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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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Soñadora

Really?

86 posts in this topic

Today we took our very first sail ever on Lake Superior. Winds about 12kts ENE. Waves maybe 2ft. Temps in the 50s. Beautiful blue skies and the backdrop of Northern Minnesota autumn.

 

Waves were kind of choppy, no swell to speak of. Soñadora seemed like a happy pony finally free to gallop on the range.

 

These days, the girls aren't so interested in sailing. They only come along for all the extra stuff like eating out and watching movies in the cockpit. While sailing, they're usually down below playing games or snoozing.

 

Once we went on the lake, one of the girls came up on deck, pale. She curled up in the cockpit and didn't say a word. It wasn't long after that I started feeling a bit queasy. "WTF?" I thought. REALLY???

 

For the past 15 years, we've been lake sailors. Little lakes 3-5 miles long. Any rough stuff wasn't really all that rough. And frankly, if it looked really rough, we would just stay in the marina and chill.

 

I've sailed in some choppy stuff on SF bay and Juan de Fuca and I NEVER felt like I did today. Is this really what it's going to be like?

 

Maybe it's just some kind of ear infection or something. Happens sometimes this time of year with allergies.

 

It will really suck if this is what I have to look forward to. :(

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Probably just something you ate...Nothing else bring some fresh ginger,shred some and make a tea....if you want add a squeeze of lemon and a teaspoon of honey.

 

Works for the wife,she gets queasy in anything over 15 kts,and the ginger settles her queasiness right away.

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Sons when you sailed in SF and JdF in choppy stuff you had probably been sailing regularly and your inner ear had some conditioning. This was your first sail in how long?

 

That said I had an inner ear thing 6 mths ago that was really fucked up. I was getting giddy spells when getting out of bed in the morning which I had put down to drinking too much the night before. One night at a friends for dinner I went to take my place at the table which involved a sharp right hand turn at the sideboard. I lost it and face planted a framed picture picture on the sideboard smashing the glass then staggered to my seat and bleed all over the tablecloth. It was a good look. That scared the shit out of me and especially my wife.

 

The doc did some tests and my heart and BP were fine. He then got me to lay on the table with my head hanging over the edge and sit up then lay back with my head in different positions. Head left-no problem, head straight-no problem, head right-holy jebus WTF just happened.

 

Turned out to be an inflammation of the inner ear, cleared up in a few weeks. No other symptoms except the dizzy staggers.

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I firmly belive that anxiety has a lot to do with sea sickness. I know with my wife when she started to become more relaxed on the boat she would not get sea sick as much. Can't prove it but but I'm positive there is a conection.

 

You haven't been sailing your boat for a while. Don't worrie about it. It'll go away when you get back into the sailing rythem.

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Pretty much everybody will get motion sickness at some time or another. Some combination of boat motion, temp, humidity, what you ate or drank recently, etc. will catch up. With all the time off, your personal resistance is probably a bit lower than normal and seeing her not feeling well put the thought into your mind.

 

It will pass.

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I firmly belive that anxiety has a lot to do with sea sickness.

Definitely true, at least in my case. However, I've been sick on a 300' ship where there was nothing at all to worry about except missing good grub.

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I firmly belive that anxiety has a lot to do with sea sickness. I know with my wife when she started to become more relaxed on the boat she would not get sea sick as much. Can't prove it but but I'm positive there is a conection.

 

You haven't been sailing your boat for a while. Don't worrie about it. It'll go away when you get back into the sailing rythem.

 

I think sea sickness is much worse if you fight the boats motion.

Once I stop trying to correct for the motion it tends to settle.

I just imagine I am one of the fittings these days.

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I firmly belive that anxiety has a lot to do with sea sickness. I know with my wife when she started to become more relaxed on the boat she would not get sea sick as much. Can't prove it but but I'm positive there is a conection.

 

You haven't been sailing your boat for a while. Don't worrie about it. It'll go away when you get back into the sailing rythem.

 

I think sea sickness is much worse if you fight the boats motion.

Once I stop trying to correct for the motion it tends to settle.

I just imagine I am one of the fittings these days.

 

Make sure you don't imagine you're the joker valve.

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I firmly belive that anxiety has a lot to do with sea sickness. I know with my wife when she started to become more relaxed on the boat she would not get sea sick as much. Can't prove it but but I'm positive there is a conection.

 

You haven't been sailing your boat for a while. Don't worrie about it. It'll go away when you get back into the sailing rythem.

 

I think sea sickness is much worse if you fight the boats motion.

Once I stop trying to correct for the motion it tends to settle.

I just imagine I am one of the fittings these days.

 

Make sure you don't imagine you're the joker valve.

 

If I did I would be in a flap.

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Today we took our very first sail ever on Lake Superior. Winds about 12kts ENE. Waves maybe 2ft. Temps in the 50s. Beautiful blue skies and the backdrop of Northern Minnesota autumn.

 

Waves were kind of choppy, no swell to speak of. Soñadora seemed like a happy pony finally free to gallop on the range.

 

These days, the girls aren't so interested in sailing. They only come along for all the extra stuff like eating out and watching movies in the cockpit. While sailing, they're usually down below playing games or snoozing.

 

Once we went on the lake, one of the girls came up on deck, pale. She curled up in the cockpit and didn't say a word. It wasn't long after that I started feeling a bit queasy. "WTF?" I thought. REALLY???

 

For the past 15 years, we've been lake sailors. Little lakes 3-5 miles long. Any rough stuff wasn't really all that rough. And frankly, if it looked really rough, we would just stay in the marina and chill.

