• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Tugboat

Beau Geste in trouble

Recommended Posts

Early reports coming through the race feed on Facebook and in the media that Karl Kwok's maxi Beau Geste has suffered structural damage and withdrawn from the Auckland to Noumea race.

 

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/7042342/Mission-to-rescue-crew-from-stricken-yacht

 

Hopefully all aboard are safe and remain so!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30 to 40 knots and 3m swell according to race web page. Sounds nasty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest on their facebook page:

 

10.00pm Monday

All well on board, very bumpy with 30+kts of wind from 050.

Nobody is hanging about in the downstairs lounge of the freight train! There are a few green faces.

The boys feel gutted for Beau Geste and hope they make Norfolk safely.

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/sailnoumea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the looks of the tracker, Beau Geste looks to be in a different weather system than Vodafone with even stronger breeze.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 June 2012 - 10.30pm

 

The Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ) is currently coordinating the rescue of 18 people on board a yacht around 100 nautical miles east of Norfolk Island.

 

The 24 metre yacht, Beau Geste, is participating in the Auckland to Noumea yacht race.

 

The skipper of the yacht contacted RCCNZ at 7pm and advised the yacht had suffered damage to its decking and hull and was continuing to deteriorate.

 

RCCNZ issued a request for assistance from nearby vessels and the cargo ship Winchester Strait has responded and is making its way to the stricken yacht – the captain of the ship estimates they are approximately six hours away.

 

RCCNZ search and rescue mission coordinator John Dickson said Beau Geste had an experienced crew of racers and that remaining on board the damaged yacht while help arrived was the best course of action at this point.

 

Mr Dickson said RCCNZ had good communications with the yacht, through its satellite phone.

The yacht is equipped with two ten-man life rafts, in the event the crew needs to abandon ship.

A Royal New Zealand Air Force P3 Orion is also on standby to assist if needed.

 

No other details are currently available – an update will be provided at 6am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It will not be the first time beau geste has suffered structural damage recently, apparently in the fastnet they retired due to a crack in the deck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a good week for hong kong boats, one of their boats had to abandoned in the hk to Taiwan race over the weekend as it was taking on water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Links in this story include a link to some early structural issues...

 

breaking bad

 

 

The old ORMA 60 Vodafone slipped through a small window in a developing low as she opened a huge lead on the Auckland-Noumea Yacht Race fleet yesterday, but the second-place boat, Karl Kwok’s sexy mini-maxi Farr 82 Beau Geste got caught behind that same system. And last night, New Zealands Rescue Coordination Center got a phone call from the big Beau, reporting that the yacht had suffered damage to its decking and hull and was continuing to deteriorate, and asking for rescue. The boat has been fast since her 2009 launch, but this isn’t the first time there’s been crunching aboard...

 

 

A cargo ship has been diverted to rescue the crew, and the RCC has good comms with the yacht via satphone, and a look at the tracker shows that much of the fleet has diverted to Beau Geste – just in case. Race staff are doing a nice job updating the many fans and family via Facebook. And amidst the general worry for the crew, here’s a great story about historic Whitbread maxi Steinlager II and the race. Check the thread for the news as it happens, and join us in sending our thoughts out to our friends on the water. Pic from a couple years back from Sander Van Der Borch.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beau Geste and crew have safely made it through the night and are now close to Norfolk Is and accompanied by a boat from the island.

 

 

Stricken yacht approaches Norfolk Island

MICHAEL DALY AND MICHAEL FIELD

Last updated 07:45 05/06/2012

 

 

LATEST: A 24 metre maxi yacht with 18 crew racing the annual Auckland to Noumea race is nearing safety at Australia's Norfolk Island but authorities there are yet to work out how to make it safe.

 

Hong Kong flagged Beau Geste issued a distress call last night after its hull and decking began deteriorating quickly.

A relatively new yacht, launched in 2009, Beau Geste is a purpose built racer.

 

A member of the Australian Federal Police on Norfolk told Stuff early this morning the yacht was near Phillip Island, just to the south of Norfolk.

 

"It is not too far away, and a local boat is with it," she said.

 

Norfolk has no safe harbour but she said locals were planning to get the yacht into a reasonably safe anchorage soon.

 

"The people here are used to this sort of thing."

