there is more to them than the sketch shown in the pics on this website?

http://www.woodenboa...ctinfo/490-008/

 

It just looks right LOL

 

I'll check out Bill's boats and Rodger's also. My initial interest was for something small and cheap that can be used to entertain my Daughter between swimming lesson efforts in our pool. The old beater plastic junker Fairwind which sinks after about 30 minutes is a bit fast and big to free sail back and forth across the pool with her given when that thing is going flat out and headed right at her she runs for cover vs spinning it around when it reaches her ha ha. I can't blame her its pretty large and putting on some speed at times just under main.

 

However it seems a couple of sailing friends have footy's which have floated around the family and the makings of a major race the next time we cross paths is in the works. So I may need to step up how serious I get with this and have a fast footy on call for the job ha ha.

 

I do have some old RC gear so with some minimal upgrades and new batteries my cost could be pretty small to get one or two of these Footys going.

 

Thanks for the feedback!

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U2,

 

see below a sample of drawings ( and instructions ) you will find within the package from Wooden Boat Store

 

Flavio

 

post-62370-067595600 1337880044_thumb.jpg

post-62370-087238800 1337880093_thumb.jpg

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Yah, they suck. Been an AMYA class for years. Goofy little things that don't perform. Cheap though.

Micro Magic's are pretty much the best performing tiny yacht class out there even worth considering. Not cheap.

 

 

The issue I have with the Micro Magic is that the cost has spun out of control if they had a 21 inch class with rules like the Footy class then it would be even better and 1/4 the price to set one up. As such you have $300 hulls and $200 rigs with 21 inches of water line no thanks I'd rather go sail my real boat for that kind of money.

 

Agree the MM's are expensive. Thats why I stated as much in my first post. RG65's are only slightly larger than a MM, are a box rule and can be built for cheap. Plus they sail like little marbleheads.

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U2,

 

see below a sample of drawings ( and instructions ) you will find within the package from Wooden Boat Store

 

Flavio

 

Perfect!

 

I think I'll be placing an order. Thank you for the info - one suggestion get some more detailed youtube videos up of your boat and a few others sailing a tight little race course so you can see them in action. Maybe a short video close up of how the boats are rigged and the inner workings so people can get a sense how they are set up and that they are pretty serious little machines with a little effort and creativity put into them.

 

Fantastic IDEA! The cost of the prebuilt RC junk is staggering these days and the number of wood build kits and plans are getting rare!

 

I use to buy $60 airplane kits build them in a week have about $100 in materials in them and fly them for years before a major airframe failure ended their flying days many are retired to hanging model status at my old HS. LOL

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As one of the founders of the Footy Class Association, I'm pleased to see the interest in our little boats. I'm a bit frustrated, though, with the misconceptions I see.

 

Footys do not suck. The misconception that they can't sail is a result of old wive's tales and some unfortunate early experiences with poorly designed or built boats. Because of their short LWL, balance is critical with a Footy. Rig placement needs to be carefully tuned.

 

Once properly balanced (like any boat needs to be) a well-designed Footy sails very well in a wider variety of conditions than most larger models. They sail hands-off upwind and tack on a dime. They are cheap and easy to build. They've been raced in wind over 25mph and waves a foot high...can your boat race in waves as high as your hull length?

 

Sure they dive on a run in heavy air. But that's because of the outrageous amounts of sail we put on them. The ratio of sail area to LWL is higher than any boat since the Balmain Bug. If you don't want a Footy to dive, just change down to a smaller rig...but then I might beat you upwind :-)

 

The box rule offers a great deal of design flexibility combined with the need for interesting tradeoffs, and it has resulted in a wide variety of competitive hulls. Roger Stollery prefers to use a wider beam for stability, allowing large rigs to be used as long as possible and minimizing diving. I prefer narrow, lighter boats that still go straight when the bow goes under. No design has yet dominated the class. Boats typically weigh between 300 and 500 grams. My latest is 350 grams with a 210 gram bulb.

