MidPack

J/88

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I have the instruments mounted in the aft bulkhead like that (and they're not nearly as big). They've been okay because I race mostly singlehanded, but every time I have crew on the boat the buttons get bumped constantly. Also, the lines coming aft from the cabintop winches/clutches lay across the instruments so I can't see them as well. Finally, instruments change - you might want something else after awhile. There's no way I'd cut a big hole in the boat like that - especially an expensive new boat.

 

Even one of those swing-arm things would be better - you could push the expensive bits out of the way when desired and store them inside the cabin.

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I agree with Bob - having instruments on the back of the cabin is fine for single-handing, but really lousy for fleet racing. After my autopilot was enabled trying to round a leeward mark in a fleet race, I made some covers that prevent the buttons being pressed by the pit crew's knees.

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- i agree with the place, when close racing we put the cover on the plotter, when duo handed or for deliveries and cruising it is a perfect place.

 

- stil no ORC cert. the wet measurement is at this time two time canceled , we have a lot of heavy wind more than 40 knots in the harbor was to much for measurements next appointment is on 1th. of march , in the following week we have the number..... This is the only thing we received at this point , but no numbers .

 



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Have you received the cert with VPP numbers? Thanks for posting your setup pictures.

tried to copy paste some info from the 3 d hull i received regarding the ORC measurements that didn't work ... so i took some picture's from my screen

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I have the instruments mounted in the aft bulkhead like that (and they're not nearly as big). They've been okay because I race mostly singlehanded, but every time I have crew on the boat the buttons get bumped constantly. Also, the lines coming aft from the cabintop winches/clutches lay across the instruments so I can't see them as well. Finally, instruments change - you might want something else after awhile. There's no way I'd cut a big hole in the boat like that - especially an expensive new boat.

 

Even one of those swing-arm things would be better - you could push the expensive bits out of the way when desired and store them inside the cabin.

 

There is a war between crew knees and instrument screens mounted on cabin backs especially when grinding cabin top winches. Unless there are rod guards knees always win and repairing instruments is expensive.

 

The hole for the prod extension line is way too close to the instrument; salt water will cause corrosion and/or moisture inside the instrument face.

 

 

 

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I keep wondering why people don't seem to be implementing that iPad on the chest thing that Ray Davis had in the AC.

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I had instruments on the 'cabin backs' on my first J, never again. Not only are whacks (buttons pushed accidentally or cracked faces) from knees, elbows, feet inevitable no matter how careful people are, they end up blocked by bodies too easily. Seahood or mast for us. YMMV

 

But I can see how cabin back instrument location would be preferable for solo/double racers, especially without a remote.

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I keep wondering why people don't seem to be implementing that iPad on the chest thing that Ray Davis had in the AC.

 

I actually added a wifi module for that exact thing. I will use an old ipad with that.

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Mine is under 3 feet of snow ;)

Hook up to it and pull it south-the snow will melt off on the way! We are still registered with hopes that we will get five or more. It'd be great to race OD and be part of a bigger PHRF fleet!

 

What other J/88 owners are considering coming to CRW? If you are thinking about it-sign up!

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So the j88 has been out for about 6 months...

 

Any major issues yet?

What is/was the first thing to break?

 

Any thing that needs to be changed?

What have you changed?

 

How is the deck layout? blocks? running rigging?

How is the Standard Line Package?

The rope clutches got an unfavorable review, what's your oppinion?

 

How is the helm balance?

Any crew issues with the current deck layout?

How many crew do you sail with? weight?

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Mine is under 3 feet of snow ;)

Hook up to it and pull it south-the snow will melt off on the way! We are still registered with hopes that we will get five or more. It'd be great to race OD and be part of a bigger PHRF fleet!

 

What other J/88 owners are considering coming to CRW? If you are thinking about it-sign up!

Enjoy the 7am boat call and ride out to the ocean and back. Five more hours a day than your inshore buddies for the same amount or less races. I dont think the RC will find room for you cats inside.

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our experence

 

Hull number 10 :

We have sailed with it about 10 times , wind 2 up to 25 knots

Any major issues yet? : No
What is/was the first thing to break? : Nothing yet

Any thing that needs to be changed? : for cruising, more comfort
What have you changed? : the comfort extra backrest ,

How is the deck layout? blocks? running rigging? : ok , only took stronger spi blocks and some handy ty tack shackles.
How is the Standard Line Package? : changed the jib sheet .
The rope clutches got an unfavorable review, what's your opinion? : seems to work better than spinlock that we were used to. No complaints

How is the helm balance? : great.
Any crew issues with the current deck layout? : did not sail with full crew yet , till now the max of crew was 3
How many crew do you sail with? weight? : will be 6 510 kg.

