Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

Recommended Posts

Oh God, let me have a design job that didn't involve headroom.

 

Tricky:

You got it. Now imagine sailing that with a tiller.

 

How is the racing in NY going?

Still wearing your tie at dinner?

 

If you want a really cool place for dinner go to Sammy's. It's Eastern Euro ghetto food. Amazing. Get the veal chop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trickypig,

 

The boat was for sale a little while ago in Sweden but forgot to write down the details: could remember 1948 and 44ft though.

Did a brief search on http://www.sjohistoriska.se/sv/Fordjupning/Samlingar/ and came up with this:

 

attachicon.gifNajaden 7.jpg

 

Guess this must the boat, so there you go.

Some interior pictures:

 

attachicon.gifNajaden 6.jpgattachicon.gifNajaden 5.jpg

 

 

Bob: Thanks, no worries about the Amphora.

 

Bonus from Australia: Swanson 37

 

attachicon.gifcamille 3.jpgattachicon.gifcamille 1.jpg

 

Hobot-

 

Per your PM, I don't recall a similar double ender at Port Madison YC. I'll make a point of going down there and checking it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1187153_604980389525044_129388558_n.jpg

 

I remember when she was built at the school. Originally the topsides were painted dark, perhaps a very dark green, but I recall black topsides.

 

This new lighter beige looks much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

annie is cool! i also like this catboat (built in the netherlands)centerboard-14.jpgcenterboard-9.jpgcenterboard-15.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's another plumb bow/ long stern combo. Not enough of sail though. As used by the French to beat up passing Brit East Indiamen.

 

Cancalaise2.jpg

 

I've been overtaken by the Cancalaise, She's very quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting lugger. Though corsairs more frequently used for privateers, Robert Surcouf had a preference for brigs.

 

Another pic of her, from her website.

post-4773-0-21366400-1378811798_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mystic...

 

:wub:

I couldn't agree more. Made my annual pilgrimage last week. Nothing like walking around after they close and taking in the sights.

 

I was really happy to see Annie back out on display and fully rigged. The last few times I had been there, she was sitting at the south end docks down by the Morgan with her sprit and rigging removed and looked a little sad. I have been smitten with her since the first time I saw her as a little kid. :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now imagine sailing that with a tiller.

 

Tiller? Schmiller.

 

britannia-sailing-yacht-arriving-cowes.j

 

From a time when men were men, and wore ties while racing. If you want to get ahead, get a hat.

(OK, Charles Nicholson is using a wheel here).

 

tumblr_mkx1gw6PLx1qldhy8o1_500.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was able to spot this thing pretty well, across from the other side of the bay while standing on Berkeley Pier. Larry gets all the media, but this nearly 300 ft schooner is the largest privately owned in the world, built for Jim Clark, of Netscape fame. Reportedly Athena can reach upwards of 20 knots while under sail.

 

http://yachtpals.com/largest-sailboats-7036

 

I think this something to be admired, if only for the scale of the thing. At this rate, we're getting closer in having the ability to construct space ships. forly.

 

 

533779_717600508266385_78269195_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd been meaning to post pictures of this under the general cool boat thread, but the invasion of the thread by Scandinavian style boats has prompted me to go questing for photos from the owner's website.

 

She may be the coolest boat I know in my neck of the woods (or at least the coolest new build): she's a really outrageous 70 foot take on a Tumlare, designed and built by her owner, who seems to be one of those people who can do a million things before lunch - start a corporation, have a family, design and build a boat . . . Anyway, a boat that conforms to nothing at all, just wants to go faster and look better. Makes the Spirit boats (to whom she's a neighbour) look like conformist consumer items.

 

She's been for sale for a while, but you can just imagine the equation that the average boat buyer makes between berthing fees, accommodation etc. http://www.keme.net/...ine/WEB1/madam/

 

If I didn't have the second coolest new build wooden boat on the East Coast . . .