 

She said the wind had been strong earlier this morning but it is currently sitting around 19 kilometres per hour, gusting to 33kmh.

 

The Rescue Co-ordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ) said Beau Geste sought help around 7pm yesterday, reporting its hull and decking were damaged and it was in difficulty around 185 kilometres east of Norfolk Island.

 

Around 3.30am today (NZ time) Beau Geste was joined by a fishing boat which was accompanying the yacht towards shore, RCCNZ said.

 

Cargo ship Winchester Strait, which had responded to RCCNZ's call for help, was released overnight.

 

"The Beau Geste is working to get as close to Norfolk Island as possible and they are making good progress," RCCNZ search and mission coordinator Tracy Brickles said.

 

"The crew will wait for daybreak (around 7am NZ time) to properly assess the damage on board and ideally look to anchor the yacht as close to shore as they can."

 

A nearby bulk carrier was available to provide shelter to Beau Geste if needed.

 

Wind and sea conditions were easing, Brickles said.

 

The crew of New Zealanders, Australians, Chinese, and one American were all safe and well.

 

Beau Geste is owned by Hong Kong business man Karl Kwok and skippered by former America's Cup helmsman Gavin Brady.

 

Brady has four America's Cups to his credit along with two Round the World Races.

 

Beau Geste was designed by Farr Yacht Design and built by Cookson boats in 2009.

 

It has campaigned in over 92,600 kilometres of yacht racing and is China's most successful sailing team. It took line honours in the Los Angeles to Tahiti yacht race earlier this year.

 

Its current crew under owner skipper Karl Kwok is listed as Margaret Chan, Bill Low, Gavin Brady, Cameron Ward, David Blanchfield, David Wood, Morgan White, Rodney Daniel, Rodney Keenan, Jim Delegat, Matt Randall, Aaron Reynolds-Lovegrove, Carla Holgate, Keven Batten, Nikolas White, Richard Bearda and Kayne Mulcahy.

 

Fairfax NZ News

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

crikey....not a lot of safe anchorage at Norfolk. pretty much any change in wind direction and what was safe becomes dangerous very quickly. Big old ocean out there right now. Good luck fellas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the front didn't fall off?

 

New meaning to "Chinese Junk?"

 

So what is it with all "standards" for construction? Are they just general guidelines? Clipping a corner here or there isn't important? Are boats like this built on the bloody side of the bleeding edge of the knife minimizing construction weight, and once they buckle, it's time to throw the boat in the dump? Do designers take it to the bare minimum and not add a safety factor to the tolerances? Why do these boats keep falling apart?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the front didn't fall off?

 

New meaning to "Chinese Junk?"

 

So what is it with all "standards" for construction? Are they just general guidelines? Clipping a corner here or there isn't important? Are boats like this built on the bloody side of the bleeding edge of the knife minimizing construction weight, and once they buckle, it's time to throw the boat in the dump? Do designers take it to the bare minimum and not add a safety factor to the tolerances? Why do these boats keep falling apart?

 

Where have you been? It's been going on for years. As Ben Lexen said in 1983 "If it don't break, it's too heavy. If it does break, it's not strong enough."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This looks like the designing of ships.. Before the computer it was ok this will work but we'll add in a little for error.. Now the computer says that this will work..and 99% of the time it will work just fine. I remember going on the sides of ships and they have areas marked push here, and if you didn't push right there, the hull would oilcan. So now we have all of these boats being designed the same way.. And are having some problems with them being built to light..Is it the naval designer? They're just following the computer,and what it recommends..So you can go to the owner and tell them that their boat will be lighter..and still be safe...but it looks more and more like there needs to have a little added for any error... So who's fault is it?the computer program that tells everyone that it will work? The designer, the builder? Or just mother nature?Designers builders and mother nature has been around vessels for years..so it kind of points to one thing..Just my thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is some serious weather on the NSW coast that may give them some problems when it gets to Norfolk Is in a day or two.

 

 

post-1322-066407600 1338852398_thumb.png

post-1322-012105100 1338853022_thumb.png

 

Gabo Is is at the SE corner of the mainland. Right under the 993 on the weather map.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is Ball Bay the only place with some protection? That island seems to have no ship landing docks? Is that right ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

entry details of Beau Geste

 

 

Beau Geste

Submitted by Suellen Hurling on Mon, 19/03/2012 - 08:07 Beau Geste, China's most successful sailing team, returns to New Zealand for the 2012 Auckland to Noumea race.

