Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 11:11 PM, Matagi said:

very nice, quite some surgery done on the hull. Almost seems to me, it could have been as efficient to build a new one?

Anyway, here is an IW 31 with another 'cabin n deck' job.

IW31+Image+1.jpg

for comparison

boat_img_3103.jpg

 

 

 

The remodel looks gorgeous, but I'd actually rather have the all-fiberglass original. 

Perhaps I might feel otherwise if I were rich enough to pay somebody else to do the varnishing.

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The Wylie Wabbit is another boat that I've long admired.  It looks like a lot of fun, but I think my wife and daughter might find it too tippy.

 

1539_466_249-moore-sailboat.jpg

wabbit.jpg

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Bad phone camera photo. But interesting concept - a Whitebred 60 on the left, and America II on the right. And probably something cooler in the water in the background, but I was in a rush and didn't get out of the car to investigate.

IMG_1654.JPG

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18 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

The Wylie Wabbit is another boat that I've long admired.  It looks like a lot of fun, but I think my wife and daughter might find it too tippy.

 

1539_466_249-moore-sailboat.jpg

wabbit.jpg

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18 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

The Wylie Wabbit is another boat that I've long admired.  It looks like a lot of fun, but I think my wife and daughter might find it too tippy.

 

1539_466_249-moore-sailboat.jpg

wabbit.jpg

I like this boat.

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A cool boat: Our dinghy. I had to replace the canvas rub rail this spring. This is the second one. It costs $150 to go around the boat with this stuff. Seems the last time I did it, it was less than $100. Oh well, it needed a new forward thwart as well, the old one rotted out. 

eve-new-fender-jpg.152010

I built this 9'6" Nutshell sailing dinghy about 25 years ago when our kids were 2 and 3. At that age, they'd sail to the Bahamas with us in a 28' boat. But I had a hunch, they really wouldn't 'get' sailing, until they sailed a little sailboat, by themselves. Sailing is a feel thing (I think), that's easier to get in a small boat.  A tiller in one hand, a sheet in the other. And I secretly hoped that my wife, who never sailed until our first date, would enjoy sailing this dinghy.

 

It worked out that way! Going through old 35mm photos, I came across images of the kids, in pajamas, sailing solo in the little boat. My son doesn't like lessons. Yet even at 1-2  years old, he was apparently learning how to sail, just watching me sail the dinghy as he sat. He was a natural sailor at the start of his first solo. He never looked back.  

eve-vingette-jpg.152011

Our daughter, the older (by 1 year) of the two, was always more timid (smart!). She too wanted to go alone at an early age. But unlike her brother, she watched me the whole time. We had a kind of hand signal communication that would answer her questions (although no one else would understand it). 

eve-vingette-2-jpg.152012

And then there was Mary Ann. She sailed to the Bahamas twice with me before I built this boat. She was the last one to sail alone. I can only explain Mary Ann - the sailor, as someone who loves to be sailing. She doesn't need to sail, herself. But occasionally she takes off in this sailing dinghy, and sails the way she wants to sail. I think she does this for her self. 'Sure I can do it'. 

pea-eve-1-of-1-jpg.152016

How much cooler can a little sailboat be, than this? 

mj-tommy-dinghy-sailing-cuttyhunk-crop-1

 

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How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones. 

But....there’s more than one dog.... it has a body double? 

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19 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones. 

But....there’s more than one dog.... it has a body double? 

Oh yes, when you have one Jack Russell, who can resist another?  Daisy was a rescue and a surprise (she's no Jack Russell,...) 

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20 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Oh yes, when you have one Jack Russell, who can resist another?  Daisy was a rescue and a surprise (she's no Jack Russell,...) 

And she'd rather let the other one do the hiking out?

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4 minutes ago, kinardly said:

And she'd rather let the other one do the hiking out?

I guess so, looks like a perfect balance. 

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12 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones. 

But....there’s more than one dog.... it has a body double? 

What kind of habits do small dogs teach you?

BTW..... KC love the dinghy sailing pics! Fabulous!!

FB- Doug

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14 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

How cheering! Thank you. Small boats teach you good habits - big boats reinforce bad ones.

Absolutely.  That's one of the reasons why I believe it is v important for at least a part of early sail training to be done in dinghies

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I owned a Wabbit and yes it's "too tippy" for a family boat with young kids., It's a hoot in a breeze with some of the guys though.

