MidPack

J/88

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Any owners/crew willing to divulge how much mast pre-bend you tune for (base)? I've seen info for the J/70 and J/111 but not the J/88. We've found the J/88 rig to be stiffer/harder to bend than any other boat/rig I've owned (at least), IOW the mast is stiffer than I expected.

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Any owners/crew willing to divulge how much mast pre-bend you tune for (base)? I've seen info for the J/70 and J/111 but not the J/88. We've found the J/88 rig to be stiffer/harder to bend than any other boat/rig I've owned (at least), IOW the mast is stiffer than I expected.

Kinda needs to match the main you have designed for vs boats with different mainsails

Indeed, as TS throws out, the amount of prebend you want has a lot to do with the shape of your mainsail. Thus your sailmaker should be the first person you need to ask this question.
One of the first things you’ll want to know is the base headstay length and how to measure it: this effects the prebend for “base.” Both Quantum and North have different points for taking this measurement. (We have a measurement from stud to stud of 1.679”: that length in probably meaningless for any another boat.)

 

As to how much prebend we have at base ... I'll have to get back to you about this when we go to Charleston ...

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Most of the boats have had a few months of racing to refine the layout (SARALYSIA was just launched the Friday before race week.) Here are but a few of the observations:

• another thing worth mentioning is that two boats had rudder gudgeon issues ...

 

As you all are probably aware, the gudgeon is about ⅛" wider than the rudder head. As per design specs, to make up for this gap 1/16" shims of HPDE are placed on each side and glued in with some sort of adhesive (4200 perhaps?). Each gudgeon is attached with three ¼" bolts.

Anyway, as is likely to happen, these shims have a tendency to work loose. I take responsibility for not inspecting them each day. In our case both lower shims fell out on the the last day and led to one of the bolts braking off. In this condition the rudder tip will have over an inch of play from side to side in '"fresh to frightening” conditions'.

So check your shims or figure out a way to keep them from working loose permanently.

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Thanks brother ... I am working down in Jersey City at the mo. Planning to move back in with the family in CT by the summer ( he says, hopefully! ). Catch up closer to the 1st gun in April!!!

 

 

BSP et al. Any 88's up here in the NE ... LIS, NY/NJ. Looking for a ride on one of these porn stars!

BW,

We sail out of New Rochelle every Thursday night and a weekend or two every month from April thru October.

You're welcome to join us whenever, we love showing off the boat.

BSP

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Any owners/crew willing to divulge how much mast pre-bend you tune for (base)? I've seen info for the J/70 and J/111 but not the J/88. We've found the J/88 rig to be stiffer/harder to bend than any other boat/rig I've owned (at least), IOW the mast is stiffer than I expected.

Kinda needs to match the main you have designed for vs boats with different mainsails

Of course, I realize there will be a range.

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More J/88 info/links on doing the Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac http://www.sailfeed.com/2015/02/j88s-planing-assault-on-chicago-mac-race/

 

Sorry I didn't include this in the earlier post above.

 

It's way early and there are already 151 boats entered, in the end they expect 300+.

 

I don't know where this came from:

There are six J-88’s in Lake Michigan that are doing the race, plus three out-of-towners joining them. A total of nine boats so far! Why not “take a crack at the Mac” yourself!? With a J/88 on a trailer, it simply cannot get any easier.

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Ad says it's a new J/88 but it comes with four sails, electronics and a few odds & ends, so I assume it was a sale that fell through some how without hitting the water. Hull #40 priced at $172,436 - looks higher than list for the equipment IMO even if it is actually all new. Production has to be up to over 60 hulls by now I'd think, so this one was built 20 weeks ago?

 

http://www.portsanilacmarina.com/documents/JBoatsJ88PriceListingPortSanilacMarina_000.pdf

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Ad says it's a new J/88 but it comes with four sails, electronics and a few odds & ends, so I assume it was a sale that fell through some how without hitting the water. Hull #40 priced at $172,436 - looks higher than list for the equipment IMO even if it is actually all new. Production has to be up to over 60 hulls by now I'd think, so this one was built 20 weeks ago?

