MidPack

J/88

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hollow spot?

A very well respected pro did the bottom on several J/88's near me, and none required substantial fairing, just small mostly cosmetic stuff. We've never heard about a J/88 hollow spot around here FWIW...

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My J88 is still in the drums. Construction starts Monday I am told.

Question. It was recommended that the boat go from the factory to International Marine for bottom fairing. Apparently the mold has a dip (hollow spot) forward of the keel. Anyone familiar with this and it is legal to do this under class rules?

Soon to be Hornet #85

If your going to do the bottom, why not run it down the road to Waterline Sysytems? They are considered the best in the business!

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My J88 is still in the drums. Construction starts Monday I am told.

Question. It was recommended that the boat go from the factory to International Marine for bottom fairing. Apparently the mold has a dip (hollow spot) forward of the keel. Anyone familiar with this and it is legal to do this under class rules?

Soon to be Hornet #85

If your going to do the bottom, why not run it down the road to Waterline Sysytems? They are considered the best in the business!

 

thats what i had offered for mine , waterline systems. Not cheap .

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So you guys passed on the optional dip in the forefoot huh? Produces lift.

I will see for myself once she pops out of the mold. Road trip

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So you guys passed on the optional dip in the forefoot huh? Produces lift.

I will see for myself once she pops out of the mold. Road trip

Hollow in the bottom forward of the keel? I don't understand why the builder can't spend the money on making perfect molds. It isn't rocket science. You are paying top coin for a performance 29 ft boat, you should not be paying to fair out tooling deficiencies afterwards. I remember seeing the J-111 for the first time and was shocked at seeing how poor the factory bottom looked. Could have been a Beneteau, Tartan, or dog forbid Schock product.

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My J88 is still in the drums. Construction starts Monday I am told.

Question. It was recommended that the boat go from the factory to International Marine for bottom fairing. Apparently the mold has a dip (hollow spot) forward of the keel. Anyone familiar with this and it is legal to do this under class rules?

Soon to be Hornet #85

 

So you guys passed on the optional dip in the forefoot huh? Produces lift.

I will see for myself once she pops out of the mold. Road trip

 

Hollow in the bottom forward of the keel? I don't understand why the builder can't spend the money on making perfect molds. It isn't rocket science. You are paying top coin for a performance 29 ft boat, you should not be paying to fair out tooling deficiencies afterwards. I remember seeing the J-111 for the first time and was shocked at seeing how poor the factory bottom looked. Could have been a Beneteau, Tartan, or dog forbid Schock product.

Maybe hold your powder? Alleged "hollow" at this point, not confirmed that I know of. The first 80+ owners didn't see or report a "hollow." And Waterline has undoubtedly done some J/88's, presumably they would know...

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Allow me to shed a little more light on this. When I ordered the boat I had conversations with the dealer, North and one owner. One of those people asked how I intended on using the boat. Serious racing, casual racing and day sailing... and I responded with the casual racing/day sailing. Based on that this person said... well I would not worry about the bottom too much. We can just send it to International and have the forefoot dip faired for now. Hell he could have had his J models confused.

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Seriously. There isnt any hollow spot.

 

Mine was done locally and its clean.

Obviously they added the hollow spot on the hull numbers. Now everyone will want a hollow spot if they don't win without it.

 

 

dude... shhhh... dont tell..

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A couple of docs I thought I'd share.

 

The furler on our J/88 is the most "temperamental" we've ever owned - by far. It's the one thing about the J/88 that has been a serious disappointment. I have always been a fan of Harken products - but the J/88 furler has been a PITA even after the 2014-15 refit/replacement. The bulletin notes someone tried to furl using a winch, so it's obviously not just us having issues...

http://www.jowners.org/docs/Harken%20Unit%200%20Underdeck%20Furling%20Service%20Advisement.pdf

 

The latest J/88 owners manual (others have undoubtedly seen/found it already).

http://www.jowners.org/docs/J88%20Owner%20Manual%20Combined%207-14-15.pdf

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I suppose that if J-Boats didn't have such a well-known reputation for selling hundreds of J/24s that were in dire need of a bottom job STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY, then this wouldn't be nearly the concern it seems to be.

 

Just sayin'...

 

Hopefully this being a real dual-purpose design, the owners won't go into the mega-competitive fixation as the 24, but one never really knows, do one ?