 

I challenge anyone who thinks Footys suck to build one of Roger's, Flavio's, or my designs and get out on the pond...I guarantee it will change your perception. Build a Footy and go have fun!

 

Bill

 

Bill,

I've been to numerous footy regattas here in the NE.(and sailed a few of them) As a matter of fact you and I know alot of the same people. I've been in model yachting since 1982 and have owned just about all the AMYA sanctioned classes at one point or another. Right now, my smallest boat is a CR914 and my largest is a custom Newport 12M.(thinking about a Wheeler build)

 

Footy's are OK if you don't mind sailing slow and the goofy looks don't bother you.......they bother me, alot. If Footy's are what everyone is sailing at the local club, then by all means I would recommend one. If not, there are plenty other box rule classes that perform FAR better, look FAR better and are almost as cheap and easy to transport.

 

I have sailed your Cobra 2 design..............it was OK and from what I'm told a great Footy. They just don't perform or look good enough for my tastes.

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Video from "on board" a Brando' sistership ( courtesy Mr. Alberto Nencioni from Milan )

 

Flavio

post-62370-036625300 1337881775_thumb.jpg

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Video from "on board" a Brando' sistership ( courtesy Mr. Alberto Nencioni from Milan )

 

...3:50.........a canting keel----really??? :blink:

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Here's a couple pics of my latest Footy in progress. Not too tubby, I don't think :-)

 

Bill

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Whats with the banana shaped hulls? is there a trend that shows this shape works better than flatter hulls? Just curious? Looking like I'll be building a hull in the next week or so with the plan to be racing against a buddy 2nd week of June. Could be a complete flop but I have pretty much all the materials I need from some of the junk I kept from my plane building days.

 

Bill I like your Razor hull shape you posted here http://footy.rcsailing.net/plans.php - little flatter hull shape. If my build goes fast I might tweak the Razor idea a tad with an idea I have formulating and see how that goes.

 

It looks likes in some of the picts I've seen the keels are set up so they can be swapped guessing different weights for given conditions and presumably rig combos ie sail area etc? Seems like a smart idea not to mention if you have multiple hulls you can simply have a couple of keels that work with all the hulls?

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Squalamax, to each his own...I have no problem with someone not liking them, and choosing a class more to their liking. The explanation you give for your preference is perfectly understandable, and the sport would be pretty boring if we all had to sail the same one-design boat whether we liked it or not. I just take issue when you say they suck. The fact that several national champions from other classes enjoy Footys is evidence that they can be serious racers as well as fun little boats.

 

Bill

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U20guy2, Razor was my first Footy. I suggest you build Razor3, which is easier to build and a better handling, more competitive boat. By all means, though, pick a plan you like and tweak away...the neat thing about Footys is that if your idea doesn't work out, you can build another one before next weekend!

 

Interchangeable keels are nice, but add complexity and weight to the build. Getting a good ballast ratio on a Footy generally means building with a minimum of internal structure.

 

The banana shape is a function of retaining fairly high freeboard in the bow for reserve buoyancy downwind, but removing the freeboard where it's not needed. if you don't care for the look, there's no problem with straightening the sheer.

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U20guy2, Razor was my first Footy. I suggest you build Razor3, which is easier to build and a better handling, more competitive boat. By all means, though, pick a plan you like and tweak away...the neat thing about Footys is that if your idea doesn't work out, you can build another one before next weekend!

 

Interchangeable keels are nice, but add complexity and weight to the build. Getting a good ballast ratio on a Footy generally means building with a minimum of internal structure.

 

The banana shape is a function of retaining fairly high freeboard in the bow for reserve buoyancy downwind, but removing the freeboard where it's not needed. if you don't care for the look, there's no problem with straightening the sheer.

 

K will check out the #3 - have you tried to run a different type of keel to help with the nose dive issue down wind? The "T" bulb is all the rage but it does shift weight forward some adding to the complexity of a short hull and the down wind nose dive factor. Any chance you've tried a "L" shaped keel? Curious what your thoughts are on that. L shaped keep paired with a flexible mast in the upper section letting the sail to dump some pressure might be the ticket to keeping the nose above water.