 

http://www.portsanilacmarina.com/documents/JBoatsJ88PriceListingPortSanilacMarina_000.pdf

The Johnstone's demo boat was for sale for $168,000 without a trailer, but can't find it on yachtworld anymore....

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Looking at the photo at p5, the calibration for the rudder angle indicator is on an inspection hatch, does that mean that if the inspection hatch isn't put back on in exactly the same orientation then the data are not fully calibrated?

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Looking at the photo at p5, the calibration for the rudder angle indicator is on an inspection hatch, does that mean that if the inspection hatch isn't put back on in exactly the same orientation then the data are not fully calibrated?

I grew up sailing a Laser, the Rudder Indicator we used was a wooden stick called a Tiller.

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Looking at the photo at p5, the calibration for the rudder angle indicator is on an inspection hatch, does that mean that if the inspection hatch isn't put back on in exactly the same orientation then the data are not fully calibrated?

 

I grew up sailing a Laser, the Rudder Indicator we used was a wooden stick called a Tiller.
Me too, never felt the need for a rudder indicator, especially on a tiller boat.

 

Laser rudder indicator (per description), really?

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Looking at the photo at p5, the calibration for the rudder angle indicator is on an inspection hatch, does that mean that if the inspection hatch isn't put back on in exactly the same orientation then the data are not fully calibrated?

I grew up sailing a Laser, the Rudder Indicator we used was a wooden stick called a Tiller.

 

Me too, never felt the need for a rudder indicator, especially on a tiller boat.

 

+1

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More J/88 info/links on doing the Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac http://www.sailfeed.com/2015/02/j88s-planing-assault-on-chicago-mac-race/

 

Sorry I didn't include this in the earlier post above.

 

It's way early and there are already 151 boats entered, in the end they expect 300+.

 

I don't know where this came from:

There are six J-88’s in Lake Michigan that are doing the race, plus three out-of-towners joining them. A total of nine boats so far! Why not “take a crack at the Mac” yourself!? With a J/88 on a trailer, it simply cannot get any easier.

 

There are already 4 J/88's entered for the 2015 CYC Race to Mackinac, even though the race isn't until July 10th.

 

http://www.cycracetomackinac.com/

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Forwarding this along ...

 

Dear J88 owners,

 

Indian Harbor Yacht Club has graciously offered to host a J88 championship regatta on October 10-11. This would be a great opportunity to race one design on Long Island Sound. Please let me or Jonathan Nye know if you are interested. If you know of any other owners not on this list, please forward.

Other one design events in 2015: Charleston Race Week, Block Island Race Week and Can Am regatta.

 

Thanks,

Iris

 

... ...

 

Iris Happy to see the Gearbuster has been included in the junior initiative. Regarding the Gearbuster Have been in touch with Jeff Johnstone and Rusty Stewart about hosting a J88 championship regatta at the end of the year. Believe we have the green light to do this but so far not getting much feedback on what the class would like. Think thered be interest in doing a day or two of WL racing with another day devoted to a mid-distance race? Thinking Columbus Day weekend so if a distance race was to be included, this could be the Gearbuster (Stratford Shoal and back or any other course).

 

 

 

Any ideas what the class would like? Lots of flexibility on our end. To

 

 

 

Jonathan Nye

IHYC

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So how does the 88 compare speedwise to say the Donovan 26 which is 1/3 the price?

Or the SeaScape 27 - anybody line up with one yet ?

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So how does the 88 compare speedwise to say the Donovan 26 which is 1/3 the price?

J/88 base price $124K well equipped IMO, just add sails $10K, electronics $4K and incidentals...

Show me a Donovan 26 with a base price of $41K ...

 

Oh, were you comparing a base price Donovan 26 ($65K exworks) with a race ready j88 that includes an engine, a suit of racing sails, B&G Electronic package ($172K)

 

 

 

So how does Donovan 26 compare with say the 88 with getting a one-design start with more than six boats in 2015?

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So how does the 88 compare speedwise to say the Donovan 26 which is 1/3 the price?

Or the SeaScape 27 - anybody line up with one yet ?
Two J/88's were in the same section with a Seascape 27 at Charleston Race Week last April. The J/88's both dusted the Seascape 27 in every race, in fact the Seascape 27 was DFL boat-for-boat and corrected in almost every race no matter what the wind/sea state. But I don't think the Seascape was designed for buoy racing, so not really a fair comparison?

