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Not at all Dog. We have these really cool terms, might as well use them.

 

"Futtock shrouds"?

 

Square rigger stuff, if I remember correctly. Reals tars would climb out hanging upside down from the futtock shrouds rather than use the lubber holes.

 

Futtock.jpg

 

How about the double diagonals on multihull masts, can we start calling those Futtock shrouds too?

Kashmir_Prout_46_catamaran_mast.jpg

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Absolutely!

We can't let a term like "futtock shrouds" fade into obscurity.

 

Good call Milo. When I was a kid in Australia MILO was a chocolate drink as I recall.

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Absolutely!

We can't let a term like "futtock shrouds" fade into obscurity.

 

Good call Milo. When I was a kid in Australia MILO was a chocolate drink as I recall.

Still is in NZL and AUS, Bob. Big brand chocolate drink (and breakfast cereals).

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" Snotter" is another term that deserves to live on in other than a piece of lug sail rigging.

Therefore , thats what we call the soft fabric tube thing that douses the asymetric.

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I've got futtock shrouds and deadeyes then- way cool. Somehow I think when they Beat To Quarters on the Surprise they warp the futtock shrouds as part of the prep. I'll go with that.

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" Snotter" is another term that deserves to live on in other than a piece of lug sail rigging.

Therefore , thats what we call the soft fabric tube thing that douses the asymetric.

Indeed. Whereas "Snotty" is a midshipman in the Royal Navy of yore.

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" Snotter" is another term that deserves to live on in other than a piece of lug sail rigging.

Therefore , thats what we call the soft fabric tube thing that douses the asymetric.

 

We usually call that Oh Shit It's Twisted.

But vernacular is different all over the world.

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My coolboat of the day. I like the size (30' LOD), the clean, bright interior with standing headroom, good tankage, storage and refrigeration - it appears to be really well thought-out.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2007/Ted-Brewer-Nimble-2445226/Mazatlan/Mexico#.UjvMDMakoWQ

 

 

Careful comparison reveals it's not a stock Nimble 30. Adds are the bowsprit and second headsail and maybe the shoal draft - the Nimble 30 appears to have a regular keel. The owner/builder posted elsewhere that he's built other boats. Does anyone know anything about this builder or his boats?

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"stuns'l"?

I haven't heard that term since the Aubrey/Maturin series. Likely the only stuns'l most of us will ever fly is when we decide to air out the bath towels while underway.

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new entry for consideration: the Riptide 35 from Bieker Boats, built by the capable hands of Jim Betts of Anacortes, WA. I think this boat gets a lot of things right. The interior is pretty interesting. It looks very functional without being the typical sport-boat coffin. I like the foot holds molded into the lazarette lids for the helmsman. Reports are that this is a very quick boat. Massively better looking than anything I've ever seen from J boat, but only two of them built thus far.

 

DSC_0027+4.jpg

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Likely the only stuns'l most of us will ever fly is when we decide to air out the bath towels while underway.

 

Towels are more probably closer to being watersails than stuns'ls. "Hey, you sass that hoopy Ford Prefect? There's a frood who really knows where his towel is."

 

 

water%20sail_8773BW_xlarge.jpg

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new entry for consideration: the Riptide 35 from Bieker Boats, built by the capable hands of Jim Betts of Anacortes, WA. I think this boat gets a lot of things right.

 

 

Drawing 8 and a half feet with a bulb on the bottom, I'd imagine it can carry quite a bit of sail. It just can't do it anywhere near me.

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new entry for consideration: the Riptide 35 from Bieker Boats, built by the capable hands of Jim Betts of Anacortes, WA. I think this boat gets a lot of things right.

 

 

Drawing 8 and a half feet with a bulb on the bottom, I'd imagine it can carry quite a bit of sail. It just can't do it anywhere near me.

Same here. 24% of the Chesapeake is under 6' in depth.

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new entry for consideration: the Riptide 35 from Bieker Boats, built by the capable hands of Jim Betts of Anacortes, WA. I think this boat gets a lot of things right.

 

 

Drawing 8 and a half feet with a bulb on the bottom, I'd imagine it can carry quite a bit of sail. It just can't do it anywhere near me.