Our experience now , has unfortunately only on a river so we don’t have enough space, in a few weeks we will go to bigger water.

Overall : really love the J88 , handles very nice solo or dual handed. Three is perfect for jibe’s, but upwind we need some weight.

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So the j88 has been out for about 6 months...

 

I've been sailing on the first 88 to hit the Bay. Having a ball.


Any major issues yet? None
What is/was the first thing to break? Nothing Yet...boat's only sailed a dozen times and never in our typical breeze yet.

Any thing that needs to be changed? Nothing to date
What have you changed? Nada

How is the deck layout? blocks? running rigging? Deck layout is great. Ergo's are good and boat is easily sailed crewed and short handed.
How is the Standard Line Package? Quite good.
The rope clutches got an unfavorable review, what's your oppinion? No issues but as I've said...max breeze to date is 14 TWS.

How is the helm balance? Very well balanced.
Any crew issues with the current deck layout? nope
How many crew do you sail with? weight? Sailed with 6, 7, 4 and 5. Boat needs some beef on the rail to keep her flat but the rig is very tunable and even racing with 4 was manageable. The rating is a bit of a problem but we've got a lengthy appeal into the local PHRF committee. It will move upward.

 

Love the boat and have no doubt that once production comes into full swing, there WILL be a OD class in SF Bay!

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Thank you insails and schonnerman - seems like jBoats set up the boats pretty good then.

 

 

Hey, where are the other J/88's for Charleston Race Week, still only 3???

007 L to T dropped out?

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On a slightly different subject, what is the cost of a Triad trailer for an 88?

Mine was 9k on the invoice. The quality of the trailer is INCREDIBLE. One of the rare moments in life you feel like you got more than what you paid for.

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without properly fitted supports and load distribution hull deformation. see j/80 bulletin on fitting to trailer in thread on keel loss.

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8 support pads , 4 on each side . Keel is resting on the trailer as well, not hanging. I dont see a problem at ALL , especially cause its a ''tow-around'' size.

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That's some pretty sloppy sailing on display !

 

I like how he drops the helm at :25 secs !

 

Man you crash-tack because nobody is manning the tiller in a big breeze and THEN watch the fun happen.

 

Don't know if it's a terrible location for trimming the jib or not, but that second guy couldn't make it look any harder or more awkward - 32 years sailing and I've never stuck an ankle over the lee rail to grind, that's a new one on me.

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Is it me or would both of those boats benefit from a bit of trim on the outhaul (only the first part of the first vid).

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8 support pads , 4 on each side . Keel is resting on the trailer as well, not hanging. I dont see a problem at ALL , especially cause its a ''tow-around'' size.

For an object that's service life is to hang from the bottom of a boat at all angles, I've often wondered how much weight is too much on the keel.

 

I can understand the studs/bolts and root would be adversely affected by it dangling from the hull at highway speed and vibrating at harmonics.

 

However I've also seen boatyards rest the full weight the boat on the keel and then rock the boat as they adjust the poppets to keep the boat steady, apparently oblivious to the deformity of the keel sump area.

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For an object that's service life is to hang from the bottom of a boat at all angles, I've often wondered how much weight is too much on the keel.

I don't know for sure, but I'd always thought you want as much weight on the keel as possible. The pads/jack stands are only to keep the boat (perfectly) upright, any weight on them and the hull could deform. The keel bottom has to be fully supported (not point loads), but all the weight can be on the keel. It would seem the load afloat with the keel would be worse (tension instead of compression on the hard) and the dynamic loads underway, shear while heeling, etc. Lots of boats live on trailers and even some larger one designs with trailers (I can't imagine those owners take the boats off their trailers in winter, to store on a cradle or jack stands).

 

But again I am not sure, maybe someone will come along and educate us all.

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8 support pads , 4 on each side . Keel is resting on the trailer as well, not hanging. I dont see a problem at ALL , especially cause its a ''tow-around'' size.

For an object that's service life is to hang from the bottom of a boat at all angles, I've often wondered how much weight is too much on the keel.

 

I can understand the studs/bolts and root would be adversely affected by it dangling from the hull at highway speed and vibrating at harmonics.

