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Coolboats to admire

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Speedwell of Hong Kong.....spotted in St. George’s Harbor, Bermuda, a few years ago. The next photo shows her under sail .24797D60-FBBF-4470-A2DA-FA83B695FAA4.thumb.jpeg.3e532afbffe584c444d5c6eabec3dba2.jpeg0CF3B6A4-F3A2-4D0C-AA22-0ACE6C0B9997.thumb.jpeg.418dc05eceb0a1afb6246dc3181c1577.jpeg

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22 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Anyone know what design this is? Mono or cat? 

te

That is the most hideous Shannon mega barge.  They pulled into Belfast late in the summer and blighted the harbor.  Its a monohull..barge waste of everything.

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While anchored at Ile Saint-Honorat, Michael Schmidt’s Y7 slipped in opposite us.

20190726_164912-01.thumb.jpeg.b30b23cce0f6854835f19919ea43c693.jpeg

https://www.yyachts.de/en/y7

Not a fan of the interior, however twin engines pushing flow over the rudders qualifies as a nifty idea IMO. One guesses it would make docking easier too…I've never driven a 2x motor mono with a keel?  As Med’ sleds go I think she’s a looker.

Though needs a larger swim platform/transom… all the rage for charter guests now.

No beach club?

Jeez… one needs decent space to park the SEABOB

As you were....

 

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4 hours ago, eliboat said:

That is the most hideous Shannon mega barge.  They pulled into Belfast late in the summer and blighted the harbor.  Its a monohull..barge waste of everything.

Wow, it is a Shannon! Have I been living under a rock? They built a 38 and a 53, and I'm guessing this one is the 53'. 

Here's the 53 HPS, sailing

 

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I've seen that "thing" live, I think it was started for Bob Bitchin', late of Latts and Atts magazine, and reflected his highly refined aesthetic sensibilities.

It is a pretty much total rejection of the late Jim McCurdy's theory that, unless it was joyful to SAIL, a sailboat had no reason to exist.

Walter Schultz (Shannon) labored under the delusion that he was a yacht designer. At one time he had David Walters as a partner. Walters went on to design and build the Cambria's, which were and are lovely boats. 

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Reminds me of these.

Only not as good looking.

image.thumb.png.170d94af3905b14030338cbc08d531f4.png

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18 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Wow, it is a Shannon! Have I been living under a rock? They built a 38 and a 53, and I'm guessing this one is the 53'. 

Here's the 53 HPS, sailing

 

They could at least make the effort of getting on board somebody who can trim a sail!

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On 12/4/2019 at 5:16 AM, eliboat said:

That is the most hideous Shannon mega barge.  They pulled into Belfast late in the summer and blighted the harbor.  Its a monohull..barge waste of everything.

Looks like they started designing a mobo and decided "fuck it, let's put some masts on it".

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23 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

Not my boat, but it's cool and I did take the photo

DSC_5365.jpg

Nice dinghy, too, as I'm sure you'd agree.

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Nice boat and dinghy!

I don't recognize the flag flying over the transom.  Any hints?  

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5 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

Not my boat, but it's cool and I did take the photo

DSC_5365.jpg

Is that a Tumlaren or an Albatross?

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10 hours ago, Panoramix said:

They could at least make the effort of getting on board somebody who can trim a sail!

What would be the point?

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6 hours ago, olaf hart said:

Is that a Tumlaren or an Albatross?

Spidsgatter. I'll ask about the flag.

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Cute.  Not a term I like to associate with a sailboat, but cute.

Is the mizzen sheet stayed to the head of the rudder?  That's nuts.  One bad jibe, and that rudder is flying into the ocean.  Not to mention the nice holes in the transom where the gudgeons used to be. 

I had an Oday 23, and the main sheet was stayed to the backstay.  It allowed for end of boom sheeting and kept the cockpit clear, but I never liked all that potential shock load on the backstay.

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26 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

Cute.  Not a term I like to associate with a sailboat, but cute.