 

Tom, they can get away with it in local waters there to Puget Sound. Deep water, and often light winds. Definitely a high SA/D boat.

 

Paul Bieker, if folks didn't already know, designed the dagger foils for OTUSA's AC72. With that kind of pedigree, I don't think there's any question as to the boat's performance. For example, get a load of the rudder. The tubercules on the trailing edge are designed to prevent cavitation while planing. The boat also features water ballasts to help keep her on her feet with shorthanded crews.

 

riptide35_rudder.jpg

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If they are on the trailing edge, that rudder has a hell of a lot of balance area!

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_leading_ yes - leading edge. sorry. coffee still sinking in.

 

and furthermore, I have the cavitation bit wrong, too. i'm mixing this up with another project I'd been following. From JBE's site:

 

The rudder has four tubercles along the leading edge which aid helm control by delaying the stall point . This revolutionary technology draws from the observation of the unique bumps on the leading edges of Humpback whale fins. The bumps are designed into the core and were cut out on our CNC table.

 

looks like an SA'er was all over this once before. I'm no naval engineer, nor do I want to pretend to be one. I just see that rudder and think: "whale bumps. that fully kicks ass. "

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=137128&p=3838429

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Nice looking galley for a sporty boat.

 

IMG_4773.JPG

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I like how they got their standing headroom by standing you in the bilge: http://www.biekerboats.com/Bieker_Boats/Riptide_35_MKII_Particulars_files/RT35II_arrangements_RevD-Web%20Layout%20Arrangement.pdf

 

Clever how they got the framing for the keel by wrapping around the forward edge of the stb'd settee (so only running forward from the keel root). I hope they're right that's all the framing they need...sure looks like it could use a nice grid in the rest of the floor.

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Bob - it's used to heat the moist towelettes when serving up fresh caught crab.

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watersails? something like this?

Le81-aken.png

 

 

Likely the only stuns'l most of us will ever fly is when we decide to air out the bath towels while underway.

 

Towels are more probably closer to being watersails than stuns'ls. "Hey, you sass that hoopy Ford Prefect? There's a frood who really knows where his towel is."

 

 

water%20sail_8773BW_xlarge.jpg

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Bob - it's used to heat the moist towelettes when serving up fresh caught crab.

 

...for which there's a recipe taped up over the stove. I want to see the carbon fiber toothbrush holder in the head, which only accepts tooth brushes that have been cut in half.

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Bob - it's used to heat the moist towelettes when serving up fresh caught crab.

 

...for which there's a recipe taped up over the stove. I want to see the carbon fiber toothbrush holder in the head, which only accepts tooth brushes that have been cut in half.

You did note that for weight savings, the rubber pad for the whale foot pump has been removed. ;)

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Nice looking galley for a sporty boat.

Except that those sharp corners and edges should be well-rounded.

Why no crash bar on the cooker?!

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"sky-scrapers, moon-rakers, star-gazers, water and below- water sails"

 

The great maritime historian Basil Greenhill admitted he had no idea what a "below-water sail" could be . . .

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Nice looking galley for a sporty boat.

 

Except that those sharp corners and edges should be well-rounded.
Why no crash bar on the cooker?!

Aye yay yay. The nanny state invades boat design. I'm betting you kids never scraped your elbows at the playground, either. :)

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The stove is to help with the rating - it only needs a safety bar if you plan to actually use it.

 

You can eat anything that can be warmed up in that microwave . . . or MRE's

 

 

Actually I really like the boat - "Alright" just has me on a roll.

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The stove is to help with the rating - it only needs a safety bar if you plan to actually use it.

 

You can eat anything that can be warmed up in that microwave . . . or MRE's

 

 

Actually I really like the boat - "Alright" just has me on a roll.

 

for sure. Compared to say a J/105, I thought it looked pretty good. The reality is that this boat's meant to go fast for people who have deep pockets. It'll never be a OD boat, and it's not designed as a full time cruiser, either.

 

As for safety bars, I've always thought those were meant primarily to keep you from falling into a gimballed stove while it's in use and making a mess out of everything sitting on it. The stove and microwave combo on the Riptide do not appear to be gimballed, to me. *shrug*

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Thought the references to a microwave were a joke - referring to the small box on the hull side forward of the locker, behind the stove. Light? The stove itself looks like a normal gimballed marine stove to me.

