bljones

Uglyboat Admiration Society Hang Out

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Tied with what? I don't see anything on that ... thing ... to which you could tie a dockline.

 

sealander-18.jpg

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I wonder how dry it woudl stay if thay encounter a decent power boat wake, especially if they have a full complement of 6 people aboard. (The web site mentions comfiortable seating for up to 6.)

 

sealander_skr092_0.jpg

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you just have to remember to unhitch it from the tow vehicle first. I guarantee that there will be a lawsuit soon for this very reason.

How very true. I've seen the odd boat, trailer and towing vehicle ALL launched from a boat ramp on occasion. Floating caravans too perhaps?

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If that was designed for the little lakes in Germany, it's probably fine. It will have to do battle with little electric powered pink swan boats.

 

 

edit: or white pedal ones.

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Why??

 

_dsc0454_0.jpg

 

A floating caravan. Maybe "Sealander" is a bit ambitious...

 

http://www.sealander.de/de/product

 

Is that the guys from Top Gear again?

 

Wouldn't it be a lot simpler and more useful to simply camp aboard a trailerable cabin cruiser?

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Auscat,

I'd say my feelings are hurt but that's just part of being on SA. At least I'm trying, plus like I mentioned I'd be happy to rebuild the cabin house for any buyer. The utilitarian syle house is very functional and does fit more the MP52-Trawler concept we are developing. It's geared as the perfect sailors motorboat. Plenty of info and pics on our site. www.maltesecatamarans.com

Plus with pricing at 450k "sail away" you could even afford to have Bob Perry design your dream cabin house.:)

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That house is jarring, but this is the admiration society, so here goes.

 

The hulls do look nice. What's the power? Rudders? What's it doing on a sandbar?

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:):) Tom,

Some better pics. The pic Auscat picked was on the album and a goof pic by a friend with photoshop skills..(to be deleted shortly)

What can I say, its a US built Catamaran inspired some of the big name designs like GB,CW,MC and Mainecat. I don't think its too bad for this 34 yr old's first attempt into the boat market. Like I said this model was more geared for the fuel efficient Powercat Trawler customer. You be the judge

M52 Render

Bow Shot

Bow Shot

Reverse Bow

Twin Bows

MP52 Trawler

 

Inspirations included all these rolled into one:

Lagoons

fbp64

gb60

44classic

 

 

 

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That customer is actually a friend of mine, but couldn't find you so he built a Cowmaran. Another Uglyboat I admire.

 

cowmaran-december-2013.jpg

 

Yours needs a bridge with controls upstairs.

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That customer is actually a friend of mine, but couldn't find you so he built a Cowmaran. Another Uglyboat I admire.

 

cowmaran-december-2013.jpg

 

Yours needs a bridge with controls upstairs.

 

Tom,

 

I do not consider the cowmaran ugly, I think it is very cool!

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Tom,

Our optional Cabinhouse configuration might be more pleasing to some, but I personally like the aggressive look of the current configuration.

M52 Sail Cabin2

MP52 Trawler Cabin2

MP52 Trawler

M52 Render

 

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That customer is actually a friend of mine, but couldn't find you so he built a Cowmaran. Another Uglyboat I admire.

 

cowmaran-december-2013.jpg

 

Yours needs a bridge with controls upstairs.

Tom,

 

I do not consider the cowmaran ugly, I think it is very cool!

We are lighting it up for Christmas parades. I think it's the coolest boat around and am in a bidding war with another friend to buy it. The price has soared to $601 so far. If either of us believed there was a chance he'd sell it, we would go a lot higher.

 

It would be a lot less ugly if he put the batteries in the hulls and hung a fuel tank under the deck. Details. At least the control cables don't run on the deck any more!

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Tom,

Our optional Cabinhouse configuration might be more pleasing to some, but I personally like the aggressive look of the current configuration.

 

 

The more conventional looking house looks better and my guess would be it would sell better.

 

I like the utilitarian aspects of the box house. Wastes less space and makes better shade.

 

But if its going to be a powerboat that size, it needs a bridge.

 

I admire anyone who tries to build and sell boats. Good luck!

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That customer is actually a friend of mine, but couldn't find you so he built a Cowmaran. Another Uglyboat I admire.

 

cowmaran-december-2013.jpg

 

Yours needs a bridge with controls upstairs.

 

Tom,

 

I do not consider the cowmaran ugly, I think it is very cool!

