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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

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Bump-n-Grind

The Official Trash the Bounty thread . leave the Sandy thread for stor

828 posts in this topic

I took a tour of the Bounty this summer..it was docked about 2 miles from my YC on the Hudson for a week...sad....glad to hear that the crew is safe but what a waste of work on the boat

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The 180-foot, three-masted ship is a replica of one made famous in the film "Mutiny on the Bounty" and was featured in that movie.

Awesome bastardisation of The Queens English/ History and Journalistic story research ... all in one :)

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HMS BOUNTY's crew has abandoned ship to two life rafts and exposure suits. Coast Guard has picked up ALL of them. Sure wish this Captain had gone east like so many were suggesting. Just a bad place to be 90 miles SE of Hatteras. Glad all her crew is safe. What an experience!

 

https://www.facebook.com/#!/Schooner.MISTRESS

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Why were they in the storms path anyway? They had a weeks notice to find safe harbor.

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Its worse than that... they set sail from New London on October 25. At the time they shoved off the dock, Sandy was thrashing around off Miami and the path was well known. There is no reason in the world that they should have been out there.

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Only 14 crew accounted for... Hope for the best

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Saw her this summer up in Maine when we were sailing from Islesboro to Castine.

 

IMG_1060.jpg

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Why were they in the storms path anyway? They had a weeks notice to find safe harbor.

 

Yes but doesn't this re inforce your admiration to those seamen of a past era who, without the benefit of satellite weather, inherently knew when and where to avoid hurricane or typhoon seasons ? Still, all our hearts are with the Bounty crew and all you yachties in the path of this monstrous storm. Here in Asia with the excellent tv coverage, eathcam.com and this forum we are with you by the hour and our hearts are with y'all

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How can a ship be "stranded at sea", as reported?

 

No propulsion, which also kind of answers the inevitable What's it rate?

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Being blown toward cape Hatteras, no aux power, taking on water, no DC elect, big seas, high winds="stranded at sea".

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Its worse than that... they set sail from New London on October 25. At the time they shoved off the dock, Sandy was thrashing around off Miami and the path was well known. There is no reason in the world that they should have been out there.

 

Heard about it this morning.

 

Why were they out there? My question too.

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Being blown toward cape Hatteras, no aux power, taking on water, no DC elect, big seas, high winds="stranded at sea".

Hmmm.

 

Perhaps a more accurate temr would be "fucked at sea"

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I totally don't get this. Did they just not believe the forecast path?

If they would have just sailed straight east or even north easterly they would have been fine.

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Once the crew heard what the captain had in mind to do, I'm surprised there wasn't another mutiny...

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Are you fucking serious....

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/10/29/ns-hms-bounty-hurricane-sandy.html?cmp=googleeditorspick

"Claudia McCann, whose husband is the captain of the Bounty, said she hadn't slept since she received word the ship was taking on water.

She said her husband, Captain Robin Walbridge, was trying to get around Hurricane Sandy en route to Florida.

"He was just trying to avoid it, skirt it. Skirt through it, skirt around it," McCann said Monday."

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If you try and crack the whip going SOUTH you are going to eat the gulfstream head on. NOT FUN.

If you go wide of the stream, then you are beating into a hurricane. Not fast in a square rigger to say the least.

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This is so stupid it sounds like an insurance job. I just hope that Captain didn't kill anyone. He should be working for an Italian cruise line.

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'Skirt around it'?

 

 

Jfc......

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'Skirt around it'?

 

 

Jfc......

 

A much better plan than skirting through it.

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'Skirt around it'?

 

 

Jfc......

 

A much better plan than skirting through it.

 

 

 

 

It's rarely a good idea to attempt skirting around the environment....

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And the Darwin Award goes too.....

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maybe the Cap't went down with the ship.

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I'm pretty sure that will soon be Ex-captain....

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot....

Went out into Atlantic Ocean on Oct 25th?! Who follows an idiot like this? I would vote with cell phone on the morning of 25th, "Hey Delta do you have any flights away from here, there's a dumb-ass going sailing and I want to be far far away"

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According to Captain Robin Walbridge, Bounty has no boundaries. As her captain, he is well known for his ability and desire to take Bounty to places that no ship has gone before

 

Doesn't sound that flattering and bad ass at this point. . .

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If the Skipper is one of the 14 picked, that could get ugly..