 

 

E

Was that boat in 007? Looks about right for the boat they were shot on for one quick scene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was able to spot this thing pretty well, across from the other side of the bay while standing on Berkeley Pier. Larry gets all the media, but this nearly 300 ft schooner is the largest privately owned in the world, built for Jim Clark, of Netscape fame. Reportedly Athena can reach upwards of 20 knots while under sail.

 

http://yachtpals.com/largest-sailboats-7036

 

I think this something to be admired, if only for the scale of the thing. At this rate, we're getting closer in having the ability to construct space ships. forly.

 

 

533779_717600508266385_78269195_n.jpg

 

If they got rid of that superstructure she would be a nice looking vessel.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bulb, no, that yacht is named Regina. Relevant pic of the interior.

 

Berenice-Marlohe-James-Bond-Skyfall-%C2%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kimbottles, I agree. I think it looks like an office building with a schooner rig. Maybe that's what Jim was going for, what with all the tech talk about setting up offshore companies outside of the US to work around immigration laws.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wasn't the James Bond boat a Spirit yacht?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wasn't the James Bond boat a Spirit yacht?

 

that was the first film, Casino Royale. beautiful boat, but I liked Eva better.

 

s640x480_b.jpg

 

 

Kimbottles, I wish I didn't know who he was, either. But there's a boring story in there about html layers and some other obscure javascript crap that helped propel my miserable career in dot-coms. The real genius of that company runs a night club here in SF now. Not that I really give a turtle caught in a riptide about any of it these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

annie is cool! i also like this catboat (built in the netherlands)centerboard-14.jpgcenterboard-9.jpgcenterboard-15.jpg

 

Is that amount of (what I'm interpreting as) weather helm normal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Catboats and weather helm.

Country Western music and Telecasters.

Some things you can't separate.

 

Wish they had done something artful with the top of the stem. It looks so crude like that.

If you don't want to give it any shape at least angle the poor thing to echo the sheer.

It's like a gorgeous woman with a wart on the tip of her nose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Catboats and weather helm.

Country Western music and Telecasters.

Some things you can't separate.

 

Wish they had done something artful with the top of the stem. It looks so crude like that.

If you don't want to give it any shape at least angle the poor thing to echo the sheer.

It's like a gorgeous woman with a wart on the tip of her nose.

agreed, it does look crude

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Catboats and weather helm.

Country Western music and Telecasters.

Some things you can't separate.

 

Wish they had done something artful with the top of the stem. It looks so crude like that.

If you don't want to give it any shape at least angle the poor thing to echo the sheer.

It's like a gorgeous woman with a wart on the tip of her nose.

agreed, it does look crude

 

Easy fix with Bob's eye and a saw!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Catboats and weather helm.

Country Western music and Telecasters.

Some things you can't separate.

 

Wish they had done something artful with the top of the stem. It looks so crude like that.

If you don't want to give it any shape at least angle the poor thing to echo the sheer.

It's like a gorgeous woman with a wart on the tip of her nose.

 

No kidding. That stem looks like a fencepost, maybe worse. In the overall process of building that boat it would not have taken much time to bevel the stem to match the hull and trim it to the sheer. Maybe the guy doesn't wan the boat to be stolen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could very well be a Dutch thang. Still not bad for a couple young lads. Looking at their website, it appears they designed her as well as built her.

 

They appear to be have an ambitious business model, progressing in a short time with restorations, wooden boat building and re-powering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh God, let me have a design job that didn't involve headroom.

 

Tricky:

You got it. Now imagine sailing that with a tiller.

 

How is the racing in NY going?

Still wearing your tie at dinner?

 

If you want a really cool place for dinner go to Sammy's. It's Eastern Euro ghetto food. Amazing. Get the veal chop.

 

Blowing dogs off chains today. Broke both starts and got shut out at a top mark rounding so we're not covering ourselves with glory. Boatspeed is good and crew work great so 10 more races to make good.