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US20guy2, L shaped keels work fine. I would like to have had one a few weeks ago when we raced in a weedy pond! I've used different keel shapes without noticing a change in the pitching tendency, though. Other attempts to contro diving like T-shaped rudders, wide bows, or dive planes haven't shown advantage, either.

 

Flexibility in the rig does help in gusty conditions. The invention of the McRig (thanks again, Brett) was the greatest innovation in the class, and works well on RG65s, too.

 

In my opinion, the best way to control diving is to pick the right sail for conditions....I think we tend to use too much sail for too long. More sail than needed to maintain hull speed may be a liability. I'd love to have one of you smart guys out there calculate how many square inches are needed to get a Footy to hull speed at different wind velocities! If we had good data on that we might be able to solve the debate my old friend Angus and I had about whether a 500 gram boat with a bigger sail is inherently faster than a 300 gram boat with a smaller sail...or vice versa. Based on empirical observation, the jury's still out on that one.

 

I think if you like Footys otherwise, you just accept the downwind dive as a less-desirable trait that is offset by a lot of other good ones. I can't help pointing out, though, that Footys aren't the only boat that will dive if pressed downwind. I've buried an RG65, a USOM, and a Marblehead up to the mast, too.

 

Bill

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Thanks everyone for the show and tell. These have always appealed to me, but I haven't seen the latest ones for awhile. I wanted to bring 2-3 of them aboard Blurocket, to play with in the evenings. What fun to get our cruising buddies together for cocktails and a race. Never got around to it though.

 

I raced Marbleheads 30 years ago. I can't imagine how complicated and expensive they must be now.

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.... and bobbing about upwind at hull speed ( note red telltales on foresail ;-) )

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Ok guys - I have a hard wood veneer super thin source from a local cabinet maker with lots of scrap I can have. I have some old RC junk radio stuff but now it seems I have a couple of other people interested so now thinking I need to find a super cheap 2.4Ghz radio. Any suggestions last time I purchased a radio the only players was Airtronics and Futaba LOL seems now there are tons of cheapie systems for as low as $30 for the transmitter.

 

Also thinking a modified micro servo which runs more like a winch vs a fixed range back and forth servo would work better with a two stick transmitter for the sail control. I'm guessing you guys tweak these servos so they work more like a winch vs a return to zero position servo right?

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Servo mod for continuous run forward and reverse for winch use. This seems like a better option for the cheap radios which have spring loaded sticks that return to zero for sail trim this would be a pain in the butt to hold the stick in various spots the whole time

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-modify-a-servo-motor-for-continuous-rotatio/step8/How-to-modify-a-servo-motor-for-continuous-rotatio/

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Stick with the simplicity of an arm winch in a Footy. I use a Hitec HS-5085MG which has plenty of power and is programmable for 120 degrees rotation, and fairly light. If your transmitter has a spring loaded stick for the "throttle" channel, it's usually pretty easy to defeat by taking the back off the radio and cutting/disconnecting the spring. I use Spektrum gear, but lots of guys are using the "off brand" 2.4 stuff with good results.

 

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Stick with the simplicity of an arm winch in a Footy. I use a Hitec HS-5085MG which has plenty of power and is programmable for 120 degrees rotation, and fairly light. If your transmitter has a spring loaded stick for the "throttle" channel, it's usually pretty easy to defeat by taking the back off the radio and cutting/disconnecting the spring. I use Spektrum gear, but lots of guys are using the "off brand" 2.4 stuff with good results.

 

post-2619-050155000 1337967264_thumb.jpg post-2619-018243700 1337967445_thumb.jpg

 

I've done the spring removal before was just thinking with all the cool wild micro stuff and super cheap prices on some of this RC equipment that someone would have a Servo set up as a basic winch by now LOL. Christ a super micro Hitech servo can be had for $10! Last time I bought gear the standard servo's were $15 and the slightly smaller mini servo's were $20+ LOL

 

OK arm it is for now any way.