 

The GP 26 looks like an awesome boat. But comparing a GP 26 with no engine, no head and less than half the displacement of a J/88 on price doesn't make much sense, but haters gonna hate...welcome to SA. Yawn...

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No hate, just curious. Both are getting press in SA. Perhaps the J80 would be a fairer comparison, but the 80 was designed in 92. Wasn't Wraceboat's boat show deal $55k and #40 listed for $172k? Savage17, thanks. That's the kind of info I was looking for. Gosh, sensitive bunch here.

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Gotta share, we took out #61 yesterday in 20+ for her first sail on Puget Sound and WOW, what a cool boat. Coming from a Moore 24 owner if I didn't already have a boat it would be very hard to talk me out of a J/88. How many 30'ers can you go out with two friends in 20+, throw up the chute and have a blast at 14 knots? very impressed. Doing a demo race today on her - she's still available....

 

10827976_772436762851745_651703089585619

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No hate, just curious. Both are getting press in SA. Perhaps the J80 would be a fairer comparison, but the 80 was designed in 92. Wasn't Wraceboat's boat show deal $55k and #40 listed for $172k? Savage17, thanks. That's the kind of info I was looking for. Gosh, sensitive bunch here.

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Gotta share, we took out #61 yesterday in 20+ for her first sail on Puget Sound and WOW, what a cool boat. Coming from a Moore 24 owner if I didn't already have a boat it would be very hard to talk me out of a J/88. How many 30'ers can you go out with two friends in 20+, throw up the chute and have a blast at 14 knots? very impressed. Doing a demo race today on her - she's still available....

 

10827976_772436762851745_651703089585619

Who made the suit? I googled Viking Sails and nada.

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Gotta share, we took out #61 yesterday in 20+ for her first sail on Puget Sound and WOW, what a cool boat. Coming from a Moore 24 owner if I didn't already have a boat it would be very hard to talk me out of a J/88. How many 30'ers can you go out with two friends in 20+, throw up the chute and have a blast at 14 knots? very impressed. Doing a demo race today on her - she's still available....

 

10827976_772436762851745_651703089585619

 

Who made the suit? I googled Viking Sails and nada.

Yup, Ballard sails. That's Alex In the lower right of the photo. He made the sails.

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I believe the J/88 won its first race in the PNW yesterday and hit 18 knots in 20-25.

 

That said, there are quite a few 30 foot and unders that can do 14 knots with 3 people. Basically every new performance boat introduced in the last few years. Farr, C&C, Seascape, Donovan not to mention Old Moores, Santa Cruz, Express, etc. I like the J/88 a lot, but it has plenty of peers in the performance category. It's the complete package that makes it different than most.

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Roleur - I agree that there are many boats that can go out, like you say, but not many boats you can go out with 2 sailors and an old guy, feel under control and then sail back to weather in 25 knots sitting in the cockpit, fully under control the entire time (and in February none-the-less). I've been on a number of boats you mention, the Moore - absolutely (I own #26), the SC27, no way downwind in breeze, but great upwind. The Farr280 and C&C30od, maybe, but I will guess they need more people and a bit more paying attention to get the same feel. Never been on the seascape and donavan, so no idea there but the Express 27 and Moore 24 may be the best comparisons for stability, control and ease of use. Probably the J/70 but I don't think the Melges - Just my humble opinion.

 

I was very impressed with the boat, and after racing the next saturday in 20 to 25, puffs to 27/28 with 6 good sailors I was even more impressed. We took 2nd behind a Farr 395 and were one of 3 boats to fly our chute the entire way. Never felt out of control while rippin' along at 14 knots, pushing over 18 in the puffs, then drug her back to weather - much easier dragging the J/88 to weather than my Moore 24....

 

you can read about the race here, unfortunately we lost the photo boat for the rippin' downwind run and final 7 mile upwind leg, as they were helping the Sierra 26 recover. But they got a few good photos before that. This weekend we try her out in lighter winds, looks like 5 to 8. Should be a big switch after the stronger winds of our first two days out. Oh, and yes, we know the mainsail is not class legal, we did that on purpose as we won't see OD racing for quite some time here in the PNW and figured these sails would be club sails at that point. Same measurements, they just have the RSS battens and a red logo. And Yah, Sure, Ya Betcha, they are Ballard Sails.

