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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

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Enzedel92

San Francisco August 2012

1,034 posts in this topic

^ Thanks

--

 

This by DC, besides it being fairly rare to see him on video these days, is a fun listen. (here's as good as anywhere, he does talk about SF briefly)

 

Notable: Were it his choice he would probably run the next AC in 90' mono's, 20 crew, lower tech in wind prediction etc, and with strong nationality rules.

 

 

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My guess is that this is a local railroad operating in just the Quonset area and Locomotive 1855 will take the train to a hub where a big company like CSX or Burlington will take over.

 

Exactly. CP and UP. The Seaview locomotive won't be leaving the local area. Both CP and UP require an account to track containers. Probably have to rely on bloggers to follow the cars. On the plus side, the article seems to indicate that they will be going direct to Pier 80 and the photos don't show anything double-stacked so the Caltrain tunnel clearances won't be an issue.

 

"The special unit train will depart Davisville no later than this weekend and travel over the Providence, Worcester Railroad, New England Central Railroad, Canadian National Railway, and Union Pacific Railroad to its final destination at San Francisco's Pier 80"

 

Will the journey be north to Canada, across to the Pacific, then south along the coast to San Francisco? If so then the train could pass very close by my place.

 

Interesting too above, "ICG Logistics and the Seaview Railroad proposed to put together an all-rail alternative to cross-country trucking" That would have been a lot of trucks!

 

And on "almost 8,000ft container train" - would that end up as part of an even longer train?

 

Thanks for the article above - very informative - and good to see a bit of innovation going on (although the use of the whole continental rail system sounds like a bit of a nightmare).

 

Still not sure about the boats. Could they go on trucks as oversize loads? The reason I ask is that the article makes it sound like the original intention was tucks only (although admittedly it is mainly concerned with containers).

 

You are quite right when you say the boats are one of the last things needed - but at the same time there are still 40 odd days available, more than enough time for a sea voyage - just as in the past. It seems to me that if the boats go by ship after all, the containers could have gone as well for practically nothing extra and still have arrived in good time.

 

Maybe they were trying to do the right thing by their local partners. Maybe it's 'Greener'. Maybe they wanted to be flexible and innovative. Maybe it really is cheaper and /or less hassle.

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The boats should have no problem fitting inside a 40ft container when the sterns are removed.

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The boats should have no problem fitting inside a 40ft container when the sterns are removed.

 

Tony Tony! Not those boats*, these ones...

 

061112PWAC-0212.jpg

 

061112PWAC-0263.jpg

 

and this..

 

CASC1D21_0401.jpg

 

this too - probably fit on the train though...

 

061212PWAC-5089.jpg

 

Maybe they'll travel first class?

 

V14_8479.jpg

 

* The design brief for the AC45s included being transportable in standard containers - the 72s are theoretically boxable as well, but in BIGger boxes!

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I doubt they can wide-load those by truck or train cross-country, even if most of it were done across I80 or I90; the 'side streets' would still be major problems.

 

I bet they send those by ship, maybe out of Boston.

 

Good pic selections.

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Wanna get your rocks off?

--

An island offering a secluded beach, promises of great fishing and stunning views of the San Francisco skyline is up for sale - and at a discounted price.

Red Rock Island, a 6-acre mass of rock tucked away in a northern part of San Francisco Bay, is now being offered for just under $5 million, Realtor Steven Higbee said. The property was on the market earlier this year for $22 million.

http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2012/07/08/2135925/island-with-great-views-of-san.html

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from a recent tweet by a SF reporter

--

Eric Young@Eyoung03 America's Cup might add a World Series stop in Haikou, China. Late November racing. Not finalized. Details still be worked out.

--

 

edit, something on Haikou from 2010: http://www.whatsonsa...com/ent121.html

 

Interesting - on Hainan - as is Sanya, where the VOR boats stopped. Both ports seem to be claiming to be new or wannabe 'sailing centres'.

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Nice effort by Jack

http://www.cupexperi...at-do-they-mean

 

America's Cup World Series – lights on AC45: what do they mean?

 

Thanks for posting this, SR. I'll mention it in the LiveLine thread, too.

 

I've got another article in the works about the Stowe displays and the "chatter" messages from the RC and umpires.

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Nice effort by Jack

http://www.cupexperi...at-do-they-mean

 

America's Cup World Series – lights on AC45: what do they mean?

 

Thanks for posting this, SR. I'll mention it in the LiveLine thread, too.

 

I've got another article in the works about the Stowe displays and the "chatter" messages from the RC and umpires.

Yes - nice job illustrating the examples. Anyone should be able to follow them.

 

Are the chatter messages available on iPhone ?

 

edit - they are.

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Nice effort by Jack

http://www.cupexperi...at-do-they-mean

 

America's Cup World Series – lights on AC45: what do they mean?

 

Thanks for posting this, SR. I'll mention it in the LiveLine thread, too.

 

I've got another article in the works about the Stowe displays and the "chatter" messages from the RC and umpires.

Ask Jack ... hmmm ... can't help it, but that could make for another hilarious thread ;)

 

in a one on one matchrace the yellow and red are eminently clear, but what in a fleetrace ? suppose there is a bit of a kerfuffle between half of the fleet and half of them start hitting the yellow button, is the "who's claiming against who" then done by radio ?

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Nice effort by Jack

http://www.cupexperi...at-do-they-mean

 

America's Cup World Series – lights on AC45: what do they mean?

 

Thanks for posting this, SR. I'll mention it in the LiveLine thread, too.

 

I've got another article in the works about the Stowe displays and the "chatter" messages from the RC and umpires.

Ask Jack ... hmmm ... can't help it, but that could make for another hilarious thread ;)

 

in a one on one matchrace the yellow and red are eminently clear, but what in a fleetrace ? suppose there is a bit of a kerfuffle between half of the fleet and half of them start hitting the yellow button, is the "who's claiming against who" then done by radio ?

