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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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Tcatman

US Olympic Strategic Plans

27 posts in this topic

Interesting - not surprising - how the panel is mostly from the East Coast/New York area. Either US Sailing is not aware there are people who actually sail on the West Coast or there is not much sailing on the West Coast and US Sailing should focus on bringing sailing to the West Coast. <sarcasm>

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Recommendations seem solid, application will be the key, e.g. CISA does not list any Olympic classes regattas at their site. 1 question, if the better a class does in international competition/ranking then the more funding it gets, how do they propose to raise the competitive level of lower performing classes? Self funding? Or just vote them out of the games?

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Well, US Olympic doubles down on the team approach with a core of 4 to 6 teams in each class. Moreover, they seem to empower class specific coaches to mold this team.

 

I understand the efficiency that such a program develops... but I question how the concentration of power in one coach will optimize the performance of any individual sailor or team. (god help the class if the coach is merely OK)

 

Seems to me that US Olympic envisions young sailors developing around the country under their personal coaches and then when they are ripe... they will be picked for the Olympic team and then study under the Svengali of coaches and gold will result........ hmmm.... not impressed!

 

I might have structured the program with a common core of Olympic coaches at the base of the pyramid and hire the appropriate individual coaches for the elite level going into the last year of the quad.

 

 

About Youth Development. I see lots of words... and little in an understanding of how to harness the current junior sailing programs and yacht clubs. Olympic class sailing... indeed any high performance saling (skiffs, cats, boards) is extremely rare at the adult level much less the junior level in the US... What changes with this strategic plan? How you change the culture is the key question.... and I see nothing but aspirational pie in the sky.

 

What is needed is US Olympic leadership and key funding that enrolls specific Yacht Clubs in a focused program.... NOT a top down managed program that looks like some other countries plan. (I may be too harsh at the moment... but I did not see the needed vision in the document)

 

 

could be worse tho.... look a the aussie post from Walrus on the first ISAF event down under... at least I am not that negative...

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=142303

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Now, here's a real surprise:

 

"5. We failed to generate a performance edge (speed and technique) required to win an Olympic medal."

 

Did we need yet another US Sailing committee to conclude that?

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Now, here's a real surprise:

 

"5. We failed to generate a performance edge (speed and technique) required to win an Olympic medal."

 

Did we need yet another US Sailing committee to conclude that?

 

Reading between the lines they basically bitch slapped Brenner back into oblivion.

 

But yes mostly restating the obvious without much specific input. Generally not dealing with the reality that there isn't anyone really interested in Olympic sailing in the US. Kids are spoon fed sailing in low performance borrowed boats, kept on a really tight leash far too long.

 

The problem in the US isn't really talent, it is the attitude of the pretenders who we somehow let take control of the entire Youth system.

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Interesting - not surprising - how the panel is mostly from the East Coast/New York area. Either US Sailing is not aware there are people who actually sail on the West Coast or there is not much sailing on the West Coast and US Sailing should focus on bringing sailing to the West Coast. <sarcasm>

Well, there is a reason why the US Sailing team sucks.

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Now, here's a real surprise:

 

"5. We failed to generate a performance edge (speed and technique) required to win an Olympic medal."

 

Did we need yet another US Sailing committee to conclude that?

 

Reading between the lines they basically bitch slapped Brenner back into oblivion.

 

But yes mostly restating the obvious without much specific input. Generally not dealing with the reality that there isn't anyone really interested in Olympic sailing in the US. Kids are spoon fed sailing in low performance borrowed boats, kept on a really tight leash far too long.

 

The problem in the US isn't really talent, it is the attitude of the pretenders who we somehow let take control of the entire Youth system.

And they sail these real short courses and do 11 a day, so they never learn how to make the boat go fast. Great boat handleing, sucky boat speed. Then they get to the Olympic's where they sail long courses and we get great starts and then spit out the back

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There's not a single mention of the Junior Olympics, obviously it isn't part of their development plan, it is just another way to soak some money out of people to cover the payroll in Portsmouth. There's no mention that there is little Olympic Class sailing in the U.S. and any description on how to rebuild the base of U.S. Olympic sailing. There's no mention of adding a bunch of Grade 1 events in the U.S. to cause the Europeans to have to spend more of their money on travel and shipping and re-tip the balance of expenses. It all looks like attempted short-term gains again, and no long range view on rebuilding the excitement of sailing in Olympic classes. Here's my prediction - in 2016 performance will be a bit better of the U.S. Team with equipment specific coaches. It really comes down to the individual, there might be a medal or two, but nothing like medalling in all equipment.

