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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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Bump-n-Grind

The Official Trash the Bounty thread . leave the Sandy thread for stor

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I took a tour of the Bounty this summer..it was docked about 2 miles from my YC on the Hudson for a week...sad....glad to hear that the crew is safe but what a waste of work on the boat

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HMS BOUNTY's crew has abandoned ship to two life rafts and exposure suits. Coast Guard has picked up ALL of them. Sure wish this Captain had gone east like so many were suggesting. Just a bad place to be 90 miles SE of Hatteras. Glad all her crew is safe. What an experience!

 

https://www.facebook.com/#!/Schooner.MISTRESS

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Its worse than that... they set sail from New London on October 25. At the time they shoved off the dock, Sandy was thrashing around off Miami and the path was well known. There is no reason in the world that they should have been out there.

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Why were they in the storms path anyway? They had a weeks notice to find safe harbor.

 

Yes but doesn't this re inforce your admiration to those seamen of a past era who, without the benefit of satellite weather, inherently knew when and where to avoid hurricane or typhoon seasons ? Still, all our hearts are with the Bounty crew and all you yachties in the path of this monstrous storm. Here in Asia with the excellent tv coverage, eathcam.com and this forum we are with you by the hour and our hearts are with y'all

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Its worse than that... they set sail from New London on October 25. At the time they shoved off the dock, Sandy was thrashing around off Miami and the path was well known. There is no reason in the world that they should have been out there.

 

Heard about it this morning.

 

Why were they out there? My question too.

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Being blown toward cape Hatteras, no aux power, taking on water, no DC elect, big seas, high winds="stranded at sea".

Hmmm.

 

Perhaps a more accurate temr would be "fucked at sea"

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Are you fucking serious....

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/10/29/ns-hms-bounty-hurricane-sandy.html?cmp=googleeditorspick

"Claudia McCann, whose husband is the captain of the Bounty, said she hadn't slept since she received word the ship was taking on water.

She said her husband, Captain Robin Walbridge, was trying to get around Hurricane Sandy en route to Florida.

"He was just trying to avoid it, skirt it. Skirt through it, skirt around it," McCann said Monday."

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This is so stupid it sounds like an insurance job. I just hope that Captain didn't kill anyone. He should be working for an Italian cruise line.

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'Skirt around it'?

 

 

Jfc......

 

A much better plan than skirting through it.

 

 

 

 

It's rarely a good idea to attempt skirting around the environment....

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cbc just reported at least 2 unaccounted for. the number of people originally on board seems to be unclear.

Owner says 17 were on board, 16 made it to life rafts, 14 made it to helicopter.

 

2 confirmed (+/-) are wearing survival suits and life jackets... god help them.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/10/29/ns-hms-bounty-hurricane-sandy.html

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maybe the Cap't went down with the ship.

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot....

Went out into Atlantic Ocean on Oct 25th?! Who follows an idiot like this? I would vote with cell phone on the morning of 25th, "Hey Delta do you have any flights away from here, there's a dumb-ass going sailing and I want to be far far away"

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According to Captain Robin Walbridge, Bounty has no boundaries. As her captain, he is well known for his ability and desire to take Bounty to places that no ship has gone before

 

Doesn't sound that flattering and bad ass at this point. . .

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If the Skipper is one of the 14 picked, that could get ugly..

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Biography - Captain Robin Walbridge

 

 

 

robin.jpg

According to Captain Robin Walbridge, Bounty has no boundaries. As her captain, he is well known for his ability and desire to take Bounty to places that no ship has gone before. Captain Walbridge's philosophy is that all people of all ages should have the chance to see the great ships from the Golden Age of Sail - ships that have changed the course of history, made and destroyed nations, and have had an impact on us as a people and culture today.

Captain Walbridge is a quiet, self-effacing individual; yet, when you stop to consider all he has done in its entirety, collectively, it and he are pretty amazing. If you spend any time with him, you will realize that his loves are obvious: life, youth, the sea and HMS Bounty. He does not have children of his own, but has all the patience in the world when it comes to kids.

