Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Just Another Sailor

Everglades Challenge 2013

Recommended Posts

The Everglades Challenge 2013 begins in 11 days with about 90 teams in 6 different classes. From paddle-boards, kayaks, dinghys, sharpies to catamarans and trimarans the race aka challenge attracts individuals that appreciate the outdoors and the personal challenges an event like this provides. With competitors carrying a SPOT GPS Messenger the race can be followed live via the web. For more information go to www.watertribe.org

 

From Fort DeSoto at the entrance to Tampa Bay down the coast to check point one at Englewood to check point 2 and 3 inside the Everglades National Park at Chokoloskee and then across the very shallow Florida Bay to Key Largo. The race offers so many challenges for competitors that it has attracted several notable competitors like Randy Smyth, Jamie Livingston and Meade Gudgeon.

 

Hopefully several SA supporters will learn about this experience and maybe next your we'll see you on the starting line.

 

Youtube video of 2012 start:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New job this year, otherwise I would be there. After failing to finish in 2011 and completing the shorter Ultramarathon last year, the plan is make a run at the full event in 2014. Still debating driving down for the start, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The long range models look pretty good with mostly northerlies and one frontal passage early in the week. If it holds it could be a great year for sailors. I hope I'm not jinxing you by saying it, but it's entirely possible you could be at Key Largo on Monday afternoon if the forecast holds. If you can time getting down to Flamingo with the front that's coming through, you'll have a ripping ride across FL Bay the short way. Right now the frontal passage looks to be sometime on Monday.

 

It's killing me that I can't do it this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its fun to speculate about the wind forecast this far out but I agree that its more likely to change than be correct. Ironically I think our competion will have the advantage if the wind stays out of the north. The Core Sound 20 will likely be faster than us down wind. The Lightning's real strenght over other class 4 boats is pointing ability. And of course who knows what will happen with the E-Scow. If its a light breeze that boat will leave all of us behind.

 

Sure would be nice to get in Monday afternoon :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guy I'm going to be watching is Phil Garland and his turbo Core Sound 17. His boat with a taller carbon rig and square-top laminate sails makes mine appear positively pedestrian. I see there's another Lightning, so you've got a one design start!

 

Also, looks like three nutters trying to do the event on SUPs! God bless 'em.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Class 6 looks very interesting after considering Randy's Sizzor. I'm hoping the experienced gained last year will keep me competitive considering my old Hobie 18 horse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It's killing me that I can't do it this year.

 

Sorry to hear that too, Enjoyed your updates!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not intending to sidetrack the discussion, but, I'm a fan of this race, and what it's trying to do. I'd like to participate - and recently heard about a North Carolina edition of the Watertribe race. Anyone know anymore than the fact that there IS one? I'm up by DC - NC would be a lot easier to make than down by Chokoloskee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a watertribe North Carolina Challenge every September. But you are in luck this year because they are starting a new challenge this May on the Chesapeake called the OkoumeFest Ultra Marathon 2013. Circumnavigate Eastern Neck Island, Wye Island, and Kent Island.

 

See http://watertribe.com/Events/OkoumeFestUltraMarathon/Default.aspx for details.

 

NCC: http://watertribe.com/Events/NorthCarolinaChallenge/Default.aspx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a watertribe North Carolina Challenge every September. But you are in luck this year because they are starting a new challenge this May on the Chesapeake called the OkoumeFest Ultra Marathon 2013. Circumnavigate Eastern Neck Island, Wye Island, and Kent Island.

 

See http://watertribe.co...on/Default.aspx for details.

 

NCC: http://watertribe.co...ge/Default.aspx

 

Thanks a BUNCH - I was completely unaware of this! My paddling buddies are spread between NYC & Orlando, and a couple that fly out 2X a year from TX. I could see us mounting a few entries for the NC and eastern shore races. Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Everglades Challenge 2013 begins in 11 days with about 90 teams in 6 different classes. From paddle-boards, kayaks, dinghys, sharpies to catamarans and trimarans the race aka challenge attracts individuals that appreciate the outdoors and the personal challenges an event like this provides. With competitors carrying a SPOT GPS Messenger the race can be followed live via the web. For more information go to www.watertribe.org

 

From Fort DeSoto at the entrance to Tampa Bay down the coast to check point one at Englewood to check point 2 and 3 inside the Everglades National Park at Chokoloskee and then across the very shallow Florida Bay to Key Largo. The race offers so many challenges for competitors that it has attracted several notable competitors like Randy Smyth, Jamie Livingston and Meade Gudgeon.

