Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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On 8/20/2018 at 2:43 PM, Starkindler said:

Which is why you see no new boats sold in that size range. The smallest new cruising boat I have seen recently is 38'.  Meanwhile I see lots of decent 24-30 footers lying around the yard. 

Actually Pabouk is a one man band, he builds very few boats and even if there aren't many people ready to pay the price of a new small boats, there are enough of them to make him earn a living. He's been building those for ages.

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10 minutes of boat building magic. If this has been posted before, I apologize.

 

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Silent Maid with the new 65’ Marconi rig 

 

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1936 William Fife, LATIFA. 

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She's getting a maintenance coat of varnish and few other small touches. 

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Fife from stem,...

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to ster,..stem. 

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Horse Chicks gets a late start to the season.

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On 8/29/2018 at 8:54 PM, Sail4beer said:

Silent Maid with the new 65’ Marconi rig 

 

13090C05-4EE7-4D92-AFE3-794FE33529AA.jpeg

That's an unnaturally huge looking rig. I think I might have a safety boat following me too...

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And what looks like a distant cousin to the Cowmaran in the background.

That old coot with no hair appears to have more muscle in his calves than I have in my whole legs.

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5 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

And what looks like a distant cousin to the Cowmaran in the background.

That old coot with no hair appears to have more muscle in his calves than I have in my whole legs.

For further observation of this phenonenon (Old Coots with Muscular Legs), see "Uglyboat Admiration Society," post #7874, first photo.

 

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Ok, how about this? Broads hire boats. For those who’ve read The Big Six, or The Art of Coarse Sailing.

 

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1 hour ago, Jammer Six said:

How do they get shape on the headsail with its' foot on a boom?

 

Pond yachts use the same method: you adjust the leech tension with the forestay tension and the position of the swivel, and the boom acts like the balance arm on a steelyard. Pond yachts like them because they flip out automatically to go wing on wing when going deep downwind.

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Good morning. Busy week here with cool boats

Silent Maid

A cats

Mooeak/HorseChicks swelling up after a 5 year rebuild

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I'm always a sucker for catboats.  Really wanting to know whether the new rig on Silent Maid is all that the owner had hoped for. Those A Cats seem like a more 'practical' size than the Maid however.

 

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On ‎7‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 1:15 PM, Rasputin22 said:

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The jumping tramp on the stern is admirable...…..

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3 coolboats?

Can anyone identify designs?

My poor guess on two are: Paul Gartside ( or possibly Lyle Hess) Bill Garden.

the third???

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That clipper looks more like Atkins than Garden - bow is not exaggerated enough for Garden and the cabin isn't stylish enough either.

Gaffer looks like Gartside or Hess.

No idea of the back boat.

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The first new International Folkboat in 34 years has left the boat shop and is headed to the HISWA exhibition in the Netherlands.  More information can be found at  https://www.if-boat.com/ .  I've shamelessly stolen the following photo from a Facebook post.

 

 

first new if in 34 years.jpg

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5 hours ago, Veeger said:

I'm always a sucker for catboats.  Really wanting to know whether the new rig on Silent Maid is all that the owner had hoped for. Those A Cats seem like a more 'practical' size than the Maid however.

 

He wasn’t aboard on Saturday, but I heard back that the skipper was having trouble getting people to hear him calling tacks due to wind and too many in the cockpit at once. The rig is outrageous but not overwhelming to the boat due to its beam length. It was an original sail plan...I’ll walk on over and take a few more of the boat.

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Oh, and Veeger, define practical as it relates to a 28’ boat with a 46’ mast and 34’ boom in a 3’ draft boat<_<

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

That clipper looks more like Atkins than Garden - bow is not exaggerated enough for Garden and the cabin isn't stylish enough either.

Gaffer looks like Gartside or Hess.

No idea of the back boat.

The back boat looks Atkins. I agree the gaffer looks Hess. Except for the clipper bow, the ketch looks Gilmer.

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2 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

The first new International Folkboat in 34 years has left the boat shop and is headed to the HISWA exhibition in the Netherlands.  More information can be found at  https://www.if-boat.com/ .  I've shamelessly stolen the following photo from a Facebook post.

 

 

first new if in 34 years.jpg

This is pretty cool. I was looking at SailboatData,com, and there seem to be two folkboats: 1942 Nordic Folkboat (clinker-built in wood or FG, 4,000 built), 1967 International Folkboat, (not clinker-built, built in FG, 3,000 built). Same designer, Tord Sundén. There are some small differences in hull dimensions and weight, and the IF jib looks larger. 