Robin entered the world of tall ships through the back door. Raised in St. Petersburg, Florida, he obtained his first raw boating experience when he borrowed a sailboat at age 18 and it proved to be a defining moment. By the time he owned a 38' schooner in his mid-twenties - the sea - any sea- was firmly in his blood. At 28, he secured his 50-ton license while working on the Miller houseboats on the Suwanee River in Florida where he was the field mechanic for five years. When not on the houseboats, he taught adult education and basic navigation to fishing and boat guides.

He went on to work on the Governor Stone in Apalachicola, Florida as Captain, conducting day sail programs, and crew training programs for the operation of the vessel. It was here he earned his 100-ton license.

Robin admits to sailing on the best and with the best when it comes to sail training education for youth. He became hooked on kids working with adjudicated youth as Captain for Vision Quest and the Bill of Rights. While on board the Bill of Rights, he worked on programs taking "hard-core" youth on-board from three months to 18 months. In 1993, he worked on Boy Scout programs on the Heritage of Miami. He developed sail training programs to take scouts on one-week voyages in the Florida Keys, including programs for children with disabilities. In his off-seasons, from 1993 – 2000, he was on-call as mate or engineer for Sea Education Association's (SEA) two vessels, Westwood and Corwith Cramer. Robin also spent some time on the 198' U.S. Brig Niagara of Erie, Pennsylvania, which only enhanced his fascination for square-rigged sailing.

Robin moved on to HMS Rose in 1993 as First and Second mate and went on to obtain his 500-ton Captain's license. He continued to work with youth sail training programs, developing programs for trainees along the eastern seaboard and Great Lakes. In 1995, he obtained his 1600-ton license.

Enter HMS Bounty in 1995. It was a labor of love from the beginning, and Robin has never looked back. Keeping her afloat has been a full-time occupation for many years. If it weren't for Robin's efforts, the ship would have sunk at the dock in Fall River, Massachusetts. During these financially difficult years, Robin organized programs with a local orphanage taking four to six young adults on as part of his crew. He also worked with an Ohio-based alternative school to give children an opportunity to find their love of the sea in a new environment.

The highlight of his career, however, is the two years and over 15 voyages spent training the crew of "Old Ironsides," the U.S.S. Constitution. He was at the helm as guest Captain/Advisor for the ship's inaugural sail in 1997 after 116 years of being dormant, a moment he remembers as "awe-inspiring," as many in his position would.

Under different owners, scores of crew, coast-wise port appearances along the East coast, Great Lakes and Europe, and extensive movie making, Robin continues to present Bounty to hundreds of thousands of fans. To Robin, Bounty is an extension of himself. Once a movie prop, built as an ocean-going vessel, she is a living classroom for the scores of children who have crossed her decks, and slept in her cabins.

When Bounty was in Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, finalizing her third phase of a total renovation, Robin oversaw in its entirety all phases of the restoration, with the ultimate goal of obtaining an SSV license. Now 50 years old, Bounty has lived many lives. If up to Captain Robin Walbridge, she will continue to thrill many, for many years to come.

It is people like Captain Robin Walbridge who keep the thrill of sail training and the art of square-rigged sailing alive. He has a life-time of effort and passion to show for it.

Captain Walbridge has studied naval architecture under David Wyman, former professor of the Maine Maritime Academy. When not under sail, rare in itself, Captain Walbridge loves building experimental kayaks. He has a commercial pilots license, loves photography and is an avid chess player, and one day, will live in Costa Rica.

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Biography - Captain Robin Walbridge

 

 

 

robin.jpg

According to Captain Robin Walbridge, Bounty has no boundaries. As her captain, he is well known for his ability and desire to take Bounty to places that no ship has gone before. Captain Walbridge's philosophy is that all people of all ages should have the chance to see the great ships from the Golden Age of Sail - ships that have changed the course of history, made and destroyed nations, and have had an impact on us as a people and culture today.

Captain Walbridge is a quiet, self-effacing individual; yet, when you stop to consider all he has done in its entirety, collectively, it and he are pretty amazing. If you spend any time with him, you will realize that his loves are obvious: life, youth, the sea and HMS Bounty. He does not have children of his own, but has all the patience in the world when it comes to kids.