 

+1

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I will be sure to tell the owner you guys scolded me for calling his creation ugly.

 

This will probably drive the price up. Dammit.

 

My real problem is his wife. She had absolutely zero interest in it during the build and it took some effort to get her to go out on it the first time. Now she LOVES it! Dammit.

 

During the Christmas boat parade, each boat goes by and an announcer tells the crowd about it. I have been asked to help write a brief summary of the boat for him. This is a great honor to me. I will NOT mention that it's...um...funny looking.

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That customer is actually a friend of mine, but couldn't find you so he built a Cowmaran. Another Uglyboat I admire.

 

cowmaran-december-2013.jpg

 

Yours needs a bridge with controls upstairs.

Tom,

 

I do not consider the cowmaran ugly, I think it is very cool!

We are lighting it up for Christmas parades. I think it's the coolest boat around and am in a bidding war with another friend to buy it. The price has soared to $601 so far. If either of us believed there was a chance he'd sell it, we would go a lot higher.

 

It would be a lot less ugly if he put the batteries in the hulls and hung a fuel tank under the deck. Details. At least the control cables don't run on the deck any more!

I bid $704

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Uh oh! A big shot!

 

Hey Kim, you're probably one of the better people to ask: in all seriousness, what do you think it might sell for?

 

As I've said, finish quality is more than a bit rough cosmetically. It was built as a proof of concept prototype.

 

If he put it on the market just like it is, what would it bring? I have my own guess, which is distressingly far below the materials cost of the boat, but wonder what you think?

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40' Crowther tri with a giant R2-D2 head in place of a dodger.

 

Outboard helms, all airex core, aft cabin and a mini bridge deck on super slim hulls, seems quite a lot to admire, but alas IMO has to end up on this thread.

 

On the upside the disgusted stares from traditional mono hull owners would be short lived as you passed.

 

My last attempt at bringing something new to the table (the ultra beamy/winged mono) turned out to be old hat, I am excited at what other robot inspired trimarans might be out there ! (apart from the neel)

 

http://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sailing-trimaran/40-crowther-tri-maran/137878

 

post-72500-0-87684500-1386476283_thumb.jpgpost-72500-0-27909200-1386476298_thumb.jpgpost-72500-0-46599300-1386476316_thumb.jpg

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Uh oh! A big shot!

Hey Kim, you're probably one of the better people to ask: in all seriousness, what do you think it might sell for?

As I've said, finish quality is more than a bit rough cosmetically. It was built as a proof of concept prototype.

If he put it on the market just like it is, what would it bring? I have my own guess, which is distressingly far below the materials cost of the boat, but wonder what you think?

Wow, that is a tough one!

 

It kind of depends on demand: if only one person wanted it and the owner was very motivated to sell, it could go for some silly low price like $5K (or even less!) Home built boats just don't command the price of a "known builder".

 

However, if two people wanted it and they both "really" wanted it, the price could scream right up to $25K more or less.

 

Pricing that sort of vessel is just a complete crap shoot.

 

What is your guess Tom?

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40' Crowther tri with a giant R2-D2 head in place of a dodger.

 

Outboard helms, all airex core, aft cabin and a mini bridge deck on super slim hulls, seems quite a lot to admire, but alas IMO has to end up on this thread.

 

On the upside the disgusted stares from traditional mono hull owners would be short lived as you passed.

 

My last attempt at bringing something new to the table (the ultra beamy/winged mono) turned out to be old hat, I am excited at what other robot inspired trimarans might be out there ! (apart from the neel)

 

http://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sailing-trimaran/40-crowther-tri-maran/137878

 

attachicon.gif0_3-2.jpgattachicon.gif1_3.jpgattachicon.gif2_3.jpg

 

Looks more RoBoCop than R2D2 to me. Either way it kind of suits the overall look. Not an Uglyboat, just kind of unusual.

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Auscat,

I'd say my feelings are hurt but that's just part of being on SA. At least I'm trying, plus like I mentioned I'd be happy to rebuild the cabin house for any buyer. The utilitarian syle house is very functional and does fit more the MP52-Trawler concept we are developing. It's geared as the perfect sailors motorboat. Plenty of info and pics on our site. www.maltesecatamarans.com

Plus with pricing at 450k "sail away" you could even afford to have Bob Perry design your dream cabin house. :)

No offence intended mate and good onya for having a go.Posted it here because these guys have a broader view than most.