 

What type of product are folks sealing their balsa with? Thinking it needs to be something that doesn't add much weight but seals up the balsa good. I might actually have some MonoKote some place - kinda tempted to brush up my covering skills and monokote the hull ha ha.

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Wow I must be old fashion the stupid steering wheel gun trigger 2 channel remotes were just starting to show up when I was last active in this stuff. Made sense for the fast RC cars - but now there ain't jack for crap two stick boxes in the 2 channel format anymore. I should have bought a bunch of them a few years back when they moved to the digital format with the two stick boxes.

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lol.gif @ Slater's IOM rig on a Footy!

 

I know it's not an IOM rig...

It's actually scaled down from a US 1 Meter rig. The boat sails great upwind, and even handles moderate waves pretty well. As Bill H mentioned earlier the drawback to the tall aspect rig is it pushes the bow down off the wind. The McRig set ups seem to be much better all around in Footies.

 

post-2619-046993100 1337975915_thumb.jpg

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What type of product are folks sealing their balsa with? Thinking it needs to be something that doesn't add much weight but seals up the balsa good. I might actually have some MonoKote some place - kinda tempted to brush up my covering skills and monokote the hull ha ha.

My boat is actually thin lite ply, but I sprayed it with a couple thin coats of clear polyurethane. Has held up fine for several years. I think that's what Bill H does to his balsa Footies as well.

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You can keep it simple and cheap, guys. Footys are small enough that you don't need much power, and 90 degrees travel is fine for the winch. I suggest something like the Hitec HS-55 for rudder and HS-82mg or HS-85mg for the winch. With those and a cheap 2.4ghz radio from Hobby King or another similar vendor you should get going for well under $100 worth of electronics.

 

To seal balsa, I use whatever spray can I have around...usually Rustoleum clear enamel or Krylon acrylic. 2 or three coats sanded between seems to do a decent job.

 

I build using either balsa or 1/64 aircraft ply, depending on what is readily available. My local (one hour drive away) HS doesn't have the ply, but I can sometimes get it at Michael's craft store. I recommend 1/16 if you use balsa. I've used 1/32, but usually break something before I finish the build. Balsa needs to be wetted with an ammonia-based cleaning product and taped to something like my water softener to pre-bend the panels to rough shape...it's too brittle to bend dry. I highly recommend 1/64 ply...it's stronger, almost as light, doesn't require pre-bending, and can be cut with scissors. The only problem is that it is quite a bit more expensive than balsa. I make fins and rudders from 1/8 basswood.

 

I'm pleased to see some of you interested. If you'd like, I'll put a simple plan together for an easy-to-build but competitive Footy with template drawings for the hull panels, fin, rudder, and internal bulkhead. I can also include a rig plan and a series of build pics. I have it all, because I'm putting it together for a club build....but it will take me a while to scan and assemble everything into a pdf file that I can post here for you. I don't do fancy plans....I just share what I build from...but anyone with a modicum of modelling experience should do fine. Let me know.

 

Bill

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lol.gif @ Slater's IOM rig on a Footy!

 

I know it's not an IOM rig...

It's actually scaled down from a US 1 Meter rig. The boat sails great upwind, and even handles moderate waves pretty well. As Bill H mentioned earlier the drawback to the tall aspect rig is it pushes the bow down off the wind. The McRig set ups seem to be much better all around in Footies.

 

post-2619-046993100 1337975915_thumb.jpg

 

wow! I thought my old fairwind used to plow downwind.

 

can you really race a couple of these things in a pool?

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1/16th Balsa with Bills razor 3. Built one hull the learning hull, 2hrs messing around. Then built the second one and went to bed. No pre bending just rusty balsa skills brushed up. Going to do basswood keel for my first effort. Then basswood second effort shaped then lay up a skin over it for added strength and looks. Going to order 3mm carbon tubing and doing the single sail rig idea with 3/32wire tied to the carbon tubing.

