Sailbydate

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

In any creative career, it's much better to simply enjoy each project for what it is.

I'm an amateur painter, who has had a little commercial success. I completely agree with T-L as to approaching any creative project as something to enjoy. If I'm working on a painting, and I'm not enjoying it, it's almost always because it's not a good project for the way I paint. I scrape off the paint, and find something else.

Of course commissions sometimes require a bit of pain and suffering.

Now, where were we?

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2 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

I have several friends whose workshop furniture includes kitchen units repurposed after a renovation elsewhere.  Diarmuid's workshop looks to me like one of those.

Yes, that's a bathroom tearout re-purposed as a sharpening bench (sharpening is easier with lots of natural light). Tool storage beneath. The job is the world's second-most-complicated home office; the first-most is directly across the hall from this one. ;)

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Curved door rails & panels on a 17'-6" radius molded of four 3/16" sawn veneers. One other advantage of lamination is you can compose adjacent doors & drawer fronts; the panels and rails on these elements slip-match face veneers from a single resawn board, repeating the knots and the panels' feather figure.

 To get this 11" radius curve in a rustic walnut (which has good color but lots of knots & grain runout, plus walnut is brittle), I had to laminate two 1/8"t strips:

sdbdsh.JPG.feeb4b950485595499f1150eba1ed535.JPG

The tight radii at the ends of the counters received sawn corners, while the long runs are laminated. These clients definitely fit Chuck's 1% description, and they have firm preferences + high expectations. But they also give me as much creative license as I wish to stake out. It's a healthy patronage dynamic, which isn't always the case (especially if vast wealth differentials are in play); patronizing has two distinct meanings. When  boundaries are respected, tho, it's magical for everyone. :) See: s/v Sliver. I've fitted out six or seven rooms in this house, and they just built an addition so we can keep working together. These sorts of 1%er, out-of-state money  jobs allow me to work for local folks with limited incomes. It's all good.

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3 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

These sorts of 1%er, out-of-state money  jobs allow me to work for local folks with limited incomes. It's all good.

That sounds like a good balance, @Diarmuid .  Keeping a toe in both camps.

I don't think I could work in an office like that: too much useless beauty to distract me.  But à chacun son goût :) 

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Just now, TwoLegged said:

That sounds like a good balance, @Diarmuid .  Keeping a toe in both camps.

I don't think I could work in an office like that: too much useless beauty to distract me.  But à chacun son goût :) 

The real distractions are outside that large picture window, which opens down a lovely pasture towards a lake, with eagles & antelope & wild horses literally frolicking in the front yard.  The purpose of a two-sided desk is so the client may choose Nature TV, or face away from the window & get some bloody work done!  Besides, they're easing into semi-retirement. From this point on, they work when they want to.

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6 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

The real distractions are outside that large picture window, which opens down a lovely pasture towards a lake, with eagles & antelope & wild horses literally frolicking in the front yard.  The purpose of a two-sided desk is so the client may choose Nature TV, or face away from the window & get some bloody work done!  Besides, they're easing into semi-retirement. From this point on, they work when they want to.

I have done some of my best work in a room with a very fine view.  I just close the blinds when I need to concentrate.  They are opened when I'm doing administrivia or phoning.

The one desirable which thing I have never had in my home office is a half-workable chair.  My four-legged managers wisely don't trust me to be left alone, and they don't want to be relegated to the door.  Having found it uncomfortable to sit on top of me, they climb into the chair first ... which leaves me perched on the outer edge of the chair while paws knead my back.

I sometimes fantasise about a custom-made desk chair which would accommodate us all in comfort ... but I fear that too much comfort would dent my creativity, and that dangling off the edge of the seat is much better than the stuff the religious do, such as tying barbed wire to their undies to heighten spiritual awareness. 

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Maybe it's the satin/matt finish on ERICA. Her topsides look like a new tropical hardwood strip floor in a contemporary foyer. 

43849478065_f52458709f_o.jpg

More gloss?