 

"Gentlemen shall wear jacket and tie for dinner. tasteful dress-casual attire is permitted at other times. Denim attire is not appropriate. Hats shall not be worn indoors."

 

Thank's for the tip on Sammys... where is it near?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

having seen all of the "Big three" - Athena, Maltese Falcon, and Mirabella V - in person, and two sailing (Athena and MF), I can say that none of them are terribly nice looking, but they do have a pretty impressive wow factor. Watched MF sail at 10-15 knots through the spectator fleet at the start of a transatlantic race off Newport - I was engineless that day so was hove to at a safe distance but I'm sure she caused more than a few of the skippers in the spectator fleet to require clean pants....

Athena from a kayak:

P1120530_zps26f53608.jpg

P1110544_zps93b97f8c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mirabella V - largest single masted vessel ever built. Rig is 292' I believe. This is at Newport Shipyard, the "small" boats behind her include 100+ foot megayachts and a J-Class (probably Hanuman)

DSC02141_zpsba9b751d.jpg

Maltese Falcon - quite a sight to see under sail!

DSC01424_zpsa28bae19.jpgDSC01420_zpsbf22e464.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine's bigger.

 

Tricky:

I have no idea where Sammy's is. Ask a Jewish person. You can have schmaltz on your spuds and the biggest veal chop you ever saw. See if my buddy Rob Laub is playing there.

 

I said to my Jewish client and host, "I thought you guys were always starving."

He said, "we were. But when we ate,,,,,,,,,,,"

 

It was a night to remember. There is a very interesting twist to that night's story but I'll save it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the pic of MF, it's still hard to conceive of someone t-boning it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great photos Brodie. I saw Maltese Falcon in Newport, RI and MirabellaV in Bermuuda. Mirabella was much prettier than MF and there is the Wow factor for the sheer size and engineering of MF. However, but not really impressive to me for the exact reason Kim stated. You feels so detached from the water and you can't dip your toes in water on the leeward side when the boat is heeled.

 

However, the J Class boats are sensational! Yummm

 

Trickypig, what kind of boats are you racing on in NYC? Have a blast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was once at the helm of the USS Canberra (CA-70/CAG-2).

She sure as hell could T-Bone MF.

 

(Too bad she is no longer with us.)

 

12._CA-70_68_-69.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a model of the Canberra as a kid. Looked just like that until a Stuka based in my brother's room dive bombed it with firecraclers...

 

Brodie, that blue "reasonably sized" 126 ft mega yacht behind Mirabella V in your first picture is one of our expedition style boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mega Yachts lose touch with the water, so why bother with a boat?

 

So you can say "mines bigger than yours".

 

That's all those ridiculous things are about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine's bigger.

 

Tricky:

I have no idea where Sammy's is. Ask a Jewish person. You can have schmaltz on your spuds and the biggest veal chop you ever saw. See if my buddy Rob Laub is playing there.

 

I said to my Jewish client and host, "I thought you guys were always starving."

He said, "we were. But when we ate,,,,,,,,,,,"

 

It was a night to remember. There is a very interesting twist to that night's story but I'll save it.

Sammys,

157 chrystie Street,

Lower east side

 

Very hard core - the schmalz and frozen vodka live on in the memory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, they are nice guys. they are well underway of becoming a prime location for wooden boats. The 8mr and 6mR i sail on are both there for maintenance. They are currently also restoring a very nice 6mr and have a beautifull seekreuzer still wrapped up until there is time and space to work on it.

 

 

Could very well be a Dutch thang. Still not bad for a couple young lads. Looking at their website, it appears they designed her as well as built her.

 

They appear to be have an ambitious business model, progressing in a short time with restorations, wooden boat building and re-powering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Mine's bigger.

 

Tricky:

I have no idea where Sammy's is. Ask a Jewish person. You can have schmaltz on your spuds and the biggest veal chop you ever saw. See if my buddy Rob Laub is playing there.