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Thought the references to a microwave were a joke - referring to the small box on the hull side forward of the locker, behind the stove. Light? The stove itself looks like a normal gimballed marine stove to me.

 

ahhh - I see what you're saying, now. I assumed the joke was about the small box, too. But I also assumed that the stove was a microwave. whadda-I-know? If that's gimballed it's really fancy lookin'. All the gimballed stoves I've seen had more clearance around the sides and the back. They are probably all 20+ years old, on even older cruisers, too.

 

Despite this shortcoming, I'd still risk the burns on top of giving my left nut for this boat.

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propshaft detail. folding propeller? How about a folding strut. I hear that if you rev the aux up while it's folded in reverse, it'll keep the bow from stuffing while up on a plane, making up for the lack of no safety bar on the stove. And no, I'm not serious.

 

photo-12.JPG

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Very perceptive there, Skol.

 

re The microwave, I meant the little gadget up by the boat's knee, not down by the cook's knee.

 

I like the water ballast on this boat. When Commodore and Nancy took off for the South Pacific, their FLASHGIRL had water ballast. Makes for a more comfortable passage and you can get rid of the weight when you don't need it.

 

That foot pump lever would take some skin off (or rip a kite) - I hope it's removable.

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Very perceptive there, Skol.

 

re The microwave, I meant the little gadget up by the boat's knee, not down by the cook's knee.

 

I like the water ballast on this boat. When Commodore and Nancy took off for the South Pacific, their FLASHGIRL had water ballast. Makes for a more comfortable passage and you can get rid of the weight when you don't need it.

 

That foot pump lever would take some skin off (or rip a kite) - I hope it's removable.

 

 

Sounds great. Any links to their voyage / boat? If pushing the performance envelope, water ballast seems infinitely more practical for us mortals compared to something like a canting keel.

 

re: kite - with asyms on a sprit, they should be easy to bag back in the cockpit after they're furled. But you're right about the skin. I'd manage to saw my leg off on the foot pump, somehow.

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Water ballast is really nice. My experience is that it can really change the feel of the boat to have more of a steady, heavy momentum motion. Plus the ability to add and remove the equivalent of 4-5 crew without having to feed them is nice... but then again, they're not there to take the kite down at 3am during the squall either!

Very perceptive there, Skol.

 

re The microwave, I meant the little gadget up by the boat's knee, not down by the cook's knee.

 

I like the water ballast on this boat. When Commodore and Nancy took off for the South Pacific, their FLASHGIRL had water ballast. Makes for a more comfortable passage and you can get rid of the weight when you don't need it.

 

That foot pump lever would take some skin off (or rip a kite) - I hope it's removable.

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That stove is gimballed.

And harness straps for cooking, in my view death-traps. If its that rough that you need one, you do not want to be tied to the dangerous spot.

I think this owner is like minded. Do not cook, self heating meals, do a quick boil of water and dryfreezefood or noodles.tc.

 

And the corners are rounded, though small radius.

I reckon some wants to radia the stove too, remember, it can stick out while heeled.

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I can tell you from first hand experience that the Riptide 35 is very quick downwind in a breeze.

 

We rounded the weather mark with them in 20+ knots on Sunday, and they took 10 minutes off us on the ensuing 30 minute run. (I was on a FARR 395).

 

But we did seem to be going a little better upwind.

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http://www.wyliedesigngroup.com/press_files/FlashGirl,%20American%20Yacht%20Review.pdf

 

I've read various places that cruisers motor at least 80% of the time. Screw that.

 

thanks for that link, Bob. Sure is an interesting build. I like the big portlight for the aft cabin. can you imagine waking up to that view while on the hook? Niiice. I thought it was also interesting to note that FlashGirl has no floor boards in order to provide a bit more headroom. As mentioned, the curved bottom doesn't matter much when heeled, anyway. Makes me wonder if this boat didn't influence the Riptide MkII to some degree, or if this is an old trick.