Robin entered the world of tall ships through the back door. Raised in St. Petersburg, Florida, he obtained his first raw boating experience when he borrowed a sailboat at age 18 and it proved to be a defining moment. By the time he owned a 38' schooner in his mid-twenties - the sea - any sea- was firmly in his blood. At 28, he secured his 50-ton license while working on the Miller houseboats on the Suwanee River in Florida where he was the field mechanic for five years. When not on the houseboats, he taught adult education and basic navigation to fishing and boat guides.

He went on to work on the Governor Stone in Apalachicola, Florida as Captain, conducting day sail programs, and crew training programs for the operation of the vessel. It was here he earned his 100-ton license.

Robin admits to sailing on the best and with the best when it comes to sail training education for youth. He became hooked on kids working with adjudicated youth as Captain for Vision Quest and the Bill of Rights. While on board the Bill of Rights, he worked on programs taking "hard-core" youth on-board from three months to 18 months. In 1993, he worked on Boy Scout programs on the Heritage of Miami. He developed sail training programs to take scouts on one-week voyages in the Florida Keys, including programs for children with disabilities. In his off-seasons, from 1993 – 2000, he was on-call as mate or engineer for Sea Education Association's (SEA) two vessels, Westwood and Corwith Cramer. Robin also spent some time on the 198' U.S. Brig Niagara of Erie, Pennsylvania, which only enhanced his fascination for square-rigged sailing.

Robin moved on to HMS Rose in 1993 as First and Second mate and went on to obtain his 500-ton Captain's license. He continued to work with youth sail training programs, developing programs for trainees along the eastern seaboard and Great Lakes. In 1995, he obtained his 1600-ton license.

Enter HMS Bounty in 1995. It was a labor of love from the beginning, and Robin has never looked back. Keeping her afloat has been a full-time occupation for many years. If it weren't for Robin's efforts, the ship would have sunk at the dock in Fall River, Massachusetts. During these financially difficult years, Robin organized programs with a local orphanage taking four to six young adults on as part of his crew. He also worked with an Ohio-based alternative school to give children an opportunity to find their love of the sea in a new environment.

The highlight of his career, however, is the two years and over 15 voyages spent training the crew of "Old Ironsides," the U.S.S. Constitution. He was at the helm as guest Captain/Advisor for the ship's inaugural sail in 1997 after 116 years of being dormant, a moment he remembers as "awe-inspiring," as many in his position would.

Under different owners, scores of crew, coast-wise port appearances along the East coast, Great Lakes and Europe, and extensive movie making, Robin continues to present Bounty to hundreds of thousands of fans. To Robin, Bounty is an extension of himself. Once a movie prop, built as an ocean-going vessel, she is a living classroom for the scores of children who have crossed her decks, and slept in her cabins.

When Bounty was in Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, finalizing her third phase of a total renovation, Robin oversaw in its entirety all phases of the restoration, with the ultimate goal of obtaining an SSV license. Now 50 years old, Bounty has lived many lives. If up to Captain Robin Walbridge, she will continue to thrill many, for many years to come.

It is people like Captain Robin Walbridge who keep the thrill of sail training and the art of square-rigged sailing alive. He has a life-time of effort and passion to show for it.

Captain Walbridge has studied naval architecture under David Wyman, former professor of the Maine Maritime Academy. When not under sail, rare in itself, Captain Walbridge loves building experimental kayaks. He has a commercial pilots license, loves photography and is an avid chess player, and one day, will live in Costa Rica.

 

 

 

There's a real good fuking reason that the Nurse & I imposed 'boundaries' on our two children as they were growing up....

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From their blog:

 

"This is a sad day. The storm hit the ship pretty bad. One of the generators failed and the ship was taking on more water than it wanted. Distress call was sent out and the coastguard rescued ALL 17 crew. We are very thankful for that. Bounty was left at sea to fend for herself with the prayers of many. May God protect the ship from sinking!

 

DON'T GIVE UP! kEEP THE PRAYERS COMING. NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE.

 

We will let you know how things are progressing with the ship. Thank you for your prayers.

 

To our wonderful Captain Robin: You did a great job and the very best that you could. Thank you for your efforts and keeping the crew safe. God bless you sir."