 

However I've also seen boatyards rest the full weight the boat on the keel and then rock the boat as they adjust the poppets to keep the boat steady, apparently oblivious to the deformity of the keel sump area.

 

The ISO 12215-9 Load Case 3 for vertical pounding considers the stress on the keel and its support structure in those conditions. The requirement is to support the maximum loaded displacement of the boat minus the weight of the keel, multiplied by the acceleration or gravity which is 9.81.

 

You can put the full weight of a J-88 and then some on its keel.

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The ISO 12215-9 Load Case 3 for vertical pounding considers the stress on the keel and its support structure in those conditions. The requirement is to support the maximum loaded displacement of the boat minus the weight of the keel, multiplied by the acceleration or gravity which is 9.81.

 

You can put the full weight of a J-88 and then some on its keel.

I gather from above that the floor members of the J88 have applied a safety factor of 3 with regards to the ISO 12215-9.

 

Not being familiar of the existence of ISO 12215-9 nor planning to purchase the official ISO version, I read a brief by U. Remmlinger from 2010 which at the time -9 was still in the draft stages.

 

It does appear that "Load case 3 -- Keelboat vertical pounding" would be the relevant case. Interestingly though, these ISO standards are for effects of the impact on the hull and keel from a height into water (e.g. falling off the crest of a wave). I would venture to wager that the floor members of the J88 are not designed to withstand a vertical drop impact on the keel onto anything but water.

 

 

Today I asked an expert on Keel vs. Poppet loading and he said the general boatyard standard is 80% on the Keel and the rest evenly distributed on the Poppets placed at reinforced areas of the hull, like bulkheads and webs.

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You could verify with loadcells I guess, but I've never seen anyone check relative load in 40 years.

 

Here's another statement from a cradle manufacturer, but I'll stick with the same practice we've always used (full support under the keel, and as many poppet/pads as possible). A well built cradle or trailer with full support under the keel and 8 support pads sounds about as good as it gets. I don't trust jackstands, and some yards and insurance carriers don't either. YMMV

 

Keels can generally support up to 95% of a boat’s displacement. The sides and bottoms of most modern laminated hulls should never be required to accept concentrated loads, i.e. a large amount of weight on a few pads. If possible, supporting means used against the hull should be located at bulkheads and/or stringers.

http://www.navstore.com/jowi-steel-boat-cradle-model-2.html

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You could verify with loadcells I guess, but I've never seen anyone check relative load in 40 years.

 

Here's another statement from a cradle manufacturer, but I'll stick with the same practice we've always used (full support under the keel, and as many poppet/pads as possible). A well built cradle or trailer with full support under the keel and 8 support pads sounds about as good as it gets. I don't trust jackstands, and some yards and insurance carriers don't either. YMMV

 

Keels can generally support up to 95% of a boat’s displacement. The sides and bottoms of most modern laminated hulls should never be required to accept concentrated loads, i.e. a large amount of weight on a few pads. If possible, supporting means used against the hull should be located at bulkheads and/or stringers.

http://www.navstore.com/jowi-steel-boat-cradle-model-2.html

That quote is nice, but the pics on the site don't seem to abide, except for that nice cradle with bunks for the 1D48. Ian Farrier seems to have done a very nice job with the trailer for his new F22, too!

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yesterday first afternoon with full team training, today is planned a full day of training with a J92s , with media rib and training buoy s. As we are used to symmetrical spinakkers we have already a lot of questions, Does any one have good links , tricks for the perfect kite handling ?

But what a great fun we already had yesterday did about 40 jibes and we searched for the right angel upwind

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Looks like the two J/88's at CRW ended up in PHRF B, the smallest boat in their section - so they'll probably get waterlined. They'll know each day what the odds are based on the forecast. J/88's rated 87 (all the similar LOA boats are in PHRF C, thanks to ratings).

 

Other boats in PHRF B so far: J/35, J/105, J/88(2), J/120(2), Sabre 426, Seascape 27, Cape Fear 38, SR33.

 

J/88's and a Seascape 27 in the same section as J/120's - words fail me...

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Too bad you can't get an OD start. I am surprised that the 105 and 120 didn't get OD starts either. Perhaps all 5 crews should coordinate, get the same boat, and sail OD...

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Tough sledding for 29 footers against big heavies like 120s, but they'll be off and gone shortly after the gun and the 88s will be in the clear soon enough. Not to worry.