 

I said to my Jewish client and host, "I thought you guys were always starving."

He said, "we were. But when we ate,,,,,,,,,,,"

 

It was a night to remember. There is a very interesting twist to that night's story but I'll save it.

Sammys,

157 chrystie Street,

Lower east side

 

Very hard core - the schmalz and frozen vodka live on in the memory

 

Sammy's Romanian.

 

Stories about Sammy's usually require waiting until the statutes of limitation run out.

 

For those who don't know the place: It's in a little, below street level, dump covered in Polaroids of famous people who ate there. They used to have identical triplets as waiters. A violinist you paid to go away. A guy who played a wurlitzer. The waiters argued and wouldn't bring you things if they didn't want to. The Vodka came encased in ice. And the steaks hung off both sides of the (large) plates. The first time I went there a stripper at another table got up and did her routine.

 

One of my favorite restaurants in New York, but you can only go once or twice a year if you value your arteries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Mega Yachts lose touch with the water, so why bother with a boat?

 

So you can say "mines bigger than yours".

 

That's all those ridiculous things are about.

 

One of the nice things about mega yachts is that they keep lot's of people employed, like me and the 200+ employees where I work, plus the employees of all the suppliers. Just sayin'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Dragon was intended to be the "poor man's" version of a 30 sq. meter. Look beautiful. Not much fun to crew on though.

My older brother and I had a Dragon. We both enjoyed the heck out of it. Not much in the way of accommodations with just two berths, but fun to sail. The first year my brother and his girl friend spent two months cruising the San Jauns and Canadian waters. His girl friend was new to sailing and became hooked on sailing after that. Fast forward quite a few years buddy of mine Pat Barton who's retired now, bought one. He cruised it mostly over-nighters with his wife, who had also never sailed before.

 

The Goteborg Yacht Club in Sweden, held a design competition in 1929 to find a boat that was affordable for weekend cruising. Johan Anker won the competition, and the class took off quickly. In the late 40's the Dragon was chosen as a three man keeboat for the Olympics and was an Olympic Class till 72. Would I call them a cruising boat compared to today's cruisers, probably not to some. They are however a blast and easy to sail.

 

http://www.classicboat.co.uk/class-notes/dragon-class/

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Mega Yachts lose touch with the water, so why bother with a boat?

 

So you can say "mines bigger than yours".

 

That's all those ridiculous things are about.

 

One of the nice things about mega yachts is that they keep lot's of people employed, like me and the 200+ employees where I work, plus the employees of all the suppliers. Just sayin'.

 

Precisely. When your checkbook is bigger, you can start with "what's possible?" If employing a cottage industry staffed by highly skilled people who are the best in their trade is what's possible, then please - by all means - spend a little more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Dragon was intended to be the "poor man's" version of a 30 sq. meter. Look beautiful. Not much fun to crew on though.

My older brother and I had a Dragon. We both enjoyed the heck out of it. Not much in the way of accommodations with just two berths, but fun to sail. The first year my brother and his girl friend spent two months cruising the San Jauns and Canadian waters. His girl friend was new to sailing and became hooked on sailing after that. Fast forward quite a few years buddy of mine Pat Barton who's retired now, bought one. He cruised it mostly over-nighters with his wife, who had also never sailed before.

 

 

As I have mentioned on other threads (maybe this one too) my dear departed parents cruised an International Dragon into their 80's!

 

(I am from tough stock. Maybe that's why the Sliver design is so simple below.))

post-8115-0-09174300-1378919466_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mega Yachts lose touch with the water, so why bother with a boat?

 

 

I feel a bit that way about anything that can not be capsized.

 

Until bedtime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The new 101m Dubois sloop will dwarf Miribella V if and when she gets built and launched.....Rig height is something close to 125m (410') off the water, main boom is 42m (138'). Construction is supposed to be by Vitters, the Dubois office is well into the 30 month design program!