 

Launch in New Zealand 2009, Karl Kwok's 80 foot maxi has been campaigned in the Northern Hemisphere sailing over 50,000 miles. In April Beau Geste won line honours in the LA to Tahiti race and will continue down to Auckland to compete in the Auckland to Noumea Race.

 

Boat Name: Beau Geste

 

Sail #: HKG 1997

 

Design: Farr

 

LOA: 78'

 

IRC: 1.629

 

PHRF: 1.350

 

Owner / Skipper: Karl Kwok

 

Crew: Margaret Chan, Bill Low, Gavin Brady, Cameron Ward, David Blanchfield, David Wood, Morgan White, Rodney Daniel, Rodney Keenan, Jim Delegat, Matt Randall, Aaron Reynolds-Lovegrove, Carla Holgate, Keven Batten, Nikolas White, Richard Bearda and Kayne Mulcahy

 

 

 

more here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

has rig tension or hydraulics been misapplied ?

 

 

 

nobody questions cookson's build quality

 

 

 

at least they are safe

 

 

 

with johnny's weather coming, does not look good for the boat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off I'm very glad to hear the crew is safe.

 

Cookson's build quality is first class - but anybody can make mistakes. Damage to deck sounds really odd. I'm really curious to know what sort of damage turns up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off I'm very glad to hear the crew is safe.

 

Cookson's build quality is first class - but anybody can make mistakes. Damage to deck sounds really odd. I'm really curious to know what sort of damage turns up.

Remember One Australia? It broke because they supposedly put a headsail sheet on a secondary winch instead of a primary (so the story went). Then there was Windward Passage II (or III) - someone cut holes in the deck for a couple of compass's - started to break off at the holes (tear along dotted line stuff) racing to Hobart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The story (rumour, dock talk, BS call it what you want) I heard was when they were building Mick Cookson told the Farr office it was way too light for serious offshore work. Farr office said it's fine. Mick Cookson said ok fine with me too, sign this disclaimer and I'll build it. Same source told me Speedboat by comparison was built like a brick shit house. Except maybe for the dangly bit hanging off the bottom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off I'm very glad to hear the crew is safe.

 

Cookson's build quality is first class - but anybody can make mistakes. Damage to deck sounds really odd. I'm really curious to know what sort of damage turns up.

Remember One Australia? It broke because they supposedly put a headsail sheet on a secondary winch instead of a primary (so the story went). Then there was Windward Passage II (or III) - someone cut holes in the deck for a couple of compass's - started to break off at the holes (tear along dotted line stuff) racing to Hobart.

 

A couple of the VO70's in the previous editions had instances of cracking across the deck and down the hulls as well. Even some of the 60's if I recall correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is Ball Bay the only place with some protection? That island seems to have no ship landing docks? Is that right ?

 

Norfolk does not have any berthing facilities only "open roadsteads." The ships lay off either Kingston or Cascade depending on weather and the cargo is offloaded into 30+feet whaler type open boats.

 

These are then towed alongside the jetty and cargo craned ashore. When finished the whalers and workboats are then craned ashore.

 

A great example of seamanship to watch the discharge of cargo, including cars and trucks.

 

No cranage as such available to aid repairs, will be interesting to see how it goes. That's how it was when my late Mum lived there.

 

Main thing, all safe.

 

Cheers,

 

Jim B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just heard from one of the crew.

 

All safe and sound. Arrived into Norfolk island this morning. Around 10am.

 

It sounds like the boat is not too good but he said: And all ready to get off. Was safer still to stay onboard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just heard from one of the crew.

 

All safe and sound. Arrived into Norfolk island this morning. Around 10am.

 

It sounds like the boat is not too good but he said: And all ready to get off. Was safer still to stay onboard

 

Any details on where she failed ? Good to hear there safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad the boat made it to safety on her own bottom. The uneducated Australian public would have lost their shit if ‘we’ had to go and rescue some rich Hong Kong sailor (even though there were other nationalities onboard).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad the boat made it to safety on her own bottom. The uneducated Australian public would have lost their shit if 'we' had to go and rescue some rich Hong Kong sailor (even though there were other nationalities onboard).