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5 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Oh, and Veeger, define practical as it relates to a 28’ boat with a 46’ mast and 34’ boom in a 3’ draft boat<_<

:lol:

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8 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Oh, and Veeger, define practical as it relates to a 28’ boat with a 46’ mast and 34’ boom in a 3’ draft boat<_<

Point taken.  I was thinking more hull size and displacement since, relatively speaking, both boats had an 'impractical' rig.  Once you've accepted the rig, then, well, the A's would be 'more' practical??  Mainsheets with dozens (hundreds?) of feet in line length are a whole 'nuther thang anyway...  (but I still like 'em)

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Practical boats make money and cause more stress than fun. That's why I don't own any and never will.

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2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Practical boats make money and cause more stress than fun. That's why I don't own any and never will.

Yup.  Most of us don't own 'practical' boats and never will....

Sailing Anarchy -  Impractical folks with impractical boats and impractical fiscal  skills

 

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16 hours ago, Bull City said:

This is pretty cool. I was looking at SailboatData,com, and there seem to be two folkboats: 1942 Nordic Folkboat (clinker-built in wood or FG, 4,000 built), 1967 International Folkboat, (not clinker-built, built in FG, 3,000 built). Same designer, Tord Sundén. There are some small differences in hull dimensions and weight, and the IF jib looks larger. 

Yeah, in some European countries the International Folkboat is simply called the IF due to objections from the Nordic Folkboaters.  

Incidentally, I showed the photo of the new International Folkboat to my wife.  Her reaction was, "Do you want a divorce?"

 

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32 minutes ago, Veeger said:
2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Practical boats make money and cause more stress than fun. That's why I don't own any and never will.

Yup.  Most of us don't own 'practical' boats and never will....

Sailing Anarchy -  Impractical folks with impractical boats and impractical fiscal  skills

Tell me more about this what-you-call "practical" boats.

I have never heard or seen such a thing, indeed it seems inconceivable. I've always tried to settle for a boat that was less of a PITA..... slightly....

-DSK

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Practical.

In fact the only intelligent kind of boat to own - just ask BS.

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Bob Perry 36’ daysailor.

Looked at this one for a while because it would be all I could want if it weren’t for the 6’ draft and the fact that it recently sold while I dreamed...

 

 

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Sorry

Cutter (mast stepping tomorrow) 

Dragon from the wooden boat thread

 

 

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On 9/4/2018 at 9:34 AM, captain_crunch said:

Incidentally, I showed the photo of the new International Folkboat to my wife.  Her reaction was, "Do you want a divorce?"

Ouch!

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5 hours ago, IStream said:

They stepped it on the piling?

That was the best angle I could get.

I knew I’d hear it!

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Not sure what this little guy is, but I thought it was cool enough to go look at twice.  At Henderson Harbor on Lake Ontario

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On 8/29/2018 at 1:29 PM, Bull City said:

10 minutes of boat building magic. If this has been posted before, I apologize.

 

That's way better than Pornhub. Thank You Mr. City.

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On 8/30/2018 at 7:54 AM, Sail4beer said:

Horse Chicks gets a late start to the season.

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She's a beauty for sure, Beer

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18 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

That was the best angle I could get.

I knew I’d hear it!

Is it tied up to a bull rail? 

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2 hours ago, dougweibel said:

Not sure what this little guy is, but I thought it was cool enough to go look at twice.  At Henderson Harbor on Lake Ontario

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Hmm.... isn't there an Atkin plywood cat-ketch design? Can't seem to find it at the moment

FB- Doug

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On 8/30/2018 at 3:29 AM, Bull City said:

10 minutes of boat building magic. If this has been posted before, I apologize.

very rarely I watch a full uTube vid , this was one .

Thank-you .

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4 hours ago, dougweibel said:

Not sure what this little guy is, but I thought it was cool enough to go look at twice.  At Henderson Harbor on Lake Ontario

IMG_1570.jpg

IMG_1571.jpg

Really nice. Can you post a larger photo?

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The boat building video feature frames and other components laminated on the shop floor. Is that inferior to cutting them from single pieces of Eastern Live Oak like Leo is doing? It sure seems like it would simplify the supply chain. Also, why combine inner strip planking with diagonal cold molding of outer skin(s)? I would have thought the former gives superior strength through fiber orientation along probable load axes.