Is the mizzen sheet stayed to the head of the rudder?  That's nuts.  One bad jibe, and that rudder is flying into the ocean.  Not to mention the nice holes in the transom where the gudgeons used to be. 

I had an Oday 23, and the main sheet was stayed to the backstay.  It allowed for end of boom sheeting and kept the cockpit clear, but I never liked all that potential shock load on the 

If you saw one in person you wouldn't be worried. Mizzen is tiny - smaller than most dinghy mainsails. Combined with the fact that Fishers are hugely overbuilt, no way is the mizzen sheet damaging the rudder, even if you crash jibed it during the height of a hurricane. 

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Nevertheless, that is one of the dumbest rigging details I've ever seen.

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1 hour ago, Jackett said:

If you saw one in person you wouldn't be worried. Mizzen is tiny - smaller than most dinghy mainsails. Combined with the fact that Fishers are hugely overbuilt, no way is the mizzen sheet damaging the rudder, even if you crash jibed it during the height of a hurricane. 

If anyone is a Fisher fan, I highly recommend Tim Lackey's web log of his purchase and renovation of a formerly sunken Fisher 30.  For those of you unfamiliar with Tim, he is a professional plastic classic restorer located in Maine.  Tim bought this boat for his personal use, and over the course of the years long renovation, he decided to sell the boat.  But not before he had crawled into every nook and cranny, fixing, renovating, and upgrading the boat with great skill, and documenting the process along the way.

https://fisher30.lackeysailing.com/

For any of you that just like to look at what can be done with a plastic classic, I highly recommend Tim's website.  He meticulously chronicles the projects for the owners, but we mere mortals get to peep in too.

https://lackeysailing.com/

Talk about your Cool Boats to Admire....

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2 hours ago, Hukilau said:

If anyone is a Fisher fan, I highly recommend Tim Lackey's web log of his purchase and renovation of a formerly sunken Fisher 30.  For those of you unfamiliar with Tim, he is a professional plastic classic restorer located in Maine.  Tim bought this boat for his personal use, and over the course of the years long renovation, he decided to sell the boat.  But not before he had crawled into every nook and cranny, fixing, renovating, and upgrading the boat with great skill, and documenting the process along the way.

https://fisher30.lackeysailing.com/

For any of you that just like to look at what can be done with a plastic classic, I highly recommend Tim's website.  He meticulously chronicles the projects for the owners, but we mere mortals get to peep in too.

https://lackeysailing.com/

Talk about your Cool Boats to Admire....

Tim did some beautiful upgrade work on a friends boat a few years ago. Great work and a great work ethic. I emailed a question and he promptly replied ......most consider their tricks of the trade to be well guarded secrets and are unwilling to share acquired knowledge. 

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I've been following him for more than a decade. He does some very nice work.

I got the impression after he launched the Fisher that he quit owning a boat - bought some land in the Canadian Maritimes instead.

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COMETA, a 52' Sparkmen and Stevens yawl built in 1946. I love this angle on a sailboat, especially a low freeboard hull like this. Such a solid ride. 

2042114009_SSCometayawl.jpg.5ce7d4d08af68ee37c78204804e3c69b.jpg

Lavishly cared for,...

198058666_Cometagalley.thumb.jpg.0cb2276560fa88d200753aa600ed2b9a.jpg

and sympathetically modernized in a listing I found. And it is sold just to save anybody the effort of contacting the broker. 

1074635672_Cometanavstation.thumb.jpg.d5cfca55265889dd5dbb017da8282225.jpg

 

 

 

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Love the deep bulwarks.

Not so great for the rail meat though.

But on a boat like that, who's kidding who by sitting on the rail?

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

But on a boat like that, who's kidding who by sitting on the rail?

gotta stack 'em somewhere when they're not being used .

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25 minutes ago, Mid said:

gotta stack 'em somewhere when they're not being used .

Something like this?

image.png.415ca05bc9eae1005ff6043d4d8d805d.png

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On 12/9/2019 at 8:23 AM, Hukilau said:

Cute.  Not a term I like to associate with a sailboat, but cute.