 

 

Isn't it the New Zealand Rescue Authorties dealing with this one? I could be wrong, but i'm pretty sure that AUS rescue had no major input ($$) into this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad the boat made it to safety on her own bottom. The uneducated Australian public would have lost their shit if 'we' had to go and rescue some rich Hong Kong sailor (even though there were other nationalities onboard).

 

with the type of weather on it's way to them today and tomorrow I wonder if this story is over yet. With no place to park in calm conds at a guess she'll be on a chain and cop a pounding

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am glad the boat made it to safety on her own bottom. The uneducated Australian public would have lost their shit if 'we' had to go and rescue some rich Hong Kong sailor (even though there were other nationalities onboard).

 

 

Isn't it the New Zealand Rescue Authorties dealing with this one? I could be wrong, but i'm pretty sure that AUS rescue had no major input ($) into this?

 

NZ ran the SAR 'cos the race originated in Auckland. Now she's safely (dangerous term that) at anchor at Norfolk Island it's our neighbours to the west who have inherited the problem.

 

Perhaps this is where TK's building lumber and plywood come into play!

 

OTOH it might be a nice training exercise for the Royal Australian Navy. Is HMAS Tobruk still in commission? She has a deck strengthened for tanks and a 70-ton derrick. Just the ticket!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The story (rumour, dock talk, BS call it what you want) I heard was when they were building Mick Cookson told the Farr office it was way too light for serious offshore work. Farr office said it's fine. Mick Cookson said ok fine with me too, sign this disclaimer and I'll build it. Same source told me Speedboat by comparison was built like a brick shit house. Except maybe for the dangly bit hanging off the bottom.

 

Hey Abbo , have you seen the lines Mikey has been drawing on the tracker over the past 24 hours? Word is one crew with an injured back and some sail damage. They are hard on the wind on the way home now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the reporting!

Bit different to the race version

 

From the ABC

 

Norfolk Island fishermen make 'miracle' rescue

 

Posted June 05, 2012 11:27:42

 

 

 

Map: Norfolk Island

Two local fishermen saved 18 people on board a yacht caught in rough seas off Norfolk Island last night.

 

The yacht, travelling from Auckland to Noumea, called for help just after 9:00pm (local time) after a crack appeared straight down the length of its hull.

 

Local fishermen Darren Bates and Dean Burrell set out in extreme conditions in a seven-metre fishing boat to rescue the yacht, which was 40 kilometres off the Norfolk Island coastline.

 

Norfolk Island administrator Neil Pope says it was a miracle everyone was rescued safely.

 

"It was absolutely horrific conditions," he said.

 

"It was blowing a gale here last night and the fact that they even went out, let alone found them, found the yacht, 40 kilometres out, was a miracle."

 

Topics:maritime, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, norfolk-island

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that everyone is safe, Imagine the phone call:

 

Owner: Hi XXXX Insurance. We had a whoopsie onboard and broke the boat. It's at Norfolk Island and we cant sail it back to the mainland

Insurance Company: Where the hell is Norfolk Island?

Owner: 2000 km east of Australia, nearly 1000km north of New Zealand

Insurance company: %^$@#

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the reporting!

Bit different to the race version

 

From the ABC

 

Norfolk Island fishermen make 'miracle' rescue

 

Posted June 05, 2012 11:27:42

 

 

 

Map: Norfolk Island

Two local fishermen saved 18 people on board a yacht caught in rough seas off Norfolk Island last night.

 

The yacht, travelling from Auckland to Noumea, called for help just after 9:00pm (local time) after a crack appeared straight down the length of its hull.

 

Local fishermen Darren Bates and Dean Burrell set out in extreme conditions in a seven-metre fishing boat to rescue the yacht, which was 40 kilometres off the Norfolk Island coastline.

 

Norfolk Island administrator Neil Pope says it was a miracle everyone was rescued safely.

 

"It was absolutely horrific conditions," he said.

 

"It was blowing a gale here last night and the fact that they even went out, let alone found them, found the yacht, 40 kilometres out, was a miracle."

 

Topics:maritime, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, norfolk-island

 

Wow, a 24m long crack would be somthing to see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's Hilarious!