 

Ask Jack Like I say in my video briefings - I don't know all the answers, but I can usually find someone with the answer to most questions...

 

Umpires can only issue penalties for Y-flags. The B-flag means you are going to file a protest ashore. Lots of B-flags have been registered, but no protests have been filed ashore to date. The B-flag button is probably being hit by mistake. In Cascais the helmsmen would either hit the yellow repeatedly or hit both yellow and red. Sort of like yelling "protest" louder and waving the Y-flag more vigorously. The result was lots of windows popping up on the umpire screens and it just took a long time to clear them all. I'm not sure, but I think now if you hit yellow more than once in a 10 sec period, only one event pops up on the umpire screens.

 

The umps in the booth and on the water are trying to anticipate potential protest situations as they develop, and for the most part, they seem able to keep up with the Y-flags. The only radio communication is between the on-the-water umps and the in-the-booth umps, not the umps and the race boats.

The umps communicate to the race boats with the chatter on the Stowe displays.

 

Not many kerfuffles so far, but here's one inspired by the raft up in Venice. In the event, Red did not crash into the wall. Red protested for not being given room at the continuing obstruction, but was penalized for going past the course limit. The RRSAC are currently interpreted such that a boat (Blue, in this case) entitled to room to round a mark (RRSAC 18) (see Blue at position 4) is not obligated to give room to a boat in the course limit zone (RRSAC 20), since Blue is sailing her proper course at the mark. Basically, Rule 18 (mark room) trumps Rule 20 (room to pass continuing obstruction) when both apply. Clear as mud? Some of this stuff makes my head spin.

 

Download the PDF with the umpire call here.

 

Umpire-Call-9.png

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Nice effort by Jack

http://www.cupexperi...at-do-they-mean

 

America's Cup World Series – lights on AC45: what do they mean?

 

Thanks for posting this, SR. I'll mention it in the LiveLine thread, too.

 

I've got another article in the works about the Stowe displays and the "chatter" messages from the RC and umpires.

Yes - nice job illustrating the examples. Anyone should be able to follow them.

 

Are the chatter messages available on iPhone ?

 

edit - they are.

 

Actually, the chatter messages are not in the CupExperience iPhone app (available here) yet... I hope to have them for the SF ACWS in August.

 

They are in the Android app (available here)

 

I'm also hoping to have replays and umpire calls available for the August release of both Apps. Other feature requests welcome - send them to me here.

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Hi Jack, will the chatter be available also for the users of app-less phones that rely on the "desktop" version of your app? Or is it already and it's just me who cannot find it?

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I know this is already posted elsewhere, but for consistency it belongs here.

Although it is now clear that the bigger items will not be being travelling by ship, it's still a mystery why they didn't go on this train - if , as they state, there's the possibility they'll go on a later one.

I can only guess that the planning for getting these boats on a train, if that's even possible, or a truck if not, would have delayed the bases and AC45s in their containers beyond what was acceptable.

This lot is due at Pier 80 then - on or before Thursday 18th.

Carbon C.- will you be keeping an eye out for it?

AC%20%20Express.jpg.jpg

© ACEA

Glad they remembered the crane

smile.gif

AC%20Express%203.jpg.jpg547447_493664207326684_450020481_n.jpgAC%20Express%202.jpg.jpg

THE AMERICA'S CUP EXPRESS

POSTED ON 09 JULY 2012

 

The America's Cup Express train is bound for San Francisco.

 

The America's Cup World Series is coming home, with all the cargo departing Newport, Rhode Island, the last stop on the 2011-12 tour for San Francisco, the host city of the 34th America's Cup.

 

The first event of the 2012-13 AC World Series brings the teams to San Francisco Bay from August 21-26. The next event is during Fleet Week in San Francisco, from October 2-7.

 

On Monday morning the America's Cup World Series cargo left Newport, bound for San Francisco by train - all 121 cars of it, incredibly making the train 1.49 miles long. This does not include some of the Race Committee boats and team RIBs, which will travel on another train, or by road transport.

The "America's Cup Express' train is routed via Vermont and Chicago en route to San Francisco and is scheduled to arrive within 10 days.

 

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" it's still a mystery why they didn't go on this train - if , as they state, there's the possibility they'll go on a later one."

 

Clearance issues. I'm guessing the big stuff will take a different less direct route..

 

edit: answere to below

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Oops, I did post it in the wrong context earlier.

Maybe the taller items would have to go on a different train route, for height restriction reasons? edit, this edit beaten by MM below :)

 

Anyway, new too, this by John Upton

 

 

What's the Big Deal About America's Cup?

http://m.7x7.com/fit...ut-americas-cup

 

I'm guessing its wider as much as taller. Trains don't tolerate sticky-out bits very well.

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I can keep an eye on one possible track right outside of office window, but it is not the only, or even possibly best way, between Chicago and SF.

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^

Providence & Worcester Train MFS9, from Davisville, RI to San Francisco, 47 cars, carrying 112 wells of boats and other material to the America's Cup Races works through Baltic, Connecticut enroute to a connection to New England Central. NECR will turn the train over to CN, then to Chicago and UP to Pier 80 in San Francisco.

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Have things sunk to this level , really? Who's going to be the first to try and touch a passing train car ? As long as the circus makes it to town isn't that enough ? It's starting to sound like the Harry Potter sailing blog .

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The only thing that keeps sinking is your shitty attitude ;) Enjoy the ride, we are!

 

Looking forward to these boats hitting SF Bay, it's about time things got 'serious' :)

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Have things sunk to this level , really? Who's going to be the first to try and touch a passing train car ? As long as the circus makes it to town isn't that enough ? It's starting to sound like the Harry Potter sailing blog .