 

Nice looking boat....long and skinny..... http://www.duboisyachts.com/design/yachts/in-design/380/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The Dragon was intended to be the "poor man's" version of a 30 sq. meter. Look beautiful. Not much fun to crew on though.

My older brother and I had a Dragon. We both enjoyed the heck out of it. Not much in the way of accommodations with just two berths, but fun to sail. The first year my brother and his girl friend spent two months cruising the San Jauns and Canadian waters. His girl friend was new to sailing and became hooked on sailing after that. Fast forward quite a few years buddy of mine Pat Barton who's retired now, bought one. He cruised it mostly over-nighters with his wife, who had also never sailed before.

 

 

As I have mentioned on other threads (maybe this one too) my dear departed parents cruised an International Dragon into their 80's!

 

(I am from tough stock. Maybe that's why the Sliver design is so simple below.))

downright palatial compared to a dragon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I alone in finding HETAIROS attractive, at least by the standards of similarly large yachts? At any rate she doesn't have the grotesque superstructures of some of her sisters.

 

I don't know if the aesthetic of "downstairs" is crap or cool, but it is at least different from the pipe organs, Edwardian shag palaces, or marble-icious Holiday Inn Dubai look of some. They have sort of faked a back-story for the boat as a recycled commercial vessel.

 

"The finish of the interior is itself remarkable. The furniture detailing and use of wood varies from one space to another, as if the interior has grown with the supposed history of the boat, from stained cherry in some areas to teak and limed ash in others. Furthermore, all the elements were specifically designed and aged to mimic what they might have looked like if the yacht really had been built 100 years ago. The stained walnut floor planks are not cut quite straight, and include faux repairs and butterfly joints. Grit was mixed in with epoxy between the planks to suggest a century of accumulated dirt.

Furniture was designed to look pre-dinged and the cherrywood, for example, is not only stained but also carries an added patina. ‘It was a challenge for interior company Oldenburger,’ says Young, ‘to throw stuff at it, hit it with chains, and rub dirt into it before varnishing – if it was all beautifully sprayed and painted, the interior wouldn’t have felt soft.’

Likewise, the white paint on the deckhead was deliberately applied over a slightly darker undercoat ‘with a rubbish brush’ to create distinct rough brushstrokes and create the impression of a surface that had been painted over many times. The effect is extraordinary – this is not what some might term ‘shabby chic’, but rather an emotive and genuinely believable recreation of a century-old coaster-cum-luxury yacht."

I'm tempted to say they can have some genuine accumulated dirt from us, surprisingly inexpensively. And I have many rubbish brushes.

What is it about some designs that makes it hard for the viewer to judge their scale? I've always thought among the marks of a gifted designer were the ability to make a boat look good from any angle, and to disguise size.

Anyway, the first photo makes her look like a model, and I'd be happy to have her in my pond, or bathtub.

post-38-0-81394600-1378930693_thumb.jpg

post-38-0-01441400-1378931479_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I pretty much like all boats, some are just prettier then others. Big boats are engineering marvels and the power they develop is just amazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

The Dragon was intended to be the "poor man's" version of a 30 sq. meter. Look beautiful. Not much fun to crew on though.

My older brother and I had a Dragon. We both enjoyed the heck out of it. Not much in the way of accommodations with just two berths, but fun to sail. The first year my brother and his girl friend spent two months cruising the San Jauns and Canadian waters. His girl friend was new to sailing and became hooked on sailing after that. Fast forward quite a few years buddy of mine Pat Barton who's retired now, bought one. He cruised it mostly over-nighters with his wife, who had also never sailed before.

 

 

As I have mentioned on other threads (maybe this one too) my dear departed parents cruised an International Dragon into their 80's!

 

(I am from tough stock. Maybe that's why the Sliver design is so simple below.))

downright palatial compared to a dragon.

well spacious maybe, really don't think anyone will think of her as palatial......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember back in the 70's when "distressed" furniture was all the rage in high end furniture stores.

