Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 11:11 PM, Matagi said:

very nice, quite some surgery done on the hull. Almost seems to me, it could have been as efficient to build a new one?

Anyway, here is an IW 31 with another 'cabin n deck' job.

IW31+Image+1.jpg

for comparison

boat_img_3103.jpg

 

 

 

The remodel looks gorgeous, but I'd actually rather have the all-fiberglass original. 

Perhaps I might feel otherwise if I were rich enough to pay somebody else to do the varnishing.

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The Wylie Wabbit is another boat that I've long admired.  It looks like a lot of fun, but I think my wife and daughter might find it too tippy.

 

1539_466_249-moore-sailboat.jpg

wabbit.jpg

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Bad phone camera photo. But interesting concept - a Whitebred 60 on the left, and America II on the right. And probably something cooler in the water in the background, but I was in a rush and didn't get out of the car to investigate.

IMG_1654.JPG

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18 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

The Wylie Wabbit is another boat that I've long admired.  It looks like a lot of fun, but I think my wife and daughter might find it too tippy.

 

1539_466_249-moore-sailboat.jpg

wabbit.jpg

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18 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

The Wylie Wabbit is another boat that I've long admired.  It looks like a lot of fun, but I think my wife and daughter might find it too tippy.

 

1539_466_249-moore-sailboat.jpg

wabbit.jpg

I like this boat.

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A cool boat: Our dinghy. I had to replace the canvas rub rail this spring. This is the second one. It costs $150 to go around the boat with this stuff. Seems the last time I did it, it was less than $100. Oh well, it needed a new forward thwart as well, the old one rotted out. 

eve-new-fender-jpg.152010

I built this 9'6" Nutshell sailing dinghy about 25 years ago when our kids were 2 and 3. At that age, they'd sail to the Bahamas with us in a 28' boat. But I had a hunch, they really wouldn't 'get' sailing, until they sailed a little sailboat, by themselves. Sailing is a feel thing (I think), that's easier to get in a small boat.  A tiller in one hand, a sheet in the other. And I secretly hoped that my wife, who never sailed until our first date, would enjoy sailing this dinghy.

 

It worked out that way! Going through old 35mm photos, I came across images of the kids, in pajamas, sailing solo in the little boat. My son doesn't like lessons. Yet even at 1-2  years old, he was apparently learning how to sail, just watching me sail the dinghy as he sat. He was a natural sailor at the start of his first solo. He never looked back.  

eve-vingette-jpg.152011

Our daughter, the older (by 1 year) of the two, was always more timid (smart!). She too wanted to go alone at an early age. But unlike her brother, she watched me the whole time. We had a kind of hand signal communication that would answer her questions (although no one else would understand it). 

eve-vingette-2-jpg.152012

And then there was Mary Ann. She sailed to the Bahamas twice with me before I built this boat. She was the last one to sail alone. I can only explain Mary Ann - the sailor, as someone who loves to be sailing. She doesn't need to sail, herself. But occasionally she takes off in this sailing dinghy, and sails the way she wants to sail. I think she does this for her self. 'Sure I can do it'. 

pea-eve-1-of-1-jpg.152016

How much cooler can a little sailboat be, than this? 

mj-tommy-dinghy-sailing-cuttyhunk-crop-1

 

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How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones. 

But....there’s more than one dog.... it has a body double? 

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19 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones. 

But....there’s more than one dog.... it has a body double? 

Oh yes, when you have one Jack Russell, who can resist another?  Daisy was a rescue and a surprise (she's no Jack Russell,...) 

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20 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Oh yes, when you have one Jack Russell, who can resist another?  Daisy was a rescue and a surprise (she's no Jack Russell,...) 

And she'd rather let the other one do the hiking out?

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12 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones. 

But....there’s more than one dog.... it has a body double? 

What kind of habits do small dogs teach you?

BTW..... KC love the dinghy sailing pics! Fabulous!!

FB- Doug

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14 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones.

Absolutely.  That's one of the reasons why I believe it is v important for at least a part of early sail training to be done in dinghies

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I owned a Wabbit and yes it's "too tippy" for a family boat with young kids., It's a hoot in a breeze with some of the guys though.

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Historic photo posted by Sarasota Sailing Squadron on their FB page. 1950ish, Stan Lowe and Bruce Chadwick return from their 14 day cruise down Florida West Coast from Sarasota to Marquese Keys and back....in a Thistle!  Chadwick later began the annual SSS Labor Day one-design Regatta, which has been going on for many decades...Lowe later became Commodore of SSS and was an active racer in the Station 10 (Tampa Bay) and Station 22 (Sarasota/Bradenton) MORC fleets.

 

image.jpeg

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I knew a chief sonarman in the navy who used to camp cruise a Thistle in Biscayne Bay. One time, lightning struck the top of the mast. Everything above the boom was gone. He got religion.

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"Nostromo" by Joseph Conrad

I am a fan of Joseph Conrad. Recently, I read "Nostromo," set in the fictional South American country of Costaguana in the 1890s, which some say was his finest work. I also discovered that the BBC made a 3-part TV film of "Nostromo" in the 1990s, featuring Colin Firth as Charles Gould. It seems to be only available for viewing on YouTube. Of course, I have watched all three parts. 