 

Neat looking boats too - I really like this size. Too bad about the furling gear - we have a similar issue on the Antrim 27 when the rig is wound up tight (adjustable headstay set-up on those - no backstay)

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Is it possible to know who is preparing for the transpac?

 

i wanted to to a long distance race in the next year , and the one i was shooting for doesnt allow the 88.

 

Boat name is Ventus, owner's name is Chris in the SF Bay area. Boat seems to be ready to go already with a successful qualifying 400nm offshore qualifying race that requires pretty much what is required to do SHTP.

 

What race is the J/88 excluded from and why? Length? Usually 28' is the cut-off if there is one and the J/88 meets that.

 

Bermuda 1-2 would be a great race for the J/88.

 

 

J/88 Ventus is registered for Singlehanded Transpac. Will be really interesting to see how the boat goes with the kite up for days and days. We should do a poll on best 24 hour run.

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I suppose that if J-Boats didn't have such a well-known reputation for selling hundreds of J/24s that were in dire need of a bottom job STRAIGHT FROM THE FACTORY, then this wouldn't be nearly the concern it seems to be.

 

Just sayin'...

 

Hopefully this being a real dual-purpose design, the owners won't go into the mega-competitive fixation as the 24, but one never really knows, do one ?

 

Neat looking boats too - I really like this size. Too bad about the furling gear - we have a similar issue on the Antrim 27 when the rig is wound up tight (adjustable headstay set-up on those - no backstay)

Lets see, it was a start up company, selling its first boat. The moulds we pulled off a boat built by a family of amateurs in the garage. It was so much faster and easier to sail than the normal quarter tonners, as as fast as many half tonners, despite a "dire need of a bottom job straight from the factory", that it became the largest OD keelboat class ever. All the newer boats that have come along with their better bottoms haven't managed that....

 

Just sayin'... :rolleyes:

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Is it possible to know who is preparing for the transpac?

 

i wanted to to a long distance race in the next year , and the one i was shooting for doesnt allow the 88.

 

Boat name is Ventus, owner's name is Chris in the SF Bay area. Boat seems to be ready to go already with a successful qualifying 400nm offshore qualifying race that requires pretty much what is required to do SHTP.

 

What race is the J/88 excluded from and why? Length? Usually 28' is the cut-off if there is one and the J/88 meets that.

 

Bermuda 1-2 would be a great race for the J/88.

 

 

J/88 Ventus is registered for Singlehanded Transpac. Will be really interesting to see how the boat goes with the kite up for days and days. We should do a poll on best 24 hour run.

 

Is there a link for entries into SSS Transpac?

 

Is Ventus related to the App?

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Is it possible to know who is preparing for the transpac?

 

i wanted to to a long distance race in the next year , and the one i was shooting for doesnt allow the 88.

 

Boat name is Ventus, owner's name is Chris in the SF Bay area. Boat seems to be ready to go already with a successful qualifying 400nm offshore qualifying race that requires pretty much what is required to do SHTP.

 

What race is the J/88 excluded from and why? Length? Usually 28' is the cut-off if there is one and the J/88 meets that.

 

Bermuda 1-2 would be a great race for the J/88.

 

 

J/88 Ventus is registered for Singlehanded Transpac. Will be really interesting to see how the boat goes with the kite up for days and days. We should do a poll on best 24 hour run.

 

Is there a link for entries into SSS Transpac? SHTP Entries

 

Is Ventus related to the App? I don't think so.

 

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Crash - I don't mean to get into a J-bashing binge here, -- but the boats I saw that had the pronounced issues with fairness and foil position weren't from the 'start up' days. It was understood that if you wanted to go racing - 10+ years after the debut of the design - you had to have the bottom of your new boat re-faired and the keel optimized. And that was a TPI boat, we won't even get into some of the licensed builds (looking at you, Trask) - I re-mounted several rudders myself that were not close to being behind the keel.

 

One would REALLY hope that the new boats didn't share that bit of family history.

 

Perhaps it is only a function of the success of the class - if you don't have dozens of boats on the line then maybe nobody would bother with all the fanatical preparation, I don't know - it's just that bit about expecting to have a new boat re-done had always left me astonished - that buyers would accept that.