 

+1

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I didn't count 400 containers, so TK should personally call Ian to let him know how disappointed he is that his early estimates were incorrect.

 

All we need now is Xlot to confirm SF has enough space for the containers and that the paperwork will be in order such that they can unload them and we should be set for the SF ACWS.

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^112 containers.

 

Have things sunk to this level , really? Who's going to be the first to try and touch a passing train car ? As long as the circus makes it to town isn't that enough ? It's starting to sound like the Harry Potter sailing blog .

 

They are likely to be street-running through Jack London Square in Oakland so touching one, or even hopping aboard for the ride to SF, would not be out of the question. However, I suspect that the intersection of trainos (as my wife calls them), AC enthusiasts, and train hoppers is a value approaching zero.

 

How is following USA-17 from Valencia to SF so different from following "The Circus travels by Train"? What -else- is one to do while waiting for the boats to splash? :D

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Have things sunk to this level , really? Who's going to be the first to try and touch a passing train car ? As long as the circus makes it to town isn't that enough ? It's starting to sound like the Harry Potter sailing blog .

 

Didn't you know that ACA stands for America's Cup Anoraks.

 

anoraks.png

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Just stumbled upon this thread and wonder, is there anything new on this train? I mean, when we were following DZ to VLC, most of us had not yet seen her in action. Even more important: There was always the fear that something could go wrong and AC33 would be handed to SNG without a match at all.

This ACXX train, is it providing anything new, any prototype parts on it we want to throw a glimpse at, anything that could spark interest in someone who has already watched ACWS events? In short, WTF is this thread about?

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^ Not much else going on and so curiosity leads some of us to take an interest in the 'AC Express' train, which is pretty novel. It could be more interesting than the ACWS ship-following in that it goes through visible/identifiable towns across the country instead of being way off shore much of the time.

 

It's a "coming down the tracks to SF" anticipation too, they haven't yet hosted an ACWS but it's finally arriving to the venue of ACSF.

 

Harmless fun, all good.

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Slow enough to be the best looking train in the world right now. Nice watery reflection here

 

 

 

p&w rolls south thru webster ma, with americas cup boats & materials ,enrote necr, then cn,then up all the way san fransisco ca, thanks for watching.

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I'm stunned. Completely speechless, what a train!

 

EDIT: Wait, something as least as important and interesting: Is there a chef on board?

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I'm stunned. Completely speechless, what a train!

 

EDIT: Wait, something as least as important and interesting: Is there a chef on board?

 

Careful there.......

 

 

sarchasm.jpg

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Just referring to the excitement that was evoked by the article about the chef in Cascais. As we say, harmless fun, all good. (Nobody said it's all bad, but anyway...)

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^^^ Apparently you can imagine a train loaded with anything better, and to a better destination, that would be more pertinent? ;)

 

In Europe and on some parts of the East Coast USA trains may be just a ho-dum thing. They aren't big from my perspective, so it's a fun and interesting new AC subject for the next few days. Have learnt a lot already, which is good for if you have any combination of curiosity and enthusiasm.

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I can imagine a train loaded with a lot of better stuff, but the ACWS stuff isn't bad for a start. A chef seems to be missing, tho. As you and I already wrote, all good, harmless fun.

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^ Can't imagine anything better for our subject here, it's a boatload of goodness porn on a train headed down the tracks to by far the best ACWS venue yet..

 

Agreed on the rest.

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Hey, I'm the perfect target group for Train Anarchy, had a model railroad myself when I was a kid. I can't imagine anything better thank talking trains!!! At least they have boat related stuff loaded.

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^^^ Apparently you can imagine a train loaded with anything better, and to a better destination, that would be more pertinent? ;)

 

In Europe and on some parts of the East Coast USA trains may be just a ho-dum thing. They aren't big from my perspective, so it's a fun and interesting new AC subject for the next few days. Have learnt a lot already, which is good for if you have any combination of curiosity and enthusiasm.

 

Not so ho-hum when the one idiot engineer likes to lay on the horn at about 5am a lot of mornings. In the winter, during a pre-front southerly, you can hear him at every crossing from about 5 miles away all the way through our edge of town. Most times you just hear a light honk or two, and the rest of the time it is not even noticed.

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There's a train whose whistle I hear occasionally at around 3am if the conditions are right, winding down the Snohomish River Valley below. I like to believe it is at the end of a long journey from all the way across the continent thru Chicago on the Union Pacific route, it's a happy sound of adventure accomplished.

 

Maybe one of these mornings that whistle will sound even better to my ears, as it approaches the turn south to SF along that line, which I saw all the way to SF on board the Pacific Starlight Express one crazy spring as an adventurous 17 yr old. Wrote a great account of the way that trip developed, it won a nice prize after.

 

There definitely is romance in trains if you let it go that way. Sigh.. :)

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Slow enough to be the best looking train in the world right now. Nice watery reflection here

 

 

p&w rolls south thru webster ma, with americas cup boats & materials ,enrote necr, then cn,then up all the way san fransisco ca, thanks for watching.

 

Crikey! It wasn't like this in '58 when Briggs Cunningham and Columbia whomped Graham Mann and Sceptre 4-zip!

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Planted some marketing seeds this evening, could be ultra cool, could be nothing. B)

 

The Coast Starlight, along with the California Zephyr, are listed among the top ten rail trips in the world. Have taken both, several times.

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Fresh rumor at http://www.socketsite.com/archives/2012/07/the_godfather_of_oracle_has_set_his_sights_on_the_marin.html

 

 

The Godfather Of Oracle Has Set His Sights On The Marina

According to a plugged-in source, Larry Ellison's "people" have put out feelers to a few San Francisco realtors, seeking a short-list of San Francisco homes down in the Marina which aren't on the market but for which their owners might be willing to accept an offer they can’t refuse, much like the Bebo founders’ acquisition of 37 Raycliff Terrace back in 2008.