 

I've sailed in some choppy stuff on SF bay and Juan de Fuca and I NEVER felt like I did today. Is this really what it's going to be like?

 

Maybe it's just some kind of ear infection or something. Happens sometimes this time of year with allergies.

 

It will really suck if this is what I have to look forward to. :(

I have had people get seasick in the somewhat smooth waters of Puget Sound. Watching things far away and staying in the open air goes a long way to helping avoid it. Your tolerance may be low now if you haven't been sailing as much. I knew some people that got sick almost EVERY time they went sailing and yet it did not stop them. I am sure it will get better!

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Yea, I'd blame the kids. Just THINKING about vomit will tilt the average person towards it.

 

So harden the ladies up. More time on the water will help. Watch this repeatedly to steel yourself to the task.

 

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I have had people get seasick in the somewhat smooth waters of Puget Sound. Watching things far away and staying in the open air goes a long way to helping avoid it. Your tolerance may be low now if you haven't been sailing as much. I knew some people that got sick almost EVERY time they went sailing and yet it did not stop them. I am sure it will get better!

 

 

My son's girlfriend is in third year of Optometry. She was part of a crew that crossed Georgia Straight on a lumpy day--she started to feel queasy, and quickly planted her bum in the floor of the cockpit (with the other queasy female) and stared at the horizon for an hour ... all the while offering a scientific explanation, complete with body part names in latin, as to why the technique would work. And it did!

My dad taught me that when I was little and we fished in the ocean. Every time I looked down at the water I started feeling quesy and he would tell me not to do that. I have also had good results with laying down and keeping my eyes closed.

 

I often get kind of a knot in my stomuch the first day of an extended cruise. Usually when I am crossing Juan de Fuca. Not really sick. Almost like it is from the stress of preparing, thinking about what I forgot, listening to the diesel, looking at the rig, etc.

 

One of our crew on Van Isle 360 last year bragged about all his experiances(sailing to Mexico, living on a boat all summer in north BC) and he was the one that got sick first in the ocean and was out of commision for 24 hours. Others got sick but still functioned. Strange how it effects people.

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Yea, looking at the horizon. The thory is that you inner ears are the first part of the body to be effected by food poisening, If you upset your inner ears your body goes in self-defence mode and emptys the stomac. looking at the horizon matchs up what the eye is seeing and what the ears are feeling.

 

Eating Banana's helps to, they taste the same going both ways. If your gonna be sick it may as well be plesent. :)

 

Only full cure is to sit under a tree. ;)

 

I'm very lucky to be the type of person who is very hard to make seasick, So poking fun at the subject is easy.

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Mate of mine is an ex-Navy Commander and clearance diver. Always gets seasick the first 24hrs at sea!

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Anyone can have a bad day. I'd sailed/flown for years w/o getting seasick and thought I was immune. Then in northern Lake Mi, beating into an unpleasant roll, I had to blow chunks over the side (which didn't elevate the spirits of the crew much). Fortunately I was quickly cured and back at it in no time. The right food can make all the difference- and beer seems to help- at least in my case...

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Wherever I go it's always the same request.......

 

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Just a clinical tidbit: susceptibility to motion sickness is related to the migraine trait. They run together in families and people who get headaches are more likely to have experience it than others. There are personality traits linked to migraine, but I don't know whether they predict sea sickness. My guess is they do.

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If possible let the seasick person steer.It gives them some control over the motion and gets their mind off how they are feeling.

 

The worse thing you can do is start talking about seasickness.

 

 

Phil

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True, except for the fact that when the vestibular input gets strong enough, it doesn't matter what the visual system sees and staring at the horizon and taking the helm only work when the syndrome is pretty mild. After that, it's eyes closed, in the rack, lying absolutely still and hoping for oblivion. Been there.

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I was in the Navy for about 12 years and yup, I got seasick. On a Navy ship there is no laying down, no resting for 24 hours, no looking at the horizon, no asking for garlic tea.... you have a job to do. Sometimes you have to carry around a plastic bag on your job, or just always know where the nearest head is located.

 

My observations are:

 

1. A small number of people never get seasick.

2. A small number of have chronic seasickness.

3. Most people need time to adjust and then are fine. That adjustment time typically can range from a few hours to a few days.

4. The more sea time, the faster the adjustment.

 

I am thinking you just need do more sailing and more some adjustment time. Odds are that with time and experience the seasickness will go away or at least be less bothersome.

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I often wonder if I'd be the type to get sea sick. I've never taken an extend cruises or been in any kind of significant chop. The most I've been in is a weekend out on the lake.

If I'm out all day on the boat with typical lake waves (powerboat wakes), then go lay down in bed at night, I'll feel like I'm still on the water. I don't know if that means I'd adapt quickly or if I'd get sea sick quickly.

 

If I read a book in the car, I'll get motion sickness so I'm not sure how'd I'd do if I had to stay down below without having a piece of the horizon to look at.

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I often wonder if I'd be the type to get sea sick. I've never taken an extend cruises or been in any kind of significant chop. The most I've been in is a weekend out on the lake.

If I'm out all day on the boat with typical lake waves (powerboat wakes), then go lay down in bed at night, I'll feel like I'm still on the water. I don't know if that means I'd adapt quickly or if I'd get sea sick quickly.

 

If I read a book in the car, I'll get motion sickness so I'm not sure how'd I'd do if I had to stay down below without having a piece of the horizon to look at.

The persistent feeling of motion after getting off the water is called "mal de debarquement" and is not related to sea sickness as far as I know. There is also a pathological condition, called "persistent mal de debarquement syndrome", where the sensation never goes away. The two are often confused, as in the Wikipedia entry.