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Seems to hide the puzzle of strips beneath. 

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Still, I'm not a good judge as I prefer this hull shape, painted. :) 

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3 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Maybe it's the satin/matt finish on ERICA. Her topsides look like a new tropical hardwood strip floor in a contemporary foyer. 

43849478065_f52458709f_o.jpg

1

Good comparison.  Maybe these retro varnish queens would look better if the wood was pre-aged, like jeans which are supplied in a worn state.

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18 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Still, I'm not a good judge as I prefer this hull shape, painted. :) 

 

Kris, I think you're onto something. Maybe it's been said, but the visibility of the wood planking distracts the eye from the shape of the hull (my eye, anyway). I knew someone who liked sculpted cars, and he always wanted them in silver, since he felt it drew your eye to, and showed the shape better than any other color. I wouldn't want a silver boat, but you get the point.

On Paine's boat, to me, the deck house doesn't seem to have had very much thought.

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14 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Kris, I think you're onto something. Maybe it's been said, but the visibility of the wood planking distracts the eye from the shape of the hull (my eye, anyway). I knew someone who liked sculpted cars, and he always wanted them in silver, since he felt it drew your eye to, and showed the shape better than any other color. I wouldn't want a silver boat, but you get the point.

On Paine's boat, to me, the deck house doesn't seem to have had very much thought.

Spot on, Mr. Bull, for my eye as well. I wondered if the house, which is kinda weak (sorry Chuck :) ), would improve taking center stage? To be fair, I think it's the deck and cockpit of this boat that gets most of the awes (I didn't take any photos from that angle-too bad). 

 

But it is a nice design overall to my eye following a good brief: "A balanced cruiser/racer for a coastal user".  I've always liked his older work, he sort of lost me on his bigger boats. 

I talked to Chuck Paine (he doesn't know me, I thought he was his brother Art,...), a few weeks ago in Tenants Harbor. He was rowing in from sailing his H 12 1/2. Just sayin,...

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2 hours ago, fufkin said:

For me, any discussion of Chuck Paine starts with the Kanter Bougainvillea 62...but maybe that's just me.

Fufkin, I like the Kanter Bougainvillea 62.  But it seems to me to be merely a refinement of the Meridian concept, without moving the game on.  Probably the best of the Bermuda series, but just derivative.

That's my disappointment with Paine: he seemed to get stuck in ruts. Three ruts, to be precise: long keelers, retro-topped fin keelers for Morris, and the Bermuda series. 

Compare and contrast that with the versatility of his colleagues in Carter's design tower. Perry and Tanton both repeatedly stepped out of their comfort zones, and when they did they innovated.  Perry is still innovating: see Francis Lee, the carbon cutters, the Scandinavian double-ender, the small gaff-rigged pilothouse boat.  And on at least the first two of that list, he has scored a "wow -- why did nobody else do that" .

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27 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I've always liked his older work, he sort of lost me on his bigger boats. 

Me too.  Frances and his recent daysailers are his best work.

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3 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Compare and contrast that with the versatility of his colleagues in Carter's design tower. Perry and Tanton both repeatedly stepped out of their comfort zones, and when they did they innovated.  Perry is still innovating: see Francis Lee, the carbon cutters, the Scandinavian double-ender, the small gaff-rigged pilothouse boat.  And on at least the first two of that list, he has scored a "wow -- why did nobody else do that" .

Paine didn't have the influence and mentoring of Bill Garden when he was a kid like Bob did. :D

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5 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Fufkin, I like the Kanter Bougainvillea 62.  But it seems to me to be merely a refinement of the Meridian concept, without moving the game on.  Probably the best of the Bermuda series, but just derivative.

 

Legs,

Displacement/Length Ratio

Meridian 46:178

Bougainvillea 62: 121

Sail Area/Disp: 

Meridian 46: 17.64

Bougainvillea 62: 17.47

Length/Beam

Meridian 46: 3.5

Bougainvillea 62: 4.0

Also, at least one of the 62s had a slick on deck retractable bowsprit as well as water ballast. I always thought of the 62 as similar to the Sundeer 64 but w a little more draft.