 

We’ll keep you posted and plugged-in. And if you’ve refused an offer, let us know.

 

 

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There's a train whose whistle I hear occasionally at around 3am if the conditions are right, winding down the Snohomish River Valley below. I like to believe it is at the end of a long journey from all the way across the continent thru Chicago on the Union Pacific route, it's a happy sound of adventure accomplished.

 

Maybe one of these mornings that whistle will sound even better to my ears, as it approaches the turn south to SF along that line, which I saw all the way to SF on board the Pacific Starlight Express one crazy spring as an adventurous 17 yr old. Wrote a great account of the way that trip developed, it won a nice prize after.

 

There definitely is romance in trains if you let it go that way. Sigh.. :)

 

A little train music for those looking forward to their arriving in Cali................................................

 

 

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Is there a map of the route it will take? I am thinking it may come near me but there are a couple routes it could go by me. Was hoping to catching it if it is close.

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There's a train whose whistle I hear occasionally at around 3am if the conditions are right, winding down the Snohomish River Valley below. I like to believe it is at the end of a long journey from all the way across the continent thru Chicago on the Union Pacific route, it's a happy sound of adventure accomplished.

 

Maybe one of these mornings that whistle will sound even better to my ears, as it approaches the turn south to SF along that line, which I saw all the way to SF on board the Pacific Starlight Express one crazy spring as an adventurous 17 yr old. Wrote a great account of the way that trip developed, it won a nice prize after.

 

There definitely is romance in trains if you let it go that way. Sigh.. :)

 

A little train music for those looking forward to their arriving in Cali................................................

 

 

Yes, great. Another one:

 

 

 

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Is there a map of the route it will take? I am thinking it may come near me but there are a couple routes it could go by me. Was hoping to catching it if it is close.

Nobody here has figured that out yet, far as I know.. Maybe by the operators and the routes they run one could tell, or guess?

 

The few details so far.

 

From the video

:

 

Providence & Worcester Train MFS9, from Davisville, RI to San Francisco, 47 cars, carrying 112 wells of boats and other material to the America's Cup Races works through Baltic, Connecticut enroute to a connection to New England Central. NECR will turn the train over to CN, then to Chicago and UP to Pier 80 in San Francisco.

From the video

:

 

p&w rolls south thru webster ma, with americas cup boats & materials ,enrote necr, then cn,then up all the way san fransisco ca, thanks for watching.

From the video

:

 

MFS-9 America's Cup Train Video Shot In Woonsocket, RI.

From a forum board here:

 

Waiting at Baltic, CT for 112 car P&W train carrying boats and equipment to America's Cup races in San Francisco.

Baltic is on the line to Willimantic.

 

... the expected routing for this train the rest of the way is NECR-St. Albans-CN-Chicago-UP.

 

From AC.com here:

 

On Monday morning the America's Cup World Series cargo left Newport, bound for San Francisco by train - all 121 cars of it, incredibly making the train 1.49 miles long. This does not include some of the Race Committee boats and team RIBs, which will travel on another train, or by road transport.

The "America's Cup Express' train is routed via Vermont and Chicago en route to San Francisco and is scheduled to arrive within 10 days.

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^ Says: A freight train carrying agricultural chemicals has derailed and caught fire,

shooting flames and plumes of smoke into the sky in Columbus, Ohio.

 

Will for sure cause some delays, reroutes, whatever to some trains. Yikes, that one is bad. Maybe Canadian National from New England to Chicago service is affected?

 

 

Chicago to SF is by Union Pacific, so:

http://www.uprr.com/...ide/index.shtml

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^ As in, tomorrow? Quite fast, it left Quonset late Monday morning with several locomotive handoffs ahead. Nice!

 

The SF setup is bound to get a lot of attention.

 

--

 

Way OT but this from Newport is new to me and a nice effort by Sailors for the Sea

 

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I might believe a week from Friday. It was handed over yesterday to CN for the run to Chicago.

 

After a load shift ended the America's Cup Express 'boat train' - a special rail move from Davisville, RI to San Francisco, CA via Seaview Transportation, P&W, NECR, CN and UPRR of the America's Cup boats and support equipment inside containers aboard the 112-car train - the NECR portion came to an unexpected halt due to a shifted load. The train had been running with the RailAmerica-painted TP&W GP40-2 4053 leading, however it was cut off when the crew tried to depart light engine. A nearby farmer whose crossing was blocked by the 8,300 foot train, showed up and 'advised' the crew that all of his vehicles were 'trapped' inside the farm property by the train, the crew returned to the two remaining units - the NECR units pictured - and pulled the train clear for him to move his vehicles to the other side and then back back into the siding, awaiting the arrival of a crane to fix the shifted load.

 

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=403146&nseq=0#remarks

 

More detail from a site that does not allow copy-and-paste: http://www.easternrailroadnews.com/category/news/

 

Original plans called for the big intermodal train

to travel to White River Junction, VT overnight

and make an early afternoon departure for St.

Albans and delivery to the Canadian National

Railway. Unfortunately the train never made it

past Claremont, NH, owing to size, crew time

and eventually the discovery of a problem with

the train

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If the original Friday quote was correct at the time, I'd now guess a week from Saturday or the following Monday. If Monday then it would probably sit on a siding in SSF where the Barnum and Baily units sit when the circus is in town. Or perhaps San Jose. I'm just not enough of a railfan to know the details. It is clear that the railfan community is doing a lot of the tracking work for us :D

 

I should have clarified earlier that the handoff to CN did not occur as planned.

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Before the 'problem' I thought we had established

This lot is due at Pier 80 then - on or before Thursday 18th

.