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My experience is that stress and anxiety can bring on sea sickness occasionally. My wife suffers from it if she starts to worry about the wx or my daughter (who does suffer from motion sickness). After all the effort of refitting your boat and moving to a new bigger strech of water you may have been feeling some pressure for everything to be perfect. I bet you'll feel great next time out.

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I often wonder if I'd be the type to get sea sick. I've never taken an extend cruises or been in any kind of significant chop. The most I've been in is a weekend out on the lake.

If I'm out all day on the boat with typical lake waves (powerboat wakes), then go lay down in bed at night, I'll feel like I'm still on the water. I don't know if that means I'd adapt quickly or if I'd get sea sick quickly.

 

If I read a book in the car, I'll get motion sickness so I'm not sure how'd I'd do if I had to stay down below without having a piece of the horizon to look at.

The persistent feeling of motion after getting off the water is called "mal de debarquement" and is not related to sea sickness as far as I know. There is also a pathological condition, called "persistent mal de debarquement syndrome", where the sensation never goes away. The two are often confused, as in the Wikipedia entry.

 

Right.

 

The absolute LAST think you want do after jumping off a boat is take a shower. Getting into the small closed (non moving) space will bring out the queezies faster than 5 hours in the slop.

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Wherever I go it's always the same request.......

 

 

The second pic down was perfect. I'll be in my bunk.

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I was an airborne command post crew-member in the USAF for 10 years. Motion sickness is basically your brain disagreeing with the fluid in your inner ear. I never barfed on a flight but got close a few times during refuelings where it was a constant up/down motion for an hour. What helped was relaxing, facing forward, and trying to sync your breathing with the motions. Could not look out windows for a horizon reference. Taking the wheel helps from what I have heard.

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I forgot to add, one person puking can start a chain reaction. We had one flight, thankfully I was not on, following POTUS from Brazil back to the states. They flew thru a big storm and out of 70 people on the plane, only a dozen or so did not barf. All it took was for one to puke in their bunk while trying to sleep.

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If possible let the seasick person steer.It gives them some control over the motion and gets their mind off how they are feeling.

 

The worse thing you can do is start talking about seasickness.

 

 

Phil

Nah. Two weeks ago I puked off my boat for the first time. I was steering. I think though what got me was that I was having to stare at the compass, it was pitch black and pounding rain so pretty much all I could see was that compass card. Luckily it was raining hard enough to clean the boat off for me...

 

But yes, in normal conditions that would be a good option!

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Sons, I chalk it up to a lack of acclimation, possibly agitated by something you all ate. Keep sailing, and it'll settle down.

 

20 years in the US Navy on submarines. Do you know that modern submarines have very poor surface riding characteristics? No keel, they just roll and roll and roll. There's no window, so no looking at the horizon. I used to tie a garbage bag to the AN/WRR-7 stack and just barf for my whole watch.

 

I blew my guts out on Mrgnstrn's boat for a section of this year's Governor's Cup. Yeah, I was the object of ridicule for the objectionable noises I made while doing it. I ain't letting it stop me.

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great discussion!

 

Just got home and here's some observations.

 

Paps and Ajax, I think you're somewhat correct as to the lack of acclimation, but I don't think I've ever really been acclimated to 'real' sailing. Sure, the lakes can get pretty sloppy sometimes, but it's more like 'severe powerboat chop', and honestly that type of sailing was fun.

 

I think the biggest factors were:

 

1.) I've been psyching myself out over Lake Superior for years. We visit the North Shore annually and it seems like the one time we drive up 61, it's blowing like stink and the lake is a mess as far as you can see towards the horizon.

 

2.)Seeing my daughter come up on deck with her pale green face didn't help.

 

3.)Coffee and pastries for breakfast. Bleah.

 

4.)Kids have all been sick with coughs and such lately. Could be related to that. There have been times in the spring/fall when my allergies kick in where I have had major dizzy spells to the point where I couldn't move. Doc says I should try antihistmine or something.

 

Still feeling a bit queazy, so I'm thinking there was more to this than being on the water.

 

As for the "mal de debarquement" that has never bothered me and in fact I rather enjoy it. I remember the very first overnight we took with my kids when they were very young. We motored to our anchorage in pretty nasty conditions. Our little 22' was a pretty good anchor sailor. Though the water was calm on the lee side of the little island we anchored next to, the wind whipped us around pretty good. On the way home, I keept having that feeling as though we were still on the boat and it was pretty cool. Maybe in more severe conditions I won't think so.

 

Now with that said, if it came to me shouting at the water, everyone around will know. I do not go quietly into that goodnight when it's time to barf. I was actually hoping I would just to get it over with. But we made it in under the lift bridge and into flat water before that happened.

 

I'm going to chalk this up to just being freaked out by it. It just hardens my resolve. If I go out and it keeps happening, I'll just have to go out even more! I've invested too much into this to walk away from it just because of a little barfing.

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Two words Sons - Ginger chews...pick up a bag at Trader Joes, and throw a couple in your pocket. At least until you get acclimated- then, no worries ;)

 

I saw you guys head out on Saturday, was it any better then?

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Two words Sons - Ginger chews...pick up a bag at Trader Joes, and throw a couple in your pocket. At least until you get acclimated- then, no worries ;)

 

I saw you guys head out on Saturday, was it any better then?

 

That was the day in question ;)

 

It was fine once we came back in under the lift bridge. Actually a really nice sail back to the marina.