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There's no mention that there is little Olympic Class sailing in the U.S.

Nor in Great Britain or Australia I think you'll find...

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There's no mention that there is little Olympic Class sailing in the U.S.

Nor in Great Britain or Australia I think you'll find...

 

....I see what yer mean........ :mellow:

 

 

 

49erdropdown_triangle.gif

 

 

UK 49er nationals weekenddropdown_triangle.gif

 

Summary overall resultsProvisional Overall Results Place Points Sail No Bow No Name Helm Crew Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Race 8 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 6 Oct 7 Oct 1 6 151 22 49er D Evans S Hiscocks 2 (6) 1 1 2 2 9 1116 4 49er David Hopper Mark Asquith 1 (5) 3 2 3 3 13 BER 16 49er Rick Peacock Nick Murray 3 3 4 3 (7) 4 18 102 34 49er Henry Lloyd Williams Sam Batten (25/DNC) 1 5 11 1 5 20 1187 23 49er Bleddyn Mon Nick Redding (13) 2 7 6 5 6 24 1027 10 49er James McIntosh Fynn Steritt (12) 4 9 5 6 7 30 1231 15 49er Tim Gratton Chris taylor 4 8 11 7 (14) 8 32 1125 8 49er Graeme Willcox Andrew Tarboton 6 (12) 12 4 10 9 37 940 13 49er Matt Humphries Luke Yeates 10 11 (14) 12 4 10 37 8 7 49er Edd Clayson Ollie Sparsley-Corfield 5 10 13 (15) 9 11 41 1151 26 49er Jack Hawkins Duncan Bryan 17 9 2 (25/DNF) 13 12 41 901 12 49er David Conlon Finbar Anderson 7 7 16 (20) 11 13 44 997 21 49er Matty Lyons James Lyons 8 13 (18) 8 15 14 48 708 9 49er Tristan Hutt Thomas Clayton 16 (21) 6 10 16 15 50 1198 27 49er Tom Bucktrout Dominick Burke 9 (25/OCS) 17 16 8 16 57 1169 14 49er Peter Lawrance Miles Blaver-Mann 11 (19) 10 19 17 17 57 1098 5 49er Simon Conway Rich Sheridan 14 15 15 13 (18) 18 68 6 (776) 28 49er Ron Price Clare Stubbs (22) 14 21 21 12 19 69 1 3 49er Steve Hopper Chris Rodway 18 (22) 20 9 22 20 69 865 1 49er John Hall Martin Gibson 15 18 22 14 (25/DNC) 21 70 1119 36 49er Richard Hall Will Harris (25/DNC) 25/DNC 8 18 19 22 75 2 29 49er H Osborne Charles Baudouin 19 16 (25/DNF) 17 23 23 79 142 6 49er Chris Tilbrook Carys Roberts 20 20 19 (25/DNF) 20

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it's not Olympic classes 'per se' that make the difference. It's all those other high performance boats that kids have the opportunity sail in the UK. Be it a fireball, a 505, or a RS500. these boats are available to learn on, the best get moved to the Olympic classes.

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There's no mention that there is little Olympic Class sailing in the U.S.

Nor in Great Britain or Australia I think you'll find...

....I see what yer mean........ :mellow:

49er

OK, and now compare the number of entries in the Star Nationals in the US with the number of entries in the Star Class Nationals in the UK .

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McKee Appointed High Performance Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing

Two-time Olympic medalist will lead USA’s sailors toward success at Games

 

Portsmouth, R.I. (November 29, 2012) – Two-time Olympic medalist Charlie McKee (Coronado, Calif.) has been appointed High Performance Director of the U.S. Olympic Sailing Program. His responsibilities will include managing all on-the-water elements of the U.S. Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider, including the coaching program, technical development and youth development with a goal of enabling U.S. sailors to reach the highest level of competition for the next Olympic and Paralympic quadrenniums. He will report to Josh Adams, Managing Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing.

 

“Charlie is a proven winner in Olympic sailing as both a sailor and a coach,” said Adams. “He brings a passion for Olympic class sailing and a high level of expertise in the boats we sail. Charlie is absolutely the right person to lead all performance aspects of US Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider.”

A medalist in the World Youth Championships (Laser Class), McKee brought home two Olympic Games medals (bronze 470, 1988 and bronze 49er, 2000), and was the coach of the U.S. Olympic windsurfing team for the 1992 Olympic Games in which USA brought home a silver medal.