 

My guess would be this as the culprit. It appeared to be moving about rather worryingly in the first of the TrainAnarchy videos that SR posted.

In the second video the cars were wobbling about too, and the train was just creeping along - do they not do do any maintenance on the tracks?!

061212PWAC-5089.jpg

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...the train was just creeping along - do they not do do any maintenance on the tracks?!

 

Depends on the line. When I worked in Cupertino the line to the Permanente cement plant wnet right behind our office. Maintenance was not a concern, so the train crept along, weaving like a drunk. Class I railroads invest millions in keeping their roadbeds tidy and even.

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...the train was just creeping along - do they not do do any maintenance on the tracks?!

 

Depends on the line. When I worked in Cupertino the line to the Permanente cement plant wnet right behind our office. Maintenance was not a concern, so the train crept along, weaving like a drunk. Class I railroads invest millions in keeping their roadbeds tidy and even.

 

OK, glad to hear there are at least some flat tracks. New York --> California is just a branch line I guess.

 

(actually looking again I can't tell if the wobbles I thought I was seeing are from the track, the video quality - or my eyesblink.gif)

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Fwiw (slow day..)

What do the future of American Orchestras and the America’s Cup have in common?

July 11th, 2012 by Beth Hondl

 

The America’s Cup and the American Orchestra have more in common than you might think, as Cheeko Matsusaka explores in this blog post. Originally from Newton, Massachusetts, Cheeko Matsusaka currently lives in Sarasota, Florida where she is a cellist with the Sarasota Orchestra. Hers is the first of three winning blog posts from our recent American Orchestra Forum blog contest.

http://symphonyforum.org/?p=1854

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Special train chugs through Vermont

 

A special mile-and-a-half long train — 121 cars — transporting the gear and yacht parts of the America’s Cup competitive sailing fleet chugged through Vermont Thursday on its way from Newport, R.I. to San Francisco.

 

It was supposed to be a 10-day trip until a container shifted Tuesday causing a one-day delay and then crew scheduling problems Wednesday led to a second day on a siding in New Hampshire. Thursday, it finally got underway again.

 

Wondering if New England Central if providing a reduced rate on its locomotive in return for all the publicity to come. . . :lol:

 

The railroad crews operating the America’s Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

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Special train chugs through Vermont

 

A special mile-and-a-half long train — 121 cars — transporting the gear and yacht parts of the America's Cup competitive sailing fleet chugged through Vermont Thursday on its way from Newport, R.I. to San Francisco.

 

It was supposed to be a 10-day trip until a container shifted Tuesday causing a one-day delay and then crew scheduling problems Wednesday led to a second day on a siding in New Hampshire. Thursday, it finally got underway again.

 

Wondering if New England Central if providing a reduced rate on its locomotive in return for all the publicity to come. . . :lol:

 

The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

HELP NEEDED Quick all 'Canucks' - WE need - Fast setting concrete - Lots of 'Canuck' red paint - 3 different size 'Maple-leaf' stencils - lots of workers - c/w The PM's office c/w staff - ENTRY FORMS for AC 34 in SF..

 

Plot - KISS let rail-cars into Canada - -

 

Concrete all rail lines

 

Paint 'Red maple-leaf's' everywhere - inside - outside - top - bottom - minimum - 10 on each side of the wing.

 

Urgent transport to Vancover. Send to SF - - BEAT (& BEET - also) your bloody little asses'es'es.

 

Briing ACup home.

 

Boast & Brag.

 

Appeal to the international court - against - 'un-fair play' by the - Bloody Yanks - - gotta win that. HE HE HE HE HE HE YES - YAHOOO ! ! !

 

Ciao. james

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The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ? or is this a cunning plan to prove to the world that the shortest way between two points is a hyperbole ? ;)

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from http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=403292&nseq=9

 

8223.1342151969.jpg

 

The America's Cup Express train is crossing the Winooski River at North Duxbury, VT on the NECR Roxbury Subdivision, on its way to Montreal and ultimately San Francisco. The move originated at Davisville, RI, where the boats and support equipment were loaded in the 112-well container train bound for the San Francisco Pier 80. The train moved to the P&W, NECR and now CN to Chicago, where it will be handed off to the Union Pacific for shipment to California.

 

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The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ? or is this a cunning plan to prove to the world that the shortest way between two points is a hyperbole ? ;)

Good one

 

Here is one explanation, from CC's link above

 

It might seem a bit circuitous, but Hunter said, "It was a competitive route as far as timing and pricing."

 

more trivia

 

The train is described as "intermodal" because it is carrying containers than could be loaded on trucks or ships as well as rail cars. This train has eleven 40-foot flat racks, nine 20-foot containers, four 40-foot standard containers, one 45-foot, high-cube container and 105 40-foot, high-cube containers.

 

Moffett of Seaview Transportation likened the train to the circus trains of another era that contained everything the entertainers needed for their shows. The setup for each America's Cup regatta includes machine shops, broadcasting facilities, and team gear tents, Moffett said.

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can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ?

 

It's also possible that there is a major rail freight 'corridor' that flows between maritime shipping ports along the Great Lakes.

 

This is what ~driving~ directions would look like, via some of the waypoints mentioned in posts above.

 

Newport, RI

 

Providence, RI

 

Saint Albans, VT

 

Montreal, QC

 

Chicago, IL

 

San Fran, CA

 

Map Link (says it's close to 3500 miles)

 

 

29vld08.jpg

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The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ? or is this a cunning plan to prove to the world that the shortest way between two points is a hyperbole ? ;)

 

Stinger nailed it. Maybe back in the day when Rail was the way to travel across the US you could ship some AC45's on a more direct route from Newport to SF, but these days that isn't the case, I think. Need to hit the main commerece rail lines to ensure a timely transit to the other side of the country.

