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what is it?

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That is either the most wicked looking or most hideous stern treatment ever. We are leaning towards the former. What say you, and what is it?

what is it 1 8.jpg

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it easy to piss off the back

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kuka light production design?

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It's a good place to lose your car keys, wallet or a winch handle!

 

..........toss a net across the back and it'll be a great place for the beer cooler

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The language on the website ("neural networks", "CFD optimization", etc.) bears the stamp of "let's throw words around that sound really really cool", and sorta ignores the fact that yacht designers working within a rule have been doing this for a few centuries. Some may recall when Britton Chance figured that aerodynamic models might work in the water and fit within the 12 meter rule ... and tried the Kamm Effect when he designed 'Mariner'. In the words of one T. Turner at the time, 'even a turd's pointed at both ends'.

 

Not to mention that any mathematical model they use is necessarily a multivariate one ... and multivariate models need a sh*tload of empirical data before they can pretend to approach the elements of the real world they seek to predict. Mostly because ain't nobody knows what a normal distribution might look like for the joint distribution of the several variables.

 

Nevertheless, it looks fast and just might be fast. Time will tell, eh?

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Google Pic search tells me it's a Nissan Van.

Damn close, I think.

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Interestingly, given how the perspective fore-shortens the image, I thought it was a new Mini 6.5 design, particularly since the rumour mill has a new Pogo 3 in the works. So now I'm wondering how this kind of design might apply to the Mini 6.5 box rule. Thoughts from anyone more knowledgeable about such things? First thought is that you'd want transom-hung rudders on your Mini.

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Solo or two up only for this one then... The Classe 40 circuit has a lot of "full crew" events - not going to be much room for that!

 

Also - doing a long passage 3/4 up, you're gonna need bunks for 2.

 

Normally, without the open transom - you'd have 1 sleeping in a bunk, back-highside, another kipping at the chart table and the other on deck, when 3 up on an ocean race (eg. Transat Quebec St. Malo). This won't work + there isn't room for 2 bunks stacked amidships - since you would normally have all your stackable geaer mid high side and you don't want your food & gear bags stacked on deck...

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Any kind of following sea and that cockpit is underwater. Better keep that little hatch tight...

 

 

Its going to be faster this time.........

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Any kind of following sea and that cockpit is underwater. Better keep that little hatch tight...

Why would this go any further underwater than any boat with a sugar scoop or with an open transom? It is self draining. THe hatch is there to satisfy the rule, and provides a means for excape shoul the boat turtle with you stuck inside. I believe that rise in the transom has something to do with the size fo spinnakers or Code 0's. It allows for proper sheeting angles. There may be more to it than that, but I have heard this from an owner of another Class 40.

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extend the water line and frangable rudder(s) that will break off and not cause a main hull problem with a leak

might want to move the back stays off the wings though, I'm guessing the spinn blocks are back there too

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It looks like an extremely uncomfortable way to carve weight out of the stern. Might be fast though.

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I want one. How much?

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Any kind of following sea and that cockpit is underwater. Better keep that little hatch tight...

Why would this go any further underwater than any boat with a sugar scoop or with an open transom?

 

Well I'm no naval architect but to me that looks like a wave piercing stern ;).

 

There's no flotation in the last few feet of the boat. Hard to tell how much, looks like at least 2-3 feet. So if the boat is pooped from aft, the stern is going to be pushed down by the leading edge of the wave, that puts say half a ton of water on the scoop and opens up the cockpit to the rest of the wave which is going to wash up through the transom and down the hatch. As the boat then goes bow down, any water that's been scooped up is going to go forward.

 

Even sugar scoop and open transom boats have at least a few inches of transom below the deck. So as the wave approaches, the stern lifts which changes the angle of attack of the transom to the wave.