God, what a beautiful boat! Color me envious. 

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Laminated frames & beams are better than sawn.

The strip planking is commonly done as the first layer to make the "mould" that the veneers are later laminated to. The Gougeon's detail this as one of the simplest and strongest methods of laminating a hull. It also makes a true monocoque hull in which the bulkheads are really just partitions and mostly not required for stiffness.

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On 9/7/2018 at 11:03 PM, Steam Flyer said:

 

Hmm.... isn't there an Atkin plywood cat-ketch design? Can't seem to find it at the moment

FB- Doug

Very sharpie-esque

- Stumbling

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30 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Bolger Chebacco perhaps?  Not certain. 

Bill Garden did something like that. Can't seem to find the info right now.

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3 minutes ago, viktor said:
35 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Bolger Chebacco perhaps?  Not certain. 

Bill Garden did something like that. Can't seem to find the info right now.

Chebacco is a sho-nuff pretty boat, reportedly they sail well too.

I thought the plywood cat-schooner

On 9/7/2018 at 1:19 PM, dougweibel said:

Not sure what this little guy is, but I thought it was cool enough to go look at twice.  At Henderson Harbor on Lake Ontario

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was an Atkin but it could be a Garden...... my memory is what used t think it was. Flat bottom double ended cat schooner, supposed to be easy to build. I'm sure the design will pop up here any minute now to embarrass me.

FB- Doug

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On 9/3/2018 at 10:02 AM, Veeger said:

I'm always a sucker for catboats.  Really wanting to know whether the new rig on Silent Maid is all that the owner had hoped for. Those A Cats seem like a more 'practical' size than the Maid however.

 

Bolger did a lot of cat-yawls, including the Chebacco. Garden did several variants of his cat-schooner, l believe.

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On 9/7/2018 at 3:30 PM, SloopJonB said:

Laminated frames & beams are better than sawn.

The strip planking is commonly done as the first layer to make the "mould" that the veneers are later laminated to. The Gougeon's detail this as one of the simplest and strongest methods of laminating a hull. It also makes a true monocoque hull in which the bulkheads are really just partitions and mostly not required for stiffness.

So, not a lot of bulkheads and stringers taking up space below like some cold molded boats? Very good. Thanks for the explanation.

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On 9/7/2018 at 3:29 PM, Bull City said:

Really nice. Can you post a larger photo?

Sorry for the delay Bull.  I was off on a mountain biking holiday...

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5 hours ago, dougweibel said:

Sorry for the delay Bull.  I was off on a mountain biking holiday...

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It is pretty. Too bad about the Companionway of Doom.

I wonder why there's an extra strip of wood around the edge? Double the varnish work in tight places, double the fun?

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18 hours ago, viktor said:

Yep, that's the one. A cutie...... unfortunate about the mast/companionway conflict though.

To our less-ancient SA'er brethren: an offset companionway being a death trap is a long running joke. Feel free to join in.

FB- Doug

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2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Too bad about the Companionway of Doom.

Yes, fortunately balanced by halyard winch. 

Also interesting that this Canadian dock has cleats. (See "Looking forward to the invention of cleats in Canada" thread in CA.)

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4 hours ago, dougweibel said:

Nah, the dock is in New York state.  Henderson Harbor is on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario.

Which marina in Henderson Harbor?

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Millennials on a 1938 Rhodes Astro. 

I'm biased (I have 2 and have co-raised more than a dozen sailing millennials) but I often hear boomer curmudgeons dissing the millennials. Ha!

 

Here's my take: The Millennials are better sailors than their boomer parents because, we sent them to local sailing clubs that have sailing-boating programs(see, we take the credit!). Not expensive around here and the kids, starting at like 10, think it's the cool thing to do, so they love it. They are taking advantage of the glut of cheap neglected glass boats. Some are learning the skills needed to care for wooden boats(somebody should give these kids a mainsail!). 

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Further, they grew up rowing, then sailing little boats, Opti's, Turnabouts, Lazers, 420's, etc, etc. Simple, uncomplicated boats. They are still in those little boats zipping around in these harbors, $$$$ yachts wizzing by their decks. They started at the beginning, and now, they are natural sailors. 

'Natural sailors', how many of those do you know?