 

WetHog :ph34r:

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The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ? or is this a cunning plan to prove to the world that the shortest way between two points is a hyperbole ? ;)

 

Stinger nailed it. Maybe back in the day when Rail was the way to travel across the US you could ship some AC45's on a more direct route from Newport to SF, but these days that isn't the case, I think. Need to hit the main commerece rail lines to ensure a timely transit to the other side of the country.

 

WetHog :ph34r:

 

Actually not much different than most logistics - rarely is something direct that goes coast to coast. Hubs do serve a purpose, whether it be by rail, truck or plane.

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The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ? or is this a cunning plan to prove to the world that the shortest way between two points is a hyperbole ? ;)

 

Stinger nailed it. Maybe back in the day when Rail was the way to travel across the US you could ship some AC45's on a more direct route from Newport to SF, but these days that isn't the case, I think. Need to hit the main commerece rail lines to ensure a timely transit to the other side of the country.

 

WetHog :ph34r:

 

Actually not much different than most logistics - rarely is something direct that goes coast to coast. Hubs do serve a purpose, whether it be by rail, truck or plane.

 

You're joking right? Do you really think going 'international' (& yeah I've heard of NAFTA), to get something essentially from the 'minor hub' of NY to the insignificant state of California demonstrates a viable national rail network?

 

 

29vld08.jpg

 

 

It sure is picturesque though! (Can you hear those banjos duelling?) Who cares about efficiency.

 

8223.1342151969.jpg

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Here is one explanation, from CC's link above

 

It might seem a bit circuitous, but Hunter said, "It was a competitive route as far as timing and pricing."

 

more trivia

 

The train is described as "intermodal" because it is carrying containers than could be loaded on trucks or ships as well as rail cars. This train has eleven 40-foot flat racks, nine 20-foot containers, four 40-foot standard containers, one 45-foot, high-cube container and 105 40-foot, high-cube containers.

 

Moffett of Seaview Transportation likened the train to the circus trains of another era that contained everything the entertainers needed for their shows. The setup for each America's Cup regatta includes machine shops, broadcasting facilities, and team gear tents, Moffett said.

 

And one more quote - with regard to the delay....my guess as to what shifted was wrong it seems;

 

It was supposed to be a 10-day trip until a container shifted Tuesday causing a one-day delay and then crew scheduling problems Wednesday led to a second day on a siding in New Hampshire. Thursday, it finally got underway again.

Not quite sure what this is doing in an article singing the praises of rail transport - but at least it's honest.

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Yep, almost pointed that out, good on ya.

 

The dip up into Canada ~could~ possibly be for NAFTA or other licensing reasons; Canadian National is doing almost half the real tow to come.

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You're joking right? Do you really think going 'international' (& yeah I've heard of NAFTA), to get something essentially from the 'minor hub' of NY to the insignificant state of California demonstrates a viable national rail network?

 

 

Perhaps surprisingly, New York is not a major freight rail hub. Chicago is much larger. You want transcontinental rail to be clipping along at track speed, not crawling through major metropolises.

 

Last report from Bethel, VT.

 

2341.1342190290.jpg

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You're joking right? Do you really think going 'international' (& yeah I've heard of NAFTA), to get something essentially from the 'minor hub' of NY to the insignificant state of California demonstrates a viable national rail network?

 

 

Perhaps surprisingly, New York is not a major freight rail hub. Chicago is much larger. You want transcontinental rail to be clipping along at track speed, not crawling through major metropolises.

 

Last report from Bethel, VT.

 

2341.1342190290.jpg

 

Ok I believe you - well almost. The thing is that still looks like a branch line to me. A true transcontinental track would have so much traffic on it that 1/ it would have to be a double track to be safe and 2/ no one in their right mind would want to (or be allowed to) live anywhere close to it because of the noise 24 hours a day. Hmmm?

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You're joking right? Do you really think going 'international' (& yeah I've heard of NAFTA), to get something essentially from the 'minor hub' of NY to the insignificant state of California demonstrates a viable national rail network?

 

 

Perhaps surprisingly, New York is not a major freight rail hub. Chicago is much larger. You want transcontinental rail to be clipping along at track speed, not crawling through major metropolises.

 

Last report from Bethel, VT.

 

 

Ok I believe you - well almost. The thing is that still looks like a branch line to me. A true transcontinental track would have so much traffic on it that 1/ it would have to be a double track to be safe and 2/ no one in their right mind would want to (or be allowed to) live anywhere close to it because of the noise 24 hours a day. Hmmm?

 

You're quite right that it is not double tracked or even two main lines, but the picture was taken in Vermont. Neither Rhode Island, Massachusetts, nor Vermont are exactly on the road to anywhere. Looking at the map, I think that Montreal is indeed the closest route to a transcontinental rail line for the AC Special. The closest major port in that area would be New Jersey, but then the train would have to first transit or go around New York to get there. I'll stick with the theory that using CN is indeed the fastest way to SF.

 

Note that the rails in the picture are not rusted on top. That shows the line gets enough traffic to keep them shiny.

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The railroad crews operating the America's Cup Train, as it is called, switch Thursday night in St. Albans with a Canadian crew coming aboard for the next leg of the trip on Canadian National track. Hunter said the train will go to Montreal, then to Chicago and west to San Francisco.

 

can anybody explanify to a potentially US railroad geographical challenged eurocrapper what the logic is in sending that train from Newport up north to Montreal ? or is this a cunning plan to prove to the world that the shortest way between two points is a hyperbole ? ;)

 

Stinger nailed it. Maybe back in the day when Rail was the way to travel across the US you could ship some AC45's on a more direct route from Newport to SF, but these days that isn't the case, I think. Need to hit the main commerece rail lines to ensure a timely transit to the other side of the country.