 

Will definitely need to grab some Ginger chews or ginger whatever. Honestly though, I think I just need to get out there more. And if I'm going to hurl, then so be it.

 

I really just think it was a combination of things, anxiety being a big part of it.

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Two words Sons - Ginger chews...pick up a bag at Trader Joes, and throw a couple in your pocket. At least until you get acclimated- then, no worries ;)

 

I saw you guys head out on Saturday, was it any better then?

 

That was the day in question ;)

 

It was fine once we came back in under the lift bridge. Actually a really nice sail back to the marina.

 

Will definitely need to grab some Ginger chews or ginger whatever. Honestly though, I think I just need to get out there more. And if I'm going to hurl, then so be it.

 

I really just think it was a combination of things, anxiety being a big part of it.

 

Shit - I don't know what day it is anymore! Ah - October 1st...oh man.

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20 years in the US Navy on submarines. Do you know that modern submarines have very poor surface riding characteristics? No keel, they just roll and roll and roll. There's no window, so no looking at the horizon. I used to tie a garbage bag to the AN/WRR-7 stack and just barf for my whole watch.

 

I was on a submarine for 5 days as a civilian contractor. The last day I was feeling queasy due to loss of sleep and anxiety about the process of being taken off the boat. I found I was more comfortable down below the center roll and less comfortable above the center of roll. I was very glad to get out in the Bahamian sunshine.

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Mrs K always get seasick. If I mention any remedy like looking at the horizon, she's temporarily relieved by a sharp focus on the desire to kill me. She prefers to go below and curl up somewhere and ponder life after our divorce.

 

I used to get seasick almost every time I went out. I can hardly remember the feeling of being seasick now.

 

I notice before I go out, even now, that I get butterflies in my stomach. Nervousness. As I'm packing my gear and ready to get in the car and go to the boat. Weird, as sailing is so routine for me now.

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Ever been on a boat were someone just fall asleep and can't wake up?

Happened to me twice during deliveries from Seattle to Portland. They fall asleep in the straights, wake up and stumble around for a few minutes and fall back asleep. 30 hours later we cross the Columbia river bar and wake wondering what the fuck happened. Weird!

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Don't worrie about it son's. Remember there are only four stages of seasickness.

 

1, You think you are going to be sick.

 

2, You are being sick.

 

3, You are scared your going to die.

 

4, You are scared you won't (die).

 

Is this helping?

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Ever been on a boat were someone just fall asleep and can't wake up?

Happened to me twice during deliveries from Seattle to Portland. They fall asleep in the straights, wake up and stumble around for a few minutes and fall back asleep. 30 hours later we cross the Columbia river bar and wake wondering what the fuck happened. Weird!

Sounds like the Little Loser when he gets queasy, which usually has a secondary cause in addition to motion. The last time it was diesel fumes on the way back from Bermuda. I got the leak stopped (the little capillary line on the Tank Tender started leaking and had been improperly routed below the tank, creating a siphon), cleaned up the bilge, the fumes went away and so did the queasiness.

 

There are times the Starter Wife just doesn't feel like cooking below while underway, usually when the wind is up, so either I cook, or shorten sail for lunch or dinner.

 

When we first bought this boat I had been away from the ocean for 15 years, my first overnight across the gulf of Maine was pretty rough and I suffered. Since then I've made it a point to do frequent overnights so we stay acclimated and practiced at staying hydrated, fed and rested. That was the last time I've done The Big Spit.

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My daughter rarely got nausea as a kid, but almost always became uncharacteristically drowsy after an hour or two on the water. The one time I was really sick, I got sleepy and felt much better after a nap.

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Sons, I chalk it up to a lack of acclimation, possibly agitated by something you all ate. Keep sailing, and it'll settle down.

 

20 years in the US Navy on submarines. Do you know that modern submarines have very poor surface riding characteristics? No keel, they just roll and roll and roll. There's no window, so no looking at the horizon. I used to tie a garbage bag to the AN/WRR-7 stack and just barf for my whole watch.

 

I blew my guts out on Mrgnstrn's boat for a section of this year's Governor's Cup. Yeah, I was the object of ridicule for the objectionable noises I made while doing it. I ain't letting it stop me.

 

The only time I got queezy was on a shipride. mind you, not on the ship (734), but on the gaddam tug taking us out to the ship.

once onboard, I was cool. easy rolling motion on a boomer. not so much on the orange/red tugs.

-m

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20 years in the US Navy on submarines. Do you know that modern submarines have very poor surface riding characteristics? No keel, they just roll and roll and roll. There's no window, so no looking at the horizon. I used to tie a garbage bag to the AN/WRR-7 stack and just barf for my whole watch.

 

I was on a submarine for 5 days as a civilian contractor. The last day I was feeling queasy due to loss of sleep and anxiety about the process of being taken off the boat. I found I was more comfortable down below the center roll and less comfortable above the center of roll. I was very glad to get out in the Bahamian sunshine.

dude, you were queezy because you were on the surface. while submerged, they don't rock and roll. gently pitch up or down to change depth, yes, but no repeated rolling.

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Don't worrie about it son's. Remember there are only four stages of seasickness.

 

1, You think you are going to be sick.

 

2, You are being sick.

 

3, You are scared your going to die.

 

4, You are scared you won't (die).

 

Is this helping?

 

hah...laughter = the best medicine

 

In hindsight, it had to be something else. Felt pretty shitty the last couple of days, actually. I think the cure is to get the fuckoutta here and go live in the tropics somewhere.