*disp for Meridian from Chuck Paine literature calculated at 3/4 load, Bougainvillea #s from Sailboatdata

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Thanks for that comparison, Fufkin.  Looks like I hadn't peeked closely enough at the Kanter 62 -- I wasn't aware that it was so much lighter and narrower than Meridian.  My bad.

However, while the 62 looks like a step in the Sundeer direction, it is still quite a distance from it.  Similar ballast and displacement numbers, but the Sundeer has a much longer waterline. is significantly narrower, and has much fuller ends (at least at deck level).

Both designs are now about 25 years old.  Kanter's blurb includes some quaint reminders of that, such as their extolling of the bulb keel; rare at the time, but now the norm.

It would be interesting to see what either designer would do now with the same brief.

My own take would be to start with the Kanter, slim it a bit, broaden the stern, use a solent rig, and shave a lot of weight off the interior by doing what Beth&Evans did with Hawk: using cored furniture, dumping the second head, and culling the varnished wood.   

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No problem Legs,

You're right about waterline re the Sundeers. The 60 had about 59 ft. As far as I know Paine and Dashew shared a lot of ideas...where they differed was waterline and draft/upwind capabilities. I guess the rig height and roachier main as well.

The length to waterline ratios were about the same w the Meridian and Bougainvillea so I guess the hull shapes shared some similarities re overhang.

...and yeah I'd put the 62 on a furniture diet as well..

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15 minutes ago, fufkin said:

As far as I know Paine and Dashew shared a lot of ideas...where they differed was waterline and draft/upwind capabilities

Yes, that upwind issue is the only major reason why I could never really be a true fan of the Dashew boats.  I want a sailing boat to actually sail upwind, but they seem to prefer diesel when the wind goes much ahead of the beam.  There were some ugly threads on other websites where they extolled their boats while fudging the windward abilities, and they were not happy when called out on it.  Bit of a shitstorm, I recall.

I think that mast and rig technology has now moved on enough that Paine's higher masts could dump the backstay and use a much roachier main, so the gap there would close. 

As to waterline, I don't think there was much of a gap.  Some of the difference was Paine's preference for some bow rake, against Dashew's plumb wave-piercer, and I am not sure where I'd land on that one.  The rest is that Paine had a few feet of subtle overhang at the rear, just enough to reduce wetted surface in light winds, when Dashew would probably be dieselling.  I'd go with Paine on that one.

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On 9/18/2018 at 11:54 AM, SloopJonB said:

That gave me heart palpitations.

Me too. It's upsetting to see a boat like that outdoors and in the water instead of in a nitrogen-filled, dark room.

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On 9/19/2018 at 3:44 PM, TwoLegged said:

As to waterline, I don't think there was much of a gap.  Some of the difference was Paine's preference for some bow rake, against Dashew's plumb wave-piercer, and I am not sure where I'd land on that one.  The rest is that Paine had a few feet of subtle overhang at the rear, just enough to reduce wetted surface in light winds, when Dashew would probably be dieseling.  I'd go with Paine on that one.

The larger the boat, the less the importance of a bit of additional LWL. Hull speed of at LWL=50' is 9.5kts. To bump that up a quarter of a knot requires going to LWL=53' . And, since sailboats usually sail at some fraction of the wind speed, a boat with hull speed over 9 kts is going to spend a lot of time at speeds where wave drag is not a huge factor. The designer has a little wiggle room to consider other factors like anchoring, getting in and out of the dinghy, chances of getting green water on deck, behavior when overloaded at the start of a cruise, light air performance (as noted above), etc. 

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On 9/18/2018 at 4:58 PM, Kris Cringle said:

I wondered if the house, which is kinda weak (sorry Chuck :) ), would improve taking center stage?