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Biography - Captain Robin Walbridge

 

 

 

robin.jpg

According to Captain Robin Walbridge, Bounty has no boundaries. As her captain, he is well known for his ability and desire to take Bounty to places that no ship has gone before. Captain Walbridge's philosophy is that all people of all ages should have the chance to see the great ships from the Golden Age of Sail - ships that have changed the course of history, made and destroyed nations, and have had an impact on us as a people and culture today.

Captain Walbridge is a quiet, self-effacing individual; yet, when you stop to consider all he has done in its entirety, collectively, it and he are pretty amazing. If you spend any time with him, you will realize that his loves are obvious: life, youth, the sea and HMS Bounty. He does not have children of his own, but has all the patience in the world when it comes to kids.

Robin entered the world of tall ships through the back door. Raised in St. Petersburg, Florida, he obtained his first raw boating experience when he borrowed a sailboat at age 18 and it proved to be a defining moment. By the time he owned a 38' schooner in his mid-twenties - the sea - any sea- was firmly in his blood. At 28, he secured his 50-ton license while working on the Miller houseboats on the Suwanee River in Florida where he was the field mechanic for five years. When not on the houseboats, he taught adult education and basic navigation to fishing and boat guides.

He went on to work on the Governor Stone in Apalachicola, Florida as Captain, conducting day sail programs, and crew training programs for the operation of the vessel. It was here he earned his 100-ton license.

Robin admits to sailing on the best and with the best when it comes to sail training education for youth. He became hooked on kids working with adjudicated youth as Captain for Vision Quest and the Bill of Rights. While on board the Bill of Rights, he worked on programs taking "hard-core" youth on-board from three months to 18 months. In 1993, he worked on Boy Scout programs on the Heritage of Miami. He developed sail training programs to take scouts on one-week voyages in the Florida Keys, including programs for children with disabilities. In his off-seasons, from 1993 – 2000, he was on-call as mate or engineer for Sea Education Association's (SEA) two vessels, Westwood and Corwith Cramer. Robin also spent some time on the 198' U.S. Brig Niagara of Erie, Pennsylvania, which only enhanced his fascination for square-rigged sailing.

Robin moved on to HMS Rose in 1993 as First and Second mate and went on to obtain his 500-ton Captain's license. He continued to work with youth sail training programs, developing programs for trainees along the eastern seaboard and Great Lakes. In 1995, he obtained his 1600-ton license.

Enter HMS Bounty in 1995. It was a labor of love from the beginning, and Robin has never looked back. Keeping her afloat has been a full-time occupation for many years. If it weren't for Robin's efforts, the ship would have sunk at the dock in Fall River, Massachusetts. During these financially difficult years, Robin organized programs with a local orphanage taking four to six young adults on as part of his crew. He also worked with an Ohio-based alternative school to give children an opportunity to find their love of the sea in a new environment.

The highlight of his career, however, is the two years and over 15 voyages spent training the crew of "Old Ironsides," the U.S.S. Constitution. He was at the helm as guest Captain/Advisor for the ship's inaugural sail in 1997 after 116 years of being dormant, a moment he remembers as "awe-inspiring," as many in his position would.

Under different owners, scores of crew, coast-wise port appearances along the East coast, Great Lakes and Europe, and extensive movie making, Robin continues to present Bounty to hundreds of thousands of fans. To Robin, Bounty is an extension of himself. Once a movie prop, built as an ocean-going vessel, she is a living classroom for the scores of children who have crossed her decks, and slept in her cabins.

When Bounty was in Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, finalizing her third phase of a total renovation, Robin oversaw in its entirety all phases of the restoration, with the ultimate goal of obtaining an SSV license. Now 50 years old, Bounty has lived many lives. If up to Captain Robin Walbridge, she will continue to thrill many, for many years to come.

It is people like Captain Robin Walbridge who keep the thrill of sail training and the art of square-rigged sailing alive. He has a life-time of effort and passion to show for it.

Captain Walbridge has studied naval architecture under David Wyman, former professor of the Maine Maritime Academy. When not under sail, rare in itself, Captain Walbridge loves building experimental kayaks. He has a commercial pilots license, loves photography and is an avid chess player, and one day, will live in Costa Rica.

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Biography - Captain Robin Walbridge

 

 

 

robin.jpg

According to Captain Robin Walbridge, Bounty has no boundaries. As her captain, he is well known for his ability and desire to take Bounty to places that no ship has gone before. Captain Walbridge's philosophy is that all people of all ages should have the chance to see the great ships from the Golden Age of Sail - ships that have changed the course of history, made and destroyed nations, and have had an impact on us as a people and culture today.