 

“I am honored to be a part of this effort,” said McKee. “We plan to build on the good work that has been done previously, and work hard to give athletes the support they need to succeed in the increasingly competitive environment that is Olympic Sailing today. This includes a focus on technical expertise, high-level coaching and sufficient funding. There are many different paths to athletic success, and we intend to work with both the elite-level and aspiring athletes to help them to achieve their goals in the best way we can.”

A graduate of the University of Washington (BA Economics, 1986), McKee previously worked for 12 years as a commercial real estate appraiser before returning to the water full time. He has been involved in two America’s Cup campaigns, and has been racing everything from AC boats to foiling Moths. He lives in Coronado, Calif. with his wife Becky and three sons.

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McKee Appointed High Performance Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing

Two-time Olympic medalist will lead USA’s sailors toward success at Games

 

Portsmouth, R.I. (November 29, 2012) – Two-time Olympic medalist Charlie McKee (Coronado, Calif.) has been appointed High Performance Director of the U.S. Olympic Sailing Program. His responsibilities will include managing all on-the-water elements of the U.S. Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider, including the coaching program, technical development and youth development with a goal of enabling U.S. sailors to reach the highest level of competition for the next Olympic and Paralympic quadrenniums. He will report to Josh Adams, Managing Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing.

 

“Charlie is a proven winner in Olympic sailing as both a sailor and a coach,” said Adams. “He brings a passion for Olympic class sailing and a high level of expertise in the boats we sail. Charlie is absolutely the right person to lead all performance aspects of US Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider.”

A medalist in the World Youth Championships (Laser Class), McKee brought home two Olympic Games medals (bronze 470, 1988 and bronze 49er, 2000), and was the coach of the U.S. Olympic windsurfing team for the 1992 Olympic Games in which USA brought home a silver medal.

 

“I am honored to be a part of this effort,” said McKee. “We plan to build on the good work that has been done previously, and work hard to give athletes the support they need to succeed in the increasingly competitive environment that is Olympic Sailing today. This includes a focus on technical expertise, high-level coaching and sufficient funding. There are many different paths to athletic success, and we intend to work with both the elite-level and aspiring athletes to help them to achieve their goals in the best way we can.”

A graduate of the University of Washington (BA Economics, 1986), McKee previously worked for 12 years as a commercial real estate appraiser before returning to the water full time. He has been involved in two America’s Cup campaigns, and has been racing everything from AC boats to foiling Moths. He lives in Coronado, Calif. with his wife Becky and three sons.

 

This seems like a very good move.

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OK, and now compare the number of entries in the Star Nationals in the US with the number of entries in the Star Class Nationals in the UK .

 

One wonders how far they're going to have to go to find 10 competitive boats for the docklands regatta at the London boat show.

 

http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/news/166843/-CNM-Estates-UK-Star-Championships

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McKee Appointed High Performance Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing

Two-time Olympic medalist will lead USA’s sailors toward success at Games

 

Portsmouth, R.I. (November 29, 2012) – Two-time Olympic medalist Charlie McKee (Coronado, Calif.) has been appointed High Performance Director of the U.S. Olympic Sailing Program. His responsibilities will include managing all on-the-water elements of the U.S. Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider, including the coaching program, technical development and youth development with a goal of enabling U.S. sailors to reach the highest level of competition for the next Olympic and Paralympic quadrenniums. He will report to Josh Adams, Managing Director of U.S. Olympic Sailing.

 

“Charlie is a proven winner in Olympic sailing as both a sailor and a coach,” said Adams. “He brings a passion for Olympic class sailing and a high level of expertise in the boats we sail. Charlie is absolutely the right person to lead all performance aspects of US Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider.”

A medalist in the World Youth Championships (Laser Class), McKee brought home two Olympic Games medals (bronze 470, 1988 and bronze 49er, 2000), and was the coach of the U.S. Olympic windsurfing team for the 1992 Olympic Games in which USA brought home a silver medal.

 

“I am honored to be a part of this effort,” said McKee. “We plan to build on the good work that has been done previously, and work hard to give athletes the support they need to succeed in the increasingly competitive environment that is Olympic Sailing today. This includes a focus on technical expertise, high-level coaching and sufficient funding. There are many different paths to athletic success, and we intend to work with both the elite-level and aspiring athletes to help them to achieve their goals in the best way we can.”

A graduate of the University of Washington (BA Economics, 1986), McKee previously worked for 12 years as a commercial real estate appraiser before returning to the water full time. He has been involved in two America’s Cup campaigns, and has been racing everything from AC boats to foiling Moths. He lives in Coronado, Calif. with his wife Becky and three sons.

 

This seems like a very good move.

 

+1.