 

Now it's being done in sailboats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the furling booms on the mega sail yachts that are disturbing. They aren't Park Ave. booms - maybe 9 de Julio Avenue?

 

Interesting how the last gilded age had private yachts that were as long, but generally shorter and smaller super structures. What was the hereshoff quote? The pleasant aroma of varnish, coal, cigar smoke and champagne wafting over the waves?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great photos Brodie. I saw Maltese Falcon in Newport, RI and MirabellaV in Bermuuda. Mirabella was much prettier than MF and there is the Wow factor for the sheer size and engineering of MF. However, but not really impressive to me for the exact reason Kim stated. You feels so detached from the water and you can't dip your toes in water on the leeward side when the boat is heeled.

 

However, the J Class boats are sensational! Yummm

 

Trickypig, what kind of boats are you racing on in NYC? Have a blast.

 

Hi Boomers,

 

the Swan 42 one designs. They are the NYYC's one design, 22 of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Mine's bigger.

 

Tricky:

I have no idea where Sammy's is. Ask a Jewish person. You can have schmaltz on your spuds and the biggest veal chop you ever saw. See if my buddy Rob Laub is playing there.

 

I said to my Jewish client and host, "I thought you guys were always starving."

He said, "we were. But when we ate,,,,,,,,,,,"

 

It was a night to remember. There is a very interesting twist to that night's story but I'll save it.

Sammys,

157 chrystie Street,

Lower east side

 

Very hard core - the schmalz and frozen vodka live on in the memory

 

Sammy's Romanian.

 

Stories about Sammy's usually require waiting until the statutes of limitation run out.

 

For those who don't know the place: It's in a little, below street level, dump covered in Polaroids of famous people who ate there. They used to have identical triplets as waiters. A violinist you paid to go away. A guy who played a wurlitzer. The waiters argued and wouldn't bring you things if they didn't want to. The Vodka came encased in ice. And the steaks hung off both sides of the (large) plates. The first time I went there a stripper at another table got up and did her routine.

 

One of my favorite restaurants in New York, but you can only go once or twice a year if you value your arteries.

 

I'm all for artery clogging, vodka drinking and lasciviousness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i sailed the swan 42 a lot in europe as well. fun little boats!

 

hetairos is nice from the deck half way up to the mast (as most pictures are). personally i think the sailplan and especially the top of the sail plan looks off.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I alone in finding HETAIROS attractive, at least by the standards of similarly large yachts?

 

The thing that jars to my eye is a bermudan rig under the plumb bow/counter stern hull. That hull shape, in my mind, needs a gaff rig to look right. AIUI, it was a response to using Thames Tonnage as a rating rule, and when length and sail area etc came in - and consequent adoption of bow overhang - the new hull shape was set by the time rigs changed to bermudian. E.g. Britannia had a spoon bow (called ugly at the time) was built with a gaff, but re-rigged with a bermudian mainsail. But again, I'm being Mr Picky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point, presumptuous one, and if they'd done her with a gaff rig they could fit through the Panama Canal (which dictated the stumpy rig) by housing the topmast. And wouldn't she have made a sight as a cutter? A standing gybe on a rig like that wouldn't bear thinking about though.

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Am I alone in finding HETAIROS attractive, at least by the standards of similarly large yachts?

 

The thing that jars to my eye is a bermudan rig under the plumb bow/counter stern hull. That hull shape, in my mind, needs a gaff rig to look right. AIUI, it was a response to using Thames Tonnage as a rating rule, and when length and sail area etc came in - and consequent adoption of bow overhang - the new hull shape was set by the time rigs changed to bermudian. E.g. Britannia had a spoon bow (called ugly at the time) was built with a gaff, but re-rigged with a bermudian mainsail. But again, I'm being Mr Picky.

Although, thinking about it, lots of straight stemmed boats had no rating rules in mind - smacks, pilot cutters and so on, though I can see that the development of bow overhangs would have came from rules that measure lwl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fugs:

Wrong.