Captain Walbridge is a quiet, self-effacing individual; yet, when you stop to consider all he has done in its entirety, collectively, it and he are pretty amazing. If you spend any time with him, you will realize that his loves are obvious: life, youth, the sea and HMS Bounty. He does not have children of his own, but has all the patience in the world when it comes to kids.

Robin entered the world of tall ships through the back door. Raised in St. Petersburg, Florida, he obtained his first raw boating experience when he borrowed a sailboat at age 18 and it proved to be a defining moment. By the time he owned a 38' schooner in his mid-twenties - the sea - any sea- was firmly in his blood. At 28, he secured his 50-ton license while working on the Miller houseboats on the Suwanee River in Florida where he was the field mechanic for five years. When not on the houseboats, he taught adult education and basic navigation to fishing and boat guides.

He went on to work on the Governor Stone in Apalachicola, Florida as Captain, conducting day sail programs, and crew training programs for the operation of the vessel. It was here he earned his 100-ton license.

Robin admits to sailing on the best and with the best when it comes to sail training education for youth. He became hooked on kids working with adjudicated youth as Captain for Vision Quest and the Bill of Rights. While on board the Bill of Rights, he worked on programs taking "hard-core" youth on-board from three months to 18 months. In 1993, he worked on Boy Scout programs on the Heritage of Miami. He developed sail training programs to take scouts on one-week voyages in the Florida Keys, including programs for children with disabilities. In his off-seasons, from 1993 – 2000, he was on-call as mate or engineer for Sea Education Association's (SEA) two vessels, Westwood and Corwith Cramer. Robin also spent some time on the 198' U.S. Brig Niagara of Erie, Pennsylvania, which only enhanced his fascination for square-rigged sailing.

Robin moved on to HMS Rose in 1993 as First and Second mate and went on to obtain his 500-ton Captain's license. He continued to work with youth sail training programs, developing programs for trainees along the eastern seaboard and Great Lakes. In 1995, he obtained his 1600-ton license.

Enter HMS Bounty in 1995. It was a labor of love from the beginning, and Robin has never looked back. Keeping her afloat has been a full-time occupation for many years. If it weren't for Robin's efforts, the ship would have sunk at the dock in Fall River, Massachusetts. During these financially difficult years, Robin organized programs with a local orphanage taking four to six young adults on as part of his crew. He also worked with an Ohio-based alternative school to give children an opportunity to find their love of the sea in a new environment.

The highlight of his career, however, is the two years and over 15 voyages spent training the crew of "Old Ironsides," the U.S.S. Constitution. He was at the helm as guest Captain/Advisor for the ship's inaugural sail in 1997 after 116 years of being dormant, a moment he remembers as "awe-inspiring," as many in his position would.

Under different owners, scores of crew, coast-wise port appearances along the East coast, Great Lakes and Europe, and extensive movie making, Robin continues to present Bounty to hundreds of thousands of fans. To Robin, Bounty is an extension of himself. Once a movie prop, built as an ocean-going vessel, she is a living classroom for the scores of children who have crossed her decks, and slept in her cabins.

When Bounty was in Boothbay Harbor Shipyard in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, finalizing her third phase of a total renovation, Robin oversaw in its entirety all phases of the restoration, with the ultimate goal of obtaining an SSV license. Now 50 years old, Bounty has lived many lives. If up to Captain Robin Walbridge, she will continue to thrill many, for many years to come.

It is people like Captain Robin Walbridge who keep the thrill of sail training and the art of square-rigged sailing alive. He has a life-time of effort and passion to show for it.

Captain Walbridge has studied naval architecture under David Wyman, former professor of the Maine Maritime Academy. When not under sail, rare in itself, Captain Walbridge loves building experimental kayaks. He has a commercial pilots license, loves photography and is an avid chess player, and one day, will live in Costa Rica.

 

 

 

There's a real good fuking reason that the Nurse & I imposed 'boundaries' on our two children as they were growing up....

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From their blog:

 

"This is a sad day. The storm hit the ship pretty bad. One of the generators failed and the ship was taking on more water than it wanted. Distress call was sent out and the coastguard rescued ALL 17 crew. We are very thankful for that. Bounty was left at sea to fend for herself with the prayers of many. May God protect the ship from sinking!