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Historic photo posted by Sarasota Sailing Squadron on their FB page. 1950ish, Stan Lowe and Bruce Chadwick return from their 14 day cruise down Florida West Coast from Sarasota to Marquese Keys and back....in a Thistle!  Chadwick later began the annual SSS Labor Day one-design Regatta, which has been going on for many decades...Lowe later became Commodore of SSS and was an active racer in the Station 10 (Tampa Bay) and Station 22 (Sarasota/Bradenton) MORC fleets.

 

image.jpeg

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I knew a chief sonarman in the navy who used to camp cruise a Thistle in Biscayne Bay. One time, lightning struck the top of the mast. Everything above the boom was gone. He got religion.

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"Nostromo" by Joseph Conrad

I am a fan of Joseph Conrad. Recently, I read "Nostromo," set in the fictional South American country of Costaguana in the 1890s, which some say was his finest work. I also discovered that the BBC made a 3-part TV film of "Nostromo" in the 1990s, featuring Colin Firth as Charles Gould. It seems to be only available for viewing on YouTube. Of course, I have watched all three parts. 

Nostromo is the name of the main character, an Italian sailor who settles in Costaguana and becomes a hero of sorts, an incorruptible, indispensable man. In part three, Nostromo acquires a trading schooner, which is gorgeous. Read the book, watch the BBC film.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

"Nostromo" by Joseph Conrad

I am a fan of Joseph Conrad. Recently, I read "Nostromo," set in the fictional South American country of Costaguana in the 1890s, which some say was his finest work. I also discovered that the BBC made a 3-part TV film of "Nostromo" in the 1990s, featuring Colin Firth as Charles Gould. It seems to be only available for viewing on YouTube. Of course, I have watched all three parts. 

Nostromo is the name of the main character, an Italian sailor who settles in Costaguana and becomes a hero of sorts, an incorruptible, indispensable man. In part three, Nostromo acquires a trading schooner, which is gorgeous. Read the book, watch the BBC film.

English was Conrad's second language, yet I've never read another writer with Conrad's vocabulary and command of the language.

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16 hours ago, RKoch said:

Historic photo posted by Sarasota Sailing Squadron on their FB page. 1950ish, Stan Lowe and Bruce Chadwick return from their 14 day cruise down Florida West Coast from Sarasota to Marquese Keys and back....in a Thistle!  Chadwick later began the annual SSS Labor Day one-design Regatta, which has been going on for many decades...Lowe later became Commodore of SSS and was an active racer in the Station 10 (Tampa Bay) and Station 22 (Sarasota/Bradenton) MORC fleets.

 

image.jpeg

That brought back some memories of stories from my father when he was young.   In the 1940s, he started out his boat ownership life with a Snipe, then later a Lightning.   He told me tales of cruising on the Lightning.   I think the farthest he went cruising was Venice, FL on the Lightning, far short of what they did.   He and several other of his friends moored their boats off of Bayshore Blvd.   I have a couple of pictures of the Snipe and Lightning that I would post, but they are out of reach at the moment.

Good find, RKoch!

- Stumbling

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A recent post by Crash on another thread mentioned one of his previous boats, a Melonseed Skiff. I have drooled over these for years, If I lived on a lake, I would get one.

 

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There must be at least a thousand different dinghy classes.  One that has always appealed to me is the Finn.  The Finn has been an Olympic sailing class since 1952, longer than any other boat.  It has a catboat rig like a Laser, but the hull is more substantial, so the crew is less likely to get a wet butt.  The mast is unstayed, so rigging the boat is very simple.  On YouTube, there are videos of Finns racing in winds that would seem crazy for most other unballasted dinghy classes.

 

 

08_OG_FIN_MR_Ainslie_600_rdax_60.jpg

finn_sail_plan.png

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Some masochist used a Finn in the most recent Everglades Challenge.

Ironbutts to admire...

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8 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Some masochist used a Finn in the most recent Everglades Challenge.

Ironbutts to admire...

I have what is supposed to be one of the first Finns brought into the US, #11. It's hot molded wood from 1954, which makes it slightly younger than me. At one point it was owned by Pete Sutter, sailmaker extraordinaire of SF Bay. I know his son David cruised the San Juans in the boat.  You'd have to be a lot tougher than I am...  

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2 hours ago, monsoon said:
5 hours ago, southerncross said:

13,600 lb displacement and 25' of waterline = snail = no likey 

I would love that boat ...

i.e. I would love it to be owned by someone on a swinging mooring next to me.