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20 years in the US Navy on submarines. Do you know that modern submarines have very poor surface riding characteristics? No keel, they just roll and roll and roll. There's no window, so no looking at the horizon. I used to tie a garbage bag to the AN/WRR-7 stack and just barf for my whole watch.

 

I was on a submarine for 5 days as a civilian contractor. The last day I was feeling queasy due to loss of sleep and anxiety about the process of being taken off the boat. I found I was more comfortable down below the center roll and less comfortable above the center of roll. I was very glad to get out in the Bahamian sunshine.

dude, you were queezy because you were on the surface. while submerged, they don't rock and roll. gently pitch up or down to change depth, yes, but no repeated rolling.

 

You do realize that I know this, right? I'll also let you know that they DO still roll when submerged, if you are parked beneath a hurricane. "Gently" pitch up and down? Not if I'm driving.

 

"Torpedo evasion! Bong Bong Bong Bong!" Yeehaw!

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Hey Ajax, do subs really have acceleration alarms? I heard from a drunken navy submariner (ya, I know it's redundant) that when a LA Class punched the throttle it would knock people off their feet, so there was basically a "hang on" alarm. True??

 

BV

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Don't worrie about it son's. Remember there are only four stages of seasickness.

 

1, You think you are going to be sick.

 

2, You are being sick.

 

3, You are scared your going to die.

 

4, You are scared you won't (die).

 

Is this helping?

 

+1 LOL.

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Hey Ajax, do subs really have acceleration alarms? I heard from a drunken navy submariner (ya, I know it's redundant) that when a LA Class punched the throttle it would knock people off their feet, so there was basically a "hang on" alarm. True??

 

BV

 

That's total bullshit. I served aboard 1 Permit class and 3 LA class boats and the alarms were all the same:

 

General

Collision/Flooding

Diving

Power Plant Casualty

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fd that is very funny.

Sons, lots of good info here. You will be fine.

 

I have never been seasick, but here are a few of my observations about seasickness:

 

As CL says ~ stay hydrated!! Especially if one gets seasick ... keep up with water intake. I think this is the most important of all.

 

Get rest when you can.

 

Stress & anxiety seem to contribute to a significant cases of seasickness. Reassure your guests that boats can take a lot, and they are designed to heel, bob and move funny through the water.

 

Don't think about or focus on whether you feel seasick or not ... distract yourself with other tasks.

 

I have seen one too many sailors who are seasick directly as a result of being hungover and sleep deprived ... 'nuff said. :P

 

Saltine crackers, apples, ginger snap cookies, dried mango, bananas, jello ... eat small snacks often. Keep them handy in a container or Ziploc bag in the cockpit.

 

If you or a crew has to take a medication to help them with seasickness, write down the time that you (or they) took the medication.

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Hey Ajax, do subs really have acceleration alarms?

That's total bullshit.

 

If you think about how heavy they are, you'll see the rate of acceleration can't be too great. Then throw in that the propeller is optimized for silent running at walking speeds.

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Hey Ajax, do subs really have acceleration alarms? I heard from a drunken navy submariner (ya, I know it's redundant) that when a LA Class punched the throttle it would knock people off their feet, so there was basically a "hang on" alarm. True??

 

BV

 

That's total bullshit. I served aboard 1 Permit class and 3 LA class boats and the alarms were all the same:

 

General

Collision/Flooding

Diving

Power Plant Casualty

 

wait, there isn't one for

 

GIANT SQUID!

 

:huh:

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Hey Ajax, do subs really have acceleration alarms? I heard from a drunken navy submariner (ya, I know it's redundant) that when a LA Class punched the throttle it would knock people off their feet, so there was basically a "hang on" alarm. True??

 

BV

 

That's total bullshit. I served aboard 1 Permit class and 3 LA class boats and the alarms were all the same:

 

General

Collision/Flooding

Diving

Power Plant Casualty

 

wait, there isn't one for

 

GIANT SQUID!

 

:huh:

 

No need. Just call for Ned, fetch the harpoon!

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Hey Ajax, do subs really have acceleration alarms? I heard from a drunken navy submariner (ya, I know it's redundant) that when a LA Class punched the throttle it would knock people off their feet, so there was basically a "hang on" alarm. True??

 

BV

 

That's total bullshit. I served aboard 1 Permit class and 3 LA class boats and the alarms were all the same:

 

General

Collision/Flooding

Diving

Power Plant Casualty

 

oh come on...you forgot one...

 

EOT: Ring Ring Ring "All-ahead flank cavitate!"

 

of course nowadays EOT is electronic. pretty un-inspiring to hear a sedate "Bing" like "you got mail!" for bells.

 

and of course I was refering to mr. semi, not you....

 

-M

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fd that is very funny.

Sons, lots of good info here. You will be fine.

 

I have never been seasick, but here are a few of my observations about seasickness:

 

As CL says ~ stay hydrated!! Especially if one gets seasick ... keep up with water intake. I think this is the most important of all.

 

Get rest when you can.

 

Stress & anxiety seem to contribute to a significant cases of seasickness. Reassure your guests that boats can take a lot, and they are designed to heel, bob and move funny through the water.

 

Don't think about or focus on whether you feel seasick or not ... distract yourself with other tasks.

 

I have seen one too many sailors who are seasick directly as a result of being hungover and sleep deprived ... 'nuff said. :P

 

Saltine crackers, apples, ginger snap cookies, dried mango, bananas, jello ... eat small snacks often. Keep them handy in a container or Ziploc bag in the cockpit.

 

If you or a crew has to take a medication to help them with seasickness, write down the time that you (or they) took the medication.

