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Presuming Ed

A flock of Pen Duicks

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Question - was V, built for the 69 San Francisco to Tokyo singlehanded race (which she won, by 11 days in 39 days 16 hours), the first boat built with water ballast tanks? I would think that the first boats to use movable ballast were sandbaggers, but did anybody use water - in tanks or otherwise - before Tabarly?

 

Pen_Duick_V_%283%29.jpg

 

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I've got tabarleys book somewhere about his various designs my favorite was his story of the 35' water ballasted mono. Forget the specs but they were pretty crazy for the time something like 7k dspl with 7.5 meter draft?

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I remember Pen Duik VI coming into Cape Town on one of the Round the World Races. I was working my summer holiday for a chandeler and one of the crew asked us to take a look at some instruments on board that needed to be replaced. Got a quick tour of the boat and got a grunt from a taciturn Tabarly who was, and is a big hero to me.

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When was the forward mast in PD III converted to a mainmast? It was originally 2" shorter than the aft mast so she technically measured as a schooner. That meant the sail attached to the aft side of the forward mast was a "foresail" not a mainsail, and could be fully battened without rating penalty. Not to mention the enormous "Golliwobbler" she carried between the masts.

 

Only days ago I was recounting to my son how Tabarly used to sail PD III in and out of the pen at CYCA because the "motor" was a Ford 10 upside down in the bilge with holes drilled in it, and the "prop" was a fibreglass fairing. It was f*cking funny watching the likes of Sir Robert Chrichton-Brown trying to emulate Tabarly's incredible seamanship.

 

Thanks PE for the photo - that's a keeper.

 

Edit: AFAIK, PD V was the first boat to race with water ballast tanks. Maybe someone tried the principle beforehand, but Tabarly was the first to prove it as a succesful racing method.

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What about PD VI and the depleted uranium keel? I read they wound up replacing it with lead. What an audacious and outrageous thing to stick on a boat though!

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When was the forward mast in PD III converted to a mainmast? It was originally 2" shorter than the aft mast so she technically measured as a schooner. That meant the sail attached to the aft side of the forward mast was a "foresail" not a mainsail, and could be fully battened without rating penalty. Not to mention the enormous "Golliwobbler" she carried between the masts.

 

Only days ago I was recounting to my son how Tabarly used to sail PD III in and out of the pen at CYCA because the "motor" was a Ford 10 upside down in the bilge with holes drilled in it, and the "prop" was a fibreglass fairing. It was f*cking funny watching the likes of Sir Robert Chrichton-Brown trying to emulate Tabarly's incredible seamanship.

 

Thanks PE for the photo - that's a keeper.

 

Edit: AFAIK, PD V was the first boat to race with water ballast tanks. Maybe someone tried the principle beforehand, but Tabarly was the first to prove it as a succesful racing method.

I agree with R. When was PD111 converted, it was a schooner in the Admirals Cup and set a huge 'Gollywabbler' set on the foremast that over lapped the main like a headsail.

 

I remember looking at the Whitbread boats when they came to Sydney, I was amazed at how he could do a single handed race in a Maxi built for 20 odd crew.

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are the boats privately owned ?

 

He was a naval officer, I think most of the boats were built with Government money ...

 

Saw the tri in St Malo in 1975 after Colas did his solo rtw

 

I don't know how high above the water the self steering vane was, but it had been almost cut in half by the backstay ....

 

I have read Tabarly's book. ( too many years ago )

 

he said the motor they put in for the hobart was a renault diesel , IIRC.

 

 

Then they did a summer cruising trip ( show the flag ? ) to New Caledonia from the finish. maybe they had arrangements for shipping back to france from there ?

 

Was Colas ' first introduction to sailing. He was an academic at Sydney Uni

 

they got clobbered by a cyclone

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are the boats privately owned ?

 

He was a naval officer, I think most of the boats were built with Government money ...

Saw the tri in St Malo in 1975 after Colas did his solo rtw

 

I don't know how high above the water the self steering vane was, but it had been almost cut in half by the backstay ....

 

I have read Tabarly's book. ( too many years ago )

 

he said the motor they put in for the hobart was a renault diesel , IIRC.

 

 

Then they did a summer cruising trip ( show the flag ? ) to New Caledonia from the finish. maybe they had arrangements for shipping back to france from there ?

 

Was Colas ' first introduction to sailing. He was an academic at Sydney Uni

 

they got clobbered by a cyclone

 

The boats were mostly privately owned.

PD 1 of course was given to him by his father and restored out of his war-missions bonuses as a Navy air pilot.

PD II he got help (free supplies) from suppliers, such as plywood manufacturers, fittings, sailcloth etc.., later sold to french national sailing school.

PD III: he started cooperating with aluminum suppliers so again made big savings on the build, naval help started with only free-time for him and the opportunity for good young crews to be drafted (then compulsory) onto PD.

Started making money from books in a good way.

PD IV: on top of the aluminum and supplies he had money coming from medias, but IRS ruled that this was income and he was forced to sell to Colas.

PD V: usual help + quick resale

PD VI: usual help + cheap build price from the navy shipyards.

 

When he died,he privately owned PDI, PDIII, PDVI

The association sponsored by Bank Pop took over the upkeep of those, bought back and restored PD V, paid for PD II restoration.

This is helped by the fact that in France a number of "heritage yachts" may be "government classified" allowing owners to qualify for tax deductions, same as buildings or ships.

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I once sailed for a day with Eric. He was entered (with a full crew) in the first Capetown to Rio race in 1971. He had a very cool boat with a wishbone gaff. It's not pictured with the others. He was just ready to go out for a day sail before the race, and I asked if I could come along. I was crew on an American boat named Molly Brown. I asked him if he likde to sail alone (he had done may solo races). He told me "no, but that is part of my job". I remember him as a very friendly guy.

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Thank you for the clarification, Moody Frog .

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Doing a tour of the Med.

 

 

(Top to bottom - V, II, I, III, VI, VI? IV- the alu tri - not there, unsurprisingly as she was lost at sea along with Alain Colas in 78 on the first Route du Rhum.)

 

Actually Tabarly built two aluminum tri's, the second being the foiler Paul Ricard.......

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Doing a tour of the Med.

 

 

(Top to bottom - V, II, I, III, VI, VI? IV- the alu tri - not there, unsurprisingly as she was lost at sea along with Alain Colas in 78 on the first Route du Rhum.)

 

Actually Tabarly built two aluminum tri's, the second being the foiler Paul Ricard.......

 

Correct, but this one was the start of an other story: Tabarly giving-up owning his racing yachts to jump on the sponsoring band-wagon.

The foiler was built and sponsored by the alcohol-giant "Paul Ricard" (before french law outed alcohol and tobacco sponsoring)

 

The next one was a Joubert-Nivelt Whitbread maxi, "Côte d'Or" belonging to a Belgian chocolate firm.

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1970 in Corsica. Small harbor, boats at stern tie to the dock, wind about 5 kts paralell to the dock. In sails III with engine off. Lots of shouting from the shore. As they pass an open slip they luff and drop an anchor. Let the rode run as the boat looses way, drop sails and begin to back down. Helm over to swing the stern into the slip. Almost the best docking I ever saw. More shouting and line tossing. 5 minutes later they are starting up the engine, swinging from the hook.

 

No glory without guts.

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Oops.

 

1973.

 

No slips, just a space between boats.

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