 

I have an ancient 2Ch stick and some old mini servos for now. Might do the hobbyking cheap 2.4ghz idea later.

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Ill sand the hull this weekend and shoot it with spray paint. By end of next week should be all set waiting on ordered bits for the rig.

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So far about $20 invested counting razor blades super glue and balsa.

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Another very cheap way to experiment is to build your hull from blocks of blue (Stryofoam) or pink (Foamular) foam. You can carve out hulls with more complex shape, add back if it's too small or cut more off where it's too big. If you get the mast or keel in the wrong place pull it out, fill the hole with foam and cut another hole. Paint it after your are happy. The "wooden hull" is foam sealed with water based acrylic, shot with cheap white from a spray bomb and simulated wood using a brown magic marker.

 

Keel is 2 pieces of 1/32 ply sandwiched over a piece of carbon rod to give it stiffness and a foil shape. Rudder is similar using 1/32" balsa over a carbon rod. I attached the bulb to the keel with hot glue and hockey tape. This lets you move it quickly if something is not quite balanced.

 

Go diagonal, you'll like having the extra 11% waterline length and won't need a funky rig to fit the box rule. With well designed swing rig these things will sail well hands off. The rig is attached by one piece of line so changing up or down takes about 1 minute to do.

 

Take care,

 

Brent

 

BC3.jpg

 

BC2.jpg

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Brent....where have you been?? Miss having you active in Footydom. How come no pic of the 4-foot high rig :-)

 

All the best.....Bill

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Peter Shepherd has done a great job web-publishing a plan and article I wrote last year for building my Footy "Ranger."

 

Scott Wallis has been campaigning a Ranger made from Depron sheet in the UK this season with some success. You can see some pics of it on Peter's site, too, and his build techniques, too.

 

Ranger is a nice sailing boat, but its double chine and narrow beam make it a tricky build for a first attempt with big thumbs :-) If you done some modeling before, though, you should be fine.

 

Either way, the build techniques illustrated (in the many pictures my wife was kind enough to take) can be used for any Footy.

 

Here's the link: http://www.sailfootyuk.com/build-a-ranger.html

 

Thanks, Peter....nice job.

 

Bill

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Hey Bill is this serious stuff adhesive mentioned by Peter something like our 3M Marine grade 4200 or 5200 we have here in the states? Seems like it would be similar stuff.

 

Also this 2mm tube he mentions for the rudder - I have found 3mm stuff at TowerHobbies but nothing close to 2mm. Any ideas about that and possible sources? Getting my shopping list in order so I can have this boat done by the end of next weekend thanks

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Guessing 2mm solid rod for the rudder - which you pass through a fitted bit of tubing etc?

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Sorry...been away for a few days.

 

For the rudder, I generally use 1/8" tubing with a heavy wall that I get from Hang 'em High. I think it is .0125 diameter in the catalog. An aluminum or carbon tube with that inside diameter is glued into the hull for the rudder post to pass through. I have a tiller fitting that goes over the top of the tube and tightens with a set screw. You can probably make one or find something suitable at your hobby shop.

 

I'm not familiar with the glues you mentioned. For wood models, I use ACC. For foam, I use UHU Por, which I got at Michael's craft store. It may be difficult to find, but it's a contact cement that doesn't melt the foam, and spreads thinly so weight is kept to a minimum. It's widely used by airplane modelers, so your hobby shop may have some equivalent.

 

Don't worry about the difference between 2, 2.5, or 3mm stock....just use what you can get...they all work.

 

Keep up the good work..........Bill

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bill thanks for the tip on the tubing for the rudder box. My 2mm and 3mm stuff just arrived. I took a week break from the footy. However by Monday I need to have a fully functioning one for my footy challenge from another sailing buddy ha ha.

 

So this weekend will be full on footy get er done mode.

 

If I can sort out how to post picts here I'll post some.

 

I'll also report back on if I got my butt kicked or did some butt kicking.

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