 

If you feel the need to take medicine, take some ashore or on a day sail to check your reaction first. When I was in Australia, one of our crew was an international pilot and picked up Stugeron patches in Vancouver as they were not available in Australia. We got them literally the morning of the Melbourne-Hobart start and with several crew susceptible to seasickness applied the patches as we left the dock. 24 hours later, in big wind and seas of the west coast of Tasmania we had a few folks (of the 9 crew) get seasick. One guy really went down hard with confusion, some blurred vision,etc. and we put him below in a bunk and ended up checking him every 20 minutes for the next day and 1/2 as he slowly improved. If there had been an accessible harbor, we would have probably abandoned the race and taken him ashore. He was so bad that I put him off the boat in Hobart and made him fly home rather than take him on the delivery. Doctor determined he was acutely allergic to the active ingredient so the "cure" created a very hazardous situation. One of the least fun times in my sailing experience.

 

We had actually gone after the patches as the Owner would get seasick within an hour of clearing Port Phillip Heads and usually "come good" about the time we passed SW Cape. He seemed immune to the meds. Didn't bother him and he got seasick right on schedule. The mind is a powerful master and he expected to get seasick as soon as we left the bay and it always happened.

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That entire class of drug is famous for producing confusion, sedation, hallucinations etc. They also have a spectrum of other delightful side effects, such as urinary retention, which is a full-fledged emergency. Use with due caution and test ashore, as IB says..

 

There is a bit of a Stugeron cult in the US, because it isn't approved here, but it's essentially the same as the local stuff.

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IB , excellent points raised. I didn't have the time or heart to go into detail today again. Great reminder to check tolerance of meds, pre-trip.

I am not familiar with the meds available in the US, but I have found that crew-mates using ? Meclizine and/or ? Bonamine have found them fairly ineffective.

 

The drug I am most confident in administering if necessary, is Gravol (Dimenhydrinate). I always give the children's chewable dose first, to see if tolerated and it is often all that is needed. For a big adult I would suggest a full adult dose, if Child's size is not enough. I have found Gravol to be effective 90 % of the time. My being so positive in telling the affected that it will work well, me thinks is half the battle ( ie: mind over matter)

 

In my offshore med kit, I always carry alternatives in case someone continues to be ill for several days, instead of the usual 2 or 3. As Moe wisely stated, the side effects can be nasty and are to be used with caution and awareness.

Sturgeon would be my last choice. It is not available in Canada anymore, as far as I know, though it is available in England.

 

I believe strongly in preventative measures, awareness of early symptoms, mind over matter, hydration and keeping busy.

 

That being said, I am prone to getting "landsick" when back on solid land after days at sea. Though after our recent 18 day sail it was much less than normal. : )

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Best cure for seasickness: Search for the nearest tree, and sit under it for an hour. Then beer. Always works.

 

Failing that, lots of time on the water time before going offshore. Conditioning helps. After that, Scopalomine works for me.

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I would advise to go below, remove the cover from the engine, sit next to the engine while breathing in the oil fumes.

 

Oh... And eat some cold fried chicken.

 

Well, that's what we always told the new kids back in our scout days. Being one of the few with natural immunity I thought it quite funny. There was usually a betting pool on which one would come up first, how long they could last etc.

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Years ago I spent some time as a Flying Doctor in outback Australia.

Nice folks, but there was something wrong with the planes.

Then I found out the pilots ran a book on how many G's it took to make the new doctor black out.

 

They stopped it after I threw up all over the controls, the pilot was cleaning that plane out for days afterwards.

 

 

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Years ago I spent some time as a Flying Doctor in outback Australia.

Nice folks, but there was something wrong with the planes.

Then I found out the pilots ran a book on how many G's it took to make the new doctor black out.

 

They stopped it after I threw up all over the controls, the pilot was cleaning that plane out for days afterwards.

Not that this story is anything like yours. But I went on a mail run out of Alice Springs, and on the first landing they flew over the airstrip then pulled and twisted on the controls, or what ever they do, alarms and beeps were go off everywhere in the cockpit. I went from white to pale to assuming the crash position very bloody quickly. Pilots are cunts, bloody glorified Bus Drivers.

 

In regards to going out on the water and sea sickness. If I haven't been out for a while I take a tablet for the first day, then I'm right after that.

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Hi Sonny,

 

I am the guy opposite you in Barkers Island Marina on the no-name Crealock 34. Also stationed previously at Hansen's Harbor and Watergate Marina and live in South Minneapolis, and have three children including two teenage daughters. Yes, that guy with the foreign accent who talks to much and drinks too much beer after a good sail. No I am not stalking you but I do find the concidences are funny.

 

I am responding to this thread because the last comment related to flying in outback Australia. Another little coincidence so I thought I might respond. My grandfather was one of the first Qantas pilots flying the mail run between Port Headland and Daly Waters (just north of The Rock) in the late 1930's. They crashed three times. When he went join the RAAF in WWII they found his sight was not good enough. Go figure. That was good because almost the entire first draft of the RAAF in WWII was killed in combat.

 

Seasickness. With luck your little family will get over the seasickness with more time on the lake It really is beautiful out there and your boat is not only georgous but also very capabale. I think seasickness is a little age related. I used to get terribly seasick between about eight and sixteen. There is a good chance your teenagers will grow out of it. I don't seem to get seasick much anymore.

 

We more than 30 days on the boat this year, and wifey and the kids all got sea sick just once, beating into 15-25 knts towards Conorcopia from Sand Island. Waves on Lake Superior have a short interval and in boats our size this can make for rough going when compared to, say, the big ocean swell of the Pacific.