That way I could admire its pretty lines and seductive varnished wood ... while the PBO* endured the snail-like performance and tiny cabin whenever she could a) find a gap in her varnishing schedule, and b) had recovered from the concussion caused by bounding up the companionway to smack her head on the mizzen mast set on the bridgedeck

* PBO = Poor Bloody Owner

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It's a nice looking boat. 13K# on a 25' WL would be frustrating for me in lighter air, but it's probably a pretty comfortable ride in a breeze.

i agree with TwoLegged...Id love for someone else to own it and I'd just admire it.

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Looks too slow to actually go anywhere.

Quote

A proven bluewater vessel, Amaryllis has sailed the California coast to Mexico, across the South Pacific to Polynesia, Fiji, New Zealand and return by way of Hawaii. Now we comfortably cruise local waters from Washington’s San Juan Islands north to remote anchorages along British Columbia’s beautiful Inside Passage.

 

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8 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Looks too slow to actually go anywhere.

 

From the same drawing board as the Allied Seawind, the first fiberglass boat to sail around the world. Probably quite similar to the Seawind in form. But, as you suggest, not the boat for anyone who is in a hurry.

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On 6/16/2018 at 9:32 PM, Sailbydate said:

Yes. I like it. Looks like she's in beautiful condition too.

Sail, after watching obtuse carbon shapes for 9 mos this is pleasing to the eye.  Slow sounds nice sometimes.

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On 6/17/2018 at 3:36 PM, SemiSalt said:

From the same drawing board as the Allied Seawind, the first fiberglass boat to sail around the world. Probably quite similar to the Seawind in form. But, as you suggest, not the boat for anyone who is in a hurry.

If we were in a hurry, we should not have chose a sailboat!  Around the world seems to qualify as "getting there" :-)

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Nice. I checked out the harbor and found an earlier example of the Ellen I sailed on Saturday...

85A865E6-4BAC-499C-8D43-70A783E00C9E.jpeg

5F76F05A-6CAE-4E8F-9C71-9E7D655BC7B1.jpeg

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5 minutes ago, RKoch said:

Svea:

 

 

image.jpeg

Damn that is beautiful but it's hard to believe anybody ever thought it was a good idea.

I wonder how far the bow man moves up & down when it decides to start pitching?

30 feet?

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Damn that is beautiful but it's hard to believe anybody ever thought it was a good idea.

I wonder how far the bow man moves up & down when it decides to start pitching?

30 feet?

In the era when these boats were designed, I doubt that was much of a consideration.

"Bow man missing cap'n, and one of the foredeck team has a broken back".

"No problem, Snodgrass.  The boss bought some spare crew last week. They are in the starboard bilge.  So deploy two of them, and dispose of the broken man"

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Damn that is beautiful but it's hard to believe anybody ever thought it was a good idea.

I wonder how far the bow man moves up & down when it decides to start pitching?

30 feet?

Only if there's 30' waves. The J's were day-racers, they sailed in relatively protected waters. 

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1 hour ago, RKoch said:

Only if there's 30' waves. The J's were day-racers, they sailed in relatively protected waters. 

Unless you were challenging for America's cup, in which case you had to sail on your "own bottom" from your country of challenge (effectively the UK).

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28 minutes ago, KC375 said:

Unless you were challenging for America's cup, in which case you had to sail on your "own bottom" from your country of challenge (effectively the UK).

The British J's were shipped over to the US. Lipton attempted to have Shamrock V sailed back, it was nearly a disaster. Irving Johnson was the mate, and wrote a good account of the trip if you can find it. The boat was surveyed after arrival and declared a total loss, but somehow wasn't broken up and survived to be rebuilt. The long overhangs weren't suitable for North Atlantic storm conditions.

https://books.google.com/books/about/Shamrock_V_s_Wild_Voyage_Home.html?id=v0CYGAAACAAJ

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The J's are cool, but in another stratosphere. I suggest we move on. No offense intended.

Moving on, I wish I had the ball$ to own a classic wooden boat.

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Look on the shelf behind the old sail magazines. Those balls are there in the mason jar.

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On 5/22/2018 at 7:33 AM, Kris Cringle said:

Something you rarely find under sound varnish, rot. 

I wasn't surprised, the varnish was never sound on the forward edge, under the overhanging trim piece above. This build on the stern of my boat is hard to maintain. I never gave it much thought until the scraper disappeared into it. Ha! But it was just as well.

 

The black hole revealed that the lower piece (that has the rot) is the one bolted through the hull to deck flange(see the FH SS bolt). Sort of a "sill" that the upper piece, that matches and connects at toe rail height, is simply screwed to. 

 

Always the optimist(you have to be with an old boat), I could see the sandwich would be 'pretty' easily dismantled (cut the bolts off from here) and the top pieces salvaged, the lower 'sill' cut and replaced, and re-bolted-bedded. It's obviously been a leaker, but a fiberglass flange, doesn't care. I'm thinking of person to spend some quality time, in the lazaretto. 

 

Didn't hold me up. Yesterday I sanded and filler stained the starboard toe rail and this stern rail in 25 knot gusts(had to weight my stain pail to stay ondeck).  Today it will get at least one coat of sealer, and I'm home free.

Meanwhile the cleaned out rot hole is drying out, more or less. The only thing left is to choose a can of something, miracle rot eliminator, at the hardware store, to stuff into the holes. 

Any suggestions? 

42276191141_ab9f537691_b.jpg

The boat is long launched now and I ran out of time, so: I ended up scooping out the rot, letting it dry, brushed in epoxy-neat. After drying, I packing it full of fairing thickened West epoxy. Not a good match. Then a thinner coat with a brown dye. That was a closer match but after that dried, I spread on a dab of the filler stain I used on the toe rails. Good enough, now slathered with varnish. I suspect this will be a permanent fix. You can see it, but no one else will.  

29108281468_f8fd1b8eea_b.jpg

The toe rails came out great. 

29108283488_54a2cdcfcd_b.jpg

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Looks great! I’m a couple of weeks out yet. I just finished siding my house and launching the Ensign Turbo. I hope my boat looks as good when I’m done

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16 hours ago, RKoch said:

The British J's were shipped over to the US. Lipton attempted to have Shamrock V sailed back, it was nearly a disaster. Irving Johnson was the mate, and wrote a good account of the trip if you can find it. The boat was surveyed after arrival and declared a total loss, but somehow wasn't broken up and survived to be rebuilt. The long overhangs weren't suitable for North Atlantic storm conditions.

https://books.google.com/books/about/Shamrock_V_s_Wild_Voyage_Home.html?id=v0CYGAAACAAJ

I stand corrected. When was the “own bottom” requirement dropped?

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The “own bottom” requirement was dropped for Sceptre’s challenge in 58. The Js were towed across, or sailed under short jury rig. At the same time, the minimum length was changed from 65’ to 44’ to permit 12s. 

 

Quote

ORDER WITH RESPECT TO ADMINISTRATION OF GIFT DATED DECEMBER 17, 1956

NEW YORK YACHT CLUB, having filed a verified petition dated September 21, 1956, praying that an order be made pursuant to Section 12 of the Personal Property Law or otherwise, directing that the gift by George L. Schuyler of the America’s Cup which was won by the yacht AMERICA at Cowes, England on August 22, 1851, in trust under a Deed of Gift dated October 24, 1887, shall be administered as if the minimum load water-line length of the competing yachts or vessels of one mast and thereby required to be forty-four (44) feet and without regard to and free from the direction contained therein that yachts or vessels competing for the America’s Cup shall sail on their own bottoms to the port where the contest is to take place, and that such other and further relief as to the Court may seem just and proper be granted to petitioner; and it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court from said petition and the papers annexed thereto that circumstances have so changed since the execution of said Deed of Gift, in a manner not known to the said donor and not anticipated by him, as to render impractical a literal compliance with the aforesaid terms of said Deed of Gift; and it further appearing that the grantor of said Deed of Gift has died and that the Attorney General of the Sate of New York is the only person interested in this proceeding; and said Attorney General having appeared and certified that he has no objections to the entry of an order as prayed for by petitioner,

NOW, upon motion of Carter, Ledyard and Milburn, attorneys for petitioner, it is

ORDERED that New York Yacht Club, as trustee of the America’s Cup given under the Deed of Gift dated October 24, 1887 made by George L. Schuyler, hereby is directed to administer the said Gift as if said Deed of Gift included no provision requiring yachts or vessels competing for the America’s Cup to sail, on their own bottoms, to the port where the contest is to take place, and as if the minimum load water-line length of the competing yachts or vessels of one mast was thereby required to be forty-four (44) feet.

Enter, Hon. Edgar J. Nathan, Jr. J.S.C. Justice

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"Praying, Prayed"? :lol: A 93 word sentence?

Lawyers are indeed a special breed.

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5 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

The “own bottom” requirement was dropped for Sceptre’s challenge in 58. The Js were towed across, or sailed under short jury rig. At the same time, the minimum length was changed from 65’ to 44’ to permit 12s. 