The square house does nothing for me but for speed of build and budget it would work for some.

That pic looks like the Nth end of Hill Inlet facing Sth but reversed.At least you put boards in it and not keels.

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Uh oh! A big shot!

Hey Kim, you're probably one of the better people to ask: in all seriousness, what do you think it might sell for?

As I've said, finish quality is more than a bit rough cosmetically. It was built as a proof of concept prototype.

If he put it on the market just like it is, what would it bring? I have my own guess, which is distressingly far below the materials cost of the boat, but wonder what you think?

Wow, that is a tough one!

 

It kind of depends on demand: if only one person wanted it and the owner was very motivated to sell, it could go for some silly low price like $5K (or even less!) Home built boats just don't command the price of a "known builder".

 

However, if two people wanted it and they both "really" wanted it, the price could scream right up to $25K more or less.

 

Pricing that sort of vessel is just a complete crap shoot.

 

What is your guess Tom?

 

It is a tough one. I've thought about it quite a bit. The thought experiment runs like this: I don't know the owner and have never heard of the boat. I'm still working at the brokerage.

 

He walks in an tells me to sell it within a month. I'd guess $5-$10k, most likely in the middle of that range.

 

He walks in an tells me to sell it within six months. This is enough time to find a crazy person like you or me. Maybe even one with money. Might be able to get as much as $15k. I doubt it could be sold for $25k, but you never know where a bidding war will end. People get more concerned about beating the other guy than about actual value and the sky is the limit.

 

Even at $25k, the materials are not paid for and the labor is valued at zero.

 

The good news: the owner and his wife are very happy with it and his wife has no idea how much it cost. I'd say it's well worth what it cost to them, even if it would be pretty near impossible to convince anyone else to pay that much.

 

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Uh oh! A big shot!

Hey Kim, you're probably one of the better people to ask: in all seriousness, what do you think it might sell for?

As I've said, finish quality is more than a bit rough cosmetically. It was built as a proof of concept prototype.

If he put it on the market just like it is, what would it bring? I have my own guess, which is distressingly far below the materials cost of the boat, but wonder what you think?

 

Wow, that is a tough one!

It kind of depends on demand: if only one person wanted it and the owner was very motivated to sell, it could go for some silly low price like $5K (or even less!) Home built boats just don't command the price of a "known builder".

However, if two people wanted it and they both "really" wanted it, the price could scream right up to $25K more or less.

Pricing that sort of vessel is just a complete crap shoot.

What is your guess Tom?

It is a tough one. I've thought about it quite a bit. The thought experiment runs like this: I don't know the owner and have never heard of the boat. I'm still working at the brokerage.

 

He walks in an tells me to sell it within a month. I'd guess $5-$10k, most likely in the middle of that range.

 

He walks in an tells me to sell it within six months. This is enough time to find a crazy person like you or me. Maybe even one with money. Might be able to get as much as $15k. I doubt it could be sold for $25k, but you never know where a bidding war will end. People get more concerned about beating the other guy than about actual value and the sky is the limit.

 

Even at $25k, the materials are not paid for and the labor is valued at zero.

 

The good news: the owner and his wife are very happy with it and his wife has no idea how much it cost. I'd say it's well worth what it cost to them, even if it would be pretty near impossible to convince anyone else to pay that much.

Looks like we are in about the same ballpark. I think it is a very cool boat and does not belong in this thread.

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It seems a little overloaded. Johann Tanzer built a good boat, but couldn't design above the waterline for shit.

 

Speaking of waterlines, I wonder what deranged idea led to this:

 

10954691514_533d65fe2d_c.jpg

 

The boat is actually floating level. Not only why, but how? It's the same on both sides.

 

My Catalina has exactly the same problem - yet I see many that don't and mine is nowhere near the same year as that 28 in the pic. How does that happen? Boat is level in this one, from the other side she would look heeled the other way.

 

attachicon.gifNimue NYD 2013.jpg

Level line on a curved surface - trompe de luis.

 

No, that's not it. There were several other boats in the bay and they all looked normal. A waterline should look level with the water, otherwise someone didn't do their job right. I have seen this on a couple of Catalinas, they look factory applied.

 

Another one, from my marina:

 

11291598293_c5f7e95a33_h.jpg

 

This does seem to be a peculiarity of Catalinas, but why?