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Great Red,

Actually, I know what you mean...when I bought my J-109 in 2003, I was initially surprised at how many things weren't quite right on a boat that had cost $200k +; including a folding prop that sometimes refused to open, and vinyl headliner that would form "bubbles" and separate from the ply it was theoretically adhered to. What I learned/realized over time, was that each boat is still essentially hand built, and while you can buy components from know suppliers, at the relatively small numbers were talking (my boat was hull 58), there's no integrated development testing like goes on in automobile or aviation manufacturing...and so these issues show up, even for the best of builders. Hell, one of the big positives of Catalina Yachts is that Frank Butler is said to read and respond to every new customer (and old too I think) issue relating to build issues...

 

You could get all that sort of stuff sorted.,, and the J-24 had more than its fair share, but at a cost that might drive even the remaining builders out of business...

 

I'm not really sure what the answer is. Certainly if the J-24 had only sold a couple a dozen hulls, no one would have cared...I think you're right and it became an issue due to the success of the boat...

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Red,

 

The mods you are talking about are two fold. First, they are optimizations. Over time through decades of sailing the optimal keel placement has been determined. That is in no way an indictment of the factory, if the class had clamped down on mods it would not be an issue. Second, the offsets as drawn and keel as poured are two different things. The castings were poorly done. Again though, if the boats had stayed modification free it would be a non-issue.

Will Museler

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Fair points - crash & sailman, but to be sure I wasn't talking about warranty issues - heck, the headliner fell off my 2006 VW Jetta - and they sure made more of those than anybody built keelboats ( really guys ? a $ 20,000 car and you can't figure out some GLUE ?) - but as we know, VW has 'other' larger issues to address nowadays.

 

Similarly, the aspect of "optimization" - yes, this was a definite bone that I had with J-Boats -- when the vast majority of J/24s were being sold to customers keen on racing them - to have to have to bottoms re-done WHEN NEW was enough to make me want to have nothing to do with them - the "we can't be bothered" attitude was only validated by guys willing to put up with it.

 

Of course, the Class management didn't help the matter either - you have an old boat ? Fine - but you can't modify it to match the cockpit of the new boats (no lazarette hatches - a safety issue) - so you want a NEW boat ? well - you STILL have to get it re-worked if you want to be competitive. What a crock - for decades they knew the keel was in the wrong place.

 

Then we had a competitor purchase a Bashford ( Australian ) license-built boat - only to find that it was CLEARLY a much better built boat - complete with a fair bottom, keel in the right place and a glassed hull-deck joint (stiffer, no leaks) - so demonstrating that it COULD be done - J in the US just couldn't be bothered to do it. This boats was so demonstrably faster - we took to calling it the J/25. Kinda takes the "One Design" aspect and makes a mockery of it - in my opinion.

 

This new design looks to be a real nice one - I sure hope that they can deliver on the promise of all of the interest in it without selling short the buyers in a similar way - I mean, for the price one pays you would certainly HOPE so.

 

Sorry if I sound bitter - I really don't mean to - it is more of a "Oh no, not THIS again..."

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Trying to get a handle on the cost of that system. From the web site looks like you custom build for your boat, not a kit.

15k+/- for instruments and autopilot. It's not so custom, other than the mounting of the ram. The rest of the components are defined. You just need to choose whether you want the awesome and expensive option, or more awesome and more expensive option.

 

Ventus also has a Pelagic autopilot that is on the opposite end of the cost spectrum. Video I saw, he was using that during an ocean race.

 

Solo, we looked at that Octupus drive (Simrad calls it an SD10) for our Schumacher. Hard over time did seem slow. In the end I wouldn't choose it. Either a ram mounted below with a "tiller arm" slotted through the transom, or a Pelagic, seem like better options.

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Not a big fan of a slot through the transom even with a compartment like the Andrews 28.

Reason? Curious...

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DQOTD: Is the OD heavy jib worth adding to sail inventory?

 

We have the OD L/M jib of course. The heavy jib seems like a (too) subtle difference in SA, not a great deal smaller. Do those who have both find the heavy useful?

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DQOTD: Is the OD heavy jib worth adding to sail inventory?

 

We have the OD L/M jib of course. The heavy jib seems like a (too) subtle difference in SA, not a great deal smaller. Do those who have both find the heavy useful?

The Heavy Jib is built flatter and out of heavier material, so it won't distort or blow out. If you use the OD L/M jib above it's wind range, it will likely not look and perform the same again.

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DQOTD: Is the OD heavy jib worth adding to sail inventory?