 

 

 

Water ballast is really nice. My experience is that it can really change the feel of the boat to have more of a steady, heavy momentum motion. Plus the ability to add and remove the equivalent of 4-5 crew without having to feed them is nice... but then again, they're not there to take the kite down at 3am during the squall either!

Very perceptive there, Skol.

 

re The microwave, I meant the little gadget up by the boat's knee, not down by the cook's knee.

 

I like the water ballast on this boat. When Commodore and Nancy took off for the South Pacific, their FLASHGIRL had water ballast. Makes for a more comfortable passage and you can get rid of the weight when you don't need it.

 

That foot pump lever would take some skin off (or rip a kite) - I hope it's removable.

 

For sure it seems like a really cool trick to have up your sleeve when the sea state is handing your ass to you in a lightweight boat. I'm trying to think of any downsides and not coming up with many.

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I can tell you from first hand experience that the Riptide 35 is very quick downwind in a breeze.

 

We rounded the weather mark with them in 20+ knots on Sunday, and they took 10 minutes off us on the ensuing 30 minute run. (I was on a FARR 395).

 

But we did seem to be going a little better upwind.

 

Expat, thanks for the anecdote. where were you racin'? Sounds like it was fun.

 

p.s. Speaking as someone who spent part of their childhood in the Galveston area, I like your avatar. Going back to visit family is painful. They're spread six ways to Sunday around the metro, and there's very little time to get back out to the water side and old haunts. Houston sucks.

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A non-gimballed stove is totally useless at sea. The stove is the second most important system after whatever holds the spinnaker up. Crew can't sail if they don't eat, and they can't eat if they can't cook. Unless you are a masochist and believe in cold food all the way across the ocean.

 

It doesn't cost any more money to do it right, putting some radii on the corners. It is simply a lack of experience or a misguided sense of style or both.

 

Also that stove area doesn't seem to have any provision for putting on a harness--that would be part of the "crash bar". That's another thing that you absolutely need at sea. Some way to support yourself while cooking. IT isn't only the possibility of 3rd degree burns that requires a proper stove outfit. If you are going to go to the trouble of putting a stove in, do it right or don't do it at all.

 

well, I think this: It *is* Cruising Anarchy, so I feel proud to incite a debate about the galley, while a fully retractable prop hasn't even registered yet. ;)

 

I also think there are a thousand or more small boat voyages on the books that haven't had the luxury of a gimballed doohickey with a cooking trapeze. On the other hand, plenty sailors have also resorted to shitting into a bucket, too, but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up a working head on my boat. I hear your wisdom on this galley thing and tend to agree with you, but "absolutely need" is probably too strong of a stance.

 

I still think the corners are fine. What say you about Hans Christian boats with fancy granite counter tops and brass faucets and all that? Is the stove the only point of danger in the galley while underway? I think we're splittin' hairs. :rolleyes:

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It isn't the stove per se but the whole arrangement and the treatment of the corners of the joinery. One of those things where people just don't learn from experience and we repeat the same mistakes over and over...yes, you can cruise with a svea and a bucket. Just see how long you put up with that on ocean crossings. Dabbling with anchored overnights you can do anything landlubbery down below and get away with it. Not on the open sea with a 24 hour operation.

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I just have a single-burner Sea Swing which is easily stowed when underway - on the windward side of course!

 

A partial offset to hard corners is (are?) a bunch of good grabholds down below. I added a few in my boat but the Riptide appears to have that sorted. If your rib cage gets thrown into something hard, it hurts no matter how rounded off it is. I tend to agree with fasty though - those corners look a bit sharp, like they didn't want to make the extra trim pieces to round them off.

 

Re the cabin sole, the problem is that any water that would have been below the floorboards is sloshing around getting things wet. Even a big racer/cruiser like the J/120 has this problem due to shallow bilges. It's a little unnerving when it's happening, and it's usually not enough water to remove completely.

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well, I think this: It *is* Cruising Anarchy, so I feel proud to incite a debate about the galley, while a fully retractable prop hasn't even registered yet. ;)

 

 

It did with me. Is there a universal joint at the other end or something? I have never picked barnacles out of a submerged U-joint before. I think that might be a good record to keep intact. ;) Or if the flexing part is inside the boat, what kind of stuffing box allows that?