 

WetHog :ph34r:

 

Actually not much different than most logistics - rarely is something direct that goes coast to coast. Hubs do serve a purpose, whether it be by rail, truck or plane.

 

You're joking right? Do you really think going 'international' (& yeah I've heard of NAFTA), to get something essentially from the 'minor hub' of NY to the insignificant state of California demonstrates a viable national rail network?

 

 

Not joking at all.

 

No experience with rail logistics but I have a significant amount of experience with air and truck logistics in the US and internationally, and different modes of transportation and different priorities have different trade-offs. Pretty basic actually.

 

Time is money in my business and we look at routing carefully. Both air and truck have hubs strategically located across the US, which shipments go through. Do a transit time analysis of next day air vs 2 day air vs 3 day air across the country or to different continents and you'll find different routes and hubs are involved. Same thing with passenger air travel. Pick the cheapest fare and it may take you through one, two or three different airports based on bookings and available flights with possible plane changes. Regarding air shipment the most simple and accurate is counter to counter deliveries, but that only applies to smaller packages, not 40' containers.

 

Seems similar to what is happening here.

 

 

 

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I should add that the bank of the curve shows it to be a higher speed line than the idyllic background suggests.

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Not joking at all.

 

No experience with rail logistics but I have a significant amount of experience with air and truck logistics in the US and internationally, and different modes of transportation and different priorities have different trade-offs. Pretty basic actually.

 

Time is money in my business and we look at routing carefully. Both air and truck have hubs strategically located across the US, which shipments go through. Do a transit time analysis of next day air vs 2 day air vs 3 day air across the country or to different continents and you'll find different routes and hubs are involved. Same thing with passenger air travel. Pick the cheapest fare and it may take you through one, two or three different airports based on bookings and available flights with possible plane changes. Regarding air shipment the most simple and accurate is counter to counter deliveries, but that only applies to smaller packages, not 40' containers.

 

Seems similar to what is happening here.

LMAO, didn't think a little quip could cause this kind of discussion ... I made two basic errors when typing the line in that (1) seeing it on a map shows that the northbound deviation is far less important than I would have thought (2)forgot that the railroad network on your continent is far less developed or fine meshed than it is overhere (no judgement, simple facts).

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LH1RAWvd1c

 

 

Published on Jul 13, 2012 by Riss1145

 

This is my very first attempt at a video upload. It was shot with an EOS T1i. Location - Milton - Westford Rd. RR crossing. Miton, Vermont. Time/Date - 1650 hours (that's 4:50PM for those of us who aren't on the 24-hour clock), 07/12/212.

The consist, made up of disassembled America's Cup racing yachts & support equipment, was 121 cars long. nearly 8000 feet (1.5 miles) in length. Lead power was NECR 721, a GP-38, followed by NECR 3857, an SD40-2. That doesn't sound like sufficient power for a consist of that length. They didn't seem to be struggling though, as the grade was level in that area.

The consist was heading for St. Albans yard where it would be transferred to power, most likely Canadian Pacific, which would carry it to the west coast for the races.

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Not joking at all.

 

No experience with rail logistics but I have a significant amount of experience with air and truck logistics in the US and internationally, and different modes of transportation and different priorities have different trade-offs. Pretty basic actually.

 

Time is money in my business and we look at routing carefully. Both air and truck have hubs strategically located across the US, which shipments go through. Do a transit time analysis of next day air vs 2 day air vs 3 day air across the country or to different continents and you'll find different routes and hubs are involved. Same thing with passenger air travel. Pick the cheapest fare and it may take you through one, two or three different airports based on bookings and available flights with possible plane changes. Regarding air shipment the most simple and accurate is counter to counter deliveries, but that only applies to smaller packages, not 40' containers.

 

Seems similar to what is happening here.

LMAO, didn't think a little quip could cause this kind of discussion ... I made two basic errors when typing the line in that (1) seeing it on a map shows that the northbound deviation is far less important than I would have thought (2)forgot that the railroad network on your continent is far less developed or fine meshed than it is overhere (no judgement, simple facts).

 

I do not think our RR lines are less developed, its more who owns what, and how they work and link together. They are not a national lines, but owned by various corporations, due to who developed them back in the day, and how the trusts were broken-up in the early 20th century. Same for the telephone lines, oil companies, etc.

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Not joking at all.

 

No experience with rail logistics but I have a significant amount of experience with air and truck logistics in the US and internationally, and different modes of transportation and different priorities have different trade-offs. Pretty basic actually.

 

Time is money in my business and we look at routing carefully. Both air and truck have hubs strategically located across the US, which shipments go through. Do a transit time analysis of next day air vs 2 day air vs 3 day air across the country or to different continents and you'll find different routes and hubs are involved. Same thing with passenger air travel. Pick the cheapest fare and it may take you through one, two or three different airports based on bookings and available flights with possible plane changes. Regarding air shipment the most simple and accurate is counter to counter deliveries, but that only applies to smaller packages, not 40' containers.

 

Seems similar to what is happening here.

LMAO, didn't think a little quip could cause this kind of discussion ... I made two basic errors when typing the line in that (1) seeing it on a map shows that the northbound deviation is far less important than I would have thought (2)forgot that the railroad network on your continent is far less developed or fine meshed than it is overhere (no judgement, simple facts).

 

I do not think our RR lines are less developed, its more who owns what, and how they work and link together. They are not a national lines, but owned by various corporations, due to who developed them back in the day, and how the trusts were broken-up in the early 20th century. Same for the telephone lines, oil companies, etc.

 

Exactly, like he said - less developed. I suspect you are just used to things as they 'have always been' and maybe haven't thought about RR as essential national infrastructure - but would you accept this sort of thing with the roading system?