 

We have the OD L/M jib of course. The heavy jib seems like a (too) subtle difference in SA, not a great deal smaller. Do those who have both find the heavy useful?

Is it measured as a j3.5 heavy weather jib? In my opinion the j88 needs 3 jibs. The flatter full sized jib should be fast as the breeze comes up

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Two 88's racing in tomorrow's Ft Lauderdale to Key West. 160 ish ocean miles in 15 knots of reaching. Sounds like near perfect conditions for a 88.

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DQOTD: Is the OD heavy jib worth adding to sail inventory?

 

We have the OD L/M jib of course. The heavy jib seems like a (too) subtle difference in SA, not a great deal smaller. Do those who have both find the heavy useful?

Is it measured as a j3.5 heavy weather jib? In my opinion the j88 needs 3 jibs. The flatter full sized jib should be fast as the breeze comes up

 

I might agree, though a genoa might be the third. Yes, I understand the reasons/benefits of non-overlapping rig/sail plans, and I'm not advocating trying an genoa on a J/88!

 

But racing a J/88 in PHRF when the wind is really light (LT 4 kts TWS) is painful. Nothing like reaching that last leeward mark in first, and having others boats put up big genoas and blowing by us on the last beat (corrected & boat for boat)...

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DQOTD: Is the OD heavy jib worth adding to sail inventory?

 

We have the OD L/M jib of course. The heavy jib seems like a (too) subtle difference in SA, not a great deal smaller. Do those who have both find the heavy useful?

Is it measured as a j3.5 heavy weather jib? In my opinion the j88 needs 3 jibs. The flatter full sized jib should be fast as the breeze comes up

I might agree, though a genoa might be the third. Yes, I understand the reasons/benefits of non-overlapping rig/sail plans, and I'm not advocating trying an genoa on a J/88!

 

But racing a J/88 in PHRF when the wind is really light (LT 4 kts TWS) is painful. Nothing like reaching that last leeward mark in first, and having others boats put up big genoas and blowing by us on the last beat (corrected & boat for boat)...

Do you get swell where you race in light airs? We've found the 88 to be really quick in the light airs upwind, we can out pace bendy 40.7s and first 35s but that's generally in flat water. The only boats we struggled with are a well sailed HOD 35 and some corbys. Our north J2 has a lot of shape in the foot giving us decent power in the light stuff

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DQOTD: Is the OD heavy jib worth adding to sail inventory?

We have the OD L/M jib of course. The heavy jib seems like a (too) subtle difference in SA, not a great deal smaller. Do those who have both find the heavy useful?

Is it measured as a j3.5 heavy weather jib? In my opinion the j88 needs 3 jibs. The flatter full sized jib should be fast as the breeze comes up

I might agree, though a genoa might be the third. Yes, I understand the reasons/benefits of non-overlapping rig/sail plans, and I'm not advocating trying an genoa on a J/88!

 

But racing a J/88 in PHRF when the wind is really light (LT 4 kts TWS) is painful. Nothing like reaching that last leeward mark in first, and having others boats put up big genoas and blowing by us on the last beat (corrected & boat for boat)...

Do you get swell where you race in light airs? We've found the 88 to be really quick in the light airs upwind, we can out pace bendy 40.7s and first 35s but that's generally in flat water. The only boats we struggled with are a well sailed HOD 35 and some corbys. Our north J2 has a lot of shape in the foot giving us decent power in the light stuff
Again I am talking ghosting winds, against boats carrying 155% headsails in PHRF. But it wouldn't surprise me to find out I'm not sailing the J/88 to it's potential upwind in light air. The J/88 has seemed a little harder to dial in, but then it's the first boat I have ever sailed with NO overlapping headsails. It's a new world...

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I crewed occasionally on a J88(OD Jib) in Boston/Marblehead and here is what I thought worked best...

 

- weight forward and low

- Jib trimmer 100% focus on the ticks, calling out lifts and headers and adjusting constantly then adjusting again as the driver came up / headed off

- sheet / car / windward sheet all moving smoothly and continously

 

Only time I felt like we really couldn't hang was when sailing against lighter boats with higher sail/displacement ratios in super light wind. Farr30/Hendersons

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Also make sure your jib battens aren't too stiff it can compromise the shape especially towards the head of the jib. I agree with all the points from above, one more thing to add for the weight, be careful not to over heel the boat to leeward, the boat naturally has quite a narrow waterline so it doesn't need much heeling to make it go just enough to hang the sails to leeward.