 

You can bemoan the section you are in or revel in it - remember the difference between an adventure and an ordeal is your attitude.

 

One time my boat partner had a little snit about the section we were posted to and threatened to not race - the R/C looked at me and I answered "Fuck That, we're here to sail, bring it on !"

 

As for proper sail-handling of assyms.... Hell, you could write a book !

 

# 1 - avoid reaching take-downs at all cost - you REALLY want to be able to gybe-douse or at least turn down into your drop to unload the sail - otherwise with the long luff and big girths of an assym you are very likely to shrimp like Bubba Gump.

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As we are used to symmetrical spinakkers we have already a lot of questions, Does any one have good links , tricks for the perfect kite handling ?

 

Sailing World had a good article “The Commandments of Asym Trim”:
  • Thou shall rotate your asymmetric to weather.
  • Thou shall keep the tack line in mind.
  • Thou shall never sail a straight line.
  • Thou shall use your twings only if you must.
  • Thou shall always have and talk about pressure.
Also...
Also there's some good videos on assy trim on YouTube. Look for assy, j/70, melges, dave ullman.
9781408101261.jpg
Read "Higher Performance Sailing: Faster
Handling Techniques" by Frank Bethwaite.
Oh. Spend time on the water. It's a learning curve:
:wacko: Year 1: what the hell is going on here?
:rolleyes: Year 2: hey, this might actually work... puff in 3-2-1...
B) Year 3: get out of our way. We're rippin' Wohoo....

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As we are used to symmetrical spinakkers we have already a lot of questions, Does any one have good links , tricks for the perfect kite handling ?

 

Sailing World had a good article “The Commandments of Asym Trim”:
  • Thou shall rotate your asymmetric to weather.
  • Thou shall keep the tack line in mind.
  • Thou shall never sail a straight line.
  • Thou shall use your twings only if you must.
  • Thou shall always have and talk about pressure.
Also...
Also there's some good videos on assy trim on YouTube. Look for assy, j/70, melges, dave ullman.
9781408101261.jpg
Read "Higher Performance Sailing: Faster
Handling Techniques" by Frank Bethwaite.
Oh. Spend time on the water. It's a learning curve:
:wacko: Year 1: what the hell is going on here?
:rolleyes: Year 2: hey, this might actually work... puff in 3-2-1...
B) Year 3: get out of our way. We're rippin' Wohoo....

 

 

Year 3....funny but TRUE !!

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wow thanks , all great tips,

 

So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend together with a J92S , and had a lot of fun, really love the J/88 !!!

Now we know that we have to learn some more,,,

Wind was between 15 and 25 knots.

Nice upwind speed . there is a BIG difference between sitting as a couch potato in the rail , or folded around the wire, 0,5 knots of speed ..

 

Also we learned to steer some times as a maniac, searing for pressure downwind. And than she flies

 

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

 

Wondering where we will be at 3 years

 

maybe not that fancy to look at but this the first attempt of a smal race, the J92S had some problems with her asi , so we did only 1 round. comic thing at the end the helmsman forgot that we where in the rail :D

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Insails , i see you installed the Lowrance unidock with 2 speakers. Im not sure i want to drill 2 big holes for those speakers. I will maybe go with a set of bose acoustimass inside. How do you like the unidock?

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wow thanks , all great tips,

 

So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend together with a J92S , and had a lot of fun, really love the J/88 !!!

Now we know that we have to learn some more,,,

Wind was between 15 and 25 knots.

Nice upwind speed . there is a BIG difference between sitting as a couch potato in the rail , or folded around the wire, 0,5 knots of speed ..

 

Also we learned to steer some times as a maniac, searing for pressure downwind. And than she flies

 

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

 

Wondering where we will be at 3 years

 

maybe not that fancy to look at but this the first attempt of a smal race, the J92S had some problems with her asi , so we did only 1 round. comic thing at the end the helmsman forgot that we where in the rail :D

Yikes!

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So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend

 

You asked for it (or did you)?

 

If I was driving like that, I would get kicked off in 2 minutes. Zero concentration = waste of time and effort. 100% focus should be on speed and driving the boat. Let someone else worry about the other boat.

 

Infuckers? I would opt for a tighter angle, and maybe more twist if necessary, for the jib. Close hauled base setting should be at coach roof or handrail = sheeting angle of 6-7 degrees. Harder for the driver to keep pace but you'll point much higher and be able to press for speed.