 

Don't give up on Lake Superior yet! There are some things you can do to mitigate the seasickness factor. Keep the kids out of the cabin and in the cockpit watching the horizon where possible. Try "Bomine", it is a wonder drug (not sure about kids). Avoid beating into the wind in rough conditions even if it means waiting a few days or going another direction. Downwind is always better! And if none of the above works, try moving your boat to the Apostle Islands. Most of the sailing there is very protected so there is relatively little wave action.

 

Next May we will be launching to the guest dock and then sailing East through the great lakes. We hope to end up back in Australia after a few years. It has been fun watching your pretty boat turn up in the same places we are.

 

Take it easy,

 

Shane

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For me its always:

 

Day 1: A bit woozy

Day 2: Feeling pretty sick

Day 3: Please God, blow my brains out and end it now!

Day 4: Unbreakable

 

Meds only delay this process; better to work through it quickly. I am finding as I get further into middle age, I am getting less sick. That is unless I'm asked to play with a alcohol stove in a closed space and read some numbers off the gribs.

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I always thought seasickness was something everyone got over after a couple of days. Then I saw this:

The poor bastard took a slow 27' boat all the way from Hawaii to the PWN and was sick the whole way.

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For me its always:

 

Day 1: A bit woozy

Day 2: Feeling pretty sick

Day 3: Please God, blow my brains out and end it now!

Day 4: Unbreakable

 

Meds only delay this process; better to work through it quickly. I am finding as I get further into middle age, I am getting less sick. That is unless I'm asked to play with a alcohol stove in a closed space and read some numbers off the gribs.

 

Pac Cup race the owner and someone who has done more ocean and long races than I can count was pretty sick. Out of boredom he started digging through the race kit handed to him when we left. At the bottom was a little cardboard box with a wrist watch in it with big claims that it helps or prevents sea sickness> LOL HA HA HA - He strapped it on and cranked it up little electrodes on his wrist etc. Of course it did nothing we had email capability so he wrote a particularly entertaining email to the company. At the end of the email he asked if he could mail it back to them for further research and testing and apologized for the unsightly stains on the watch and the box. HA HA

 

To our surprise he got an email back about two days later explaining that they did not need his watch sent back and they appreciated his feed back on how it worked. HA!!!!!!!!!

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At the end of the email he asked if he could mail it back to them for further research and testing and apologized for the unsightly stains on the watch and the box.
:D

 

I think I've tried every quack remedy available. Nothing works except acclimation.

 

Does anyone get the reverse once back on shore? You know where the restaurant has the same role period as the last 3 days

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For me its always:

 

Day 1: A bit woozy

Day 2: Feeling pretty sick

Day 3: Please God, blow my brains out and end it now!

Day 4: Unbreakable

 

Meds only delay this process; better to work through it quickly. I am finding as I get further into middle age, I am getting less sick. That is unless I'm asked to play with a alcohol stove in a closed space and read some numbers off the gribs.

 

Pac Cup race the owner and someone who has done more ocean and long races than I can count was pretty sick. Out of boredom he started digging through the race kit handed to him when we left. At the bottom was a little cardboard box with a wrist watch in it with big claims that it helps or prevents sea sickness> LOL HA HA HA - He strapped it on and cranked it up little electrodes on his wrist etc. Of course it did nothing we had email capability so he wrote a particularly entertaining email to the company. At the end of the email he asked if he could mail it back to them for further research and testing and apologized for the unsightly stains on the watch and the box. HA HA

 

To our surprise he got an email back about two days later explaining that they did not need his watch sent back and they appreciated his feed back on how it worked. HA!!!!!!!!!

There are actually some randomized, controlled, trials showing a benefit of median nerve stimulation--what that device does--for nausea from pregnancy and chemotherapy. Nothing for motion sickness, AFAIK.

 

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My wife gets sea sick pretty regularly. Course she is downstairs with the 2.5 year old most of the time in bad weather. The 2.5 year old does not get sick no matter how rough it is. Yet anyhow. My wife has tried most everything but Sturgeon (I suspect it won't work either) and Antivert (Meclizine). The problem for her with all the remedies including the pressure bracelets is vision changes. She thought she was having a stroke the first time she put on the bracelets. We tried Zofran also but that is strictly a anti-nausea med. Didn't seem to help much. Worse case, I'll start an IV and give fluids.

This summer while crossing the Strait of Georgia the wife got sick and came up on deck. The baby bitched and bitched about mama being upstairs. After being told to basically to fuck off the baby comes up into the cockpit and watches as Jen proceeds to vomit then go into dry heaves. Baby started to cry saying "Mama! Stop coughing! Stop coughing!" We got into somewhat sheltered water shortly after that and when asked if she still wanted to go to Mexico on the boat, she slowly raised her head from the bucket and said "Of course. Why do you ask?" I love that woman!! :lol:

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honestly, I think in my case it has to be related to sinuses or something. I wonder if an antihistamine would help.

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I used to get sick the first day offshore, I would heave it up and then was fine after the first heave. I found that delaying the heave just made it worse. Best to heave ASAP and be done with it.

 

Now that I have been commuting by small boat across Puget Sound every working day for 15 years I find I no longer get sick.

 

Guess I have acclimated full time now.

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My wife gets sea sick pretty regularly. My wife has tried most everything but Sturgeon (I suspect it won't work either) and Antivert (Meclizine). I love that woman!! :lol:

 

I seem to have become the Spelling Police around here, though I suspect you are right that eating fish or even caviar is contraindicated for seasickness. Stugeron is the drug she may or may not seek.