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So, on that note, will we see the new boat at RTTS? Seems like a perfect opportunity to show off ease of handling and show the boat is not a one trick (downwind) pony.

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No idea yet, we're doing CSS for sure, but it's hard not to take my Moore on the Race to the Straits....

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Still pretty fun in medium breeze. Powered up easily with 5 crew, higher and faster than the 105 to weather. Couldn't capture the 1000lbs Sierra 26 but crossed the line 2nd in class and held onto 2nd after correction

 

Read about the race here

 

j88-downwind.jpg

Photo by Jan Anderson - Janpix.smugmug.com

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I believe the J/88 won its first race in the PNW yesterday and hit 18 knots in 20-25.

 

That said, there are quite a few 30 foot and unders that can do 14 knots with 3 people. Basically every new performance boat introduced in the last few years. Farr, C&C, Seascape, Donovan not to mention Old Moores, Santa Cruz, Express, etc. I like the J/88 a lot, but it has plenty of peers in the performance category. It's the complete package that makes it different than most.

My Elliott 770 was capable of 15+ sustained with 2 people, and 5.5+ upwind with 2 in the same conditions. Hitting 18 is impressive but what were the sustained speeds, and on what point of sail was 18 in 25? I've only gotten my Columbia to 15.5 in 25, but that was with a frac chute and full delivery main on a pretty tight reach, and our sustained speeds were closer to 10-12.

 

I'm not trying to take anything away from the 88 performance, just trying to put it into some sort of perspective.

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I believe the J/88 won its first race in the PNW yesterday and hit 18 knots in 20-25.

That said, there are quite a few 30 foot and unders that can do 14 knots with 3 people. Basically every new performance boat introduced in the last few years. Farr, C&C, Seascape, Donovan not to mention Old Moores, Santa Cruz, Express, etc. I like the J/88 a lot, but it has plenty of peers in the performance category. It's the complete package that makes it different than most.

 

My Elliott 770 was capable of 15+ sustained with 2 people, and 5.5+ upwind with 2 in the same conditions. Hitting 18 is impressive but what were the sustained speeds, and on what point of sail was 18 in 25? I've only gotten my Columbia to 15.5 in 25, but that was with a frac chute and full delivery main on a pretty tight reach, and our sustained speeds were closer to 10-12.

 

I'm not trying to take anything away from the 88 performance, just trying to put it into some sort of perspective.

And a kite surfer is capable of 20-40+ knots with 1 person.

 

"I'm not trying to take anything away from the Elliott performance, just trying to put it into some sort of perspective."

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Midpack,

is there something wrong with trying to get a handle on what the sustained speeds on a J88 are in those conditions? They happen to be my competition, and I think they're pretty nice boats. Anybody can read the top speed off a knotmeter, but that really doesn't say anything about the performance does it? I've done 11 knots in a Pearson Wanderer, but no on in their right mind would say a Pearson Wanderer *DOES* 11 knots. I'd be more interested in hearing what the average speeds in those conditions.. how did the boat handle, did it feel close to broaching, actual useful information. Sorry if my post offended your delicate sensibilities, but there's no need to be a condescending douche.

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sustained 14 to 16kn of boat speed, gusts got us over 18kn (glanced and saw 18.2 at one moment) at 155 to 165 degrees true with the A2, not a reaching sail, couldn't push it much higher in that breeze. And I'm guessing the ride home was a bit different on the Elliot, possibly a bit wet and not as comfortable sitting in the cockpit. I've been enjoying the boat and have been really impressed with its performance both in heavy and light air. It has exceeded my expectations and I'll be sad when she sells. Keep getting that Elliot out sailing, no body will force you into a J/88.

 

And remember, they are two different beasts. The J/88 is a very stable keel boat with an inboard diesel, sink, nav desk, head, bunks for 4, cockpit seats with comings (ours even has a dodger). Hard to compare and in most sport boat formulas the J/88 doesn't even qualify as a sport boat.