 

Yeah wonderful job heading from safe harbor straight into a hurricane.........................

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HMS Bounty

Yesterday

Latest Communication from Captain Robin Walbridge.

Sent last night.

Good evening Miss Tracie

I think we are going to be into this for several days, the weater looks like even

after the eye goes by it will linger for a couple of days

We are just going to keep trying to go fast and squeese by the storm and land as

fast as we can.

I am thinking that we will pass each other sometime Sunday night or Monday morning

All else is well

Robin

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We saw the Bounty in 2008, heading up the coast from San Francisco in some pretty uncomfortable weather:

20080611-011511-1.jpg

 

Here's some video of her sailing a few miles offshore, north of Bodega Bay, pounding in the swells. I had stopped at "Death Rock" to watch as she was sailing north to Victoria B.C. to participate in a Tall Ships event:

http://sailvalis.com/wordpress_1/wp-filez/Bounty.mpg

 

A few minutes later she turned around and headed back south to Bodega Bay, anchoring htere for a few days while they waited for better conditions. Here she is at anchor:

20080611-214002-1.jpg

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Sounds like the captain wrote the bio while beating off to his own picture.

 

 

Well he's definitely got had a bounty full of self admiration, that's for sure.......

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Holy Crap !

 

What the hell.

 

I'm not going to criticize him because I don't know the whole story (like did someone tell him the storm was headed straight out to sea or had dimished to sub 40 or ??)

 

But jeezus.

 

Probably won't get another job in the states but maybe he will get a job on an italian cruise ship.

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Prayers for the two missing. Hope you're right Celph. Think I'll wait for the full story before questioning the decisions onboard. These are scary times for all involved.

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is an avid chess player, and one day,.....

.......checkmate?

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...cane-sandy.html

 

From the above, appears quite clear that all are not safe. Two souls still lost...I hope they have a VHF, Personal EPIRB, something.

 

Three crew members were washed overboard as they tried to get to two covered life-rafts, said the U.S. Coast Guard. Only one of the three members made it to the life-raft and was among the 14 people hoisted onto helicopters.

Coast Guard officials said the two missing crew members — a man and a woman — are believed to be in cold water survival suits and life-jackets. He said the air search is being plotted based on wind direction and speed, and will be expanded.

Claudia McCann, whose husband Robin Walbridge is the captain of the Bounty, told CBC News her husband is one of the two missing crew members. CBC News has learned the other missing crew member is Claudene Christian.

HMS Bounty sank several hours after the evacuation.

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Putting this boat to sea on this course has got to rank up there with the worst decisions ever in sailing, this storm track has been on everyone's screens for a week. I just hope nobody ends up dead, but that's not looking good. Why would anyone sail outside Hattaras (what was that nickname?) in front of a freaking Hurricane!?!?!?

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Sadly and tragically the Bounty's tracking site still shows its last known position. With Sandy menacing way to close.

 

bounty.jpg

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How many crew does it take to sail a tall ship thru a storm on a passage? Pretty sure all the lines don't go to binnacle. Having a hard time picturing one guy on the emergency manual bilge pump. Should have pressed a few landsmen?

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Putting this boat to sea on this course has got to rank up there with the worst decisions ever in sailing,

 

Easy now, Dorag will be along any minute advocating a libel suit against you on behalf of the feckless captain.

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Trying to "skirt" between a hurricane and a shore is as fine a definition of hubris as one might wish for.

 

Add to that the fact that since the hurricane was just coming off the coast of Cuba, Sandy has had very wide skirts indeed.

 

There are reasons Cape Hatteras is known as "The Graveyard of the Atlantic." And now el Capitan Walbridge is one more reason.

 

Sad.

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So maybe he tried to go east, was slow due to sea state/problems and was swept north due to gulf stream. When did he seek assistance?

Pay attention: He announced his intention to "skirt between the hurricane and land" and declined advice to go east, according to his wife, as reported above.

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Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

 

the Capt. is one of the 2 missing

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BRIDGEWATER – The captain of the Picton Castle says he cannot understand why The Bounty was at sea when a massive hurricane was forecast to hit.

Indeed, Dan Moreland postponed leaving Lunenburg more than a week ago precisely because of Hurricane Sandy.