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.....

might want to move the back stays off the wings though, I'm guessing the spinn blocks are back there too

Yeah, I was thinking it's acting as an outrigger, without being an outrigger. Same logic seems to apply to the backstays- better angle to masthead so less tension needed, less mast compression, better headstay tension? -assuming the fragile looking "wing" can handle the loads...

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Nice and very fresh thinking compared to new family of square boxed 60's.

Can somebody explain why the new type of toe rail/hull-to-deck connection are at 45 degrees?

Probably less weight, stronger, more $$$...

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.....

might want to move the back stays off the wings though, I'm guessing the spinn blocks are back there too

Yeah, I was thinking it's acting as an outrigger, without being an outrigger. Same logic seems to apply to the backstays- better angle to masthead so less tension needed, less mast compression, better headstay tension? -assuming the fragile looking "wing" can handle the loads...

 

Would expect a bigger matter is that there is more space between the runners for the main on jibes/tacks. When shorthanded is pretty tough to not have the main hit the runners at least a little bit.

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Scot my old friend. And yes, I do class you as an old friend. Stop this bollox of imagined designs. Put something up as unknown, Disappeared, or anything apart from would be fancy boys saying "Send our renderings to Anarchy" For sure they'll put it on the front page. We,, as a community, deserve more. WcW

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New Ker Class 40 one design

 

http://www.forty1design.com/

 

Winner

 

The scoop on the back with little in regards to buoyancy would concern me. Anyone who's caught a big wave over the back would probably be thinking the same.

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looks like something you have left after a button gets pushed in an old Bond movie

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CPJ555 is almost the winner. Yes, it is the new Kerr 40. More specifically, it's the new Bat Boat!

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So what with this, the 40, the 40's 46' big brother, and the now Bolt 37 as well,it looks like JK is the king of semi-production race boats.

 

(Not this JK.)

30_page_3_image_0002_timeid_1270732617_1270732617.jpg

 

(nor this one)

 

 

but this one.

 

jason%20mug%20shot.jpg

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What is with the lines running through the cabin? Seems a bit leaky to me.

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Might have something to do with freeboard measurements. Read the class rules. And yes its ugly.

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Might have something to do with freeboard measurements. Read the class rules. And yes its ugly.

Also the class has some numbers you have to hit for RM with the masthead in the water so less boyancy in the corner gets you a higher rm in sailing trim, thats the same reason the deck has the big chamfer in it.

I like ChrisT's comment about the runners being a bit more out of the way when Gybing.

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What is with the lines running through the cabin? Seems a bit leaky to me.

 

They run through a tunnel, sealed from the interior.

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It looks like water will collect in the back end since the hull slopes downward as you move forward. Maybe the designer is thinking the motion will cause it to slosh out. Still...... And why exactly would you put a three foot rearward facing extension on a five foot tiller? Giving away a lot of mechanical advantage there. But it probably won't matter too much since the rear facing extension can only move about an inch before it runs into the end of slot. At least you won't have any stalling issues. Okay, I'm done nitpicking for now.

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Frankly, if the stern will not keep my beer cans from rolling into the sea, it's worthless.

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Any kind of following sea and that cockpit is underwater. Better keep that little hatch tight...

Why would this go any further underwater than any boat with a sugar scoop or with an open transom?

 

Well I'm no naval architect but to me that looks like a wave piercing stern ;)/>.

 

There's no flotation in the last few feet of the boat. Hard to tell how much, looks like at least 2-3 feet. So if the boat is pooped from aft, the stern is going to be pushed down by the leading edge of the wave, that puts say half a ton of water on the scoop and opens up the cockpit to the rest of the wave which is going to wash up through the transom and down the hatch. As the boat then goes bow down, any water that's been scooped up is going to go forward.

 

Even sugar scoop and open transom boats have at least a few inches of transom below the deck. So as the wave approaches, the stern lifts which changes the angle of attack of the transom to the wave.

 

+1

 

The first word that came to me when I saw the image was

 

"pooped"

 

By so many.

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