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sustained 14 to 16kn of boat speed, gusts got us over 18kn (glanced and saw 18.2 at one moment) at 155 to 165 degrees true with the A2, not a reaching sail, couldn't push it much higher in that breeze. And I'm guessing the ride home was a bit different on the Elliot, possibly a bit wet and not as comfortable sitting in the cockpit. I've been enjoying the boat and have been really impressed with its performance both in heavy and light air. It has exceeded my expectations and I'll be sad when she sells. Keep getting that Elliot out sailing, no body will force you into a J/88.

 

And remember, they are two different beasts. The J/88 is a very stable keel boat with an inboard diesel, sink, nav desk, head, bunks for 4, cockpit seats with comings (ours even has a dodger). Hard to compare and in most sport boat formulas the J/88 doesn't even qualify as a sport boat.

Thanks Ballard - sounds like a great ride. The Elliott's gone, moved to a Columbia, and I think we will have 3 88's in our class this year. Last year there was one in our beer can series and I was pretty impressed with the way it moved. We definitely had speed on it downwind, upwind usually but it took half the season before we were pointing even close to where the 88 was. It's one of the better looking J's under sail and I'm glad you're enjoying it.

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Midpack,

is there something wrong with trying to get a handle on what the sustained speeds on a J88 are in those conditions? They happen to be my competition, and I think they're pretty nice boats. Anybody can read the top speed off a knotmeter, but that really doesn't say anything about the performance does it? I've done 11 knots in a Pearson Wanderer, but no on in their right mind would say a Pearson Wanderer *DOES* 11 knots. I'd be more interested in hearing what the average speeds in those conditions.. how did the boat handle, did it feel close to broaching, actual useful information. Sorry if my post offended your delicate sensibilities, but there's no need to be a condescending douche.

Not sure how my post was any more/less offensive than yours, but I don't see a need to resort to name calling. Classy...

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Had a great time in 30+ last weekend. Solid boat, held up to the beating just fine and it was actually dry down below when we were done!

 

10866142_781124575316297_108887618493519

 

Taken by Jan Anderson just after the start - well before things got a bit more hairy. See more of her shots here - janpix.smugmug.com

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That's a nice picture. looks like a good ride. I have yet to even try flying the masthead in 30+ so good onya.

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Midpack,

is there something wrong with trying to get a handle on what the sustained speeds on a J88 are in those conditions? They happen to be my competition, and I think they're pretty nice boats. Anybody can read the top speed off a knotmeter, but that really doesn't say anything about the performance does it? I've done 11 knots in a Pearson Wanderer, but no on in their right mind would say a Pearson Wanderer *DOES* 11 knots. I'd be more interested in hearing what the average speeds in those conditions.. how did the boat handle, did it feel close to broaching, actual useful information. Sorry if my post offended your delicate sensibilities, but there's no need to be a condescending douche.

So Ryley, you're saying you need to show those numbers more like this picture of my GPS track on my Melges 24 in last year's Whitebread Race.

 

988728_675922069092085_49027888_n.jpg?oh

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IP, I just think that those kinds of numbers, coupled with average windspeed, show a more complete picture of a boat's performance than the statement "we hit 18 knots."

And p.s. showoff :P

 

and p.p.s. congrats on a great performance - again. maybe see you for the GOR again. We'll see. Every other year seems to give the crew time to forget how much 'fun' they had.

 

Anyway, I think we're going to have 3 J88's in mass bay this year - looking forward to them getting out more this year than last.

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Had to post it. Hope to see you at the GOR. Better tide this year. Favorable both ways. We have 2 88s on Peconic Bay this year. They're good boats.

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We all know that IRC is not kind at all with the 88.

But in a light air venue (6-12 knots) I'm guessing that the boat would be quite competitive under this handicap rule too. What would be your best IRC pick between the J/88 and the J/97 (= proven IRC killer) for light air racing.

I know we are talking of totally different animals, but to me the comparison makes sense with an all up cost in the same ballpark...

 

max

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Upcoming One-Design Events ...