Is the mizzen sheet stayed to the head of the rudder?  That's nuts.  One bad jibe, and that rudder is flying into the ocean.  Not to mention the nice holes in the transom where the gudgeons used to be. 

I had an Oday 23, and the main sheet was stayed to the backstay.  It allowed for end of boom sheeting and kept the cockpit clear, but I never liked all that potential shock load on the backstay.

It might be able to be used as a poor mans self steering set up. High winds create more weather helm, offset by increased mizzen sheet load dragging the rudder to leward. Of course off the wind it would all go to hell.

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

Looks like an ossuary... catacombs

FB- Doug

Or one hell of a pizza oven.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

WTF is that Bull?

 

1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

Looks like an ossuary... catacombs

FB- Doug

right click > search google for image.

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Looks like an ossuary... catacombs

FB- Doug

I thought that was a large flightless bird.

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I thought that was a large flightless bird.

You're thinking of the 737 Max.

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12 hours ago, Ishmael said:

You're thinking of the 737 Max.

nope, he's thinking of the the apteryx: a small flightless bird with hairy feathers 

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16 hours ago, steele said:

It might be able to be used as a poor mans self steering set up. High winds create more weather helm, offset by increased mizzen sheet load dragging the rudder to leward. Of course off the wind it would all go to hell.

It looks to me like it lands on the pivot axis of the rudder to minimize the effect on steering.

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4 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

It looks to me like it lands on the pivot axis of the rudder to minimize the effect on steering.

Crawford Melonseed (much smaller) sheets to the rudder/tiller right at the line/axis of the pintles/gudeons (sp?).  I never noticed any impact on helm feel/loading as a result  of trimming the main, upwind, down, or reaching...

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4 minutes ago, Crash said:

Crawford Melonseed (much smaller) sheets to the rudder/tiller right at the line/axis of the pintles/gudeons (sp?).  I never noticed any impact on helm feel/loading as a result  of trimming the main, upwind, down, or reaching...

I really envy you folks who grew up sailing all those iconic boats.

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I really wish we had hung on to that boat.  What a sweet little daysailor.  And it just looks right...

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On 12/11/2019 at 4:30 PM, Ishmael said:

Or one hell of a pizza oven.

Ossuary, pizza oven, hell, there has to be some sort of link there...

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17 hours ago, WGWarburton said:
17 hours ago, chester said:

nope, he's thinking of the the apteryx: a small flightless bird with hairy feathers 

I liked those.

I did too. What happened to them? Did we eat them all, already?

- DSK

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Pulpit Harbor in Penobscot Bay is a museum afloat. The Lewis R French sailing through the rocks. 

1079509333_FrenchsailingintoPulpit.thumb.jpg.3e39e8afde42916b1a6a6c9f82155ba2.jpg

Few watching may know this timeless sight could as well be 150 years old as the French was built in 1871. 

1584680562_FrenchsailingintoPulpitBW.thumb.jpg.985831100723fa94c9515d9b1c53eca2.jpg

Still engineless in 2019, the schooner drops and sets anchor under sail. 

612413727_Frenchsailingin._.thumb.jpg.76a65742a45bb492e19dd121d7745c51.jpg

Later that day, descendants of the Cabot family sell us fresh brownies.

Cabot kids (hopefully as delightful as these were),  have been rowing in Pulpit Harbor since the 1880s when the Cabot's of Boston area bought some hardscrabble coastline from head shaking natives(useless for farming), to become the first 'Rusticators' on the island. 

1703254673_Cabotkidssellingbrownies.thumb.jpg.7393e61c5c1fd2256792329af577985e.jpg

The kids are new but the Whitehall rowing boat may have ferried their great, great (great?)  grandparents around Pulpit Harbor.

The Whitehall design is older than that originating in Europe way before the Lewis R French was built. 

This artifact now in the boat shed along the shores of Pulpit Harbor was designed in 1915 by B.B Crowninshield (and built shortly after). It will be launched once again in 2020. 