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I saw the Astro gracefully sailing through my harbor as we came in this week, (under power,...). Lovely sight this elegant narrow hull, everyone low in the water and smiling. 

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No sailor can resist dropping everything to watch another sailor, sail onto their mooring. The jib dropped to the deck as they rode the light Easterly on main alone past their mooring (off starboard) with a dinghy tied. 

 

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Winding the bow into the wind on the last of the boats way, they gently led the old boat toward the mooring. Were they short,...were they short!!??...

No. They've done this a million times in theirs lives already. They rounded up just shy of the ball and the current (which they read),  finished the move.

'Brilliant', I would say.

'Killin' it', they would say. 

 

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I'm reminded of how much more comfortable millennials are handling boats every time I watch my son step onto and off a Laser from  or onto the dock. And he's about 6-5 and 220# now. 

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It's called youth - it was the same for me and my kids.

There was a time when I could jog around on deck - now I have to crouch & hang on to go forward. :angry:

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm biased (I have 2 and have co-raised more than a dozen sailing millennials) but I often hear boomer curmudgeons dissing the millennials. Ha!

Here's my take: The Millennials are better sailors than their boomer parents because, we sent them to local sailing clubs that have sailing-boating programs(see, we take the credit!). Not expensive around here and the kids, starting at like 10, think it's the cool thing to do, so they love it. They are taking advantage of the glut of cheap neglected glass boats. Some are learning the skills needed to care for wooden boats(somebody should give these kids a mainsail!). 

Further, they grew up rowing, then sailing little boats, Opti's, Turnabouts, Lazers, 420's, etc, etc. Simple, uncomplicated boats. They are still in those little boats zipping around in these harbors, $$$$ yachts wizzing by their decks. They started at the beginning, and now, they are natural sailors. 

'Natural sailors', how many of those do you know?

2

I am early-60s vintage. so kinda in between the boomers and millennials.  I too was raised on the water: sailing with parents from before I could walk, own rowing boat from age about 7, sails added when I was ~10, then sailing courses for most of the summer for most of my teens.

So I was a proper little water rat, and all aspects of boat handling came naturally.  Coming alongside other boats or quaysides under sail, landing on a slipway downwind under sail, picking up moorings under sail, sailing backwards off a crowded mooring, keeping a dinghy upright in a blow.  Those were just everyday things, and we had a strong incentive to get them right because our boats were wooden and we all painted and varnished them ourselves.

So I am delighted to hear of a new generation learning the same skills.

 

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32 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

It's called youth - it was the same for me and my kids.

There was a time when I could jog around on deck - now I have to crouch & hang on to go forward. :angry:

Yeah, me too! Handrails are our friends.....

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

I am early-60s vintage. so kinda in between the boomers and millennials. 

Sorry Legs but that makes you a fully fledged Boomer.

1946 to 1964

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De Nile ain't just a river!

 

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I'm a Gen-X-er and came up through the yacht club sailing programs in the 70s an 80s.  Best memories of my life.  My daughter next year will be old enough to start the sailing programs at Cottage Park YC and am looking forward to seeing her flourish (keeping fingers crossed).

She may be a little spoiled driving our larger boat.  She has already asked why the Optis dont have wheel steering.  LOL.

Here she is at 3:
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and 4:

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3 hours ago, kimbottles said:

In the yard at CSR Marine

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What is that beauty, Kim?

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I spent a little while with Chris Hood a couple years back trying to get an upsized version of the 32.  I still revisit the concept even now but at 1.5 - 1.6 times the size,( instead of 1.2 x we were originally talking) of the 32. Okay, well mebbe a smidge more relative freeboard--but only a smidge.  It takes a pretty big increase to get sitting headroom for a WC.  She's such a light displacement boat that even at 1.5 x, the bigger boat (priced by the pound) might still be doable.... 

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Granddaughter, B.C. & son out for a sail:

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If we're drifting to offspring on the boat, here's one of mine in the shade of the big orange spinnaker:

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To invert the subtopic of kids on the boat, here’s Mum on the boat last month. 92 and Alzheimer-y but still loves it. Now I know why we have that funny mast at the back - to lash the wheelchair to! 

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Great shot, she looks like she's really enjoying herself!

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On 9/12/2018 at 9:37 PM, Bull City said:

Granddaughter, B.C. & son out for a sail:

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Ha! You look like James Taylor there!!

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