The house looks like my old J22's, which had nice lines for a white production boat, but I'd expect more on a custom design. Perhaps that's what the owner wanted.

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I'm drawn to the Rozinante.  

29893132717_91f6f4bc51_o.jpg

It's a very appealing design that gets better as you circle it. Only a few boats look like they're moving while on a dock, and this is one. 

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Taking their best friends rowing. 

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I was anchored in Pulpit Harbor waiting for the fog to lift last weekend. It was a joy to watch these two fine dinghy's effortlessly gliding by the famous rock pulpit in the mist. 

The beasts were lulled to sleep by the calm of it all. 

rowers-pulpit-harbor-jpg.156561

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Wonderful.

So you’re coming over to Ireland next summer to photograph our boat. There’s a good pint or two in it for you ... you really are very good! 

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6 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

OK I’ll bring it to Maine then. Will that swing the deal?

Thanks, Ed. I'd enjoy photographing your boat anywhere. 

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Very social rowers, look at direction they are sitting, they could just row behind eachother and have eye contact, brilliant.

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Was chatting with a colleague yesterday and he got to talking about a job he had installing a lithium bank on Aileen. He's not a boat guy and his takeaway was: "so fancy, they didn't let me wear shoes!"

Pretty interesting:

 

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On 9/21/2018 at 4:54 PM, Kris Cringle said:

I'm drawn to the Rozinante.  

29893132717_91f6f4bc51_o.jpg

It's a very appealing design that gets better as you circle it. Only a few boats look like they're moving while on a dock, and this is one. 

29893132987_7182955a1a_o.jpg

 

Saw a 1965 ‘glass hull on Annapolis CL last week for $750. I’m so deep into Polynavicular Moribus that I couldn’t even respond. Sad for me great for someone else I hope.

I'm going to check on it again as I sip a little sailors courage

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9 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Saw a 1965 ‘glass hull on Annapolis CL last week for $750. I’m so deep into Polynavicular Moribus that I couldn’t even respond.

Oh, Beer, that's sad.  You are punishing yourself here by using the wrong reasoning tools.

You need to follow Rasputin, (the original Russian one, not our esteemed local memoirist @Rasputin22).  Grigori Rasputin reputedly asked:

"Certainly our Savior and Holy Fathers have denounced sin, since it is the work of the Evil One.
But how can you drive out evil except by sincere repentance?
And how can you sincerely repent if you have not sinned?"

So, as you see, by Rasputin's logic the path to virtue is by sinning-and-repentance.  More sin means more repentance means more virtue.  Which means buy more boats so that you can later repent of each bout of PNM.

$750 on that glass Rosinante could help save your soul.

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Rozinante 16" X 20"

rozinante.thumb.jpg.d3fe1c34762f869ac4b593e40e9bddf3.jpg

 

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It was gone when I looked again

Not the first or the last dream

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Rozinante 16" X 20"

rozinante.thumb.jpg.d3fe1c34762f869ac4b593e40e9bddf3.jpg

 

Bull, that's VERY nice. Love the suggestion of motion in the water and contrast to the boat.

Is that a specific place with those headlands?

FB- Doug

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4 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

How do you think I got my name Two Legged?

You picked it when you signed up. Just like the rest of us.

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14 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

How do you think I got my name Two Legged?

probably for the lack of a comma

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13 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Bull, that's VERY nice. Love the suggestion of motion in the water and contrast to the boat.

Is that a specific place with those headlands?

FB- Doug

Thanks, Doug. It's from a photo that was posted in January by Tricky Pig on this thread (#9154). He said:

"Not here much lately but photographed this on Pittwater (Sydney) last week in a classic Nor Easter. Lion Island in the background"

fullsizeoutput_c50.jpeg

 

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15 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

How do you think I got my name Two Legged?