 

Love the reporting!

Bit different to the race version

 

From the ABC

 

Norfolk Island fishermen make 'miracle' rescue

 

Posted June 05, 2012 11:27:42

 

 

 

Map: Norfolk Island

Two local fishermen saved 18 people on board a yacht caught in rough seas off Norfolk Island last night.

 

The yacht, travelling from Auckland to Noumea, called for help just after 9:00pm (local time) after a crack appeared straight down the length of its hull.

 

Local fishermen Darren Bates and Dean Burrell set out in extreme conditions in a seven-metre fishing boat to rescue the yacht, which was 40 kilometres off the Norfolk Island coastline.

 

Norfolk Island administrator Neil Pope says it was a miracle everyone was rescued safely.

 

"It was absolutely horrific conditions," he said.

 

"It was blowing a gale here last night and the fact that they even went out, let alone found them, found the yacht, 40 kilometres out, was a miracle."

 

Topics:maritime, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, norfolk-island

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the reporting!

Bit different to the race version

 

From the ABC

 

Norfolk Island fishermen make 'miracle' rescue

 

Posted June 05, 2012 11:27:42

 

 

 

Map: Norfolk Island

Two local fishermen saved 18 people on board a yacht caught in rough seas off Norfolk Island last night.

 

The yacht, travelling from Auckland to Noumea, called for help just after 9:00pm (local time) after a crack appeared straight down the length of its hull.

 

Local fishermen Darren Bates and Dean Burrell set out in extreme conditions in a seven-metre fishing boat to rescue the yacht, which was 40 kilometres off the Norfolk Island coastline.

 

Norfolk Island administrator Neil Pope says it was a miracle everyone was rescued safely.

 

"It was absolutely horrific conditions," he said.

 

"It was blowing a gale here last night and the fact that they even went out, let alone found them, found the yacht, 40 kilometres out, was a miracle."

 

Topics:maritime, accidents, disasters-and-accidents, norfolk-island

 

Wow, a 24m long crack would be somthing to see.

 

:lol: another keyboard bites the dust!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah mate, I've had several chats with him on the sat phone. He rang on Monday morning a couple of hours after they had retired and turned back. He wanted to press on but the powers that be wanted to go home. Injury is very minor and the sail repair took about 5 minutes! I advised that if they continued "home" they had at least 2 and a half days of 20-30 westerly to enjoy followed by a 30 plus southerly for the last day. Far better to press on with north-westerlies all the way to Noumea.

 

The powers that be disagreed with myself and Mike and continued west. They were all smiles while running home in the 30 knot NE until the westerly finally arrived at a solid 40! Then they rang again and said what's going on? I said well..... nothings really changed since you rang three hours ago! It took a forecast from Clouds to convince the "brains trust" to head north for a while. They are still determined to make landfall in OZ, I hear Bundaberg is the goal. Ridiculous decision, they had done all the hard yards then decided to beat back into a beautiful tailwind just because it was "home".

 

I don't know what his daily rate is but it sure as hell isn't enough!

 

The story (rumour, dock talk, BS call it what you want) I heard was when they were building Mick Cookson told the Farr office it was way too light for serious offshore work. Farr office said it's fine. Mick Cookson said ok fine with me too, sign this disclaimer and I'll build it. Same source told me Speedboat by comparison was built like a brick shit house. Except maybe for the dangly bit hanging off the bottom.

 

Hey Abbo , have you seen the lines Mikey has been drawing on the tracker over the past 24 hours? Word is one crew with an injured back and some sail damage. They are hard on the wind on the way home now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[ QUOTE ]

 

Anyone know a good yacht transport company?

 

[ UNQUOTE ]

 

 

 

anyone know a QUICK transport company ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[ QUOTE ]

 

Anyone know a good yacht transport company?

 

[ UNQUOTE ]

 

 

 

anyone know a QUICK transport company ?

Huey? rough, but effective.

 

I do hope the boat is safe, but that kind of boat is never built to be on a mooring or anchor in severe weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brave but correct call to stay with the boat. Well done to all involved.