 

DON'T GIVE UP! kEEP THE PRAYERS COMING. NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE.

 

We will let you know how things are progressing with the ship. Thank you for your prayers.

 

To our wonderful Captain Robin: You did a great job and the very best that you could. Thank you for your efforts and keeping the crew safe. God bless you sir."

 

Yeah wonderful job heading from safe harbor straight into a hurricane.........................

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HMS Bounty

Yesterday

Latest Communication from Captain Robin Walbridge.

Sent last night.

Good evening Miss Tracie

I think we are going to be into this for several days, the weater looks like even

after the eye goes by it will linger for a couple of days

We are just going to keep trying to go fast and squeese by the storm and land as

fast as we can.

I am thinking that we will pass each other sometime Sunday night or Monday morning

All else is well

Robin

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We saw the Bounty in 2008, heading up the coast from San Francisco in some pretty uncomfortable weather:

20080611-011511-1.jpg

 

Here's some video of her sailing a few miles offshore, north of Bodega Bay, pounding in the swells. I had stopped at "Death Rock" to watch as she was sailing north to Victoria B.C. to participate in a Tall Ships event:

http://sailvalis.com/wordpress_1/wp-filez/Bounty.mpg

 

A few minutes later she turned around and headed back south to Bodega Bay, anchoring htere for a few days while they waited for better conditions. Here she is at anchor:

20080611-214002-1.jpg

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Sounds like the captain wrote the bio while beating off to his own picture.

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Sounds like the captain wrote the bio while beating off to his own picture.

 

 

Well he's definitely got had a bounty full of self admiration, that's for sure.......

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"Robin entered the world of tall ships through the back door." And is now exiting through the back door...

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Holy Crap !

 

What the hell.

 

I'm not going to criticize him because I don't know the whole story (like did someone tell him the storm was headed straight out to sea or had dimished to sub 40 or ??)

 

But jeezus.

 

Probably won't get another job in the states but maybe he will get a job on an italian cruise ship.

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According to CBC, the Captain and a female (not his daughter as I just posted) Crew are missing

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ive heard multiple reports that all the crew were rescued

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Prayers for the two missing. Hope you're right Celph. Think I'll wait for the full story before questioning the decisions onboard. These are scary times for all involved.

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is an avid chess player, and one day,.....

.......checkmate?

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...cane-sandy.html

 

From the above, appears quite clear that all are not safe. Two souls still lost...I hope they have a VHF, Personal EPIRB, something.

 

Three crew members were washed overboard as they tried to get to two covered life-rafts, said the U.S. Coast Guard. Only one of the three members made it to the life-raft and was among the 14 people hoisted onto helicopters.

Coast Guard officials said the two missing crew members — a man and a woman — are believed to be in cold water survival suits and life-jackets. He said the air search is being plotted based on wind direction and speed, and will be expanded.

Claudia McCann, whose husband Robin Walbridge is the captain of the Bounty, told CBC News her husband is one of the two missing crew members. CBC News has learned the other missing crew member is Claudene Christian.

HMS Bounty sank several hours after the evacuation.

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Putting this boat to sea on this course has got to rank up there with the worst decisions ever in sailing, this storm track has been on everyone's screens for a week. I just hope nobody ends up dead, but that's not looking good. Why would anyone sail outside Hattaras (what was that nickname?) in front of a freaking Hurricane!?!?!?

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Sadly and tragically the Bounty's tracking site still shows its last known position. With Sandy menacing way to close.

 

bounty.jpg

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How many crew does it take to sail a tall ship thru a storm on a passage? Pretty sure all the lines don't go to binnacle. Having a hard time picturing one guy on the emergency manual bilge pump. Should have pressed a few landsmen?

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Putting this boat to sea on this course has got to rank up there with the worst decisions ever in sailing,

 

Easy now, Dorag will be along any minute advocating a libel suit against you on behalf of the feckless captain.

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Trying to "skirt" between a hurricane and a shore is as fine a definition of hubris as one might wish for.

 

Add to that the fact that since the hurricane was just coming off the coast of Cuba, Sandy has had very wide skirts indeed.

 

There are reasons Cape Hatteras is known as "The Graveyard of the Atlantic." And now el Capitan Walbridge is one more reason.

 

Sad.

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So maybe he tried to go east, was slow due to sea state/problems and was swept north due to gulf stream. When did he seek assistance?