I assumed it was because you had introduced Vlad Putin to Rastafarianism ;) 

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17 hours ago, Bull City said:

Rozinante 16" X 20"

rozinante.thumb.jpg.d3fe1c34762f869ac4b593e40e9bddf3.jpg

 

Damn fine rendition!    You even got the halyards tightened up for him.

fullsizeoutput_c50.jpeg

 - Stumbling

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3 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

Damn fine rendition!    You even got the halyards tightened up for him.

Part of my service - no extra charge! :P

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7 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

I assumed it was because you had introduced Vlad Putin to Rastafarianism ;) 

Not sure where you are going with that Two.

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25 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:
7 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

I assumed it was because you had introduced Vlad Putin to Rastafarianism ;) 

Not sure where you are going with that Two.

Ras + Putin.

Yes, lame ...

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33 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

I thought you were deeper than that...  Your forgiven.

I'm a Jill of all trades.

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14 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Get a room:lol:you two!

Shouldn't that be a narrow "double" quarterberth? ;) 

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3 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Shouldn't that be a narrow "double" quarterberth? ;) 

Oh here we go... down the boat porn black hole.

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2 hours ago, IStream said:

Not without pics we're not.

Do they have to be watercolours? ;) 

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I always knew Two Legs was a red head.  Bwahahahaha.

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For the committee's review, I present AIDA, which we saw during a race this weekend. She came motoring up the channel and into the anchorage; we took a look at her sitting happily in the Essex, CT mooring field when returning.

IMG_0573-L.jpg

IMG_0605-L.jpg

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She'll do in a pinch, I suppose, but the owner should really do something about that stain on the transom.

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15 minutes ago, IStream said:

She'll do in a pinch, I suppose, but the owner should really do something about that stain on the transom.

True that. However I don't want the owner's demerits to reflect too poorly on the boat...

The deathtrap offset companionway, however....

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I was at Brooklin BY the other day, looking at this thing tied to the dock. The yard manager came up and put his arm around my shoulders and said, in his best southern New England used car salesman voice "Whadda I gotta do to put YOU in THIS boat today?".

 

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Not a big fan of that profile. The sheer, cabin trunk and transom all seem wrong to me. But, I suppose I could suffer along with it for a ride. ;)

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You can always have more than one yacht if you’re significant other agrees!

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That always seemed to work for the guy who ran AVIS car rental. You know, the guy who owned the MIRABELLA fleet. Back when there was only I and II rumors had it that the first one was in his wife's name and the next boat was in his mistresses name. Both boats were in the VI at the time doing corporate team building events and they would have races between the boats at the culmination of the weeks events. The skippers would have the whole show well choreographed with tacking duels and close duck crossings but the crew of the winning boat always got a big tip from the lady whose boat one. Not sure who hold the title on the successive boats? Surely he can't have that many mistresses to provide boats for.

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4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I was at Brooklin BY the other day, looking at this thing tied to the dock. The yard manager came up and put his arm around my shoulders and said, in his best southern New England used car salesman voice "Whadda I gotta do to put YOU in THIS boat today?".

 

Mixed feelings about this boat but BRISTOL CHANNEL PILOT CUTTER? No! Not the front or the back nor the middle let alone the top or the bottom. 

Apart from that I’m not sure about the freeboard aesthetically. Is it slightly reminiscent of those slab sided ORC boats that Botin used to do so many of? 

Hrumph 

Does that mean I don’t get an invitation to sail on her? 

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My understanding is that the freeboard was necessary to get standing headroom below, because the hull is really quite light and shallow.

My crappy iphone pic:

IMG_0458.thumb.jpg.d15235787176ad5729430cb3c5e8855c.jpg

I wandered into the shop and found the guys sanding on the hull of a roughly 50'er from the same designer.

IMG_0456.thumb.jpg.c8664fb5323fd53228cf4aa377789f42.jpg

They are awaiting delivery of a 53' carbon/Kevlar hull from Hinckley that they will finish out.

 

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25 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

My understanding is that the freeboard was necessary to get standing headroom below, because the hull is really quite light and shallow.