2015 Sperry Charleston Race Week - April 16 ( 4 boats entered ... 23 days to go)
2015 Block Island Race Week XXVI - June 21 ( 5 boats entered ... 89 days to go)
107th Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac - July 11 ( 3 boats entered ... 110 days to go)
2015 CanAm Challenge - Youngstown Yacht Club - July 25 ( 5 boats entered ... 123 days to go)

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A great shot of our J/88 demo boat just after the start of last weekends Three Tree Point race. She's on her way in beautiful spring conditions on a 15 mile upwind beat to the weather mark followed by a rippin' tight reach home with puffs zooming the boat up over 16 knots at times. Our J/88 finished 2nd in class and 2nd overall in a 65 boat fleet!

She's sitting at our docks ready for a demo ride. Contact us at Sail Northwest to schedule a sail.

See more of Jan Anderson's pictures at janpix.smugmug.com

 

j88-ttp-after-the-start.jpg

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Is it just me, but isn't this demo boat doing a lot of racing vs demo sailing around the bay for potential owners? I could be wrong....

 

I'm not saying racing the boat isn't a great way to get a buyer, just not something I thought was common.

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We've had her in the water a month and have done a couple non-race demos. We are taking different people on the races though, 3 core and 3 rotating for demo spots.

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We've had her in the water a month and have done a couple non-race demos. We are taking different people on the races though, 3 core and 3 rotating for demo spots.

Nice Idea!!!

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So, on that note, will we see the new boat at RTTS? Seems like a perfect opportunity to show off ease of handling and show the boat is not a one trick (downwind) pony.

Seems the answer is yes. Looking forward to seeing it on the water.

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Upcoming One-Design Events ...

 

2015 Sperry Charleston Race Week - April 16 ( 4 boats entered ... 23 days to go)

2015 Block Island Race Week XXVI - June 21 ( 5 boats entered ... 89 days to go)

107th Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac - July 11 ( 3 boats entered ... 110 days to go)

2015 CanAm Challenge - Youngstown Yacht Club - July 25 ( 5 boats entered ... 123 days to go)

Congrats to Deviation on their J/88 OD section win at CRW! It appears Deviation and Touch2Play have some very tight competition between them, that always makes racing all the better.

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Congrats to Deviation on their J/88 OD section win at CRW! It appears Deviation and Touch2Play have some very tight competition between them, that always makes racing all the better.

We had a great time: CRW is a great sailing venue with great parties.

 

Despite the disparity in the finish positions, the j88's were all well sailed. The j88 sailors were all experienced racers and a really fun group of people to hang out with.

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Some j88 covers -- for when your boat gets a cold keel or bow I suppose ... they also have a mast bag, boom bag and padded rudder bag.

These would be very fashionable for traveling to your next one-design event.

 

Contact:

Oakley Jones
Northeast USA Sales
19 John Clarke Rd
Middletown, Rhode Island 02842
oakley.jones@harken.com
p: 401-849-8278
c: 401-662-3376

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Switching gears to the J88 as an offshore platform, we are really happy to have won our division in the light air, 125 nm Newport to Ensenada race. We knew the boat was competitive in heavy air for the overall from our prior experience, but we were pretty psyched to do well against bigger boats in our division(J109s,shock 35) in mostly light and reaching conditions. Lots of sail changes from the "big zero" to the mini zero ( less than zero?) J1 and A1. Our sense is that even at 69 Offwind rating, the boat is pretty slippery in the light stuff, given the right sails. But that was a lot more work than surfing downwind in breeze! We are finding the boat has a lot of "modes" and seems pretty versatile.

Not a big boat for sure, but we had five onboard and room for lots of sails and gear for an overnight race. Also happy to be able to deliver back upwind (and swell) at 6+ motoring. Really nice combination of features, and a fun boat to sail and race. I'm just an owner with no skin in the game, but I've been fortunate over the years to have owned a J80, J105, J70,and now the J88, and I can say that the J88 is a great amalgamation of the best design features from each ( with a few thrown in from the J111).

I'm sorry we will miss the Chicago Mac this year as I think racing this boat in a one design division over that distance is going to be a great experience ( albeit one for the hardy).

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While trimming the main I had a problem with the course and fine-tune being on opposite side of the traveler during a tack. (now I have no excuse for my fumbling around during a tack.)