“It was an easy decision to make. It’s black and white, there are no nuances with this. It’s a huge system and that made the decision very simple,” he said.

Moreland said he has known Robin Walbridge , the long-time captain of The Bounty, for years and he is an experienced seaman.

But Moreland said he was shocked Walbridge decided to sail given the forecast.

“Yes, I have to say yes, I can’t say anything else. When I first heard The Bounty was out there I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kidding,’ ” Moreland said.

He said there was very good information on the storm well in advance.

“I don’t understand this one at all,” Moreland said. “This is a huge system, there is no way of avoiding this, there’s no dodging and weaving around it.”

He said he is sorry two crew members are missing.

Moreland understands the agony of losing a crew member. Laura Gainey, a deckhand aboard Picton Castle, was swept overboard during rough seas in December 2006 and her body was never recovered.

In Feburary 2010, the Lunenburg-based Concordia sank in a storm off the coast of Brazil. All 64 students and staff were rescued after spending 40 hours in life rafts.

Moreland said The Bounty’s crew will be facing horrendous conditions in life rafts right now, and that rescuing them by air is a “very desperate measure,” something he described as “a last possible option.”

At this time, 14 people were being airlifted from the scene and he said conditions would be rough. “They’ll be whopped around and feeling every wave.”

Moreland expects The Bounty’s sinking to rightly come under intense scrutiny.

“When you lose a ship there are some pretty obvious questions out of this. It’s pretty horrible and the big question is, the decision to go.”

http://thechronicleh...ea-during-storm

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Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

 

the Capt. is one of the 2 missing

 

How convenient....

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If they weren't going to ride it out in-port, trying to cut South across Sandy's track seems like an incredibly poor call. I know Nova Scotia isn't the most fun place to winter, but they'd have been sailing AWAY from the storm and probably would have made it intact. Hell, I probably would have tried riding it out with the Navy in deep water before I tried squeezing between that storm and the coast. But, really, STAY IN PORT

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The video of the Coast Guard rescue amazingly compelling. It is hard to believe the calmness in the voices of the crew and pilots, especially with the altimeter warning repeatedly calls for altitude. I am always glad these folks are out there, doing what they do...

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Imagine looking at this and thinking you can skirt by

 

 

That's not the kind of skirt I'd like to cut short....

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Trying to thread the needle of the Gulf Stream and the Hatteras shoals in a HURRICANE 1,000 MILES WIDE takes either balls of titanium or brains made of swiss cheese.

You decide..............

He learned that driving the Sara.

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Imagine looking at this and thinking you can skirt by

 

 

Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

 

the Capt. is one of the 2 missing

 

How convenient....

 

You're an asshole. I understand the desire to lambast the captain but there are two people missing including potentially the captain How about we wait till we know what happened to them.

 

 

I'm really sickened by the low class you and many others exhibit daily here.

 

Troubling.

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“One of our pumps was not working properly, we just could not dewater it fast enough — water, normal sewage water that a boat of this entity takes on — and once the pumps stopped working, the generator stopped working, they just could not keep up"

what exactly is normal sewage water?

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Damn Shame, Appears she did not make it:

http://thechronicleh...paign=most_read

 

UPDATED 7:20 p.m.

Missing HMS Bounty crewmember Claudene Christian was found unconscious and later confirmed dead by the U.S. Coast Guard.

Christian's family had earlier told a U.S. news station that Christian had been found unconscious by the U.S. Coast Guard, and that officials were performing CPR on her.

KFSM, a CBS affiliate in Arkansas, reported that it spoke to Christian's aunt, Patricia Saulsberry, who said she had been in the water for 9 or 10 hours.

Meanwhile, the search continued for the other reportedly missing crewmember after hurricane Sandy forced the 16-member crew of HMS Bounty to abandon ship off the eastern coast of the United States on Monday.

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The video of the Coast Guard rescue amazingly compelling. It is hard to believe the calmness in the voices of the crew and pilots, especially with the altimeter warning repeatedly calls for altitude. I am always glad these folks are out there, doing what they do...

 

+1000 Go Coasties! (said with a new sense of appreciation)

 

Win ever

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