Pay attention: He announced his intention to "skirt between the hurricane and land" and declined advice to go east, according to his wife, as reported above.

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Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

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Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

 

the Capt. is one of the 2 missing

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BRIDGEWATER – The captain of the Picton Castle says he cannot understand why The Bounty was at sea when a massive hurricane was forecast to hit.

Indeed, Dan Moreland postponed leaving Lunenburg more than a week ago precisely because of Hurricane Sandy.

“It was an easy decision to make. It’s black and white, there are no nuances with this. It’s a huge system and that made the decision very simple,” he said.

Moreland said he has known Robin Walbridge , the long-time captain of The Bounty, for years and he is an experienced seaman.

But Moreland said he was shocked Walbridge decided to sail given the forecast.

“Yes, I have to say yes, I can’t say anything else. When I first heard The Bounty was out there I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kidding,’ ” Moreland said.

He said there was very good information on the storm well in advance.

“I don’t understand this one at all,” Moreland said. “This is a huge system, there is no way of avoiding this, there’s no dodging and weaving around it.”

He said he is sorry two crew members are missing.

Moreland understands the agony of losing a crew member. Laura Gainey, a deckhand aboard Picton Castle, was swept overboard during rough seas in December 2006 and her body was never recovered.

In Feburary 2010, the Lunenburg-based Concordia sank in a storm off the coast of Brazil. All 64 students and staff were rescued after spending 40 hours in life rafts.

Moreland said The Bounty’s crew will be facing horrendous conditions in life rafts right now, and that rescuing them by air is a “very desperate measure,” something he described as “a last possible option.”

At this time, 14 people were being airlifted from the scene and he said conditions would be rough. “They’ll be whopped around and feeling every wave.”

Moreland expects The Bounty’s sinking to rightly come under intense scrutiny.

“When you lose a ship there are some pretty obvious questions out of this. It’s pretty horrible and the big question is, the decision to go.”

http://thechronicleh...ea-during-storm

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Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

 

the Capt. is one of the 2 missing

 

How convenient....

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If they weren't going to ride it out in-port, trying to cut South across Sandy's track seems like an incredibly poor call. I know Nova Scotia isn't the most fun place to winter, but they'd have been sailing AWAY from the storm and probably would have made it intact. Hell, I probably would have tried riding it out with the Navy in deep water before I tried squeezing between that storm and the coast. But, really, STAY IN PORT

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Trying to thread the needle of the Gulf Stream and the Hatteras shoals in a HURRICANE 1,000 MILES WIDE takes either balls of titanium or brains made of swiss cheese.

You decide..............

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Imagine looking at this and thinking you can skirt by

 

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The video of the Coast Guard rescue amazingly compelling. It is hard to believe the calmness in the voices of the crew and pilots, especially with the altimeter warning repeatedly calls for altitude. I am always glad these folks are out there, doing what they do...

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Imagine looking at this and thinking you can skirt by

 

 

That's not the kind of skirt I'd like to cut short....

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Trying to thread the needle of the Gulf Stream and the Hatteras shoals in a HURRICANE 1,000 MILES WIDE takes either balls of titanium or brains made of swiss cheese.

You decide..............

He learned that driving the Sara.

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one female survivor (of last 2) has been rescued. capt still missing

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I was looking at AIS tracking yesterday and was wondering why they were out there. Hopefully the last sailor will be found.

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Imagine looking at this and thinking you can skirt by

 

 

Bounty being reported as sunk now. 2 still missing. Hope Captain gets charged with 2 counts of murder if the crew isn't found

 

the Capt. is one of the 2 missing

 

How convenient....

 

You're an asshole. I understand the desire to lambast the captain but there are two people missing including potentially the captain How about we wait till we know what happened to them.

 

 

I'm really sickened by the low class you and many others exhibit daily here.

 

Troubling.

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“One of our pumps was not working properly, we just could not dewater it fast enough — water, normal sewage water that a boat of this entity takes on — and once the pumps stopped working, the generator stopped working, they just could not keep up"

what exactly is normal sewage water?

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what exactly is normal sewage water?

 

Seepage, misheard as "sewage"?

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Damn Shame, Appears she did not make it:

http://thechronicleh...paign=most_read

 

UPDATED 7:20 p.m.

Missing HMS Bounty crewmember Claudene Christian was found unconscious and later confirmed dead by the U.S. Coast Guard.

Christian's family had earlier told a U.S. news station that Christian had been found unconscious by the U.S. Coast Guard, and that officials were performing CPR on her.