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Think I found one:

 

37' Endurance Pilothouse Cutter 1978 - Warm in Winter! - $37000 (Olympia)

00K0K_2kbRVlf1a6I_600x450.jpg

Built for cold weather, this heavy duty cruiser built by Windward Boats Marine in the UK is the perfect liveaboard and long range cruiser. A bonus tabernacle mast allows it to be lowered to navigate under bridges. A Peter Ibold design, this center cockpit with a raised deck and inside steering station affords year-round comfort.

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Think I found one:

 

37' Endurance Pilothouse Cutter 1978 - Warm in Winter! - $37000 (Olympia)

00K0K_2kbRVlf1a6I_600x450.jpg

Built for cold weather, this heavy duty cruiser built by Windward Boats Marine in the UK is the perfect liveaboard and long range cruiser. A bonus tabernacle mast allows it to be lowered to navigate under bridges. A Peter Ibold design, this center cockpit with a raised deck and inside steering station affords year-round comfort.

 

 

"I like big butts..."

That's not big. That's morbidly obese.

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Think I found one:

 

37' Endurance Pilothouse Cutter 1978 - Warm in Winter! - $37000 (Olympia)

00K0K_2kbRVlf1a6I_600x450.jpg

Built for cold weather, this heavy duty cruiser built by Windward Boats Marine in the UK is the perfect liveaboard and long range cruiser. A bonus tabernacle mast allows it to be lowered to navigate under bridges. A Peter Ibold design, this center cockpit with a raised deck and inside steering station affords year-round comfort.

 

That freak variation on the Endurance 35 hull was built by Windward in Richmond B.C..

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I studied the pic, looking for something to admire.

 

* There is a safety bar to help you get from the side decks to the 'cockpit'. I admire safety.

* It is easy to inspect the chainplates.

* The mainsail is properly covered with an appropriate sail cover.

* I think there is a light on the stbd spreader. I like spreader lights.

 

 

Other than that, I got nothin'. But my standards are pretty low.

 

By the way, I love to look at this thread every day. I always learn something and it almost always makes me smile. Thanks.

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Think I found one:

 

37' Endurance Pilothouse Cutter 1978 - Warm in Winter! - $37000 (Olympia)

00K0K_2kbRVlf1a6I_600x450.jpg

Built for cold weather, this heavy duty cruiser built by Windward Boats Marine in the UK is the perfect liveaboard and long range cruiser. A bonus tabernacle mast allows it to be lowered to navigate under bridges. A Peter Ibold design, this center cockpit with a raised deck and inside steering station affords year-round comfort.

 

 

>"I like big butts..."

That's not big. That's morbidly obese.

 

Nothing new or unusual about an ass like that.

 

Spanish_Galleon_zoom.jpg

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Think I found one:

 

37' Endurance Pilothouse Cutter 1978 - Warm in Winter! - $37000 (Olympia)

00K0K_2kbRVlf1a6I_600x450.jpg

Built for cold weather, this heavy duty cruiser built by Windward Boats Marine in the UK is the perfect liveaboard and long range cruiser. A bonus tabernacle mast allows it to be lowered to navigate under bridges. A Peter Ibold design, this center cockpit with a raised deck and inside steering station affords year-round comfort.

 

 

>"I like big butts...

"

That's not big. That's morbidly obese.

Nothing new or unusual about an ass like that.

 

Spanish_Galleon_zoom.jpg

 

Hmmmmm. Probably beats to windward as handily too. :blink:

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Yup....ya need stern chasers I reckon!

 

Not much a design in the first place but making more top heavy? That's a real bad idea.

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I studied the pic, looking for something to admire.

 

* There is a safety bar to help you get from the side decks to the 'cockpit'. I admire safety.

* It is easy to inspect the chainplates.

* The mainsail is properly covered with an appropriate sail cover.

* I think there is a light on the stbd spreader. I like spreader lights.

 

 

Other than that, I got nothin'. But my standards are pretty low.

 

By the way, I love to look at this thread every day. I always learn something and it almost always makes me smile. Thanks.

 

Well done, bugger!

 

I looked again. I think the camera angle is particularly unflattering. The boat might look pretty nice if it was coming straight at you. And you were low to the water. It might have a nice angle somewhere! ;)

 

Are there 4 chainplates on the sides?

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I studied the pic, looking for something to admire.

 

* There is a safety bar to help you get from the side decks to the 'cockpit'. I admire safety.

* It is easy to inspect the chainplates.