64991888_CabotCoveboatshed2.jpg.64f3df7fc9b31529a00fe063c0756ec7.jpg

Night in the museum. 

418953562_PinkyPulpitrock.thumb.jpg.9725aa4ecf1f608143adc6c5fc62dac2.jpg

 

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30 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

Still engineless in 2019, the schooner drops and sets anchor under sail. 

Several years ago, Mrs. B and I cruised on the Mercantile. She was also engineless, but carried a y'all yawl boat, which had a beefy inboard diesel engine. On a few occasions, the yawl boat was lowered, made fast to the stern, and acted as an auxiliary engine. A crew member would scamper down if a throttle adjustment was needed.

Here is the Mercantile with the yawl boat in the stern davits.

IMG_0752.JPG.thumb.jpg.14c257d5dfa8f5835065c9c749f0ce27.jpg

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Ditto for the Stephen Taber.  If I remember it was the cook who was assigned to run the Yawl boat.  Reasoning was that they usually were not busy in the galley when the yawl boat was needed

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21 hours ago, py26129 said:

Ditto for the Stephen Taber.  If I remember it was the cook who was assigned to run the Yawl boat.  Reasoning was that they usually were not busy in the galley when the yawl boat was needed

Old school, perhaps to a fault at some point. The Grace Bailey (a near twin to the Merchantile) went up on the rocks a mile beyond this shot last season. 

 

1377660678_GraceBailey1.thumb.jpg.1ca7ec12d41b6e3537a703f8a8e5fb78.jpg

 

They were sailing her through the Fox Island Thoroughfare on a light wind. Note the mate (or cook?) in the yawl boat, just in case. This is the glory shot for the 'dudes', sailing through the Fox. 

112860894_GraceBailey2.thumb.jpg.cb87422884a82008be46a7355d407893.jpg

 

I've sailed this route numerous times, in light air. As you get to the dog leg up ahead, you'll need to tack - or - hold your port tack (prevailing Southerly winds) and cut through a natural channel through rocks. There is plenty of room however the current can easily push you out of the channel. Plus there is a potential to mistake one nav aid for one further up, and at high water, the rocks - exposed at all other times - don't give you a reference. 

 

The owner of this schooner fleet (3 boats) swears by the olde school. Paper charts only and no electronics. Ray, the owner, knows these waters by heart as do his captains. This captain was a new guy. 

 

Getting nervous yet? 

 

1572059592_GraceBaileygrounded.thumb.jpg.fcabfb322b22f297fa0e38c73d154fe5.jpg

 

Yup. She went up gently but had to wait out the tide change. Didn't breech the hull but the boat was hauled and most of the worm shoe replaced, I think.

 

Knowing this area, I suspect he wasn't where he thought he was (that never happens!!). 

 

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10 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

She went up gently but had to wait out the tide change.

Very fortunate that the gentle grounding occurred on the right tide.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

Very fortunate that the gentle grounding occurred on the right tide.

Very. One of our coolboats.

VYEC9ef.jpg

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I didn't know Robertson was gone - long time ago too.

A shame.

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22 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

The owner of this schooner fleet (3 boats) swears by the olde school. Paper charts only and no electronics. Ray, the owner, knows these waters by heart as do his captains. This captain was a new guy. 

The Mercantile had a plotter and, I think, radar. Very nice in foggy conditions.

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1 hour ago, dacapo said:

clerarwater.thumb.JPG.5d3ee9e48ca276262945c92148bc206f.JPG

I'm still smitten by the Clearwater

Designed by my yacht design teacher Cy Hamlin.  He was the greatest!  

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6 hours ago, dacapo said:

clerarwater.thumb.JPG.5d3ee9e48ca276262945c92148bc206f.JPG

I'm still smitten by the Clearwater

Wow - talk about a waterdozer.

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Well, the Hudson River Sloops were originally built to move goods and people up and down the river and skinny boats can't carry as much stuff ;)

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3 hours ago, Crash said:

Well, the Hudson River Sloops were originally built to move goods and people up and down the river and skinny boats can't carry as much stuff ;)

Boats for rivers usually have shallow draft as well.