 

What speed did you have upwind? I would aim for 6.6-6.7 this year. 6.8 next :D

 

Looks fun. Keep it up!

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Just like on a Laser, once the boom hits the water it's all over ...

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

1655793_572907832827450_1290352552_o.jpg

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Looks like the two J/88's at CRW ended up in PHRF B, the smallest boat in their section - so they'll probably get waterlined. They'll know each day what the odds are based on the forecast. J/88's rated 87 (all the similar LOA boats are in PHRF C, thanks to ratings).

 

Other boats in PHRF B so far: J/35, J/105, J/88(2), J/120(2), Sabre 426, Seascape 27, Cape Fear 38, SR33.

 

J/88's and a Seascape 27 in the same section as J/120's - words fail me...

On the rating front!!!...I noticed that the J boat PHRF base for the J 88 is 87 (105 lp jib and 95 sq m kite). Does this 87 for Charleston reflect that? What sails are allowed for that rating? NE PHRF and Galveston gave the boat a 87 as well, and I wonder what sails the boat in Key West had with an 84? for what configuration? Thanks if anyone can chime in.

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Practice video illustrates the appeal of J-Boat's "rather conservative" approach to sail area/displacement and robust construction - lots of their buyers aren't very skilled ! Yiikes is right - these guys would be swimming out here half the time ! ( last weekend was 17-22 with gusts to 30, yeah - we sailed )

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Practice video illustrates the appeal of J-Boat's "rather conservative" approach to sail area/displacement and robust construction - lots of their buyers aren't very skilled ! Yiikes is right - these guys would be swimming out here half the time ! ( last weekend was 17-22 with gusts to 30, yeah - we sailed )

thanks.... :( so our goal is learning as fast as possible , sorry if we don't give the perfect picture at once, but we swim hard....and learn fast...

  • Like 1

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The guy's an idiot!

 

It's going to be wild and rocky these first few goes, just wait till you trawl the bag, run over it and pick it up the other side! (Been there, done that!)

 

+1 on the jib tweeker. Onto the coach roof and ease a little sheet, it'll be like you hit the turbo button

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Wow people. Calm down. They are practicing and giving us videos for our benefits. Seems like they are having fun wich is the main goal when we sail.

 

Insails , i like your videos. Keep making them.

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Wow people. Calm down. They are practicing and giving us videos for our benefits. Seems like they are having fun wich is the main goal when we sail.

Insails , i like your videos. Keep making them.

+1. The nasty posts from armchair rockstars are sad. Even if you really are a rockstar, you weren't always. Nice vids/posts insails.

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Whoa, I didn't call anyone an idiot, just that the less-than-ballistic design parameters that J has be so successful selling are well-warranted for a good segment of the market. Yeah, we get to sail year-round in good breeze here, don't expect me to apologize. Those guys sure are bundled up - nice foul weather gear - I think I remember where my jacket is...

 

The video seems to show the helm crossing center frequently - not just on transitions, which indicates a lack of focus - perhaps that's a product of the fish-eye effect of the lens but it looks sloppy to me, likewise I'd try to avoid that stance straddling the tiller - have someone call the mark's position to you if you can't see it - heck it's not like the crew is hiking out anyway. Yeah, first practice - I get it, they'll figure it out. Lots of room for improvement.

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So our first big screw up, the first time we hoist the A-Sail, later that day we took the other one, and forced some broaches . And we think now how to handel the proper way.

 

Thanks for the advice, it only helps us to get better,

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Did you guys let go the tackline on purpose?

 

Also , i didnt unwrap the boom yet. But if its that sharp i will cover it with something.

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Love it, feeling the pain!

 

I notice you're getting the sheet over the end of the boom quite a lot. Got to be annoying. I'd be tempted with just a little tweeker to stop it happening.

 

Are you blowing the vang? I think you are but it's not clear

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a we did a few things wrong,

 

Very important , we did not pay atention to the weather, later that day we found out that with some clouds there was a lot of wind infront,

 

The incident was a longer, and i took some moments out of it,

 

At first we took out the vang, that we did at the first wind, right after that there was a second and harder wind, at that point we give a lot of slack to the main and kite,

 

then we wher stuck in the broach, What we tried, ease the hailyard 4 mtrs, and at the same moment steer hard down, that did not work, we also tried to do that with the tack, you can see we put it on the winch en eased it for about 3 meters. also you can see the helms man steering on the helm. Al those things did not work, we also waited , but the wind kept blowing.