* The mainsail is properly covered with an appropriate sail cover.

* I think there is a light on the stbd spreader. I like spreader lights.

 

 

Other than that, I got nothin'. But my standards are pretty low.

 

By the way, I love to look at this thread every day. I always learn something and it almost always makes me smile. Thanks.

 

Well done, bugger!

 

I looked again. I think the camera angle is particularly unflattering. The boat might look pretty nice if it was coming straight at you. And you were low to the water. It might have a nice angle somewhere! ;)

 

Are there 4 chainplates on the sides?

 

Yep - uppers, fore & aft lowers and midstays - cutter rigged.

 

 

I object to you comparing a '57 Chevy to that aborted Endurance 35.

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New material, Cruising world names their latest bunch of bleach bottles. One imported boat is very stable, solid on deck( like a concrete dock?), a 27 footer is a pocket cruiser, and a special award for an Aileron, because it was the only one which looks like a sailboat.

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I object to you comparing a '57 Chevy to that aborted Endurance 35.

 

Think Arnold Schwarzenegger vs. Danny De Vito in Twins to see where I was coming from.

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O/K...... I presume the Endurance is De Vito? Made from the leftovers - a side effect.

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O/K...... I presume the Endurance is De Vito? Made from the leftovers - a side effect.

Wasn't it a 'milk shake'?

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Speaking of '57 Chevy-like appendages, the Santa boat from several pages ago lost them. I don't think it really belongs in this thread any more. It's kind of cute now, but we don't have a cuteboats thread yet.

 

1465323_10153621763675089_1342193925_n.j

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Dig out the boat with the yellow transom and get a pic. Looks interesting. The blue boat is sort of cute but a long way from pretty!

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This one has to win some sort of award for the closest helm-to-mast ever.

 

Good work on the stripes though, slims it right down...

post-1504-0-61968800-1388689666_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-29863100-1388689680_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-30116700-1388689693_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-48656600-1388689705_thumb.jpg

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Definitely looks like it was intended as a serious ocean cruiser, now sadly parked for the past 15-20 years or so now the anchor firmly swallowed. Too bad, really - with some work and probably not all THAT much investment it would likely be able to be 'out there' again - but the most active thing aboard is mold.

 

Sure is an odd design with that rounded sheer - decades before the ORMA 60s did it.

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This one has to win some sort of award for the closest helm-to-mast ever.Good work on the stripes though, slims it right down...

That looks like an optical delusion.

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Couldn't have put it better myself. Still - I'd love to take it for a sail (in flat water) and see how it goes. Once.

 

Here is another prize, see if you can find all the mistakes !

post-1504-0-63811100-1388693520_thumb.jpg

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Never mind the flying rigging ends - how's that backwards deck-inspection port right in the forward hull ? What could go wrong ? "I could use some ventilation...."

post-1504-0-34966800-1388693881_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-95539800-1388693898_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-73711100-1388693914_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-53436300-1388693927_thumb.jpg

post-1504-0-19453600-1388693939_thumb.jpg

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Oh, jeez. I always have to look to make sure one of those "find all the mistakes" thing isn't my boat.

 

Um... is that a sharpie cove stripe?

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Couldn't have put it better myself. Still - I'd love to take it for a sail (in flat water) and see how it goes. Once.

 

Here is another prize, see if you can find all the mistakes !

 

I'm not sure I can count that high. The pinless shackle on the Danforth is one...

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Needs more anchors!

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This one has to win some sort of award for the closest helm-to-mast ever.

 

Good work on the stripes though, slims it right down...

How is it that Yamaha can build some of the most iconic motorcycles of all time, and some of the fugliest boats?

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Couldn't have put it better myself. Still - I'd love to take it for a sail (in flat water) and see how it goes. Once.

 

Here is another prize, see if you can find all the mistakes !

It's in the water?

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The saga of Blue Dog continues.

 

First iteration. Too much rocker plus a too high sitting position meant the boat was more stable upside down.

 

852150_10151461572233809_874351786_o.jpg

 

Reborn as Blue Dog Mk. 1: Radical surgery to flatten the bottom (you don't want to know!) and a new sailing position from inside the cabin. The inability to hike out meant the boat would not go to windward at all. So, more Sawzall was needed.

1419247_10151987427713809_1980463408_o.j

 

Blue Dog Mk II: This photo taken today at Placida. Open cockpit, leeboard replaced with off-centerboard.