KFSM, a CBS affiliate in Arkansas, reported that it spoke to Christian's aunt, Patricia Saulsberry, who said she had been in the water for 9 or 10 hours.

Meanwhile, the search continued for the other reportedly missing crewmember after hurricane Sandy forced the 16-member crew of HMS Bounty to abandon ship off the eastern coast of the United States on Monday.

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The video of the Coast Guard rescue amazingly compelling. It is hard to believe the calmness in the voices of the crew and pilots, especially with the altimeter warning repeatedly calls for altitude. I am always glad these folks are out there, doing what they do...

 

+1000 Go Coasties! (said with a new sense of appreciation)

 

Win ever

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BRIDGEWATER – The captain of the Picton Castle says he cannot understand why The Bounty was at sea when a massive hurricane was forecast to hit. Indeed, Dan Moreland postponed leaving Lunenburg more than a week ago precisely because of Hurricane Sandy.

 

--------

 

Moreland expects The Bounty’s sinking to rightly come under intense scrutiny.

“When you lose a ship there are some pretty obvious questions out of this. It’s pretty horrible and the big question is, the decision to go.”

http://thechronicleh...ea-during-storm

 

The decision to set sail is inexplicable. She was in New London and there was plenty advance knowledge of Sandy. Skipper had an incredible resume and track record. Hey, he could have gone upriver to the Coast Guard Academy and, to avoid storm tides and surge, tied off between two solid docks.

 

Apparently the pressure to get to St. Pete was too great.

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This is sad.

 

That said, why didn't the Bounty heave-to?

 

No need to fight the seas, just heave-to. Hove to is another phrase that means the same. That is how ships (and sailboats) survive storms - they don't fight the seas, just heave to and wait it out. No need to beat up the hull bashing into wakes, especially for a wooden ship that leaks constantly!

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BRIDGEWATER – The captain of the Picton Castle says he cannot understand why The Bounty was at sea when a massive hurricane was forecast to hit. Indeed, Dan Moreland postponed leaving Lunenburg more than a week ago precisely because of Hurricane Sandy.

 

--------

 

Moreland expects The Bounty’s sinking to rightly come under intense scrutiny.

“When you lose a ship there are some pretty obvious questions out of this. It’s pretty horrible and the big question is, the decision to go.”

http://thechronicleh...ea-during-storm

 

The decision to set sail is inexplicable. She was in New London and there was plenty advance knowledge of Sandy. Skipper had an incredible resume and track record. Hey, he could have gone upriver to the Coast Guard Academy and, to avoid storm tides and surge, tied off between two solid docks.

 

Apparently the pressure to get to St. Pete was too great.

 

I'd be curious to know if there were any other crew/passengers that were scheduled to go....but bailed out at the last minute.....

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This is sad.

 

That said, why didn't the Bounty heave-to?

 

No need to fight the seas, just heave-to. Hove to is another phrase that means the same. That is how ships (and sailboats) survive storms - they don't fight the seas, just heave to and wait it out. No need to beat up the hull bashing into wakes, especially for a wooden ship that leaks constantly!

even if hove to, this ship leaks like a sieve crashing down steep waves (many 30 footers). According to the Volvo70 crews the Gulfstream against a strong NorEaster at Cape Hatteras is as bad as the worst conditions in the roaring 40ties (screaming 50ties)

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This is sad.

 

That said, why didn't the Bounty heave-to?

 

No need to fight the seas, just heave-to. Hove to is another phrase that means the same. That is how ships (and sailboats) survive storms - they don't fight the seas, just heave to and wait it out. No need to beat up the hull bashing into wakes, especially for a wooden ship that leaks constantly!

even if hove to, this ship leaks like a sieve crashing down steep waves (many 30 footers). According to the Volvo70 crews the Gulfstream against a strong NorEaster at Cape Hatteras is as bad as the worst conditions in the roaring 40ties (screaming 50ties)

 

The closest weather buoy reported waves of 28 feet. The ships own blog reported sailing downwind over 10 knots. The Bounty was not a clipper ship. The boat was really built as a floating dormitory and movie studio. There had to be water everywhere. The vessel had big hatches and even bigger windows. They never should have been near any storm, much less this one. They also only had 16 so called hands to "man" 180 feet.

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The video of the Coast Guard rescue amazingly compelling. It is hard to believe the calmness in the voices of the crew and pilots, especially with the altimeter warning repeatedly calls for altitude. I am always glad these folks are out there, doing what they do...