 

Hopefully several SA supporters will learn about this experience and maybe next your we'll see you on the starting line.

 

Youtube video of 2012 start:

 

That's one of my Everglades Challenge videos, and I wrote accompanying articles after watching the starts of the 2011 and 2012 races.

 

2011 Everglades Challenge Start

 

2012 Everglades Challenge Start

 

This year, I plan to do more watching than before. I'll go up for the start again, then follow the race down the course. The plan, weather and time permitting, is to keep an eye on the competitors using the Watertribe tracking app (yes, of course there's an app for that) and try to encounter as many as possible around the three checkpoints at Cape Haze, Chokoloskee, and Flamingo. I'll probably be in my friend's Cowmaran, but will use one of my boats if that falls through. I doubt I'll make it down to Key Largo for the finish.

 

One of these years, I want to participate in the race, but this is not the year. Hence my Watertribe name:

 

--Speck (last name, Tater)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Speck,

Love your power cat design. I built a 23' plywood design in 2005/6 in Key West. I am competing in Class 5 w/ a Hobie 18 ?Magnum. Looking forward to meeting you on the beach and see your cat on the water.

justanothersailor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

justanothersailor, I only wish that power cat were mine, or even that I could take some credit for the design. I'm just a fan.

 

A new engine for it arrived yesterday and is sitting under my house awaiting installation. Now both sides will have power tilt. Woo hoo! Hope the owner gets it done before the EC! I'm not sure if he wants to trek to all the checkpoints or not, but if he doesn't go I'll do it alone with one of my boats.

 

I think taking a beach cat, or any other wet boat for that matter, in the EC qualifies you as justanothermasochist! ;) I wish they did this race when the water temp gets above 80 so I could find wet boats fun. I'd do it in my Adventure Island for sure. Yeah, I know, the winged ones would swarm me, but I'd rather be bitten and warm than cold any day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SHIT need one of these event on the Great Lakes... Good luck to all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always warn n dry on my Hobie when it gets cold... fleece and drysuit.

 

I talked to a guy who did the EC in his Adventure Island (can't recall whether he finished) and he said he wore his dry suit for 5 straight days. That cured me of wanting to try it in mine! I don't even own a dry suit but if I did I would not want to wear it that long. I like air, water and humidity to all be 80!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always warn n dry on my Hobie when it gets cold... fleece and drysuit.

 

I talked to a guy who did the EC in his Adventure Island (can't recall whether he finished) and he said he wore his dry suit for 5 straight days. That cured me of wanting to try it in mine! I don't even own a dry suit but if I did I would not want to wear it that long. I like air, water and humidity to all be 80!

As outdoor enthusiast's we love the exposure to the weather, water, sun, cold and of course the heat. Dry suits today are very comfortable more so than simple foul weather gear. With a relief ziiper safer aboard a sail boat than usual gear worn by everyone else. The long term weather window for class 5 is 15-25 out of the NW. If it holds the record for the raqce should fall belore the current 26 hours. I'm sailing solo on a aged Hobie 18 design and hope to finish also in under 30 hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a fair weather outdoor enthusiast, but become a fireplace enthusiast when it gets cold. 30 hours is only about 27 hours beyond my tolerance for fun in a beach cat. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Everglades Challenge 2013 begins in 11 days with about 90 teams in 6 different classes. From paddle-boards, kayaks, dinghys, sharpies to catamarans and trimarans the race aka challenge attracts individuals that appreciate the outdoors and the personal challenges an event like this provides. With competitors carrying a SPOT GPS Messenger the race can be followed live via the web. For more information go to www.watertribe.org

 

From Fort DeSoto at the entrance to Tampa Bay down the coast to check point one at Englewood to check point 2 and 3 inside the Everglades National Park at Chokoloskee and then across the very shallow Florida Bay to Key Largo. The race offers so many challenges for competitors that it has attracted several notable competitors like Randy Smyth, Jamie Livingston and Meade Gudgeon.

 

Hopefully several SA supporters will learn about this experience and maybe next your we'll see you on the starting line.

 

Youtube video of 2012 start:

 

That's one of my Everglades Challenge videos, and I wrote accompanying articles after watching the starts of the 2011 and 2012 races.