 

Seems like a lot of complication for not much gain to me. I'm reminded of Maine Sail's tests on whether a prop should spin or not. Even dragging a locked, fixed-bladed prop through the water did not slow his boat down all that much. A folding prop seems to me to take care of most of the problem in a simpler and better way.

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Our last boat had a non gimballed stove and we never minded - but it faced aft and the boat was wide so heel was kept <20 degrees. Sailed lots of offshore miles. But yeah no excuse for sharp corners. I bet she sails at less than 20 degrees of heel too.

 

Yes the u joint is in the water. But you put a bit of force on it and the barnies will get crushed.

 

Love the full length carbon tube handrail. Paul loves carbon tubing. Very structurally efficient.

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Boat's probably drysailed, so barnacles on the drive are less of a problem. Wouldn't be surprised to see bowsprit deployment line in the handrail a la J boats. And as a racer/cruiser, living onboard isn't likely to be a design objective, so a galley set up more for reheating/tea/coffee/miso soup while underway is fine.

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Here's a bit of spirit of tradition type boat porn for you to feast your eyes on. Fairlie 55

 

 

With the man hours involved, no wonder it costs a fortune.

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Boat's probably drysailed, so barnacles on the drive are less of a problem.

 

Yes, it is. They have it rigged for a single point lift.

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well, I think this: It *is* Cruising Anarchy, so I feel proud to incite a debate about the galley, while a fully retractable prop hasn't even registered yet. ;)

 

 

It did with me. Is there a universal joint at the other end or something? I have never picked barnacles out of a submerged U-joint before. I think that might be a good record to keep intact. ;) Or if the flexing part is inside the boat, what kind of stuffing box allows that?

 

Seems like a lot of complication for not much gain to me. I'm reminded of Maine Sail's tests on whether a prop should spin or not. Even dragging a locked, fixed-bladed prop through the water did not slow his boat down all that much. A folding prop seems to me to take care of most of the problem in a simpler and better way.

 

the prop shaft uses a single cardan style joint that is submerged. the stuffing box is between the joint and the engine, so nothing fancy there. Since the prop shaft and the drive's stub shaft are inline to the engine when deployed, they can get away with using a single joint. The joint is articulated only when the drive unit is retracted.

 

I'd probably hand it to steel U-joints for fending off growth over articulating blades on a prop. Especially once some throttle is put down. My other hobby is building and driving off-road vehicles. I've seen submerged u-joints in the PNW churn up mud, sticks, tree roots, clay, and small rocks on front axles and just need a good rinsing afterward. Used this way on a boat, I don't see any big problems here.

 

The one thing I wonder about is prop walk in reverse. The feathering props do seem to make a big improvement to inline stability in reverse.

 

Retractable+Drive+12.JPG

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Boat's probably drysailed, so barnacles on the drive are less of a problem.

 

Yes, it is. They have it rigged for a single point lift.

 

Indeed, JBE also has images of a trailer that's been designed and built for it. I've gotta say, though, that I think dry sailing a 35 footer seems like a giant pain in the backside.

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Can appreicate the construction details and workmanship... but ultimately, the lines don't look that great to me.

 

Here's a bit of spirit of tradition type boat porn for you to feast your eyes on. Fairlie 55

 

 

With the man hours involved, no wonder it costs a fortune.

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Here's a bit of spirit of tradition type boat porn for you to feast your eyes on. Fairlie 55

 

 

With the man hours involved, no wonder it costs a fortune.

 

that was an exceptionally well edited video of the build. Her hull looks stouter 'n a shared mule at the end of harvest!

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I enjoyed the video also. Can't say much for the design though. A bit boring for me. The level of skill in the build is amazing.

 

"Her hull looks stouter 'n a shared mule at the end of harvest!"

 

That's exactly what I was going to say. I always say that.

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Great bit of vid. Using a piece of tube as a screed for the filler was interesting - I've only ever seen or used long squeegees. The tube looks like it works much more smoothly. They should put handles on their longboard - much easier on the hands. Nice boat that deserves a better looking cabin top - that one is sort of insipid, especially at the forward end.