The original plumb stem cutters, working boats, were a result of the way they were measured for "tonnage" and that was how they were taxed. It was advantagious to have no overhang forward and to push the rudder post as far forward as possible. That's where the long overhang aft came from.

 

Right.

Overhangs came from rules that were heavily based on DWL.

 

See Peter Johnson's Book YACHT RATING.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonnage measurements are taken between stem and stern posts, I thought about having my boat remeasured as it would drop her into the sub-35' bracket, thus save a few pennies when paying for dockage (provided the droid doesn't leave his office. Problem was getting her remeasured was rather expensive at £1,000 or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fugs:

Wrong.

The original plumb stem cutters, working boats, were a result of the way they were measured for "tonnage" and that was how they were taxed. It was advantagious to have no overhang forward and to push the rudder post as far forward as possible. That's where the long overhang aft came from.

 

Right.

Overhangs came from rules that were heavily based on DWL.

 

See Peter Johnson's Book YACHT RATING.

My brain hurts. I thought Thames Tonnage was only for yotts, but now learn of something called Builders Old Measurement which was calculated similarly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mixing threads perhaps, but HETAIROS looks like a stretched BCC with a TP52-style rig and 3Di sails.

 

What is it trying to be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mixing threads perhaps, but HETAIROS looks like a stretched BCC with a TP52-style rig and 3Di sails.

 

What is it trying to be?

 

What's it trying to be? Cool.

 

Trying too hard? Maybe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I alone in finding HETAIROS attractive??

 

No you are not, I like her. I like her a lot!

Me too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like the "Sprit of Tradition" minded designs. It's fun to be nostalgic, but why not try to have the best of both worlds? A nice modern design taking advantage of all that has been learned while utilizing the aesthetic cues from the past makes all the sense in the world to me.

 

If I ever have the time and space, I would love to try and build a modern sandbagger. It would be pure folly, but would bring a big smile to my face.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could you build a "sandbagger" looking boat with a deep bulb keel? I don't see why not and it would be major cool.

 

I agree with SailAR & Bob - contemporary underwater and old above makes the best kind of boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As they say, to each their own...

 

While I could pass on the freestanding rig and would have liked to see the sprit in wood or painted composite, Gray Wolf is, for me, a great example of the concept.

 

http://www.lymanmorse.com/boatDetails.php?boatID=11

 

 

A sandbagger with a bulb keel how awful. Oh wat. We already have that. It's called an open whatever pieslice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GREY WOLF is a very nice boat, reminds me of a modern NIGHT RUNNER. But it does not seem to do as well on the race course out here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

eagle 44. about the same size as an 8mR but won't measure like one...

 

but for a daysailor it's quite nice! i'd have one (also because my wife likes the classic hull shapes but doesn't like the hassle of wood and large maintenance...

 

Eagle%20web%20(2).jpgEagle%20web%20(20).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gray Wolf is pretty cool. I lent Jeb Brygider the owner my dock one evening in order for him to visit his then girlfriend who lived in the harbor, so I got the full on tour. I have also come across her several times out sailing. She is a real beauty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only downside (imho) from the modern T-keel is the rockinghorse characteristics sneaking in while going upwind. I just love how a longkeeler heels over and trains through waves. but the lines are nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only downside (imho) from the modern T-keel is the rockinghorse characteristics sneaking in while going upwind. I just love how a longkeeler heels over and trains through waves. but the lines are nice.

JMOD:

I'm not sure that motion has much to do with the keel. I would suspect is has more to do with the rocker of the hull and the overhangs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

eagle 44. about the same size as an 8mR but won't measure like one...

 

but for a daysailor it's quite nice! i'd have one (also because my wife likes the classic hull shapes but doesn't like the hassle of wood and large maintenance...

 

Eagle%20web%20(2).jpgEagle%20web%20(20).jpg

Yikes! That companionway is almost under water! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites