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virbac-paprec 3 loses keel

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Breaking News: At 0:45, while sailing in the third position of the Vendée Globe about 500 miles northwest of the Cape Verde islands, Jean-Pierre Dick called his team. Virbac-Paprec 3 has lost its whole keel at 23:45 pm (French time). The skipper from Nice has stabilized the situation. The boat is in place, filled ballasts, and sails at 8 knots towards the Azores. More here.

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holly F#$k... poor bugger robbed just before the finish... but role up Mr Alex T .. a potential third place for the most charismatic and entertaining of them all... fingers crossed he can get on the podium...

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Yeah, and sailing at 8 knots!

 

Could he finish like this?

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

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With the amount of tenacity that JP has shown so far I wouldn't be surprised to see him make it to the finish.

Takes a lot of pressure off of Alex

 

Best wishes JP; stay safe.

 

 

Greve de Lecq

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Good luck to JPD and hope he stays safe.

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Dumped the ballast for the final part of the race :D

 

Real weight saving strategy.

 

 

But I hope JPD can finish 4th place. 2200 miles to go and Golding&Cam are 1900 miles away.

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Oh no. What a bugger. Poor Jean-Pierre. I very much doubt he'd make it back to Les Sables d'Olonne, unassisted. That's about 2,000nm or so and the South Atlantic can be pretty treacherous at the best of times. Maybe Alex was right about these new generation VPLP/Verdier boats. If so, 1 down, 2 to go.

 

North Atlantic, sorry.

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holly F#$k... poor bugger robbed just before the finish... but role up Mr Alex T .. a potential third place for the most charismatic and entertaining of them all... fingers crossed he can get on the podium...

Are you talking about the same AT? (Cough, cough)

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Here are some more details on how JPD recovered from the knock-down after loosing the keel (translated from the French Vendee Globe website) - very interesting, surprising to hear he was able to recover after what seems like a long knock-down:

 

"I heard a big "Bang", a big noise, and the boat started to heel quite quickly, luffing up. At the same time, I let out the main sail quite quickly and the boom went into the water. The boat then got knocked down rather violently, with the solent very sheeted in. The boat stayed knocked-down quite long, enough for the wind to soften and the squall to pass. At that point, I was able to bear away slowly. The running backstay was on the wrong side of the boom. I was nevertheless able to bear away and then furl the solent. I climbed onto the boom to pass the runner onto the right side. The boat is now on a stable course at around 8kts, heading 330, which is 80 degrees off the wind."

 

French original:

"J'ai entendu un grand « Bam », un grand bruit, et le bateau s'est mis a gîter assez vite, est parti au lof. En même temps j'ai choqué la grand voile assez vite et la bôme est partie sur l'eau. Le bateau s'est alors couché tout de même assez violemment avec le solent très bordé. Le bateau est resté couché assez longtemps, le temps que le vent mollisse et que le grain parte. Là j'ai pu abattre doucement. La bastaque s'est mise du mauvais côté de la bôme. J'ai pu quand même abattre puis rouler le solent. Je suis monté dans la bôme passer la bastaque du bon côté. Le bateau est maintenant en route saine à environ 8 nœuds, au cap 330 c'est-à-dire à 80 degrés du vent".

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

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How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

I understand that's how it is upright, but with the center of resistance so far back how can the boat to turn up into the wind? The news bit said the keel broke fully off...

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How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

 

daggerboards

 

oooh right. Forgot about that bit of the boat.

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This really is a bastard for JPD. Hope he makes it to the Azores OK.

 

And I hope the class (and now SKM) don't stick their head in the sand about this. Full disclosure of findings is needed. Stuff like this isn't good for the long term heath of the class.

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How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

I understand that's how it is upright, but with the center of resistance so far back how can the boat to turn up into the wind? The news bit said the keel broke fully off...

The keel on these boats is not the CLR. That's the Daggger boards. The keel swings side to side for ballast.

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Not really sure what the video showed so this could be wrong.

 

I'm amazed that a keelless boat can recover from a knockdown if it has been laying on its side for a while. All I can think is that the bulb went and fin stayed so that there is at least something heavyish hanging out the bottom. This would increase chances of finishing.

 

In my mind at least, Golding and Guilmot (sp) ? Have both finished without keels. I believe both boats were much closer to the end, Golding was really close. Didn't Bilou lose a keel not far from the Azores and retire there, heartbreakingly close to the end ?

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The weather for JPD looks ok until near the Azores when he may get a gale (from behind).

 

Here's the weather picture for the 28th (when I have him close to landfall - I have made up some 'broken keel' polars):

 

post-8534-0-47898800-1358857832_thumb.jpg

 

One thing to be thankful is that AT is actually in quite good position to do a pick-up if its needed.

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How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

 

daggerboards

 

Can the boat sail upwind with daggerboards and water ballast only? I doubt it.

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Dumped the ballast for the final part of the race :D

 

Real weight saving strategy.

 

 

But I hope JPD can finish 4th place. 2200 miles to go and Golding&Cam are 1900 miles away.

 

Seems unlikely that he will finish. Too far, weather too rough, not enough food / fuel etc remaining, too dangerous. JPD has acknowledged this by heading for the Azores.

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How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

 

daggerboards

 

Can the boat sail upwind with daggerboards and water ballast only? I doubt it.

 

Mike Golding says I'm wrong, the boat can be sailed upwind with no keel. However over long distances it's not stable and not safe so JPD probably won't try it. http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/article/10755/vendee-globe-tv-live-mike-golding-i-was-50-miles-from-the-finish-he-is-a-long-way-out.html

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

Golding was 50 miles from the finish when his keel fell off. Close enough to get there at the helm.

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Hmmm is he gonna be DSQ'd if he finishes without a keel ? ..... no longer measures as an IMOCA 60 ?

 

After all Stamm was DSQ'd for not speaking Russian FFS !!

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

Golding was 50 miles from the finish when his keel fell off. Close enough to get there at the helm.

 

 

Why fill all ballast tanks ? surely just sail it as a big dinghy and just fill windward ones upwind and aft/windward downwind ......or am I missing something here ?

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holly F#$k... poor bugger robbed just before the finish... but role up Mr Alex T .. a potential third place for the most charismatic and entertaining of them all... fingers crossed he can get on the podium...

Are you talking about the same AT? (Cough, cough)

 

 

Snigger ;)

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

Golding was 50 miles from the finish when his keel fell off. Close enough to get there at the helm.

 

 

Why fill all ballast tanks ? surely just sail it as a big dinghy and just fill windward ones upwind and aft/windward downwind ......or am I missing something here ?

 

I would imagine the danger of rounding up with only windward ballasts full isn't worth it. It very well might be a different reason though.

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

Golding was 50 miles from the finish when his keel fell off. Close enough to get there at the helm.

 

 

Why fill all ballast tanks ? surely just sail it as a big dinghy and just fill windward ones upwind and aft/windward downwind ......or am I missing something here ?

Also remember the boat has a 29m rig. That's a hell of a lot of weight to counter-balance and stay upright.

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

Golding was 50 miles from the finish when his keel fell off. Close enough to get there at the helm.

 

 

Why fill all ballast tanks ? surely just sail it as a big dinghy and just fill windward ones upwind and aft/windward downwind ......or am I missing something here ?

 

Because the skipper has to sleep...and having the tanks all filled on one side, and no keel, is asking for disaster if the boat jibes when you are not at the helm...which I think has happened to just about ever skipper in this race at least once and that was when they had keels. If JPD wants to try to sail it 2000 miles with no keel then he would probably start by filling all the tanks to lower the CG as far as possible.

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There is a fair amount of inherent stability in a 20-foot-wide floating wedge... until it gets past 90 degrees or so from horizontal.

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It's been done before (Mike Golding?) but I'm not sure how far from home he was. If you can catch it before capsize I guess they're pretty stable!

Marc Guillemot (SAFRAN) last time.

 

How can he sail any direction other than downwind without a keel? Let alone 8 knots

Just fill all ballast tanks.

 

Golding was 50 miles from the finish when his keel fell off. Close enough to get there at the helm.

 

 

Why fill all ballast tanks ? surely just sail it as a big dinghy and just fill windward ones upwind and aft/windward downwind ......or am I missing something here ?

 

How often do you sleep on a laser?

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So that makes 45% of the starting fleet out of the race due to major breakages... Kind of amazing how few skippers have perished in this rac since it started, knock on wood...

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There is a fair amount of inherent stability in a 20-foot-wide floating wedge... until it gets past 90 degrees or so from horizontal.

 

Reminds me of that video of the scows racing in the Netherlands that was on the sa main page a few months ago. They put up a pretty impressive amount of canvas and rely entirely on form stability. Until they go over that is...

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I'm confused how flooding both ballast tanks lowers the cg, aren't those tanks typically way up close to the rail?

 

not on an imoca60. they are mostly for and aft to control trim not to add righting moment (although some of the aft tanks are further outboard to add righting moment as well)

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I'm confused how flooding both ballast tanks lowers the cg, aren't those tanks typically way up close to the rail?

 

It's not only about lowering the CoG or moving it to windward. RM is directly linked to displacement plus more weight means the hull sits deeper in the water making use of the wide waterlines.

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