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On 12/14/2019 at 4:02 AM, dacapo said:

clerarwater.thumb.JPG.5d3ee9e48ca276262945c92148bc206f.JPG

I'm still smitten by the Clearwater

I had the privilege of attending her launch in East Boothbay some 'number' of years ago....

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I'd use the poop deck and just hang onto the flagstaff.

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13 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I'd use the poop deck and just hang onto the flagstaff.

I hope you'd put a napkin down first, could really spoil the teak.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I'd use the poop deck and just hang onto the flagstaff.

 

52 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I hope you'd put a napkin down first, could really spoil the teak.

ABFE4648-D2CE-4BB6-BC3F-B1E70E9B5AF8.jpeg.23cc7414130cff56b2cecf8e1d5cdc2a.jpeg


This was my solution......

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5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Looks like getting to the head could be very exciting.

Like all good comedy, it's funny because it's true. I love the look of these pricey day sailors, but a 30 foot boat with an inboard, billed as having full berths, a shower and a cockpit table, had better have a usable head. Those 3 pretty young French girls in the ad are unlikely to crawl through the deck hatch to do their thing while somehow lying flat under the deck, although the gymnastics involved is strangely appealing. Even I would be a bit reluctant to water the fishes with no lifelines to hold on to while doing the deed.

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Why do you thing "standing rigging" is named that?

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re: standing riggin'... Wiki sums it up....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_rigging

Meanwhile a few months back in Blighty....

Back in March I had the privilege of getting a walk-through of the build of the impressive Spirit 34m 111.

Untitled-3.thumb.jpg.a374e6e46dd5185ed9513d13b083e58b.jpg

Untitled-2.thumb.jpg.464e020964a9e8a5013254888ec28b3f.jpg

Untitled-1.thumb.jpg.93add6da7901b80497bc304fcfd4a86c.jpg

What a work of art. A German owner investing in a world class build hatched out of historic Ipswich. The interior is a mass of fluid curves
that at key zones go infinite horizons.

Visionary in every sense of the word, a fantastic achievement for SPIRIT.

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13 minutes ago, Marinatrix447 said:

Spirit 34m 111.

Untitled-3.thumb.jpg.a374e6e46dd5185ed9513d13b083e58b.jpg

Untitled-2.thumb.jpg.464e020964a9e8a5013254888ec28b3f.jpg

 

Visionary in every sense of the word, a fantastic achievement for SPIRIT.

That there is some serious yacht porn. Thanks for that.

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7 hours ago, Marinatrix447 said:

re: standing riggin'... Wiki sums it up....

WHOOOOOOOOOOSH

                  :huh:

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10 hours ago, Black Sox said:

That there is some serious yacht porn. Thanks for that.

I had the good fortune to see one of the smaller models (mid 40's if memory serves) at the Newport Boat Show a few years ago.  Holy smokes, what a confection.  Not as sumptuous as the Friendships, and not as "Yankee" practical as the Morris'.   Very sharp lines, gorgeous woodwork above and below, and wholly impractical.   The smallest yacht it's size I've ever been on.  

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23 hours ago, Marinatrix447 said:

re: standing riggin'... Wiki sums it up....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_rigging

Meanwhile a few months back in Blighty....

Back in March I had the privilege of getting a walk-through of the build of the impressive Spirit 34m 111.

Untitled-3.thumb.jpg.a374e6e46dd5185ed9513d13b083e58b.jpg

Untitled-2.thumb.jpg.464e020964a9e8a5013254888ec28b3f.jpg

Untitled-1.thumb.jpg.93add6da7901b80497bc304fcfd4a86c.jpg

What a work of art. A German owner investing in a world class build hatched out of historic Ipswich. The interior is a mass of fluid curves
that at key zones go infinite horizons.

Visionary in every sense of the word, a fantastic achievement for SPIRIT.

Is that the one with the interior that proves that money doesn't bring taste?