 

2011 Everglades Challenge Start

 

2012 Everglades Challenge Start

 

This year, I plan to do more watching than before. I'll go up for the start again, then follow the race down the course. The plan, weather and time permitting, is to keep an eye on the competitors using the Watertribe tracking app (yes, of course there's an app for that) and try to encounter as many as possible around the three checkpoints at Cape Haze, Chokoloskee, and Flamingo. I'll probably be in my friend's Cowmaran, but will use one of my boats if that falls through. I doubt I'll make it down to Key Largo for the finish.

 

One of these years, I want to participate in the race, but this is not the year. Hence my Watertribe name:

 

--Speck (last name, Tater)

 

Here is my 23' Miranda 1/4 ply cat, powered by a 4 stroke 50hp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What you really need is a little tie-in to the invasive species thing.

Maybe a two hour (?) time bonus for every Burmese Python that you pick up in the everglades.....

That would be cool. Get you some real media exposure too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I should pimp my x-girlfriend's video work of EC 2009 here

She did pretty good job of catching the spirit of the Challenge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shaping up a lot like the 2010 race. It was 39 degrees at the start and the winds got really sporty on Saturday afternoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today is the day everyone sets up on the beach. There are equipment inspections and a skipper's meeting at 300pm. Last night at midnight I was thinking if I got up at 400am I could be there around lunchtime. Didn't pull the trigger, but I'm really missing being there after having gone the last three years.

 

They start tomorrow at 700 am. Should be fun, with 20kt NW winds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several Anarchists in the race. Don't forget zerothehero in class 4 aboard a Nomad, sailing with his wife.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like Phil Garland and Dan Neri of Hall Spars will be there in a specially constructed boat. It's up on their facebook page.

 

http://www.facebook.com/#!/HallSpars

 

I'm sure y'all will straighten me out but I just don't get the double masted boats??? Whats the point? And now that I mention it, I wouldn't think they would point very well. Maybe they have good power for waves... I dn't know

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine it is for more sail area with shorter masts (being easier to step and handle), also less heeling moment with lower CoE.

 

Just a guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like Phil Garland and Dan Neri of Hall Spars will be there in a specially constructed boat. It's up on their facebook page.

 

http://www.facebook.com/#!/HallSpars

 

I'm sure y'all will straighten me out but I just don't get the double masted boats??? Whats the point? And now that I mention it, I wouldn't think they would point very well. Maybe they have good power for waves... I dn't know

 

Phil's boat is a Core Sound 17 like mine. I can go on about my experiences with sailing this rig, but I'll let the designer Graham Byrnes (who currently holds the monohull record aboard a 22' version of Phil's boat) explain it's virtues.

 

"What are the unique advantages of the cat ketch rig and why have we chosen it for some of our designs?

Before going on, let us say: We are not missionaries for this rig. It is not a trademark of our designs in that it in no way represents the rig on the majority of our plans. It is however, a rig, which we have found to be extremely suitable for certain types of boats. So, it fits with our philosophy of making each design work as well as it can for it's type, while retaining a cost effective approach without compromising quality or performance.

The well-designed cat ketch rig is a simple, inexpensive and balanced rig.

The sail plan spreads the sails along the length of the boat on two masts. The low center of effort afforded by the fore and aft, rather than upward, spread of sail, produces less heeling force.

Free standing masts require no rigging; making them quick to rig and unrig, easy to reef and inexpensive. They also offer an innate degree of safety: the masts bend during gusts, flattening the sail and de-powering the rig.

Each spar is lighter, smaller and easier to handle. This is really important with beach boats, day boats and other dry-sailed craft. It only takes a few minutes to rig. In our designs, up to about 20', stepping the masts can be accomplished by one person. Being able to get in and out of the water quickly and easily makes sailing so much more accessible. If you have to contemplate an hour of preparation just to go sailing; it isn't likely that you will go sailing for an hour! In today's busy world you may have only a few days when you are free to take the whole day for sailing. On the other hand, we all have the odd hour or two of free time, and when the boat can be launched and retrieved in minutes, you can spend that hour sailing. Our larger or cabin boats utilize hinging masts in tabernacles that can also be setup quickly with one person

Docile. That is probably the best word for the behavior of this rig. Your days of yelling, "prepare to tack", "tacking" - "let it go", and "pull it in" are over. When you want to tack, you simply put the helm over and off you go on your new course. The sails will tack themselves. This may be a little un-nerving at first. If you have been sailing only sloops or ketches with headsails up until now, you will feel like you ought to be doing something. We've noticed however, that it takes the average sailor only about 3 tacks to get used to this laid back approach. By the 5th tack they are enamored and begin to aimlessly tack back and forth with a great big grin on their faces. The crew is equally happy, because they haven't moved a muscle or been yelled at during the whole procedure. As delirious as the tack may make the laid back crew, they will really get excited by the jibe. Jibing has traditionally been a recipe for disaster, with such fanciful names as the Chinese jibe, invented to describe just one of the multiple possibilities for complications. In the cat ketch rig, jibing requires exactly the same degree of panic as the tack we just discussed…you just put the helm over, pull in some excess sheet if you wish and let her slide out the other side.

Upwind. The cat ketch rig is handy and comfortably close-winded. Provided you have a good hull under you (never blame a good rig for a poor hull design), she will go to weather nicely.

Reaching & Running: Since the sprit bisects the sail load, the area above and below the sprit are balanced. So when the sheets are eased, the sails go out and stay out with none of the collapsing and filling that is the bane of the normal jib behind main. Nor is there the twisting off of the typical mainsail, when the boom lifts and causes a "death roll" in strong winds. Somewhere between a very broad reach and a run, the main sail will begin to shake and lose power. This is not a problem, just turn off the wind a bit further, jibe the main across and return to your desired course.

As you have already learned, jibing, the bane of most downwind sail-handlers is a snap. With a cat ketch rig you can also sail directly down wind, wing and wing. The boat feels stable and whisks along nicely. If the wind gets up and things get hairy, on an unstayed rig (which includes most smaller cat ketches) you can just let those sails go forward of the beam. This will immediately stabilize the boat. Also, the sails when they are allowed to go forward (about 20° ), will keep the boat tracking downwind, so it makes a very easy time of what would be the most delicate conditions for a sloop or cat rigged boat.

Taken to it's extreme, you can make delicate and gentle downwind landings in any weather by just letting the sheets go and allowing your sails fly forward completely, at the same time lifting your centerboard and letting go of the rudder pennant to lift the rudder…you glide into your (shallow) landing under complete control. This is a far cry from the usual tension and chaos of a downwind landing on a blustery day."

 

I'll vouch for what Graham said.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On my boat, its a bit undercanvased in light air. Phil's boat has a more powerful non-standard rig with taller carbon masts and square-top laminate sails which should make it do a bit better.

 

"Comfortably to windward" is a euphemism for "not as weatherly as a sloop"

 

Other than that, I don't see a downside.

 

Some pictures are starting to come on on this Facebook page: http://www.facebook....92311524201598/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few shots from the beach this afternoon.

 

421458_522429834475916_626362229_n.jpg

As you can see, Randy Smyth's SIZZOR always draws a crowd. Biggest dude-magnet on the beach!

 

 

601475_522429934475906_1781499001_n.jpg

480147_10200901759415275_593864827_n.jpg

Phil (SambaSailor) Garland's boat.

421459_10200901757775234_2102193980_n.jpg

Anarchist zerothehero's boat.

544369_10200901758015240_860554880_n.jpg

More cat-ketch goodness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nomad looks like a cool boat for this - most or all the upsides of the Lightning with few of the downsides at first glance, anyways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there such a thing as a scratch sheet for this race.

 

i see here: http://www.watertrib...rTribeRules.pdf

there are a bunch of divisions.

 

CLASS 1: EXPEDITION KAYAKS AND CANOES 14 CLASS 2: RACING KAYAKS AND CANOES 14 CLASS 3: SAILING KAYAKS AND CANOES 15 CLASS 4: MONOHULL SAILBOATS AND SMALL CRAFT 16 CLASS 5: MULTIHULL SAILBOATS AND SMALL CRAFT 16 CLASS 6: EXHIBITION SMALL CRAFT 17 DEFINITION OF A SMALL CRAFT 17 ONE-DESIGNS 18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mean by handicaps, no. It's run what ya bring and first to finish in each class is the winner. Just finishing is a victory though. Typical attrition is 40-50% and last year over 60% dropped out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually I was just looking for a list of the different people and boats that were entered in each division. i assume within each division first boat to finish wins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone gonna take video of the start???

 

I will, and then I plan to beat the leaders down to checkpoint one and take pix and vids from my Adventure Island. Gotta get up at 4 tomorrow to be at the beach by 6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck to everyone! I'm pulling for my fellow Nomad sailor zerothehero!

 

Same here... extra kudos for sailing with his wife

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like most of the mono and multi-hulls started out heading for the Gulf. However at 830 am, some appear to have had a change of heart at turned towards the ICW.

 

WInds appear to be fairly light at the start, but NOAA and Windfinder both say they'll be 20 kts by 10 or 11 this am. Going to be sporty out there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sizzors has a history of not turning on his Spot tracker. Probably the same case again this year. JAS is hauling the mail, almost to Sarasota Pass in three hours. I'm guessing Randy is ahead of him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do I see correctly that our man Zero's boat is the B Ark? Is there a telephone sanitization specialist aboard?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last reports were winds dropped down to not much right before the start. NE, 6-9 kts. Seems to be a bit lighter as they go down the course. Our man JAS is well on his way towards Venice now, but at last report has slowed from 10-11 kts to 5-6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man, what a difference. Most of the fleet is already at Longboat Key... we hung out in the mangroves there Saturday night last year. It seems CP1 is well within reach for the majority by noon, tomorrow. Winds are reportedly going light, though, so no guarantees.

 

It is also drizzling, so kudos to all competitors for preparing for, and enduring the conditions! Go the Zero!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy cow! Sew Sew is going through Stump Pass right now! That's fast! CP1 by 2pm?

 

Hobie 18 (highly modified) an hour or so behind is closest competitor.

 

Lightning "Hare on Fire" had a close shave: "Doing well. Had a scare near wipeout in 30kn gust. Lots water in the boat but bailed out successfully. Lost DonKeyHoTeys spot. Running on MicroToms spot"

The Core Sound shown above (two masted with cuddly cabin) is, I think, the first Class 4 boat: Gulf side, passing Blackburn Bay. Zero is at the Sarasota Bay Bridge... that's where I was 0600 MONDAY last year (24hr weather delay).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting drag race... a Coresound 17 (Samba) takes the Venice Canal while a Coresound 20 (DanceswithSandyBottom) is outside, almost same latitude. Seems like a no-brainer to stay outside, but it depends what the waves are like because that can be a tricky entrance. High tide is at 4:06 pm; if the tide turns before they arrive, the waves may be stacking up... Sailing on the CS20 is SOS, DWSB's son: he built the trimaran Mosquito for last year's challenge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I reading the tracker right. Just 13 boats out in the gulf?

 

I count 17... including Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (Hobie 16) who've been on the beach outside Sarasota Bay for a couple of hours now. Wonder what problems they encountered? Hope they can resume soon.

 

Dragon: Make sure you haven't limited the tracker to a specific class, and are checking EC2013.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sew Sew was at CP1 before 2pm, Just another sailor and Crazy Lugan are there now. Meade Gougeon is out in the Gulf... looks like he's got two floats on his wooden canoe with a new & bigger sail to take advantage of the increased stability. Just found out the CS17 going down the Venice Canal is Phil Garland of Hall Spars. Their boat is an awesome machine. Perfectly designed for this race. They have even placed a board on centerline to allow off-watch crew to sleep 80%under the deck on the high side. Definitely my odds-on for winner Class IV.

 

Puma (Hobie) hasn't been seen on the tracker for a few hours. CG is active off Venice Inlet... not sure if that is relevant; there is a long history of SPOT failures during the race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark Stewart reports a C130, Helo, and CG cutter as well as a Police rescue boat have been deployed out of Venice Inlet. He doesn't know who they're looking for.

BUT... PUMA - Joe Frohock - 19 ft. Catamaran's SPOT hasn't reported in since 12:30.

And there is a Hobie 16, Thunderbolt, apparently on the beach off of Osprey Florida.

Conditions are getting worse according to spotters at the Venice Jetty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hope everybody is ok....

 

How is the E-scow team doing? What is their name?

 

Also, anybody interested in this would probably be interested in the Expedition Florida 500 dude who is paddleboarding the entire coast of Florida in support of the Florida coastal ecosystem. He is up in the Tampa area now, has logged over a thousand miles and is in something like day 66.

 

Facebook is here:

http://www.facebook.com/#!/XF500

website here:

www.xf500.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iszatarock and SandyBottom are in at CP1, Samba is approaching... guess the outside/Stump Pass route was faster than the Venice Inlet. They must've beat the tide switch by minutes! Hope no mayhem for follows-on as the current switches at Stump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know these waters so I'm curious. Looks like most competitors are inside a narrow canal. Seems to make sense for the paddlers but perhaps tougher for the sailors? What drives the choice to go inside rather than outside? Does the prevailing wing make the canal an easier run than it looks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Puma has been rescued after his cat capsized and sank. He is safe at a marina in Venice being picked up by a family member.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More cat ketch goodness: SOS and Danceswithsandybottom coming into CP 1. Sambasailer Phil Garland is not too far away.

 

 

382173_10200719845186494_818898047_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anarchist JustAnotherSailor going back out into the Gulf at Gasparilla Pass. Ballsy! Talking to my friend at CP1, the wind is starting to go more W than N.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fortune favours the bold mmoon !

the tracker has a slower hobie 16 ahead of him?

 

 

where do you (gu)estimate sewsew be? in the gulf too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know these waters so I'm curious. Looks like most competitors are inside a narrow canal. Seems to make sense for the paddlers but perhaps tougher for the sailors? What drives the choice to go inside rather than outside? Does the prevailing wing make the canal an easier run than it looks?

 

 

The majority of the inlets have nasty bar crossings when the seas get up. Better to stay inside when that's happening like today. Venice Pass is just about the only all-weather pass between the start and the first checkpoint. To finish first, you have to first finish. It's a long race you can't win on the first day, but you sure can lose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fortune favours the bold mmoon !

 

where do you (gu)estimate sewsew be? in the gulf too?

 

Almost certainly. The wind is supposed to lay down some overnight, especially as one goes south. We probably won't hear from him until he clears Chokoloskee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not dissin the sew sew man but he should be somehow 'persuaded' to switch his tracker on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know these waters so I'm curious. Looks like most competitors are inside a narrow canal. Seems to make sense for the paddlers but perhaps tougher for the sailors? What drives the choice to go inside rather than outside? Does the prevailing wing make the canal an easier run than it looks?

 

 

The majority of the inlets have nasty bar crossings when the seas get up. Better to stay inside when that's happening like today. Venice Pass is just about the only all-weather pass between the start and the first checkpoint. To finish first, you have to first finish. It's a long race you can't win on the first day, but you sure can lose.

 

Makes sense. Seems like this year the wind is favorable for the inside passage. Does it usually blow out of the NW?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know these waters so I'm curious. Looks like most competitors are inside a narrow canal. Seems to make sense for the paddlers but perhaps tougher for the sailors? What drives the choice to go inside rather than outside? Does the prevailing wing make the canal an easier run than it looks?

 

 

The majority of the inlets have nasty bar crossings when the seas get up. Better to stay inside when that's happening like today. Venice Pass is just about the only all-weather pass between the start and the first checkpoint. To finish first, you have to first finish. It's a long race you can't win on the first day, but you sure can lose.

 

Makes sense. Seems like this year the wind is favorable for the inside passage. Does it usually blow out of the NW?

 

Except when it blows from the SE! Last year we had 25+ from the SE. I went inside for that one, too rough in the Gulf. The year before it was light out of the SE the whole first day and I went outside. It did get pretty sporty Sunday morning when the wind kicked up to 25 and we had 5-7 foot seas on the nose as we went into Gasparilla Pass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meade Gougeon (Yellowthing) is on the beach but OK. He's going to wait for calmer seas. He went outside in a very small boat indeed.

 

Here's his beautiful sailing canoe/trimaran before the start.

 

 

541051_10200704709329838_1510328713_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Bumpy (Jamie Livingston) on the WT message board: I got a message from Sew Sew's ground crew he said Sew Sew fliped and has some damage is heading to Fort ************ He is ok and will see what the damage is once ashore. Good luck to all and have a safe night

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SewSew has his SPOT on now. He is leading. Bunch of Beach Cats in front of the race. Mystere 4.3 beach cat with solo sailor is in forth place right now, - interesting...

Oh, didnt see the previous post. This is what makes this challenge so interesting, it is so unpredictable...