 

At last we desided to take down the kite.

 

what we did later that day with the bigger A-sail, get her in a broach, ease, vang first, than main and direct after that, the kite. get out the jib, steer hard down wind , and that worked ..

 

Very annoying is the boom , and the knot of the reef line, we dident notice that when sailing , but when i study al the footage of that day , you see it , it is on our todo list....

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insails,

 

Great write up, thanks for that and the movies. Everything you are going through is exactly why we PRACTICE!! That's the time to make mistakes and improve the team work. Keep it up!

 

Will Museler

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Insails - based on your time on the water, are you pleased/satisfied with the placement of your B&G Evo Touch on the cockpit bulkhead?

Any issues of crew or lines causing problems with screen location? Like a few others with boats pending delivery, trying to determine if that position is valuable/practical vs. mounting inside cabin with a gimbal arm.

 

From what you have learned to date, would you set up it the same way as currently configured or - if you had the chance to do over - would you go the gimbaled arm path?

 

Thanks

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bravobravobravo,

 

Yes, i find place perfect, when we sail for the performance , we don't you it and we put the cover on, When we in the harbor , we can control evrything from music to plans and settings. , when we have a delivery we use the map . and take of the cover.

 

We did not cruise that many at this moment , because its is winter, but the few time's we use the map , some music and that works fine.

 

I would not choose an other place , i thought about a flexible arm, but after a while those things are not as sturdy and i want a clean look no lose cables .

 

you can see at the movie's we don't touch the cover, and we don't make an effort to avoid it,

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im placing 3 triton displays at the mast with the same bracket as insails , nothing in the bulkhead , im not a fan of drilling holes in a boat.... especially brand new. So only 3 at the mast for now , placing the zeus touch 8 inside on a bracket .

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Doing the exact same thing on our 88. 3 T41's on a scanstrut mast pod and a Zeus 2 on a swing bracket. Just went to CCF Composites in Bristol to see our hull #25.

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Not likely...but we'll have great starting lines of J70's and J111's.

 

We will certainly get a J88 fleet going here...once the factory catches up with the backlog. The boat just hits too many sweet spots not to.

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Bill's SP

Tell us about your choice of main sail

Cloth, battens, cut...

Funny, I was just thinking: post a photo of the cockpit here and get a flurry of plotter - zeus 2 - triton display - 7 touch - simrad tiller Pilot - wifi module - unidock with 2 speakers - evo touch - gimbaled arms - music controls comments. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

 

 

There have been a few photos and videos of the j88 sailing. I'd say half of them seem to have the Mainsail flogging - maybe it's because it's really windy and it's more exciting to watch, maybe they don't have enough weight on the rail, maybe the sail is cut too full, maybe not enough twist ... IDK, sometimes that's what the skipper wants. Anyway it pains me to watch.

 

Cloth ... I'm not a sailmaker, just a user, I happen to be partial to GPL 10, this cloth is Carbon Fiber in a Technora scrim in Mylar exterior skin (i.e. laminate). I like it because of the weight and flexibility, but primarily because of its ability to hold it's designed shape. The boat owner likes its color and it is light weight. It seems to be good for the typical conditions we experience on Long Island Sound. I'm sure there are other cloths just a good or better out there.

 

Battens ... they make a difference. Middle Battens: use the two tapered battens provided by your sailmaker. Bottom Batten: use a batten with a softer bend for light air and chop, and a stiffer bend to keep the leech exit straight in heavy air. Top Batten: like the bottom, have one batten for light to medium air and another for heavy-air. The Upper Batten controls the upper sail shape, it is important and for pointing and speed. Too much tension will make the head very full and hard to de-power the rest of the sail.

 

Cut ... I'd say that depends on where you plan on sailing. If you predominantly sail on the Chesapeake or Long Island Sound you'd want a fuller cut than if you sail out of San Francisco Bay.

 

Sailmakers feel free to chime in here with a real answer. :)

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BSP, have you thought about asking UK to down-size their J/122 sail designs for the 88?

Have anyone thought to call John Fries at Fries Sail Design to get a sail that will actually work for the boat?

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Why start out with slow sails out of the gate?

BSP, have you thought about asking UK to down-size their J/122 sail designs for the 88?

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BSP, have you thought about asking UK to down-size their J/122 sail designs for the 88?

Have anyone thought to call John Fries at Fries Sail Design to get a sail that will actually work for the boat?

Why start out with slow sails out of the gate?