And does it really make sense for the rail system to avoid major metropolitan areas? That's the end destination for many of the goods carried after all and the obvious source of passengers. Oh hang on, there is essentially no long distance passenger rail in the States - why? Well we're back to - "its more who owns what, and how they work and link together"

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...forgot that the railroad network on your continent is far less developed or fine meshed than it is overhere (no judgement, simple facts).

It's bigger my friend. Way, way bigger.

 

post-16623-069900600 1342280363_thumb.jpg

 

But then we are all about the roads.

 

InterstateMap.bmp

 

 

Koukel

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Published on Jul 13, 2012 by Riss1145

 

This is my very first attempt at a video upload. It was shot with an EOS T1i. Location - Milton - Westford Rd. RR crossing. Miton, Vermont. Time/Date - 1650 hours (that's 4:50PM for those of us who aren't on the 24-hour clock), 07/12/212.

 

The consist was heading for St. Albans yard where it would be transferred to power, most likely Canadian Pacific, which would carry it to the west coast for the races.

 

That's the C in this shot. Long way to go.... Maybe once they are out of the rolling hills and lakes, slow winding-tracks New England and onto a 'super hiway' then it can get properly amped up.

 

29vld08.jpg

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...forgot that the railroad network on your continent is far less developed or fine meshed than it is overhere (no judgement, simple facts).

It's bigger my friend. Way, way bigger.

 

post-16623-069900600 1342280363_thumb.jpg

 

But then we are all about the roads.

 

InterstateMap.bmp

 

 

Koukel

 

Now THATS a fact :D

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Not joking at all.

 

No experience with rail logistics but I have a significant amount of experience with air and truck logistics in the US and internationally, and different modes of transportation and different priorities have different trade-offs. Pretty basic actually.

 

Time is money in my business and we look at routing carefully. Both air and truck have hubs strategically located across the US, which shipments go through. Do a transit time analysis of next day air vs 2 day air vs 3 day air across the country or to different continents and you'll find different routes and hubs are involved. Same thing with passenger air travel. Pick the cheapest fare and it may take you through one, two or three different airports based on bookings and available flights with possible plane changes. Regarding air shipment the most simple and accurate is counter to counter deliveries, but that only applies to smaller packages, not 40' containers.

 

Seems similar to what is happening here.

LMAO, didn't think a little quip could cause this kind of discussion ... I made two basic errors when typing the line in that (1) seeing it on a map shows that the northbound deviation is far less important than I would have thought (2)forgot that the railroad network on your continent is far less developed or fine meshed than it is overhere (no judgement, simple facts).

 

I do not think our RR lines are less developed, its more who owns what, and how they work and link together. They are not a national lines, but owned by various corporations, due to who developed them back in the day, and how the trusts were broken-up in the early 20th century. Same for the telephone lines, oil companies, etc.

 

Exactly, like he said - less developed. I suspect you are just used to things as they 'have always been' and maybe haven't thought about RR as essential national infrastructure - but would you accept this sort of thing with the roading system?

And does it really make sense for the rail system to avoid major metropolitan areas? That's the end destination for many of the goods carried after all and the obvious source of passengers. Oh hang on, there is essentially no long distance passenger rail in the States - why? Well we're back to - "its more who owns what, and how they work and link together"

 

The US may have more abandoned lines here than some places have active lines. Many have been converted to bike/running paths where they now run through developed areas near the cities. Rail still carries a lot of freight in the US, but needing direct, timely deliveries makes trucking a more versatile transport for a number of products, like what our company sells. Trains would just not work.

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And does it really make sense for the rail system to avoid major metropolitan areas? That's the end destination for many of the goods carried after all and the obvious source of passengers. Oh hang on, there is essentially no long distance passenger rail in the States - why? Well we're back to - "its more who owns what, and how they work and link together"

 

One of the reasons NYC is not a major freight hub is because of all the passenger trains using the existing rail to get in and out of the city. The fact that there is limited long distance passenger rail in the US != limited passenger rail.

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More on picturesque

 

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=403422&nseq=0

 

7926.1342275987.jpg

 

The America's Cup Express train heads north across the Georgia "High Bridge" on the NECR Roxbury Subdivision, on its way to Montreal and ultimately San Francisco. The move originated at Davisville, RI, where the boats and support equipment were loaded in the 112-well container train bound for the San Francisco Pier 80. The train moved to the P&W, NECR and now CN to Chicago, where it will be handed off to the Union Pacific for shipment to California.

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http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=403331&nseq=13

 

4100.1342192853.jpg

 

The America's Cup Express train rolls northbound through downtown (railroad town) Randolph, VT on the NECR Roxbury Subdivision, on its way to Montreal and ultimately San Francisco. The move originated at Davisville, RI, where the boats and support equipment were loaded in the 112-well container train bound for the San Francisco Pier 80. The train moved to the P&W, NECR and now CN to Chicago, where it will be handed off to the Union Pacific for shipment to California.

 

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Published on Jul 13, 2012 by Riss1145

 

This is my very first attempt at a video upload. It was shot with an EOS T1i. Location - Milton - Westford Rd. RR crossing. Miton, Vermont. Time/Date - 1650 hours (that's 4:50PM for those of us who aren't on the 24-hour clock), 07/12/212.

 

The consist was heading for St. Albans yard where it would be transferred to power, most likely Canadian Pacific, which would carry it to the west coast for the races.

 

That's the C in this shot. Long way to go.... Maybe once they are out of the rolling hills and lakes, slow winding-tracks New England and onto a 'super hiway' then it can get properly amped up.

 

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Arrival to St Albans (C above), the photo date is July 12.

 

http://www.railpictu...d=403330&nseq=0

 

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Heading into the setting sun, ``America's Cup Express`` a special rail move from Rhodes Island to California rolls by the former Central Vermont roundhouse as it enters St Albans on a warm afternoon.

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