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MidPack I have a question(s) for you. Does your boat have a rod forestay? Does it have furling? And are there any J88 one design rules in your area?

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MidPack I have a question(s) for you. Does your boat have a rod forestay? Does it have furling? And are there any J88 one design rules in your area?

It's a stock boat, so wire not rod, standard furler and we comply with J/Boats OD rules - wouldn't want to modify outside them.

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Ahhh ok. When I read the North American J88 specification it said the boat came with a rod forestay which made me question why our French boat had a wire forestay (in the uk we have 1 American built boat). Wouldn't be the first time there have been confusion over the specs of two j boats built in different countries

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wire here too!

 

 

Sent you the following PM:

 

"I like the looks of your lazy jack mainsail cover.

Would you share info regarding the make,the cost, and any other photos?"

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Found this in another thread, but wanted to make sure this crowd had a chance to see it too. Lots of great J/88 action, with drone shots!

 

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It's amazing both masts didn't come down. A Japanese charterer on my boat (starboard) hooked another port tack boat's backstay in the final Asahi Cup out here. My alloy mast crumpled. The carbon mast on the other boat exploded. Then, still hooked together, both boats came back together at speed, causing a bunch of hull damage. How those two avoided a similar fate must be either skill or luck.

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Not the best display of racecraft I've ever seen. Then again, they're there and I'm not, so they've got that going for them.

 

That said, what was that blue boat thinking, tacking directly into the 280's path?

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It's amazing both masts didn't come down. A Japanese charterer on my boat (starboard) hooked another port tack boat's backstay in the final Asahi Cup out here. My alloy mast crumpled. The carbon mast on the other boat exploded. Then, still hooked together, both boats came back together at speed, causing a bunch of hull damage. How those two avoided a similar fate must be either skill or luck.

 

 

Not the best display of racecraft I've ever seen. Then again, they're there and I'm not, so they've got that going for them.

 

That said, what was that blue boat thinking, tacking directly into the 280's path?

What surprised me was neither boat would back off, both seemed to think they could just sail out of the snag. I'd think both would let off the gas long enough to get untangled, but that's just me...I'm not big on breaking stuff.

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I couldn't believe they continued to separate for a while, after being hooked. It would seem to me that sailing parallel would have been advisable. At the end of the clip, the two boats are sailing off into the distance, side by side. Are they still snagged? It's hard to tell from the video, but it doesn't look like it.

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J/88 USA15 OCS 0:00

GP26? snags pin boat anchor line 1:14

J/88 USA15 snags pin boat anchor line 3:11

GP26 snags Farr 280 leeward running back 4:00, and they are still entangled as they sail away in parallel at the close of the video 4:38

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Are you allowed to have your sprit out on a beat in the 88?

are you looking at a Farr 280?

 

 

My bad, assumed the boat cuz of the thread we were in.

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Super finale to an awesome event. Wind 25, gusts 35 kts with 4ft swells. I think everyone who kept their spinnaker up hit 20kts on the short 1.2 mile downwind legs. The J88's handled very well in the exciting conditions.

 

Mike Bruno and the Wings team led at the end of each day's racing en route to topping J/88 class. Bruno, from Armonk, NY, won Race 3 then finished second in five of the last six starts. This was Bruno's first trip to Key West as skipper of his own boat. It was only his fourth event since taking delivery of the J/88.

 

"This is one of the world's great regattas so I'm pretty excited," Bruno said. "We had real good boat speed and I think the key was we were real consistent."

post-66960-0-82608100-1453539108_thumb.jpeg

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sure thing , was made locally.

 

let me find more pictures of it.

 

how about them pictures and contact info for the stack pack cover maker ?

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sure thing , was made locally.

 

let me find more pictures of it.

 

how about them pictures and contact info for the stack pack cover maker ?

 

answered , check your PM

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There are now eight J/88's in Chicago & Milwaukee, with a ninth reportedly coming to Chicagoland from N Michigan. We're meeting in late Feb, and the NOOD organizers have been notified of our intent to qualify for our own start for the Chicago NOODs June 17-19. The fleet has proposed buoy racing on Fri & Sun, and doing the distance race on Sat. We'd love to have some traveling programs join in, the more the merrier. We can help with launch logistics.