Sails? I saw nothing in the brochure that indicates that I need to provide sails ... I thought they came with the boat.

:wacko: Year 1: what the hell is going on here? (we're gonna need some delivery sails anyway...)

 

I think "Year 3" we call Musicman B)

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BSP, have you thought about asking UK to down-size their J/122 sail designs for the 88?

Have anyone thought to call John Fries at Fries Sail Design to get a sail that will actually work for the boat?

>Why start out with slow sails out of the gate?

Sails? I saw nothing in the brochure that indicates that I need to provide sails ... I thought they came with the boat.

:wacko: Year 1: what the hell is going on here? (we're gonna need some delivery sails anyway...)

 

I think "Year 3" we call Musicman B)

 

 

Would love to help out with the sails, LMK!

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So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend

 

100% focus should be on speed and driving the boat. Let someone else worry about the other boat.

 

The video seems to show the helm crossing center frequently - not just on transitions, which indicates a lack of focus - perhaps that's a product of the fish-eye effect of the lens but it looks sloppy to me, likewise I'd try to avoid that stance straddling the tiller - have someone call the mark's position to you if you can't see it - .

I was out sailing Sunday (15-20, gusts to 25, water temperature 36F), skylarking apparently, looking for the next puff, the mark, the other boats ... tiller crossing the centerline repeatedly while I was trying to stay on a plane ... steering with my feet because my vang fell off.

 

OMG, am I developing bad habits racing a Laser?

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wow thanks , all great tips,

 

So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend together with a J92S , and had a lot of fun, really love the J/88 !!!

Now we know that we have to learn some more,,,

Wind was between 15 and 25 knots.

Nice upwind speed . there is a BIG difference between sitting as a couch potato in the rail , or folded around the wire, 0,5 knots of speed ..

 

Also we learned to steer some times as a maniac, searing for pressure downwind. And than she flies

 

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

 

Wondering where we will be at 3 years

 

maybe not that fancy to look at but this the first attempt of a smal race, the J92S had some problems with her asi , so we did only 1 round. comic thing at the end the helmsman forgot that we where in the rail :D

 

Can the jib be trimmed from the cabin-top winches? Trimming from the primaries looks very awkward.

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wow thanks , all great tips,

 

So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend together with a J92S , and had a lot of fun, really love the J/88 !!!

Now we know that we have to learn some more,,,

Wind was between 15 and 25 knots.

Nice upwind speed . there is a BIG difference between sitting as a couch potato in the rail , or folded around the wire, 0,5 knots of speed ..

 

Also we learned to steer some times as a maniac, searing for pressure downwind. And than she flies

 

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

 

Wondering where we will be at 3 years

 

maybe not that fancy to look at but this the first attempt of a smal race, the J92S had some problems with her asi , so we did only 1 round. comic thing at the end the helmsman forgot that we where in the rail :D

 

Can the jib be trimmed from the cabin-top winches? Trimming from the primaries looks very awkward.

Not without adding a block or two, bad idea IMHO, cross-sheeting to a windward primary would be better.

 

And how is it any more "awkward" than virtually any other boat? If anything the ergonomics on the many J/Boats I've been on are better than many other designs.

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The winches are not that awkard as it may seem, i am trimming the winches my self and i am pretty long so on no other boaut i can move very easy. Keep in mind that this are our first trip with more people on the J/88 . So we where testing how to get out of the rail, finding the right place to winch . Later that day , i found my place better and i had no problem any more.

 

 

 

 

wow thanks , all great tips,

 

So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend together with a J92S , and had a lot of fun, really love the J/88 !!!

Now we know that we have to learn some more,,,

Wind was between 15 and 25 knots.

Nice upwind speed . there is a BIG difference between sitting as a couch potato in the rail , or folded around the wire, 0,5 knots of speed ..

 

Also we learned to steer some times as a maniac, searing for pressure downwind. And than she flies

 

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

 

Wondering where we will be at 3 years

 

maybe not that fancy to look at but this the first attempt of a smal race, the J92S had some problems with her asi , so we did only 1 round. comic thing at the end the helmsman forgot that we where in the rail :D

 

Can the jib be trimmed from the cabin-top winches? Trimming from the primaries looks very awkward.

Not without adding a block or two, bad idea IMHO, cross-sheeting to a windward primary would be better.

 

And how is it any more "awkward" than virtually any other boat? If anything the ergonomics on the many J/Boats I've been on are better than many other designs.