• The 57mm Carbo Fiddle Block [Hk 2673] is removed from forward Cam Base for 57 mm [Hk 133.3/16]

• A 3.00” Hexa-Cat Base Block - Small Post [Hk 170SP] is then installed on forward Cam Base for 57 mm (the forward cam base has a small post)

• The 57mm Carbo Fiddle Block is mounted on top of 3.00” Hexa-Cat Base with a 40mm Boot [Hk 369] between the two blocks.

• We removed the 150 Cam Riser Kit because it didn’t have a fair lead and occasionally the sheet would roll out in heavy wind.

• As can be seen from the photo, the aft Cam Base and 75mm Carbo Swivel has been removed.

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OD LEGAL???

seems like it

 

4.3.8 Substitution of blocks, cleats, and clutches provided by non-standard

 

equipment manufacturers, provided that the replacement parts are of

 

similar size, weight, and power ratio and perform the same function.

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Funny how this has evolved. J/105's had coarse and fine tune blocks/cleats stacked by design (like BSP's pic, and like most older boats other builders I've ever seen), call it "old school." Some J/105 owners modified them to split fore & aft of the travelers, call that "new school." Only advantage I see is helping keep the coarse and fine tune lines from fouling each other, but I assume the top sailors had other reasons. Later J designs have all split coarse and fine tune across the travelers IIRC. Seems no matter how J/Boats-Hall lay it out, some want it the "other way." To each his/her own...

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Doesn't perform the same function if it changes how he has to do his job now does it?

It depends on how rigidly the term "perform the same function" is defined.

 

The function of the Mainsheet (and Fine-Tune) is to trim the Mainsail. During a Tack, the ergonomics of the Sailtrimer may be improved, however the Mainsail is not effectively trimmed during the tack. Thus the function of trimming the Mainsheet is not changed. In both variations each sheet is independent, separate and has the same power ratio.

 

A better argument might be found against cross sheeting a spinnaker or jib sheet, since the function of trimming either of those sails may be enhanced by using a winch other than what is explicitly portrayed in the J88 Owners Manual.

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Edited from previous post [At Key West] most of the boats have had a few months of racing to refine the layout (SARALYSIA was just launched the Friday before race week.) Here are but a few of the observations:

  • four of the boats have moved the both the Course-Tune and Fine-Tune Blocks for the Mainsheet forward of the Traveler (by mounting one on top of the other.) This simplifies the tacking of the mainsheets.

I don't buy it. I've saved that photo and may send it along to the touch2play folks

Please do, I'm sure they'll appreciate that ... imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

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seriously , BSP setup should have been the factory one.

 

current one is a clusterfuck

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Doesn't perform the same function if it changes how he has to do his job now does it?

It depends on how rigidly the term "perform the same function" is defined.

 

The function of the Mainsheet (and Fine-Tune) is to trim the Mainsail. During a Tack, the ergonomics of the Sailtrimer may be improved, however the Mainsail is not effectively trimmed during the tack. Thus the function of trimming the Mainsheet is not changed. In both variations each sheet is independent, separate and has the same power ratio.

 

A better argument might be found against cross sheeting a spinnaker or jib sheet, since the function of trimming either of those sails may be enhanced by using a winch other than what is explicitly portrayed in the J88 Owners Manual.

 

 

My WAG says it's illegal as written. That clause in the J/105 class has been interpreted as basically just permission to change from Harken to Lewmar or whatever.

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Wild ass guess. As in what you took when you said it was legal in OD. Maybe all four of you should be considered in contravention of the class rules.

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Which class rules? These J88 Class Rules or these J88 Class Rules?

So far in the US there is no Formal Owners Goup

There are some pretty big differences between these two sets of rules that need to be reconciled:

6.4 The jib luff may be attached to the forestay by means of a furler system, a headfoil and bolt rope or by hanks.


As in what you took when you said it was legal in OD. Maybe all four of you should be considered in contravention of the class rules.


Yes perhaps you are right. At Key West we were sailing with the 10.28.14 Draft Rules. Do we need to debate as to whether it was a J/88 Class or fleet sanctioned event or were the owners Voting J88 Members?


Currently jBoats is the only entity concerning rules compliance of any proposed alteration. On that matter we have been repeatedly advised to go out, learn how to sail the boat, race and sail fast, make changes as necessary ... exchange information with other owners as a means of supporting and nurturing the growth of class racing.

Ned Jones, JBoats, and everyone at CCF Composites has been exceptionally helpful in keeping the first year J88 up and running.

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Wild ass guess. As in what you took when you said it was legal in OD. Maybe all four of you should be considered in contravention of the class rules.

 

5, I'm going to make that change as well. It makes a lot of sense.

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Having been a class measured for a number of classes with these 'same purpose' rules, I would suggest applying for a written interpretation allowing the change. With no performance gain other than ergonomics and no need to drill holes in the deck, I would have issued it.

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The J/88 won it's class at the double-handed Race to the Straits this weekend. They finished 2nd overall out of ~100 boats on Sunday's 30 mile kite run. Rates 87 in the PNW. That means they put about 8 minutes into the best of the 7 J/105's with the kite up.

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Anyone seen this? Sounds great!

 

http://oceanvolt.com/jboats-j88/

I inquired about this ... looks more practical than a Torqeedo on a J/70

They have done something similar to a J/80 apparently.

Oceanvolt estimates the range to be 35-40 nm (range in flat water at 4 kts) ... better than a natural gas powered outboard.

 

note: the sale price of each Valence U24-12XP battery is equivalent to the price of a new sail, the configuration requires four batteries.

 

 

 

The first boat is being built in US.

 

The SD6 has regenerative capabilities but the boat speed needs to be +6kn in order to get any power back to batteries.

 

Best,

Janne Kjellman, CTO R&D, Oceanvolt OY

 

 

 

We are looking roughly 35-40 mls range @4knots with the boat, more at

lower speeds and less on higher speed. The size is significantly less than

with the diesel motor, the weight is about the same but saves with the

fuel tank and fuel weight. The boat will gain significant power from solar

panels to boost the recharging, especially at the mooring.

 

The first J88 will be ready in June and the scheduled launch is at Newport

boat show i believe in September. Im sure a visit to the factory can be

arranged even earlier if you are interested.

 

Attached is J80 power calculations for comparison.

 

Timo Jaakkola, CEO Oceanvolt Oy

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Those are some crazy expensive batteries! I wonder why the selected those after some standard LiFePO4's at about half the price!

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we just got spanked with a phrf 69 rating. Down from 87.

 

:D time to find a way to plane in all condition

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PHRF 84 in Lake Norman NC, and they are plenty fast.

 

Not as fast as Deviation (87?) was last weekend, but close. May be the water.

 

An attractive design either way.

 

Sail safe!

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Still 87 on Lake Mich. But a few J/88's have done (too) well last/this year so I suspect the rating will be adjusted down next season...

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J88s in England

 

Greetings from the new J88 class sailors in the UK. The first boat arrived here about a year ago and we have been building up the fleet. We had our first UK National Championship at the J Cup last week with 8 J88s racing. Report and video on http://jcup2015.blogspot.co.uk

 

We are organising the class for the UK and have a first set of class rules and a Facebook page to help us get started. UK importer Key Yachting have been fantastic helping the fleet.

 

Thanks to all of the posters on this forum for sharing a lot of information and opinions which helped us choose this great boat. We hope to be able to travel to sail with you before too long.

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DQOTD: Furler drum knot!

 

Our furler hangs up horribly more often than not, because the gap between the bottom of the drum and the bridge is (unnecessarily) narrow and the furling line knot under the drum doesn't clear. I had a figure eight per the manual, and went to the smallest overhand knot possible with no tail, and the #*+^% thing still locks up! We made sure the knot was pulled up tight under the drum, but when it hangs up, sometimes it losses a little - making the problem even worse.

 

Called Harken and the rep told me to cut 4-6" off the core, leaving only the cover, and tying the knot to make the knot smaller still. I'd think that may let the cover slide, so I am inclined to remove 4-6" of cover instead, like a tapered sheet.

 

Thought I'd ask here in case others have found other/better solutions, we can't be the only ones (can we?).

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