 

I read the two Endeavors  described as shipped...perhaps that was a bad description of towed. Both in '37 IIRC, b/c Sopwith couldn't make up his mind which to sail.  Shamrock V sailed home under a cut down rig (and added mizzen) , but to my knowledge no AC boat actually sailed <to> here since the 1880s. The big sloops had no interior and simply weren't strong enough. The J's had scantling  requirements, but no interiors. And the rigs were sketchy (prone to come down).

From AC site:

"Sailing to the Event on Own Bottom:
This provision of the Deed of Gift was at times strictly interpreted to the the degree of making sure that the challenging yacht actually was under her own sail while traveling to the match, not towed by another boat.  Challengers returning across the Atlantic after Cup matches concluded were sometimes towed for convenience. Eventually the NYYC agreed at various times to permit towing the yachts to the match, particularly when conditions were light, and in 1956, for the coming of the 12-meter yachts in 1958, the Deed of Gift was amended to eliminate the requirement"

 

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Remember Piera , the Philippe Rhodes design I posted last fall? Late last winter I was surprised to see her in the building shed. She was just getting sewed back up after receiving: A new keel, all new ribs, floors, and of course a lot of her planking. 

 

She just went in the water today presumably to start swelling the hull back up again. The old boat was probably enjoying the light rain falling on the parched decks and house top. 

No rig and lots of her interior (weight) yet to be re-installed, she is floating real high on her lines. 

Yet, from any angle - high on her lines,  I still think she is one of the prettier old boats I've seen, on starboard,... 

43007951481_9362013d76_b.jpg

or port. 

41197800960_0fd0640a16_b.jpg

A simple boat in 45 x 11+' feet, big decks, small house, and cockpit that still has the rumble seat. 

43007951611_c519389635_b.jpg

 

 

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Rhodes was an artist. I've read Henderson's book on him many times just to make my eyes feel good.

No-one ever did a sweeter sheer than Rhodes.

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Nyala_dekhuis.jpg

Detail of 'Nyala', a new Dutch-built replica of S&S yawl 'Impala'.

Just... wow...

 

 

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On 6/25/2018 at 7:39 PM, SloopJonB said:

Rhodes was an artist. I've read Henderson's book on him many times just to make my eyes feel good.

No-one ever did a sweeter sheer than Rhodes.

Years ago, I was a member of Coconut Grove Sailing Club in Miami. We sailed an 18' Alberg Typhoon. Near our mooring was a neglected Rhodes Meridian named Mercator. I lusted for Mercator, but could not swing the deal:

25rhodesseafarermeridian253view_20120418_1008712933.thumb.jpg.cc8dab37df7423e645ef7c71a7fb405d.jpg

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1 hour ago, Roam said:

I think this is a very cool boat but I may not know what I'm talking about. What do you think?

http://www.schionningdesigns.com.au/9500

Interesting concept, but Schionning has previous with unconventional designs which didn't catch on ... e.g. The Radical Bay Cats  http://www.schionningdesigns.com.au/radicalbay

 

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Similar stuff has been done long ago.

http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=6813

Always liked the Freedom boats, also the Wyliecat boats. 

http://www.wyliecat.com/about/about_cool_catboat.html?contentid=1057

Maybe the 'new' part of the equation is being able to build the unstayed rigs even lighter than ever before?

 

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If you like Wylies, you'll love the Marblehead 22. 

Doug Zurn to mee is one of the great yacht designers in terms of aesthetics. The bow on this is such a nice shape...

Zurn%20Marblehead%2022%20(2).jpg

BB-010A.jpg

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7 hours ago, Matagi said:

If you like Wylies, you'll love the Marblehead 22. 

Doug Zurn to mee is one of the great yacht designers in terms of aesthetics. The bow on this is such a nice shape...

Zurn%20Marblehead%2022%20(2).jpg

 

That is very pretty. And makes much more sense as a daysailor than all these 50'ers.

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19 hours ago, Matagi said:

Zurn%20Marblehead%2022%20(2).jpg

 

 

This is replacing the Opti's in the junior racing program.

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Seriously gorgeous hull lines, enhanced by the simplicity of the wishbone rig ... but badly let down by the coachroof.

The shape is suitably subtle, but it is featureless. It needs some contrasting colour, or portholes, or handrails, or something.

22 hours ago, Matagi said:

If you like Wylies, you'll love the Marblehead 22. 

Doug Zurn to mee is one of the great yacht designers in terms of aesthetics. The bow on this is such a nice shape...