 

yep. only call. wow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That recording is scary! - brave guys for sticking it out. Glad they made it to Norfolk Island, but hopefully they are ok there if the weather turns in the next few days!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bruce Farr's comment.. "Get off"... mixed with Brady's answer of "Yes!!!!" when asked if there is something wrong with the design.. and the comment about 3 major structural issues, makes me think Bruce wanted it to go down.. No evidence then..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely bone chilling and surprisingly matter of fact recounting from Gavin. To think had the boat broken, they may have had 30 seconds to get to life rafts, or thinking every moment of their journey to Norfolk that the the boat could break in half and sink almost immediately - that must have been one of the longest motor sails of their lives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

guess they are happy enough with how she's held together to think she's ok on a pick there till rescue. interesting. pristine waters

 

edit: that or there's going to be one heck of a salvage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"......could take up to a month to get the boat back to NZ"

 

With the weather that's coming I'm not sure they'll have to worry about that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

entry details of Beau Geste

 

 

Beau Geste

Submitted by Suellen Hurling on Mon, 19/03/2012 - 08:07 Beau Geste, China's most successful sailing team, returns to New Zealand for the 2012 Auckland to Noumea race.

 

Launch in New Zealand 2009, Karl Kwok's 80 foot maxi has been campaigned in the Northern Hemisphere sailing over 50,000 miles. In April Beau Geste won line honours in the LA to Tahiti race and will continue down to Auckland to compete in the Auckland to Noumea Race.

 

Boat Name: Beau Geste

 

Sail #: HKG 1997

 

Design: Farr

 

LOA: 78'

 

IRC: 1.629

 

PHRF: 1.350

 

Owner / Skipper: Karl Kwok

 

Crew: Margaret Chan, Bill Low, Gavin Brady, Cameron Ward, David Blanchfield, David Wood, Morgan White, Rodney Daniel, Rodney Keenan, Jim Delegat, Matt Randall, Aaron Reynolds-Lovegrove, Carla Holgate, Keven Batten, Nikolas White, Richard Bearda and Kayne Mulcahy

 

 

 

more here

 

OK, whilst Carl is a good bloke (Yes, I have met him) and he runs a great programme, let's not go anywhere near the Beau Geste campaign being a 'Chinese Team'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Abbo, not good , seem this

North Eastern Area High Seas Forecast

 

IDQ10007

SECURITE

 

HIGH SEAS FORECAST FOR METAREA 10

NORTH EASTERN AREA EQUATOR TO 28S, 142E TO 170E

ISSUED BY THE AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY, BRISBANE

FOR 24 HOURS FROM 1100UTC 05 June 2012

 

PART 1 WARNINGS

Gale Warning issued by Brisbane at 050717UTC.

Within 26S153.5E to 27S160E to 28S160E to 28S153.5E to 26S153.5E.

 

PART 2 SITUATION

At 050600UTC.

A trough near 10S150E to 20S164E to 28S169E, moving very slowly eastwards to

10S150E to 19S165E to 26S170E by 052300UTC and 10S150E to 21S170E by 061100UTC.

A deep low is developing over the western Tasman Sea and is forecast to be near

30S158E at 052300UTC and 27S162E at 061100UTC.

 

PART 3 FORECAST

Within warning area.

S to SW winds 34 to 40 knots to develop from the south after 052100UTC with

rough to very rough seas. Heavy S'ly swell developing. Scattered showers and

isolated thunderstorms.

 

North of 18S, east of trough.

SE to NE winds 10 to 20 knots. Slight to moderate seas and low easterly swells.

Scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms.

 

North of 18S, west of trough.

SW to SE winds 15 to 20 knots with moderate seas. Winds reaching 20 to 25 knots

within 120NM of the coast with moderate to rough seas. Showers and isolated

thunderstorms north of 12S.

 

South of 18S, east of trough.

NE to NW winds 15 to 25 knots. Moderate to rough seas. Moderate E to NE swell.

Scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms.

 

Remainder south of 18S, west of trough.

SW to NW winds 20 to 25 knots with moderate to rough seas. Winds 25 to 33 knots

south of 23S with rough seas. Isolated showers. Showers tending scattered with

isolated thunderstorms south of 25S. Moderate S to SE swell developing.

 

WEATHER BRISBANE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like Norfolk is going to get busy.