My crappy iphone pic:

IMG_0458.thumb.jpg.d15235787176ad5729430cb3c5e8855c.jpg

I wandered into the shop and found the guys sanding on the hull of a roughly 50'er from the same designer.

IMG_0456.thumb.jpg.c8664fb5323fd53228cf4aa377789f42.jpg

They are awaiting delivery of a 53' carbon/Kevlar hull from Hinckley that they will finish out.

 

Thanks for the headsup on the headroom. Should have had a coachroof then!

Any idea how they handle the anchor?

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1 hour ago, Mr. Ed said:

Mixed feelings about this boat but BRISTOL CHANNEL PILOT CUTTER? No! Not the front or the back nor the middle let alone the top or the bottom. 

It feels to me that the Bristol Pilot Cutter aesthetic has been stretched too far here.  The front 25% is vaguely BPC, but the stern is more like Wally and the centre sections are off a Roger Martin BOC boat.  Someone couldn't make up their mind at design time.

I kinda hope this means we have reached Peak Pilot Cutter.  That aesthetic has produced some beauties, but this isn't one of them. If it wasn't for all the woody wonderfulness, it'd be very meh.

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Is that Hetairos? I do quite admire the sheer level of fuckoffosity going on there, and it seems in better proportion . . .

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1 hour ago, Cruisin Loser said:

My understanding is that the freeboard was necessary to get standing headroom below, because the hull is really quite light and shallow.

Seems to so often be the case--that the modern planing-hull features under the water make the boat above the water look ungainly and a strange departure from heavy-boat traditional designs.

Of course, overall length fixes this because standing headroom is then easy.

Why does anyone want that huge draft and vulnerable keel shape in a cruising boat?

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1 hour ago, kdh said:

Why does anyone want that huge draft and vulnerable keel shape in a cruising boat?

 

Toroa does have a lifting keel.  See http://www.botinpartners.com/project.php?id=70

Depending on how it's done, a lifting keel may just be even more vulnerable ... or it may incorporate impact absorption to make it a lot more durable than a fixed fin.

It looks like a vertical lift keel, so I guess it should be usable in partially extended states.

But the t-bulb should be a v effective line-and-weed catcher.  There is no way I'd have a t-bulb for coastal cruising

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

Toroa does have a lifting keel.  See http://www.botinpartners.com/project.php?id=70

Depending on how it's done, a lifting keel may just be even more vulnerable ... or it may incorporate impact absorption to make it a lot more durable than a fixed fin.

It looks like a vertical lift keel, so I guess it should be usable in partially extended states.

But the t-bulb should be a v effective line-and-weed catcher.  There is no way I'd have a t-bulb for coastal cruising

My thoughts too. Here's a shot of the interior. Looks more like a house than a boat that's going to be crashing through waves like a raceboat.

webRGG-tableopen-_J2A4972Persp.jpg

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4 minutes ago, kdh said:

Looks more like a house than a boat that's going to be crashing through waves like a raceboat.

Ouch.  That's a hi-tec and hi-luxury dock queen, or a v big daysailer.

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On 9/23/2018 at 9:56 AM, Bull City said:

Rozinante 16" X 20"

rozinante.thumb.jpg.d3fe1c34762f869ac4b593e40e9bddf3.jpg

 

Hey Bull, I approached this guy on his mooring and told him of your painting. I later emailed him the SA link. Did he contact you? 

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19 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

I was at Brooklin BY the other day, looking at this thing tied to the dock. The yard manager came up and put his arm around my shoulders and said, in his best southern New England used car salesman voice "Whadda I gotta do to put YOU in THIS boat today?".

I might have said, "Make it less ugly."

 

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3 hours ago, Trickypig said:

Hey Bull, I approached this guy on his mooring and told him of your painting. I later emailed him the SA link. Did he contact you? 

I don't think so. Thanks for mentioning it to him, though.

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11 hours ago, kdh said:

My thoughts too. Here's a shot of the interior. Looks more like a house than a boat that's going to be crashing through waves like a raceboat.

webRGG-tableopen-_J2A4972Persp.jpg

I can visualize plates of food sliding off that table.