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There's not a single mention of the Junior Olympics, obviously it isn't part of their development plan, it is just another way to soak some money out of people to cover the payroll in Portsmouth. There's no mention that there is little Olympic Class sailing in the U.S. and any description on how to rebuild the base of U.S. Olympic sailing. There's no mention of adding a bunch of Grade 1 events in the U.S. to cause the Europeans to have to spend more of their money on travel and shipping and re-tip the balance of expenses. It all looks like attempted short-term gains again, and no long range view on rebuilding the excitement of sailing in Olympic classes. Here's my prediction - in 2016 performance will be a bit better of the U.S. Team with equipment specific coaches. It really comes down to the individual, there might be a medal or two, but nothing like medalling in all equipment.

 

They did mentioned the US Paralympic team once. It seems that they are to share "Funding Opportunities" but no mention of actual "Funds"

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AFAIK the USA is VERY much stuck in the Opti/Club 420 world. How is that working out so far?

 

and no long range view on rebuilding the excitement of sailing in Olympic classes.

 

So... Is the question one of leadership or one of followership.. What makes anyone think that US Olympic could impact the "excitement of Olympic Sailing"?

 

The brits report how little Olympic Class Sailing their countrymen engage in. (They sail LOTS of classes which serve as feeders for talent to move up.

 

More the point... What do you see in the US dinghy sailor population that gives anyone even a glimmer of hope of getting these sailors to flip to olympic class sailing?

 

Seems to me, we need Olympic leadership that partners with the key One Design Classes.. and provides opportunities eg (training camps) for the 15 to 24 year old set on similar boats as to olympic equipment. So... in my world... F16/F18 cats feed sail mixed multihull.... 505's feed M/W High Performance (skiffs) and i420's feed MW dinghy. Lasers of course feed lasers and boards / kites ???

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505's feed M/W High Performance (skiffs)

 

Really not sure how much overlap there is there.

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true, drivers do not learn 2 string helming but the boats do plane upwind and down, the 90 d. reaches are good training for assym reaching but yes, there are big differences, still good crew training though less so as skiffs have evolved to a crew-centric platform. if I were to point at a single weakness in the US HP program it would be a lack of crew development. this is one area where charlie can have the biggest impacts as he has been a top crew for 30 years, if anyone in the states knmows how to crew on skiffs it would be him. and it is a good sign that they picked a crew to run the program, drivers tend to get the glory whilst the crews do the work in most skiffs today.

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505's feed M/W High Performance (skiffs)

 

Really not sure how much overlap there is there.

 

While not perfect, it is a far sight better than more time in a 4Twinkie/CFJ.

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true, drivers do not learn 2 string helming but the boats do plane upwind and down, the 90 d. reaches are good training for assym reaching but yes, there are big differences, still good crew training though less so as skiffs have evolved to a crew-centric platform. if I were to point at a single weakness in the US HP program it would be a lack of crew development. this is one area where charlie can have the biggest impacts as he has been a top crew for 30 years, if anyone in the states knmows how to crew on skiffs it would be him. and it is a good sign that they picked a crew to run the program, drivers tend to get the glory whilst the crews do the work in most skiffs today.

 

How 'bout this: http://sailingteams.ussailing.org/News/2012/Olympic_Sailing_Partners_with_Oakcliff.htm ??

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good moves!.....after getting CharlieMcKee as director,,I'm not surprised to hear this........

 

''........will acquire 24 Olympic class boats – eight each of the Nacra 17, 49er and 49er FX skiffs – that the US Sailing Team Sperry Top-Sider will have full access to for Team-level training and youth development throughout the year.''

 

http://sailingteams.ussailing.org/News.htm

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i hope that when these are boats not being used for the USSDT they will be made available for charter at various class events.

 

One piece of observational evidence of good things to come i think was seen at Orange Bowl this year. Not the youth event, but the open event at Coconut grove (well run event btw, for anyone who wants to come down. aside from putting the 29er's on a trapezoid one race, but i doubt they'll do that again....). There were 22 29er teams of mostly US and of young age, and 20 i420's, who were also young. The 29er's used to pull over 25boats at their midwinter events, but there was a healthy mix of Canadian boats in that regatta due to the event being some some sort of qualifer for them. The fact that we had 22 boats for an event that is not a qualifier for anything, just a chance to go sail against other 29er's, is great. It also shows the growing health of the US 29er class with many east coast teams representing.

 

It has bothered me for some time now that people complain the US doesnt do well on the world stage consistently, and then in the same breath complain that i420's and 29er's are not worth getting into because there is no one to sail against. The club420 serves its purpose, and i sailed them for years as a junior sailor, but god are they boring to sail...

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