 

NZ Update: Information from Icebreaker

 

 

 

Submitted by Suellen Hurling on Tue, 05/06/2012 - 20:35

 

 

Icebreaker have advised RAYC Race Management that they have suspended racing and are heading to Norfolk Island to undertake a keel bolt inspection.

 

At the time of the report being 21:45 hours their position was 31.07S 170.01E. ETA to Norfolk Island is approximately 48 hours.

 

All crew are well on board and no further assistance has been requested.

 

Current weather conditions are 16 knot northerlys.

 

Icebreaker will maintain the regular skeds.

 

New Zealand Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre has been advised and is keeping a watching brief.

 

http://www.sailnoumea.com/news/nz-update-information-icebreaker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good that they are safe. Hats off to the smart / brave decision to stay on the boat and to every one who was standing by.

 

I will say, Kwok runs one hell of a campaign. I can not think of another program that has participated in more of the headline races than Beau Geste has. Some news report said something about 50,000 miles but I am guessing that has to be wrong. That boat has done virtually every single significant race around the globe in the past 2 or 3 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gavin Brady said 50,000 miles, but with two-three previous serious structural failures, in the interview posted which is a must hear. He is definitely not pleased with the Farr office. Why would he be? By his description the boat suddenly just broke in half with over half the crew down below. The boat could easily have gone down in seconds and many (all?) could have died. They were damn lucky. He says the conditions were harsh, but not extreme or out of the ordinary. The wave they went off was "big" but not a monster.

 

Not good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carbon is brittle. Very strong but it breaks with no warning. Fiberglass is more flexible and forgiving.

 

Pound the carbon structure hard enough or for too long and BANG. See Rosebud for a similar situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's only one way to get into a liferaft son, and that is to climb UP into it.

 

1979 Fastnet proved that as long as the sailboat is still floating, it is a much safer place to be than a liferaft. Wait until the boat sinks out from underneath you and then get into a liferaft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1338879104[/url]' post='3738819']

sounds like the front is about to fall off

 

 

around the middle

 

Proof that they entered the Fourth Mode and made it back alive

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gavin Brady said 50,000 miles, but with two-three previous serious structural failures, in the interview posted which is a must hear. He is definitely not pleased with the Farr office. Why would he be? By his description the boat suddenly just broke in half with over half the crew down below. The boat could easily have gone down in seconds and many (all?) could have died. They were damn lucky. He says the conditions were harsh, but not extreme or out of the ordinary. The wave they went off was "big" but not a monster.

 

Not good.

 

Sailing at 70%. They knew they were on a "lemon". Sounds like the outer skin failed through to the inner Water in. But not enough to get ahead of the BAILING. So the design did let them sail 100 NM to "safety" about the only good thing that can be said. That crew saved the boat and their own lives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's only one way to get into a liferaft son, and that is to climb UP into it.

 

1979 Fastnet proved that as long as the sailboat is still floating, it is a much safer place to be than a liferaft. Wait until the boat sinks out from underneath you and then get into a liferaft.

 

Well, yes, but if the boat is about to break in half and sink, you don't really want to be standing on top while this happens. Lots of stuff about the place to get caught up in. Better an orderly exit just before she sinks to people in the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's only one way to get into a liferaft son, and that is to climb UP into it.

 

1979 Fastnet proved that as long as the sailboat is still floating, it is a much safer place to be than a liferaft. Wait until the boat sinks out from underneath you and then get into a liferaft.

 

Well, yes, but if the boat is about to break in half and sink, you don't really want to be standing on top while this happens. Lots of stuff about the place to get caught up in. Better an orderly exit just before she sinks to people in the water.

 

I agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sailed against him a few times. He had an ambitious schedule last year. Took the boat up to the Great Lakes and did a Mac I think...Ballsy.

The boat has some miles on it no question. Question is, how many cycles does it take to break Marginal...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this image from a boat builder in Auckland Leading Edge

 

more here

 

That's some fucked up shit. Those guys are bloody lucky that she stayed afloat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep photos are on facebook! They did an awesome job to hold the boat together to get to a safer place to get off onto either another boat or dry land!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What on earth stopped it doing a ONE Australia... Extraordinary it stayed together.

 

Incredible they nursed it 100 miles to Norfolk. Surely it is totalled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites