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ftbinc

NMEA 0183 to WiFi

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I have used the Digital Yacht interface and can get one for about $300.00 on ebay (with shipping) does anyone have other suggestions on how to connect the iPad with the onboard systems? I use iNavX on the iPad and would like to do this as inexpensively as possible. I would also like it to be as portable as possible for moving from boat to boat...

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Portability will be the biggest issue as each time you change boats you will have to wire into the new boat's NMEA port and power so the installations may be different. We make a WiFi device but it is more expensive than the Digital Yacht. However it has two 0183 ports that both have configurable baud rates which would help you if you are connecting to any boats that output baud rates other than 4800. It also will broadcast to more than one mobile device. Check it out if you like: www.dmkyacht.com/inavx

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Least expensive hardware? Serial to wifi board, one that doesn't say NMEA anywhere. There are a number of shields for Arduino that would work on their own, for example, cost is typically around 100 USD. There are also a number of fairly inexpensive industrial adapters. You would need to do some configuring of the wifi and serial port through a serial terminal first though. If that sounds scary, just pay the bucks for one of the products listed above.

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Distance,

 

Nice gadget. One question:

 

The Specification page says the box runs on 5-12V. The Reference page says 5-24V.

 

A 12V boat has nominal voltages as high as 15VDC. A 24V boat has nominal voltages as high as 30VDC. Based on the Specification, I can't power the box on a 12V boat. Based on the Refernece page, i can't power the box on a 24V boat.

 

Which page is correct and ... what's the scoop?

 

Thanks!

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Distance,

 

Nice gadget.

 

+1!

 

Is there a port to attach an external GPS antenna?

 

 

nvmind, missed this part:

 

<LI>Includes an external passive GPS antenna which connects via threaded SMA socket

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I use one of these aboard: DiGi WI-SP. The output from my existing Brookhouse mux is connected to the WI-SP. the DiGi is a two way device so the iPad can talk to the autopilot. The device's serial port can be configured for RS-422 so will work with differential NMEA data rather than RS-232

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Shipmodul Miniplex 2-WI

 

I have one and it can be portable e.g.

- get a length of 2 conductor wire that can be connected to a spare circuit breaker for the power;

- get additional lengths of instrument cable and tap into a NMEA 0183 output from instruments, AIS and GPS

- Use Velcro to mount it somewhere convenient.

- Power on instruments and circuit for the Mux.

- use the supplied USB cable and a Windows PC to connect PC to the mux

- Install and run the port configuration software on your PC (allows you to change baud rate in the input channels, adjust NMEA filters, turn on/off SeaTalk conversion, adjust output port configurations etc...)

- when done with the config, save the file on your PC.

- Disconnect the PC,

 

- Configure iPad/iPhone wifi port settings in iNavx TCP/IP settings ( Host 169.254.1.1; Port 10110; turn link on) and you're done.

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I realize I am diverging from the requirements of the original poster, and if the most 'inexpensive' solution is desired for getting data to the iPad or iPhone, ignore my proposition.

I recently installed the Raymarine e7 on my new sailboat that has the capability of mirroring its display to any iOS device, and also supports a bidirectional link to control the chart plotter as well.

 

admittedly, it is a more expensive solution and extreme overkill in many scenarios. however, the ~$400 cost for the serial->WiFi links seems excessive to me and restrictive when a larger boat is considered, with the potential need to remotely display not only NMEA 0183 serial data, but also NMEA 2000, Radar, Sonar, chart plotting, autopilot ... and possibly Flir IR and camera data. I think I paid ~$1200, but then, the capabilities are far greater.

 

for some applications the more expensive solution might be the better investment.

 

just thoughts ...

 

daniel

post-60320-024459600 1344651532_thumb.jpg

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another possibility...

 

i'm just guessing that maybe the portability issue arises because you are doing nav/tactics on different boats.

 

if you are running expedition on a laptop, with nmea into the laptop by USB (either nmea, or H-link, or whatever), you can configure another network in expedition that will send nmea back out over the laptop's wifi on an adhoc newtork.

 

you don't need any new hardware to do this.

 

iphone/ipad just connect to the adhoc network.

 

i do this, and it works pretty well.

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Slight hijack but relevant I think.

 

I have three instruments I want to link-

1. A Lowrance HDS-8 plotter with broadband radar.

2. A Tacktick suite of instruments including wind functions, boat functions and compass

3. A Standard Horizon VHF that receives AIS information.

 

I have a freestanding Furuno GPS with WAAS that I would like to be able to integrate as a backup GPS source .

 

I linked the Tacktick instruments to the plotter using NMEA0183. This let the Tacktick compass provide heading information that allows the plotter to do radar overlays on the chart page, and allows the Tacktick instruments to show information from the plotter like DTW and BTW. I bought the VHF radio to provide AIS information to the plotter. When I wired it to do so using NMEA0183 wiring I was able to get AIS information to the plotter and still get plotter information to the Tacktick instruments, but I lost the ability to get the compass heading information from the Tacktick to the plotter and so lost the overlay function. I do still get gps information sent to the VHF to provide DSC capability.

 

My understanding is I need an NMEA multiplexer to do this job of linking multiple senders and receivers, so my interest is in a multiplexer that provides the added benefit of creating a wifi network so I can use my iPad and iNavx (I have a gen one iPad with integral gps and wifi).

 

So far I'm looking at the iMux. I do not have easy access to a pc laptop for programming and no expectation of wanting a laptop in the system until they use a lot less power.

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Slight hijack but relevant I think.

 

I have three instruments I want to link-

1. A Lowrance HDS-8 plotter with broadband radar.

2. A Tacktick suite of instruments including wind functions, boat functions and compass

3. A Standard Horizon VHF that receives AIS information.

 

I have a freestanding Furuno GPS with WAAS that I would like to be able to integrate as a backup GPS source .

 

I linked the Tacktick instruments to the plotter using NMEA0183. This let the Tacktick compass provide heading information that allows the plotter to do radar overlays on the chart page, and allows the Tacktick instruments to show information from the plotter like DTW and BTW. I bought the VHF radio to provide AIS information to the plotter. When I wired it to do so using NMEA0183 wiring I was able to get AIS information to the plotter and still get plotter information to the Tacktick instruments, but I lost the ability to get the compass heading information from the Tacktick to the plotter and so lost the overlay function. I do still get gps information sent to the VHF to provide DSC capability.

 

My understanding is I need an NMEA multiplexer to do this job of linking multiple senders and receivers, so my interest is in a multiplexer that provides the added benefit of creating a wifi network so I can use my iPad and iNavx (I have a gen one iPad with integral gps and wifi).

 

So far I'm looking at the iMux. I do not have easy access to a pc laptop for programming and no expectation of wanting a laptop in the system until they use a lot less power.

 

I'm shopping this area as well. It appears to me that the Shipmodul Miniplex 2-Wi is a more versatile unit for nearly the same price. Not that I have anything against Brookhouse. I've had one of their standard Multiplexors for several years and have been satisfied.

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I'm shopping this area as well. It appears to me that the Shipmodul Miniplex 2-Wi is a more versatile unit for nearly the same price. Not that I have anything against Brookhouse. I've had one of their standard Multiplexors for several years and have been satisfied.

 

The only issue I could see was needing a pc to program- I'm not sure what the iMux requires.

 

 

 

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I'm shopping this area as well. It appears to me that the Shipmodul Miniplex 2-Wi is a more versatile unit for nearly the same price. Not that I have anything against Brookhouse. I've had one of their standard Multiplexors for several years and have been satisfied.

 

The only issue I could see was needing a pc to program- I'm not sure what the iMux requires.

 

The iMux could be pre-programmed with whatever NMEA sentence filters or port configs you want if you ask Brookhouse to do it. In that way, you won't need to initially access the mux via its USB port with any PC/Laptop/notebook that can run a simple terminal program to talk to the mux like talking to a modem. The Brookhouse scripting language approach is a bit cryptic for those that don't want to wade through the instructions.

 

The Shipmodul's Windows configuration software is reasonably obvious to set up the ports with some light reading of the manual. The Miniplex comes with a default configuration that requires no programming at all, but at some point, you might want to use some of the features. It's pretty much "plug and play". If you ever need to update firmware, you'll need a PC/laptop/notebook

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send nmea back out over the laptop's wifi on an adhoc newtork.

 

you don't need any new hardware to

 

 

Then you need your laptop turned on for it to work. It is better to keep the wi-fi network going even when the laptop is turned off. A box like red box or others make this possible.

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send nmea back out over the laptop's wifi on an adhoc newtork.

 

you don't need any new hardware to

 

 

Then you need your laptop turned on for it to work. It is better to keep the wi-fi network going even when the laptop is turned off. A box like red box or others make this possible.

 

 

I agree that the option to have the laptop off is a good one.

 

I was just pointing out how it can be done with no new hardware, if you have expedition.

 

Also, the OP mentioned moving from boat to boat, so I am guessing he is a tactician or navigator, and is interested in doing this while racing.

 

Most boats that have expedition, run it continuously during a race.

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Distance,

 

Nice gadget. One question:

 

The Specification page says the box runs on 5-12V. The Reference page says 5-24V.

 

A 12V boat has nominal voltages as high as 15VDC. A 24V boat has nominal voltages as high as 30VDC. Based on the Specification, I can't power the box on a 12V boat. Based on the Refernece page, i can't power the box on a 24V boat.

 

Which page is correct and ... what's the scoop?

 

Thanks!

 

We need to spend a little more time editing our technical stuff. Truth be told we have tested our box on as much as 35 volts and as little as five. We tried to make it rubust and able to handle irregular voltages that occur from the different wiring that exists out there.

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I realize I am diverging from the requirements of the original poster, and if the most 'inexpensive' solution is desired for getting data to the iPad or iPhone, ignore my proposition.

I recently installed the Raymarine e7 on my new sailboat that has the capability of mirroring its display to any iOS device, and also supports a bidirectional link to control the chart plotter as well.

 

admittedly, it is a more expensive solution and extreme overkill in many scenarios. however, the ~$400 cost for the serial->WiFi links seems excessive to me and restrictive when a larger boat is considered, with the potential need to remotely display not only NMEA 0183 serial data, but also NMEA 2000, Radar, Sonar, chart plotting, autopilot ... and possibly Flir IR and camera data. I think I paid ~$1200, but then, the capabilities are far greater.

 

for some applications the more expensive solution might be the better investment.

 

just thoughts ...

 

daniel

 

The issue with this approach is that you are stuck using the Raymarine App. If you want to run iRegatta it is not open, also it is not open to parsing the instrument data to improve sailing apps in the future. Having the link as open as possible is needed to foster an environment where app developers can come up with cool stuff for the sailing market.

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I think that some of the posts are disregarding the OP's need for a solution that can easily go with him from boat to boat.

 

He hasn't been back..., but it sounds like he does nav/tactics on different boats.

 

For a fixed installation, there are many solutions, and also many threads detailing them.

 

As I mentioned above, I use Expedition to broadcast NMEA over an ad hoc network - it doesn't require anything other than my laptop, which I bring anyway.

 

I guess I could also bring a small router, but that makes two things I have to power. I have seen USB-powered travel routers, but haven't tried one.

 

Anyway, if anyone has a suggestion for another _portable_ solution, I'm interested.

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Thanks US7070 for pointing out that I am looking for an inexpensive solution that could be portable and easy to move to another boat. I have been viewing the posts, but there has been little to get me to jump back in. Thanks to everyone that posted.

-

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US7070, you seem fixated on using a PC and ad-hoc networking set up on the PC. You have offered only that solution in any thread on Wifi. While this may work, there are other considerations like cost of the PC, and its software, securing the PC to various nav stations, having to continually run the PC in order to get a wifi connection, power drain, etc...

 

If you re-read the solution I posted using the Shipmodul miniplex and making it portable, the total cost and ease of installation and use is not much above $400. You can get away with its default port configs and installing it without a PC, however at some point, its full potential might be needed on some boats to filter NMEA sentences, for which you need a Windows PC connected to it to run the config software.

 

The PC solution doesn't do a good job at multiplexing with the same flexible features for filtering sentences, managing port speeds, combining incoming data streams, or offering Sea-Talk to NMEA translation which is really useful when moving from boat to boat. At some point, the OP might run across a Raymarine SeaTalk environment and having a mux that already has a specific port configured to do that , is a clean solution.

 

To the OP, the Mux is probably the easiest way to move from boat to boat and connect to a NMEA 0183 port as a listener. Even if the boat you move to hasn't already integrated the GPS, AIS and instrument data within their own network, the mux allows you to do it without disturbing their existing environment.

 

My $400 and $0.02 :D

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US7070, you seem fixated on using a PC and ad-hoc networking set up on the PC. You have offered only that solution in any thread on Wifi. While this may work, there are other considerations like cost of the PC, and its software, securing the PC to various nav stations, having to continually run the PC in order to get a wifi connection, power drain, etc...

 

If you re-read the solution I posted using the Shipmodul miniplex and making it portable, the total cost and ease of installation and use is not much above $400. You can get away with its default port configs and installing it without a PC, however at some point, its full potential might be needed on some boats to filter NMEA sentences, for which you need a Windows PC connected to it to run the config software.

 

The PC solution doesn't do a good job at multiplexing with the same flexible features for filtering sentences, managing port speeds, combining incoming data streams, or offering Sea-Talk to NMEA translation which is really useful when moving from boat to boat. At some point, the OP might run across a Raymarine SeaTalk environment and having a mux that already has a specific port configured to do that , is a clean solution.

 

To the OP, the Mux is probably the easiest way to move from boat to boat and connect to a NMEA 0183 port as a listener. Even if the boat you move to hasn't already integrated the GPS, AIS and instrument data within their own network, the mux allows you to do it without disturbing their existing environment.

 

My $400 and $0.02 :D

 

 

I was thinking he might _already_ be running a laptop and expedition.

 

If not, it's obviously not a good solution.

 

I am interested in your method - how long would it take, from walking on the boat, to do the wiring?

 

I'm not particularly experienced at that sort of thing, and I wouldn't want to blow up a $25,000 instrument system - is there any danger of that?

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FWIW, I just ordered the Shipmodul from Great Lakes Marine Specialties (http://www.navstore.com/). I ordered this rather than the iMux because I did not get an emailed response from iMux after four days and got a quick email back from Shipmodul and found Great Lakes helpful and knowledgeable when I called them on the phone.

 

They are going to try and set up my unit in advance a bit, and gave clear advice on how the hookup process should go and will make sue all firmware is current before shipping. I have temporary access to a windows laptop so think I can wend my way through the setup and have a US number to call if I struggle.

 

A good start from them, I hope i can do my part.

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FWIW, I just ordered the Shipmodul from Great Lakes Marine Specialties (http://www.navstore.com/). I ordered this rather than the iMux because I did not get an emailed response from iMux after four days and got a quick email back from Shipmodul and found Great Lakes helpful and knowledgeable when I called them on the phone.

 

They are going to try and set up my unit in advance a bit, and gave clear advice on how the hookup process should go and will make sue all firmware is current before shipping. I have temporary access to a windows laptop so think I can wend my way through the setup and have a US number to call if I struggle.

 

A good start from them, I hope i can do my part.

 

But this is almost 500.00 I'm trying to do this on a low budget.

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FWIW, I just ordered the Shipmodul from Great Lakes Marine Specialties (http://www.navstore.com/). I ordered this rather than the iMux because I did not get an emailed response from iMux after four days and got a quick email back from Shipmodul and found Great Lakes helpful and knowledgeable when I called them on the phone.

 

They are going to try and set up my unit in advance a bit, and gave clear advice on how the hookup process should go and will make sue all firmware is current before shipping. I have temporary access to a windows laptop so think I can wend my way through the setup and have a US number to call if I struggle.

 

A good start from them, I hope i can do my part.

 

But this is almost 500.00 I'm trying to do this on a low budget.

 

 

can you tell us more about the type of sailing you do.

 

Is it round the cans racing - maybe 5 or 6 hours on the water and then in..., or are you distance racing too?

 

will there be a laptop on the boat?

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Type of Sailing: Racing, both buoy and distance

Trying not to have a laptop on the boat, instead having a tablet.

Looking for a low cost, easy to install and use NMEA to WiFi Bridge.

 

I have used the Digital yacht bridge, but it is close to 300.00 and I was hoping someone had a solution around 100.00 based on the postings here, it looks like I might have to suck it up and put out the bucks...

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Distance, would the DMK box do the job I outlined above allowing multiple instrument inputs and outputs?

 

Thanks.

Yes and no. It will connect up your instruments to display data via wifi just fine, however it will not solve your multiplexing issue for interfacing the instruments with each other and make your HDS overlay properly. To tie your instruments together I would recommend an Actisense NDC-4-AIS. There might be other ways to wire up the boat without multiplexing but you would have to leave out some connections and not get full connectivity.

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US7070, you seem fixated on using a PC and ad-hoc networking set up on the PC. You have offered only that solution in any thread on Wifi. While this may work, there are other considerations like cost of the PC, and its software, securing the PC to various nav stations, having to continually run the PC in order to get a wifi connection, power drain, etc...

 

If you re-read the solution I posted using the Shipmodul miniplex and making it portable, the total cost and ease of installation and use is not much above $400. You can get away with its default port configs and installing it without a PC, however at some point, its full potential might be needed on some boats to filter NMEA sentences, for which you need a Windows PC connected to it to run the config software.

 

The PC solution doesn't do a good job at multiplexing with the same flexible features for filtering sentences, managing port speeds, combining incoming data streams, or offering Sea-Talk to NMEA translation which is really useful when moving from boat to boat. At some point, the OP might run across a Raymarine SeaTalk environment and having a mux that already has a specific port configured to do that , is a clean solution.

 

To the OP, the Mux is probably the easiest way to move from boat to boat and connect to a NMEA 0183 port as a listener. Even if the boat you move to hasn't already integrated the GPS, AIS and instrument data within their own network, the mux allows you to do it without disturbing their existing environment.

 

My $400 and $0.02 :D

 

 

I was thinking he might _already_ be running a laptop and expedition.

 

If not, it's obviously not a good solution.

 

I am interested in your method - how long would it take, from walking on the boat, to do the wiring?

 

I'm not particularly experienced at that sort of thing, and I wouldn't want to blow up a $25,000 instrument system - is there any danger of that?

 

Here are 2 pics of some bits and pieces of my "portable" kit.

For power, you can either tap into the distribution panel (degree of difficulty varies from boat to boat) or use a cable with a cigarette lighter plug. Many boats have a cigarette lighter socket at, or near the Nav station.

For the instrument connection, you'll need to tap into the NMEA 0183 OUT port on the boat's instrument system. Again, the ease of this will vary from boat to boat so have some decent lengths of spare instrument wire. For Ray Marine and Sea Talk,

the SeaTalk bus carries power and data so you can tap into that pretty easily. For that, I separate SeaTalk cable and a spare terminal block in case I need to splice into the wire and leave a convenient means to access the bus on another occasion. Of course you'll need owner permission to cut into the existing wiring.. Some boats with older systems may have a serial DB9 output port, in which case I have a cable for that and a couple of spare DB9 plug kits of different genders. e.g. an older Ockam system's NMEA Tap has a serial cable with a DB9 on it, so I have made up a plug and cable with the opposing gender to connect to the Mux.

 

If you need to tap into AIS and GPS separately, you'll need more cable. The mux has a port specifically set as the default port for AIS and additional input ports.

 

The time it takes will vary but if it's one of the boats you regularly sail on, you can set up some convenient connection points for future use. That may take a little longer than a one-off quick connection. In any case, we're not talking about more than a couple of hours of scouting their situation and doing it. BTW, the Mux's ports are all opto isolated top protect any downstream devices connected to the mux from electrical disparities.

post-5483-008468800 1345224211_thumb.jpg

post-5483-012962800 1345224215_thumb.jpg

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Distance, would the DMK box do the job I outlined above allowing multiple instrument inputs and outputs?

 

Thanks.

Yes and no. It will connect up your instruments to display data via wifi just fine, however it will not solve your multiplexing issue for interfacing the instruments with each other and make your HDS overlay properly. To tie your instruments together I would recommend an Actisense NDC-4-AIS. There might be other ways to wire up the boat without multiplexing but you would have to leave out some connections and not get full connectivity.

 

 

Thanks for the answer- as you can see above I figured that out myself and went with the ShipModul that combines bot functions.

 

 

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Distance, would the DMK box do the job I outlined above allowing multiple instrument inputs and outputs?

 

Thanks.

Yes and no. It will connect up your instruments to display data via wifi just fine, however it will not solve your multiplexing issue for interfacing the instruments with each other and make your HDS overlay properly. To tie your instruments together I would recommend an Actisense NDC-4-AIS. There might be other ways to wire up the boat without multiplexing but you would have to leave out some connections and not get full connectivity.

 

 

Thanks for the answer- as you can see above I figured that out myself and went with the ShipModul that combines bot functions.

 

 

 

Yes I did see that. We are working to add many of those functions to ours but through an App interface.

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I would like to see that Nexus come up with a solution for this! Their race box looks really good. A upgraded version of their race box could easily hold a wi-fi interface / router and more. I might just be dreaming, but it would be a really plus for their product range.

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If anyone wants to try a do-it-yourself NMEA 0183-wifi system you can use a python script I wrote.

 

It receives the NMEA sentences and runs a web server to deliver the data. It saves the most recent version of every sentence, without needing to be configured. I have some example web pages that parse and format the data using javascript. It is unlikely to work with something like expedition the way it runs now (because the data won't show up as serial data on the client side) but it's open to improvement.

 

I've got the NMEA server running on a linux router as an embedded system but it works well on a laptop too. The router still works as a router too, the data server is just a little background process. Any device with a browser can access the data. I rooted a nook simple touch to use as a display because it looks great in the sun.

 

Here's the link: http://www.holdentec...th-nook-display

 

Here's a picture of the system (delivering simulated data), there are some videos too if you follow the link above.

 

-Mike

 

mehserversystem_small.jpg

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Thanks breezetrees. Responses like yours remind me just how little I know :) I'm hoping i can do a little basic wiring and manage a simple terminal program, while you are knocking something like your setup together.

 

I never was good with languages . . . . . . . . or is that were good?

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Mike, i like your nook simple touch... I'm looking for a replayer on the mast of m'y J92s and it seems to be a great solution on the Deck.

 

I cant use my iPad in a case as replayer (iregatta) with the sun its impossible.

so do you improved your nook in such conditions ?

Any idea for à solution with out any laptop on board ? Miniplex 2wi or else ? (iregatta stop android dev. and i need compass speed wind angle and else ;-)

Thanks

Thierry

 

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There's a great development going on at the UK Practical Boat Owner (of all places!) forum, for DIY Mast repeaters. It's worth a read. Amazing what you can do when you get a few enthusiasts together!

 

http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread.php?t=328981

and

http://osbe.wikidot.com/

 

Andrew.

 

I am heavily involved in this project, would be really please for people to join in and give us some further requirements and feedback, the more people we can get involved the greater the skill base we can call on

 

Shaung

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Mikes post above got me thinking about rolling my own NMEA-wifi server and this is what I came up with.

 

A Raspberry Pi credit card sized computer running Raspbian (Debian), a usb wifi dongle and usb -> serial adaptor.

 

Hostapd turns the Pi into an access point and Muplex http://marinux.pk973.org/ which can multiplex multiple NMEA 0183 inputs and output via tcp port. It creates virtual terminal ports so there is no problem of exclusive use of data stream.

 

I am currently working on a website that I can access via mobile device to show the NMEA data.

 

Since taking that photo I have connected the server to the NMEA out of my Nexus Classic server and it worked great with iRegatta.

 

pi_2.jpg

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I realize I am diverging from the requirements of the original poster, and if the most 'inexpensive' solution is desired for getting data to the iPad or iPhone, ignore my proposition.

I recently installed the Raymarine e7 on my new sailboat that has the capability of mirroring its display to any iOS device, and also supports a bidirectional link to control the chart plotter as well.

 

admittedly, it is a more expensive solution and extreme overkill in many scenarios. however, the ~$400 cost for the serial->WiFi links seems excessive to me and restrictive when a larger boat is considered, with the potential need to remotely display not only NMEA 0183 serial data, but also NMEA 2000, Radar, Sonar, chart plotting, autopilot ... and possibly Flir IR and camera data. I think I paid ~$1200, but then, the capabilities are far greater.

 

for some applications the more expensive solution might be the better investment.

 

just thoughts ...

 

daniel

 

The issue with this approach is that you are stuck using the Raymarine App. If you want to run iRegatta it is not open, also it is not open to parsing the instrument data to improve sailing apps in the future. Having the link as open as possible is needed to foster an environment where app developers can come up with cool stuff for the sailing market.

 

Sorry, just getting in on this, can you confirm that the e7 doesn't wifi nmea 0183 so I can't use it with inavx?

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I realize I am diverging from the requirements of the original poster, and if the most 'inexpensive' solution is desired for getting data to the iPad or iPhone, ignore my proposition.

I recently installed the Raymarine e7 on my new sailboat that has the capability of mirroring its display to any iOS device, and also supports a bidirectional link to control the chart plotter as well.

 

admittedly, it is a more expensive solution and extreme overkill in many scenarios. however, the ~$400 cost for the serial->WiFi links seems excessive to me and restrictive when a larger boat is considered, with the potential need to remotely display not only NMEA 0183 serial data, but also NMEA 2000, Radar, Sonar, chart plotting, autopilot ... and possibly Flir IR and camera data. I think I paid ~$1200, but then, the capabilities are far greater.

 

for some applications the more expensive solution might be the better investment.

 

just thoughts ...

 

daniel

 

The issue with this approach is that you are stuck using the Raymarine App. If you want to run iRegatta it is not open, also it is not open to parsing the instrument data to improve sailing apps in the future. Having the link as open as possible is needed to foster an environment where app developers can come up with cool stuff for the sailing market.

 

Sorry, just getting in on this, can you confirm that the e7 doesn't wifi nmea 0183 so I can't use it with inavx?

 

I believe it is true, but if you go over to Panbo.com, you will find discussion of this issue.

 

the new Furuno Navnet plotters - also discussed at Panbo - appear to have gone a bit further than Raymarine with the wifi features, but at a significantly greater cost.

 

Still, I don't think the Furuno does what you are looking for either.

 

I think this is an area where there will be a lot of change in the next year or so.

 

I might hold off buying a plotter for a while, if I could.

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i think he means he can't find the discussion i mentioned, using the search tool on Panbo.

 

I can't find it either....

 

I found a few articles and comments dealing with the new e-series, but didn't see any mention of whether the e-7 broadcasts NMEA 0187, that might be used by iphone apps.

 

Perhaps i read about it somewhere else, but I am pretty sure it doesn't.

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Ok thanks. I've had a look at the Raymarine documentation and it isn't specific, but it only talks about being able to connect to iDevices, and if you want a computer connection you need to go via the network switch, which would suggest a no! I'll refer to some local techs. Another example of Raymarine's closed system approach? Probably.

 

Thanks 'enquiring mind' I did get as far as finding Panbo!

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Excellent! Open source and low power! I had thought about making something work with DD-WRT or something, but my dad is selling his big boat, so I'll have to keep my hobby ideas Viper-sized.

 

Mikes post above got me thinking about rolling my own NMEA-wifi server and this is what I came up with.

 

A Raspberry Pi credit card sized computer running Raspbian (Debian), a usb wifi dongle and usb -> serial adaptor.

 

Hostapd turns the Pi into an access point and Muplex http://marinux.pk973.org/ which can multiplex multiple NMEA 0183 inputs and output via tcp port. It creates virtual terminal ports so there is no problem of exclusive use of data stream.

 

I am currently working on a website that I can access via mobile device to show the NMEA data.

 

Since taking that photo I have connected the server to the NMEA out of my Nexus Classic server and it worked great with iRegatta.

 

 

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I like the idea of getting this to work on a WRT. These are amazing cheap, powerful devices due to their populartiy in the open source community. We soldered in serial ports following Hyerstay's links on this thread and now having working wifi that takes NMEA 0183 data from our Nexus FDX server to one wifi device like an and ipod with iregatta. However, it only allows connection to one device. I would prefer two, one for a chart plotter and one for the ipod with iregatta.

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