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Each individual piece is nice but the whole arrangement is ridiculously impractical and would be even if it were on land. On a boat, WTF? It's like sitting at a big bar where you can't see anyone face to face. How do you get in or out of that back corner with the leaves extended? And why the hell is the table so wide to the right? Is that really enough lighting for anything? How are you supposed to fuck on that giant table with the support that far off center?

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17 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Is that Hetairos? I do quite admire the sheer level of fuckoffosity going on there, and it seems in better proportion . . .

I don't like the two deck houses, and the rig looks completely wrong for the boat.

Lovely lines though. It's not like there's any possibility I would ever have it, so of course I can indulge in sour grapes.

FB- Doug

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1 hour ago, IStream said:

Each individual piece is nice but the whole arrangement is ridiculously impractical and would be even if it were on land. On a boat, WTF? It's like sitting at a big bar where you can't see anyone face to face. How do you get in or out of that back corner with the leaves extended? And why the hell is the table so wide to the right? Is that really enough lighting for anything? How are you supposed to fuck on that giant table with the support that far off center?

Umm, the table slides fore and aft (right to left in the photo), and is in the cocktail position in the photo. When centered over its support it is in the correct position for dining.  The table also has fiddles on the underside of the leaves, which are on top when the leaves are folded, as is normal when underway.

The saloon table Brooklin built for my boat also slides fore and aft, up towards the mast out of the way for to give access to the port settee for sailing, and better access to the wine locker. For dinner, it slides aft and the leaves deploy, with ample space for 6 or more to drink and dine.

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I’d rather have the Botin if money was not an issue. They don’t design boats for sailors, but rather yachts for clients with a different view of what a sailing yacht should be and appear to be.

I personally saw it as a Bristol cutter inspired design and understand the need for high freeboard to accommodate the luxurious interior. The underwater profile is awesome.

Now, if it was built without commission, I would be surprised at the disparate design elements that are numerous throughout and hope they find the right owner to recoup their outlay and not ding their reputation.

Overall, a big thumbs up!

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I’d rather have the Botin if money was not an issue. They don’t design boats for sailors, but rather yachts for clients with a different view of what a sailing yacht should be and appear to be.

I personally saw it as a Bristol cutter inspired design and understand the need for high freeboard to accommodate the luxurious interior. The underwater profile is awesome.

Now, if it was built without commission, I would be surprised at the disparate design elements that are numerous throughout and hope they find the right owner to recoup their outlay and not ding their reputation.

Overall, a big thumbs up!

I read the narrative as it being for Sr. Botin's own use, but maybe I have cloth ears for euphemism in this world. He came over as a likeable chap in the vid.

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20 hours ago, kdh said:

My thoughts too. Here's a shot of the interior. Looks more like a house than a boat that's going to be crashing through waves like a raceboat.

webRGG-tableopen-_J2A4972Persp.jpg

Why does the table extend so far to the right, (in this picture) where there are no seats? To generate fetch for the afore mentioned sliding dishes? Or to make it harder for the dancer/serving wench?

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Pottery Barn afloat?

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5 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Umm, the table slides fore and aft (right to left in the photo), and is in the cocktail position in the photo. When centered over its support it is in the correct position for dining.  The table also has fiddles on the underside of the leaves, which are on top when the leaves are folded, as is normal when underway.

When you are in a seaway and trying to get to the table, hanging off the lamp fitting ('cos there's nowt else to grab), and dodging the country cottage clobber which is leaping about at you, it will be good to know that at least your bowl of paella isn't going to slide off into your lap.

But a wave from the right angle might still chuck that table lamp into your paella.

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1 minute ago, Bull City said:

Pottery Barn afloat?

I had it down as multi-million-dollar faux-nautic Hamptons "cottage" afloat.

But then I'd never heard of a pottery barn before.  Around my way we use barns for hay

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