Nostromo is the name of the main character, an Italian sailor who settles in Costaguana and becomes a hero of sorts, an incorruptible, indispensable man. In part three, Nostromo acquires a trading schooner, which is gorgeous. Read the book, watch the BBC film.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

"Nostromo" by Joseph Conrad

I am a fan of Joseph Conrad. Recently, I read "Nostromo," set in the fictional South American country of Costaguana in the 1890s, which some say was his finest work. I also discovered that the BBC made a 3-part TV film of "Nostromo" in the 1990s, featuring Colin Firth as Charles Gould. It seems to be only available for viewing on YouTube. Of course, I have watched all three parts. 

Nostromo is the name of the main character, an Italian sailor who settles in Costaguana and becomes a hero of sorts, an incorruptible, indispensable man. In part three, Nostromo acquires a trading schooner, which is gorgeous. Read the book, watch the BBC film.

English was Conrad's second language, yet I've never read another writer with Conrad's vocabulary and command of the language.

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16 hours ago, RKoch said:

Historic photo posted by Sarasota Sailing Squadron on their FB page. 1950ish, Stan Lowe and Bruce Chadwick return from their 14 day cruise down Florida West Coast from Sarasota to Marquese Keys and back....in a Thistle!  Chadwick later began the annual SSS Labor Day one-design Regatta, which has been going on for many decades...Lowe later became Commodore of SSS and was an active racer in the Station 10 (Tampa Bay) and Station 22 (Sarasota/Bradenton) MORC fleets.

 

image.jpeg

That brought back some memories of stories from my father when he was young.   In the 1940s, he started out his boat ownership life with a Snipe, then later a Lightning.   He told me tales of cruising on the Lightning.   I think the farthest he went cruising was Venice, FL on the Lightning, far short of what they did.   He and several other of his friends moored their boats off of Bayshore Blvd.   I have a couple of pictures of the Snipe and Lightning that I would post, but they are out of reach at the moment.

Good find, RKoch!

- Stumbling

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A recent post by Crash on another thread mentioned one of his previous boats, a Melonseed Skiff. I have drooled over these for years, If I lived on a lake, I would get one.

 

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There must be at least a thousand different dinghy classes.  One that has always appealed to me is the Finn.  The Finn has been an Olympic sailing class since 1952, longer than any other boat.  It has a catboat rig like a Laser, but the hull is more substantial, so the crew is less likely to get a wet butt.  The mast is unstayed, so rigging the boat is very simple.  On YouTube, there are videos of Finns racing in winds that would seem crazy for most other unballasted dinghy classes.

 

 

08_OG_FIN_MR_Ainslie_600_rdax_60.jpg

finn_sail_plan.png

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8 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Some masochist used a Finn in the most recent Everglades Challenge.

Ironbutts to admire...

I have what is supposed to be one of the first Finns brought into the US, #11. It's hot molded wood from 1954, which makes it slightly younger than me. At one point it was owned by Pete Sutter, sailmaker extraordinaire of SF Bay. I know his son David cruised the San Juans in the boat.  You'd have to be a lot tougher than I am...  

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2 hours ago, monsoon said:
5 hours ago, southerncross said:

13,600 lb displacement and 25' of waterline = snail = no likey 

I would love that boat ...

i.e. I would love it to be owned by someone on a swinging mooring next to me.

That way I could admire its pretty lines and seductive varnished wood ... while the PBO* endured the snail-like performance and tiny cabin whenever she could a) find a gap in her varnishing schedule, and b) had recovered from the concussion caused by bounding up the companionway to smack her head on the mizzen mast set on the bridgedeck

* PBO = Poor Bloody Owner

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It's a nice looking boat. 13K# on a 25' WL would be frustrating for me in lighter air, but it's probably a pretty comfortable ride in a breeze.

i agree with TwoLegged...Id love for someone else to own it and I'd just admire it.

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Looks too slow to actually go anywhere.

Quote

A proven bluewater vessel, Amaryllis has sailed the California coast to Mexico, across the South Pacific to Polynesia, Fiji, New Zealand and return by way of Hawaii. Now we comfortably cruise local waters from Washington’s San Juan Islands north to remote anchorages along British Columbia’s beautiful Inside Passage.

 

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8 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Looks too slow to actually go anywhere.

 

From the same drawing board as the Allied Seawind, the first fiberglass boat to sail around the world. Probably quite similar to the Seawind in form. But, as you suggest, not the boat for anyone who is in a hurry.

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On 6/16/2018 at 9:32 PM, Sailbydate said:

Yes. I like it. Looks like she's in beautiful condition too.

Sail, after watching obtuse carbon shapes for 9 mos this is pleasing to the eye.  Slow sounds nice sometimes.

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On 6/17/2018 at 3:36 PM, SemiSalt said:

From the same drawing board as the Allied Seawind, the first fiberglass boat to sail around the world. Probably quite similar to the Seawind in form. But, as you suggest, not the boat for anyone who is in a hurry.

If we were in a hurry, we should not have chose a sailboat!  Around the world seems to qualify as "getting there" :-)

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