1555449_666726846703410_649137068_n.jpg

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The saga of Blue Dog continues.

 

First iteration. Too much rocker plus a too high sitting position meant the boat was more stable upside down.

 

852150_10151461572233809_874351786_o.jpg

 

Reborn as Blue Dog Mk. 1: Radical surgery to flatten the bottom (you don't want to know!) and a new sailing position from inside the cabin. The inability to hike out meant the boat would not go to windward at all. So, more Sawzall was needed.

1419247_10151987427713809_1980463408_o.j

 

Blue Dog Mk II: This photo taken today at Placida. Open cockpit, leeboard replaced with off-centerboard.

1555449_666726846703410_649137068_n.jpg

Hasn't that fucking thing sunk yet?

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It strikes me that all that time & energy could have been better spent on a decent boat. I've never understood people who spend it on essentially stupid ideas when good ideas don't cost any more of either.

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He's having fun experimenting with ideas by building them.

 

We're going to try to hook up with him and a few other frozen refugees from northern lands who are visiting our area this weekend.

 

I'll be sure to mention that his boat has been upgraded from "ugly" to "stupid."

 

Or maybe not. He's kinda big. ;)

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He's having fun experimenting with ideas by building them.

 

We're going to try to hook up with him and a few other frozen refugees from northern lands who are visiting our area this weekend.

 

I'll be sure to mention that his boat has been upgraded from "ugly" to "stupid."

 

Or maybe not. He's kinda big. ;)

 

I keep joking with him that at the rate he's going, he's going to wind up with a stand-up paddleboard. He's not completely stupid by the way, someone conferred upon him a PHD at some point, but not in naval architecture.

 

Don't think we haven't talked about wasted effort. He's my EC crew, so I can't bash him too much. He also has a 27' 4 kt. shitbox Hunter, and a Kite class dinghy to play with. Until recently he owned a Holder 20. I wish I had his energy to keep on going like the Energizer Bunny at this little boat.

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The dream dies hard...

Looks like it has lived some dreams...love it.

 

A Storfida perhaps, or similar. Meant to be ocean-going, but not a racer. Perhaps mean to compete with the Albin Vega in the cruising market. I was on one at a boat show way back in the day. I thought it was pretty neat, but I'm much to conservative (meaning risk-adverse) to get involved with anything so ...conservative (in the old-fashioned and slow sense).

 

Storfidra

Storfidra At Marina

In retrospect, it looks odd and slow.

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He's having fun experimenting with ideas by building them.

 

We're going to try to hook up with him and a few other frozen refugees from northern lands who are visiting our area this weekend.

 

I'll be sure to mention that his boat has been upgraded from "ugly" to "stupid."

 

Or maybe not. He's kinda big. ;)

 

I keep joking with him that at the rate he's going, he's going to wind up with a stand-up paddleboard. He's not completely stupid by the way, someone conferred upon him a PHD at some point, but not in naval architecture.

 

Don't think we haven't talked about wasted effort. He's my EC crew, so I can't bash him too much. He also has a 27' 4 kt. shitbox Hunter, and a Kite class dinghy to play with. Until recently he owned a Holder 20. I wish I had his energy to keep on going like the Energizer Bunny at this little boat.

What happened to the holder?

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To cramped for the family. New boat is a bit of a tub, but much more comfortable place. Also it's a lot more appropriate with the casual racing we do. The Holder killed, such that people wanted to mess with ratings.

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It strikes me that all that time & energy could have been better spent on a decent boat. I've never understood people who spend it on essentially stupid ideas when good ideas don't cost any more of either.

What are talking about? There is a complete industry built by bad ideas and with full follow up to fruition. It's good for the economy ; well, comedy anyway.

 

JonB: Didn't we talk about that in another thread about Lafarge 42's?

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Yeah but there's a difference between those ideas that seem like a good idea at the time and plain old no-hopers that can be seen at a glance. :D

 

People have been around the world many times on pavement princesses - some were even pretty good looking, but things like that plywood princeling are lucky to make it across a duckpond.

 

The first time I ever went sailing was on an old time "stone boat" - a plywood & plank trough for mixing cement. A couple of brothers about 10 & 12 years old had made it float with a pole mast and bed sheet sail. It was great fun for a trio of young boys and was VERY comparable to the boat under discussion.

 

Come to think of it, it even got some ferro into the design concept - two for two.