 

+1000 Go Coasties! (said with a new sense of appreciation)

 

Win ever

 

an amazing video. what an incredible team. thank you, yet again, USCG.

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The body of Claudene Christian has been recovered. Pretty remarkable under those conditions. Captain still missing.

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I grew up in St. Pete. My senior high school class pictures was taken aboard this ship. I couldn't imagine it being out in big weather.

 

All I can think is WTF? Why would you chance taking that old tub out in a hurricane, especially off the coast of Cape Hatteras? Now the ship has sunk, at least one crew is dead, and most likely a second?

 

Again, WTF?

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The body of Claudene Christian has been recovered. Pretty remarkable under those conditions. Captain still missing.

A hard thing. She didn't assume the risk of an idiot captain imposing stupid risks on less knowlegeable and less experienced crew. I hope they find him and keep him alive to face the consequences. Too bad he can't be lashed around the fleet, as it was done in the time of the original Bounty.

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This USCG, Bounty rescue video goes to full screen

 

http://static.dvidsh...66x274-300k.mp4

 

What kind of glove is the chopper deck crew man in this USCG, Bounty rescue vid using??

 

These USCG guys are GREAT! Well Done.

This USCG, Bounty rescue video goes to full screen

 

http://static.dvidsh...66x274-300k.mp4

 

What kind of glove is the chopper deck crew man in this USCG, Bounty rescue vid using??

 

These USCG guys are GREAT! Well Done.

 

 

Drift wood:

The Flight Mechanic / Hoist Operator is using a very heavy duty leather glove. Has alot of leather in the palm so if the hoist cable has a broken strand of wire it doen't cut his hand. I can't remember the time interval but you have to do a hoist cable check for broken wire strands of the cable and if there was broken strands you replaced the cable. There is also a splice block so if the cable breaks you can splice block in a new hoist hook to complete the rescue. If you use the hoist shear your done with the hoisting evalution because it cuts the cable with a gilatine and an electric accuated firing squib and renders the hoist inoperative! Either pilot or the FM/hoist operator can call out sheer sheer sheer and push the button to shear the cable. That was used mostly when hoisting to a vessel and the hook or cable got foaled in the rigging or attached to the vessel. You never want that sinerio Can yank a helo out of the sky or the cable parts and goes thru the rotor system, BAD DAY! You can't get the cable out of the hoist drum once you sheer so it's a last resort kind of drill. The new hoists are also two speeds so It looks pretty fast in the video! The older hoists where single speed! They did and outstanding Job! Keep up the good work! It's going to be a busy week for those Coasties! Michael T USCG Retired HH-52 Flight Mech.

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Very sad story, was on the ship in belfast and met the crew and Captain, seemed like a good capable guy but the call to go inshore of Sandy is a tough one tojustify

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Wow.

 

Officially trashed, just as the thread title said.

 

Wonder if they'll try to get it back?

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I grew up in St. Pete. My senior high school class pictures was taken aboard this ship. I couldn't imagine it being out in big weather.

 

All I can think is WTF? Why would you chance taking that old tub out in a hurricane, especially off the coast of Cape Hatteras? Now the ship has sunk, at least one crew is dead, and most likely a second?

 

Again, WTF?

"WTF?"

 

Exactly what I was thinking and exactly why I think there is more to the story than meets the eye - there has to be.

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Wonder if they'll try to get it back?

 

Do you think anyone has a big enough Boston Whaler?

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I grew up in St. Pete. My senior high school class pictures was taken aboard this ship. I couldn't imagine it being out in big weather.

 

All I can think is WTF? Why would you chance taking that old tub out in a hurricane, especially off the coast of Cape Hatteras? Now the ship has sunk, at least one crew is dead, and most likely a second?

 

Again, WTF?

"WTF?"

 

Exactly what I was thinking and exactly why I think there is more to the story than meets the eye - there has to be.

 

I don't know about that, Walter, sometimes idiocy just occurs......

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It's terrible to sit back after the fact from behind our desks and criticize an awful tragedy, but I just can't see what the logic was here. Sure sure, safer at sea than in port, this can be true in some instances, but the fact remains that this was absolutely not the case. The worst that could have happened whilst the boat was in port was the the boat was damaged or wrecked, but no lives were lost. Heading out to sea on a certain rendezvous with a giant weather system was just beyond foolish.

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