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I'm a fan of the Spirit Yachts. Pompous day sailers that seem to be enduring. This sales video sums up why classic yacht style endures and endures.

When the producers of the film Casino Royale asked Spirit for a yacht for their set, Spirit said "Sure, it'll cost you get in into the Grand Canal" The producers walked to get a freebie from another builder. The producers were back a couple weeks later, asking how much. 

Sure, there are plenty of all white plastic yachts available for free.  But how would Bond, a man that drives a 60's Aston Martin, ever sail a clorox bottle? They wrote the check. 

 

Wood is forever. 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'm a fan of the Spirit Yachts. Pompous day sailers that seem to be enduring. This sales video sums up why classic yacht style endures and endures.

When the producers of the film Casino Royale asked Spirit for a yacht for their set, Spirit said "Sure, it'll cost you get in into the Grand Canal" The producers walked to get a freebie from another builder. The producers were back a couple weeks later, asking how much. 

Sure, there are plenty of all white plastic yachts available for free.  But how would Bond, a man that drives a 60's Aston Martin, ever sail a clorox bottle? They wrote the check. 

 

Wood is forever. 

 

 

I love how they show up in James Bond films.  I am a big fan of them.

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Connery WAS James Bond - if you've read the books you realize that he was born for the role - he looks & sounds exactly like the descriptions in the books.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Connery WAS James Bond - if you've read the books you realize that he was born for the role - he looks & sounds exactly like the descriptions in the books.

I was more of a Roger Moore Bond person, but I think its just cause that was my era.   My wife of course finds Daniel Craig to be her dish.  lol.  

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Connery WAS James Bond - if you've read the books you realize that he was born for the role - he looks & sounds exactly like the descriptions in the books.

Only ever one Bond James Bond that is.

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12 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I was more of a Roger Moore Bond person, but I think its just cause that was my era.   My wife of course finds Daniel Craig to be her dish.  lol.  

Moore was fun but he was a cartoon character.

I like him better as The Saint.

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3 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Moore was fun but he was a cartoon character.

I like him better as The Saint.

Live and Let Die was on the tube a while ago, and I came across it while flipping the channels.  The scene I saw was a big fight scene.  Bond (Roger Moore) was fighting a big guy, and I swear, I was laughing out loud.  It looked like a couple of seventh grade girls going at it.  Just embarrassingly lame.  I liked Moore too, but he was a let down from Connery.

I read somewhere that Moore was supposed to be Bond from the beginning, but that he couldn't get out of his Saint contract.

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How 'bout this one? I think James was an Agent-in-Training.

772581072_007sailboat.thumb.jpg.a083efe6bfcd1f66fc8c74de78ca343d.jpg

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On 12/5/2019 at 6:35 AM, Russell Brown said:

Not my boat, but it's cool and I did take the photo

DSC_5365.jpg

All boats look better with a PT dinghy alongside.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

How 'bout this one? I think James was an Agent-in-Training.

772581072_007sailboat.thumb.jpg.a083efe6bfcd1f66fc8c74de78ca343d.jpg

Poor old Quarrel only had a few hours left at that point.

One of the rare cases where the black guy didn't die first.

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Speaking of sailboats used in films, a local boat (I posted about HERON in another thread) was used in the Johnny Depp film, The Rum Diary.

A comedy (sort of...) based on the book by Hunter Thompson. The producers probably choose the HERON on availability,  because she winters and works charter in the area of the Caribbean the film was shot.  

This wasn't a bad choice, I suppose. Set in the early 60's, this design would have been 3 or 4 decades old (the boat was built in 2000). It seemed a little stodgy (dated) to me as the characters were fast lane types.

 

I would have a picked a 50 - 60's CCA design (BOLERO available?),... Heres the HERON during shoot for the film: Do you think the boat fits the 60's dudes here?

 

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Sailors are harsh critics of sailing and boats in movies. But the owners of the Rockport HERON raved about how easy this was for them. They got a couple (few?) weeks off to vacation in the Caribbean and not have to run the b