Zurn%20Marblehead%2022%20(2).jpg

 

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Any of the good folk up in PNW heard/know about the restoration of the 1907 Albert Strange gaff cutter Tally Ho up in Sequim, WA? 

A British boatbuilder, Leo Goolden has been working on her off and on since about June last year. It's very nearly a complete rebuild by the look.

Excellent video blog (26 postings so far) of Leo's restoration efforts here: http://sampsonboat.co.uk

It's worth a look if you're into classic yacht restoration.

racing-rig-454x500.jpg

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4 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Any of the good folk up in PNW heard/know about the restoration of the 1907 Albert Strange gaff cutter Tally Ho up in Sequim, WA? 

A British boatbuilder, Leo Goolden has been working on her off and on since about June last year. It's very nearly a complete rebuild by the look.

Excellent video blog (26 postings so far) of Leo's restoration efforts here: http://sampsonboat.co.uk

It's worth a look if you're into classic yacht restoration.

racing-rig-454x500.jpg

 

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Huge and very cool undertaking but I somehow doubt that more than a few scraps of the original boat will remain by the end.

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On June 29, 2018 at 1:34 AM, Matagi said:

If you like Wylies, you'll love the Marblehead 22. 

Doug Zurn to mee is one of the great yacht designers in terms of aesthetics. The bow on this is such a nice shape...

Zurn%20Marblehead%2022%20(2).jpg

BB-010A.jpg

A friend has a 67' Zurn/Lyman-Morse motorboat. Despite being a motorboat, it's truly a work of art. 

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Barney_070.jpg?format=1000w

What's the little wheel next to the engine control?

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14 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Barney_070.jpg?format=1000w

What's the little wheel next to the engine control?

Adjustment of angle for variable pitch propeller?

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6 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Barney_070.jpg?format=1000w

What's the little wheel next to the engine control?

Variable pitch prop, as mentioned above.

great video here:

 

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On 7/5/2018 at 7:48 PM, RKoch said:

Variable pitch prop, as mentioned above.

great video here:

 

Hell of a job doing tight maneuvering using prop walking!

- Stumbling

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Sailed Marilee back in 2000 after helping manufacture the Spars. Fast, sleek and beautiful!

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Eggemoggin 47. 47' daysailer of coldmolded cedar, carbon skins, carbon rig, 7' keel, scrumptious response. Second photo is me driving one on, appropriately, the Eggemoggin Reach.

 

 

 

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That's a cool boat and I like rolling up sails as well as the next guy but man. That phone pole boom.

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On 7/6/2018 at 8:58 AM, stumblingthunder said:

Hell of a job doing tight maneuvering using prop walking!

- Stumbling

I agree with that, for sure- no thrusters needed for that guy.  I'd have to have really good ear protection if I had to listen to that engine chug and sputter all day, everyday, as he probably does.

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12 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

That's a cool boat and I like rolling up sails as well as the next guy but man. That phone pole boom.

Beautiful is as beautiful does. FWIW, it's thinner than a conventional boom with a sail flaked on top.

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The 47's are sweet looking boats.  Personally, I'd have preferred a tiller but I suppose some people like the big wheel....  (it just seems to over dominate the boat and cockpit)

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The wheel and all controls are right at the helms person's fingertips, leaving the cockpit entirely free for guests. Istream makes a good point, that the in-boom is certainly more compact than a stack pack, and probably better for the sails, as well.

I got to drive that one for a couple of hours that day, and it certainly does a terrific job of converting wind and water into pure fun. It slips through the water with barely a wake and no fuss, is quick and easy to get underway and just as easy to put to bed. 

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17 hours ago, Hawaiidart said:

I agree with that, for sure- no thrusters needed for that guy.  I'd have to have really good ear protection if I had to listen to that engine chug and sputter all day, everyday, as he probably does.

What, what are you mumbling?  Dry stacks make you deaf!!!!

-Stumbling

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On 7/5/2018 at 6:48 PM, RKoch said:

Variable pitch prop, as mentioned above.

great video here:

 

I love the sound of semi-diesels, it reminds me of old fishing boats from when I was a child.

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23 hours ago, IStream said:

Beautiful is as beautiful does. FWIW, it's thinner than a conventional boom with a sail flaked on top.

I agree that a boom of that size needs some shape, like this one:

4Yx199M.jpg

Also, it should be as light as possible, i.e., made of carbon fiber. My experience is that it's a huge improvement practically and aesthetically over the standard Forespar arrangement on that boat.

 

 

 

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