 

And the fleet is also looking at a start for the 78th SSYC Queens Cup (170+ boats in 2015) overnight race starting from Milwaukee July 1 Fri afternoon and finishing in St Joseph MI the next morning - about 85 nm. The St Joe YC is well known for throwing a great party!

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Are there any owners of the J88 with the Oceanvolt system? I am looking for owner reports on that aspect of the boat. I saw the J88 at Annapolis, and I am very interested in the boat.

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Are there any owners of the J88 with the Oceanvolt system? I am looking for owner reports on that aspect of the boat. I saw the J88 at Annapolis, and I am very interested in the boat.

USA 82 Blondie 2 has an Oceanvolt system. At Key West they had no shortage of speed around the race course. I'm sure Jeff Johnstone would love to talk about it.

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Are there any owners of the J88 with the Oceanvolt system? I am looking for owner reports on that aspect of the boat. I saw the J88 at Annapolis, and I am very interested in the boat.

 

USA 82 Blondie 2 has an Oceanvolt system. At Key West they had no shortage of speed around the race course. I'm sure Jeff Johnstone would love to talk about it.
Check your PM.

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Deviation, Wings, Blondie and Touch 2 Play tried this at different times at Key West with mixed results. There is a time and place for this I suppose.

 

 

 

Saw this for the first time while racing in the J70 Quantum Mid-winters. We tried it a few times with some success, but more failure. It definitely has a time and place.

 

It's very tactical, but from our experience, it only pays off in very specific circumstances... this was in 8-12kts of breeze, puffy/shifty conditions

 

It's great for:

  • Staying in a very narrow puff coming down the course for an extended period
  • Prolonged gybes in those narrow bands
  • Temporary rules/tactical advantages
  • Getting some immediate low separation from boats above when you see a puff coming low

 

It's not good when:

  • You have to over steer to keep the kite full
  • You can't keep the kite full when you gybe the main
  • Can't focus solely on driving - it takes some driver concentration

 

When you do it, make sure crew is really focused on weight placement and helping the driver out. Have good visibility on the puff, because once you're out of it, its slow. Have an exit plan.

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There are now eight J/88's in Chicago & Milwaukee, with a ninth reportedly coming to Chicagoland from N Michigan. We're meeting in late Feb, and the NOOD organizers have been notified of our intent to qualify for our own start for the Chicago NOODs June 17-19. The fleet has proposed buoy racing on Fri & Sun, and doing the distance race on Sat. We'd love to have some traveling programs join in, the more the merrier. We can help with launch logistics.

 

And the fleet is also looking at a start for the 78th SSYC Queens Cup (170+ boats in 2015) overnight race starting from Milwaukee July 1 Fri afternoon and finishing in St Joseph MI the next morning - about 85 nm. The St Joe YC is well known for throwing a great party!

MidPack,

Iris mentioned really wanting to bring Deviation to Chicago to race J88's. Both the Chicago NOODs and the Queens Cup sound like great regattas. This year the local one-design schedule is really getting crowded: the venues, the logistics of getting the boats there, and finding the time has become complicated. The 2017 STC Block Island Race Week, about the same dates, June 18-23; this promises to be a well attended one-design event for us. What else can you recommend for 2017 for J88's in the Chicago and Milwaukee Area? Its a long way off, but the 2018 Chicago NOODs is already on her calendar.

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So I thought I'd share our experience of sailing wing and wing in a race today. We were approaching the leeward mark on port gybe for a starboard rounding, stuck between 2 laylines, with around 10 boat lengths to the mark we pulled the boom over and sailed dead downwind to sail around a Corby 35 and beat them around the mark and cross the finish line ahead of them after a short beat. This manoeuvre absolutely worked for that situation. It was flat water and the gusts were coming in at the high 20s so we were sailing comfortably at 11-14kts on the downwind run so sailing wing and wing wouldn't have worked from a vmg point of view but at the right moment it's an awesome tactic to pull

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There are now eight J/88's in Chicago & Milwaukee, with a ninth reportedly coming to Chicagoland from N Michigan. We're meeting in late Feb, and the NOOD organizers have been notified of our intent to qualify for our own start for the Chicago NOODs June 17-19. The fleet has proposed buoy racing on Fri & Sun, and doing the distance race on Sat. We'd love to have some traveling