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Yeah but there's a difference between those ideas that seem like a good idea at the time and plain old no-hopers that can be seen at a glance. :D

 

People have been around the world many times on pavement princesses - some were even pretty good looking, but things like that plywood princeling are lucky to make it across a duckpond.

 

The first time I ever went sailing was on an old time "stone boat" - a plywood & plank trough for mixing cement. A couple of brothers about 10 & 12 years old had made it float with a pole mast and bed sheet sail. It was great fun for a trio of young boys and was VERY comparable to the boat under discussion.

 

Come to think of it, it even got some ferro into the design concept - two for two.

 

I had experience with a different kind of stoneboat, which is truer to the term. When I was a field worker for Agriculture Canada, if it was too wet to harvest, we used to walk beside said stoneboat as it was dragged down a muddy field and toss any stones we found onto the "boat". It was a miserable job, but better than sitting in the greenhouse @ 200% humidity with the stench of rotting alfalfa, counting how many mustard seeds were in a bushel. Do you have any idea how many mustard seeds there are in a bushel?

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Etymology Police here.

 

It's my understanding that a stone boat is a roughly boat-shaped lump of stone placed "bow" facing upstream in a river or stream so as to cause the flow to divide, for example, to run a mill race from the diverted flow. There's a pub in Dublin named after one.

 

But I have been wrong before now.

 

Edit: Having spent a nanosecond on Google, I see that it mainly refers to "a flat sledge or drag for transporting heavy articles such as stones", so I am sort of wrong this time too. Live and learn.

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Do you have any idea how many mustard seeds there are in a bushel?

An African or European bushel?

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A 'stone boat' was a colloquialism for one which was fabricated in ferro cement, IIRC - back in the '60's and '70's.

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Do you have any idea how many mustard seeds there are in a bushel?

An African or European bushel?

Ground or whole?

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Etymology Police here.

 

It's my understanding that a stone boat is a roughly boat-shaped lump of stone placed "bow" facing upstream in a river or stream so as to cause the flow to divide, for example, to run a mill race from the diverted flow. There's a pub in Dublin named after one.

 

But I have been wrong before now.

 

Edit: Having spent a nanosecond on Google, I see that it mainly refers to "a flat sledge or drag for transporting heavy articles such as stones", so I am sort of wrong this time too. Live and learn.

 

Yeah, me too. I always thought those wood troughs they used to mix concrete in, before the advent of small cement mixers, were stone boats but apparently Ish experienced the real thing.

 

I guess in future I'll remember that thing as a cold moulded ferrocement scow.

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Yeah but there's a difference between those ideas that seem like a good idea at the time and plain old no-hopers that can be seen at a glance. :D

 

People have been around the world many times on pavement princesses - some were even pretty good looking, but things like that plywood princeling are lucky to make it across a duckpond.

...

 

 

I would not bet on it, especially with the owner aboard. Here he is at the start of the 2012 Everglades Challenge.

 

puddle-duck-racer-lg.jpg

 

He sailed that PDR from Fort Desoto to Estero. It was a year that took out a lot of experienced Water Tribe maniacs.

 

Anyway, I'm having dinner with him tomorrow and I'll tell him you said he should find a better use for his time. The response should be worth posting. ;)

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Looking forward to it. If he has a PhD it should be more imaginative than the usual "Oh yeah, well fuck you".

 

By the way, is that yellow one the latest iteration of the blue one? If it is it's actually starting to look like something. Sort of looks like a grown up, hi-tech version of the cement trough I sailed as a 12 year old.

 

I still don't see the point though - it doesn't even look particularly economical anymore.

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A 'stone boat' was a colloquialism for one which was fabricated in ferro cement, IIRC - back in the '60's and '70's.

I have heard the term "floating footpath" used.

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Looking forward to it. If he has a PhD it should be more imaginative than the usual "Oh yeah, well fuck you".

 

By the way, is that yellow one the latest iteration of the blue one? If it is it's actually starting to look like something. Sort of looks like a grown up, hi-tech version of the cement trough I sailed as a 12 year old.

 

I still don't see the point though - it doesn't even look particularly economical anymore.

the point of the yellow boat was to see if a PDR could complete the EC. He was doing very well in a year that saw 50 mph winds and rain the first night. If he had made that attempt in 2013 I bet he would have made it. I've met the builder, he's a nice guy who like to think outside the box. Nothing wrong with that.

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