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IMG 1355

IMG 1357

IMG 1358

 

Some first picture's last trainings weekend, From Hull no 10 in the Netherlands, and what are we proud at here

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wow thanks , all great tips,

 

So we had our first training with the whole crew this weekend together with a J92S , and had a lot of fun, really love the J/88 !!!

Now we know that we have to learn some more,,,

Wind was between 15 and 25 knots.

Nice upwind speed . there is a BIG difference between sitting as a couch potato in the rail , or folded around the wire, 0,5 knots of speed ..

 

Also we learned to steer some times as a maniac, searing for pressure downwind. And than she flies

 

Once we where in a broach for about 8 minut's had the top wire of the railing under water, but the J/88 doesn't mind.

 

Wondering where we will be at 3 years

 

maybe not that fancy to look at but this the first attempt of a smal race, the J92S had some problems with her asi , so we did only 1 round. comic thing at the end the helmsman forgot that we where in the rail :D

 

Can the jib be trimmed from the cabin-top winches? Trimming from the primaries looks very awkward.

Not without adding a block or two, bad idea IMHO, cross-sheeting to a windward primary would be better.

 

And how is it any more "awkward" than virtually any other boat? If anything the ergonomics on the many J/Boats I've been on are better than many other designs.

I do a bunch of sailing on a J105. Unless it's really windy, we and most 105's trim the jib from the cabin-tops.

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I do a bunch of sailing on a J105. Unless it's really windy, we and most 105's trim the jib from the cabin-tops.

The example video was "really windy." I also raced J/105s for years and never noticed anyone doing it (cross sheeting though), must be a regional thing, or something that's come up since I left the class.

 

Depending on how you run the sheet, it could be really hard on the deck where the J/105 foot block is (J/88s don't have foot blocks, just a small plastic pad eye, you would not want to run the sheet upward from that at all or it would probably pull out eventually), and the cabintop winches are smaller (there's a reason primaries are larger) and evidently Lewmar has their own cautions RE: winch wear.

 

I am sure the pros and cons have been discussed, and it's your boat. We just have different recommendations for others, no problem.

 

http://www.j105.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1306

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I do a bunch of sailing on a J105. Unless it's really windy, we and most 105's trim the jib from the cabin-tops.

The example video was "really windy." I also raced J/105s for years and never noticed anyone doing it (cross sheeting though), must be a regional thing, or something that's come up since I left the class.

 

Depending on how you run the sheet, it could be really hard on the deck where the J/105 foot block is (J/88s don't have foot blocks, just a small plastic pad eye, you would not want to run the sheet upward from that at all or it would probably pull out eventually), and the cabintop winches are smaller (there's a reason primaries are larger) and evidently Lewmar has their own cautions RE: winch wear.

 

I am sure the pros and cons have been discussed, and it's your boat. We just have different recommendations for others, no problem.

 

http://www.j105.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1306

 

I was just asking. I've never seen a J88, but in the video, jib trimming looks awkward and off balance. On the 105, cabin-top sheeting just works.

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I do a bunch of sailing on a J105. Unless it's really windy, we and most 105's trim the jib from the cabin-tops.

 

The example video was "really windy." I also raced J/105s for years and never noticed anyone doing it (cross sheeting though), must be a regional thing, or something that's come up since I left the class.

Depending on how you run the sheet, it could be really hard on the deck where the J/105 foot block is (J/88s don't have foot blocks, just a small plastic pad eye, you would not want to run the sheet upward from that at all or it would probably pull out eventually), and the cabintop winches are smaller (there's a reason primaries are larger) and evidently Lewmar has their own cautions RE: winch wear.

I am sure the pros and cons have been discussed, and it's your boat. We just have different recommendations for others, no problem.http://www.j105.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=1306

I was just asking. I've never seen a J88, but in the video, jib trimming looks awkward and off balance. On the 105, cabin-top sheeting just works.

Maybe my respect for "fair leads" is undue, but that's what it comes down to. On the 105 you race, do you go from the jib car to the foot block to the cabintop?

 

When you see the little plastic "padeye" and it's location on the J/88 (lower left in attached pic), you'll know you could not lead from there directly to a cabintop winch (and wouldn't want to, I would expect it to pull out with any load that was not almost perfectly in line).

post-301-0-93242900-1395755611_thumb.jpg

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105's have a heavy double turning block on the rail that gives you a nice clean run to either cabin-top or the primary.