 

I snipped your message, but left in the profession of love because that woman clearly deserves it.

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Hi Sonny,

 

I am the guy opposite you in Barkers Island Marina on the no-name Crealock 34. Also stationed previously at Hansen's Harbor and Watergate Marina and live in South Minneapolis, and have three children including two teenage daughters. Yes, that guy with the foreign accent who talks to much and drinks too much beer after a good sail. No I am not stalking you but I do find the concidences are funny.

 

I am responding to this thread because the last comment related to flying in outback Australia. Another little coincidence so I thought I might respond. My grandfather was one of the first Qantas pilots flying the mail run between Port Headland and Daly Waters (just north of The Rock) in the late 1930's. They crashed three times. When he went join the RAAF in WWII they found his sight was not good enough. Go figure. That was good because almost the entire first draft of the RAAF in WWII was killed in combat.

 

Seasickness. With luck your little family will get over the seasickness with more time on the lake It really is beautiful out there and your boat is not only georgous but also very capabale. I think seasickness is a little age related. I used to get terribly seasick between about eight and sixteen. There is a good chance your teenagers will grow out of it. I don't seem to get seasick much anymore.

 

We more than 30 days on the boat this year, and wifey and the kids all got sea sick just once, beating into 15-25 knts towards Conorcopia from Sand Island. Waves on Lake Superior have a short interval and in boats our size this can make for rough going when compared to, say, the big ocean swell of the Pacific.

 

Don't give up on Lake Superior yet! There are some things you can do to mitigate the seasickness factor. Keep the kids out of the cabin and in the cockpit watching the horizon where possible. Try "Bomine", it is a wonder drug (not sure about kids). Avoid beating into the wind in rough conditions even if it means waiting a few days or going another direction. Downwind is always better! And if none of the above works, try moving your boat to the Apostle Islands. Most of the sailing there is very protected so there is relatively little wave action.

 

Next May we will be launching to the guest dock and then sailing East through the great lakes. We hope to end up back in Australia after a few years. It has been fun watching your pretty boat turn up in the same places we are.

 

Take it easy,

 

Shane

 

holy shit Shane. By now you've probably guessed I totally missed this. When were you in Hansen's? You weren't there with your Crealock, right? Now that I think about it, I may remember you there. Trying to forget that place. With the exception of the terrific dock mates, the rest of the place is something I can't recommend to others unless they've improved it somehow, like selling it to someone more competent.

 

Sounds like we won't get to know you and your boat all that well before you leave. Good on ya! We should get Clay and some of the other Lakers together over winter. I'll send you a pm with info.

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My wife gets sea sick pretty regularly. My wife has tried most everything but Sturgeon (I suspect it won't work either) and Antivert (Meclizine). I love that woman!! :lol:

 

I seem to have become the Spelling Police around here, though I suspect you are right that eating fish or even caviar is contraindicated for seasickness. Stugeron is the drug she may or may not seek.

 

I snipped your message, but left in the profession of love because that woman clearly deserves it.

 

I used spell checker for Stugeron and got the fish. I knew seasick was one word. I just started to use "every time" instead of everytime and "a lot" instead of alot. Maybe I transposed that to seasick. Ha! Even though English is my mother tongue, I still have trouble with it.

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My wife gets sea sick pretty regularly. Course she is downstairs with the 2.5 year old most of the time in bad weather. The 2.5 year old does not get sick no matter how rough it is. Yet anyhow. My wife has tried most everything but Sturgeon (I suspect it won't work either) and Antivert (Meclizine). The problem for her with all the remedies including the pressure bracelets is vision changes. She thought she was having a stroke the first time she put on the bracelets. We tried Zofran also but that is strictly a anti-nausea med. Didn't seem to help much. Worse case, I'll start an IV and give fluids.

She might want to find a good neurologist and ask about migraine treatment. Migraine is another syndrome in this poorly understood cluster and overlaps with motion sickness clinically and genetically. The visual symptoms strongly suggest a migraine component. I suspect the association with the drugs and bracelets is coincidental, but who knows?

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Yes an antihistamine would help. Benadryl and Dramamine are the same thing.

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Yes an antihistamine would help. Benadryl and Dramamine are the same thing.

They are both considered antihistimines (as are meclizine (Antivert), cinnarazine (Stugeron) and a host of others) but are different compounds.

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Anyone who claims to have never been seasick has never been on this boat.

 

post-703-0-00943000-1352435524_thumb.jpg

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Anyone who claims to have never been seasick has never been on this boat.

 

post-703-0-00943000-1352435524_thumb.jpg

 

I think if you look closely, you can see some vomit up there by the v-berth. Amazing they made it that far.

 

gawd, some people and their boats...

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I have been lucky so far, queasy but never sick. I usually get a week to ten day trip on lake superior each year, in addition to our weekly racing. Lately, I find after the week on the water it takes me about two days to feel comfortable driving again. I think the speed of visual information is very disconcerting after a lot of time at much lower speeds. No vestibular problem just a feeling that something is wrong.

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I've gotten queasy a few times. One thing that always stops it: jump in the water. Suitably attired of course. (It has usually happened to me on dive trips on high-floating cabin cruisers.) Also for some reason, foods like baloney sandwiches or anything with mayo and cheese are right out. Snickers bars and trail mix seem to be safe energy sources.

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Anyone who claims to have never been seasick has never been on this boat.

 

post-703-0-00943000-1352435524_thumb.jpg

 

 

I kind of like it for nostalgic reasons. Reminds me of my parent’s basement in 1967.

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