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well, I think this: It *is* Cruising Anarchy, so I feel proud to incite a debate about the galley, while a fully retractable prop hasn't even registered yet. ;)

 

 

It did with me. Is there a universal joint at the other end or something? I have never picked barnacles out of a submerged U-joint before. I think that might be a good record to keep intact. ;) Or if the flexing part is inside the boat, what kind of stuffing box allows that?

 

Seems like a lot of complication for not much gain to me. I'm reminded of Maine Sail's tests on whether a prop should spin or not. Even dragging a locked, fixed-bladed prop through the water did not slow his boat down all that much. A folding prop seems to me to take care of most of the problem in a simpler and better way.

 

the prop shaft uses a single cardan style joint that is submerged. the stuffing box is between the joint and the engine, so nothing fancy there. Since the prop shaft and the drive's stub shaft are inline to the engine when deployed, they can get away with using a single joint. The joint is articulated only when the drive unit is retracted.

 

I'd probably hand it to steel U-joints for fending off growth over articulating blades on a prop. Especially once some throttle is put down. My other hobby is building and driving off-road vehicles. I've seen submerged u-joints in the PNW churn up mud, sticks, tree roots, clay, and small rocks on front axles and just need a good rinsing afterward. Used this way on a boat, I don't see any big problems here.

 

The one thing I wonder about is prop walk in reverse. The feathering props do seem to make a big improvement to inline stability in reverse.

 

Retractable+Drive+12.JPG

 

 

A retractable outboard would be so much simpler.

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The vast majority of powerboaters choose gasoline power, and someone made a diesel outboard. Not sure if they still do.

 

I remain unimpressed by the retractable shaft. Seems like a lot of gear for not much gain.

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The Fairlie:

 

Lovely craftsmanship. But I can't help think there are much easier ways to build a boat. Surprised they used soo many staples in the diagonal layers but I suspect they didn't pull them.

 

Bulb shape is just ..... Hideous.

 

They put on the rudder and keel too soon. Way too much walking up and down stairs once they're on.

 

The end product is sure purty.

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I was thinking the same thing about the staples.

Unless they were plastic ones you couldn't fair the hull before the dynel went on.

Dont like metal staples permanently in the hull, its a path for water to wick through the layers if the outer seal fails, which it eventually will.

They also used sawn frames, not laminated ones, dont know why, I suspect it is cosmetic.

When I used to cold mould boats it was bad practice to leave the staples in.

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Except who wants a gasoline engine???

 

Looking at that retractable prop, I dont see it being any use on a cruiser.

 

Its really a motor to get from the marina to the startline, and back again.

 

Or a day out on the bay.

 

I really dont see the point of it.

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The guy with the staple gun seemed trigger happy to me. It doesn't look like they bagged the veneer plies, which would explain that, but that still showed some poor form.

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Is this boat cool or a nightmare? It must be great fun to sail, but is described as a long range cruising boat, which implies living in it for reasonably extended periods.

I'm not sure if I could spend much time living in a set from 2001 A SPACE ODYSSEY, or Woody Allen's SLEEPER.

Maybe I'm just an old fart, or just not ready for the future yet.

Anyway I think it's very cool - the galley and nav station rotate, for God's sake - but I don't want one.

Called a JP54.

post-38-0-84711900-1380216031_thumb.jpg

post-38-0-36223800-1380216072_thumb.jpg

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That gizmo over the nav station makes me wonder if it was designed for a radiologist, or a dentist. Anyway:

 

1) No row-away factor. Maybe a negative row-away factor.

 

2) Too big for normal people to cruise. Sometimes you have to muscle stuff - not happening on that boat.

 

3) Very difficult to maneuver in close quarters (twin rudders = no effect of prop wash), tiny rudders and SailDrive, etc.

I guess that's a bow thruster - you'd need it.

 

4) Way too much draft, and the unreliability of a swing keel.

 

5) Not close to a comfortable, cruising cockpit.

 

6) That cabin? The reference to Sleeper nails it. Where's the orgazmatron?

 

No.

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I dunno. If I could convince my wife to dress up like Barbarella for a crossing, I'd take one. I think you have to keep in mind that racy boats are a distinct niche, and they're not marketed toward the traditional idea of a cruising sailboat. I'd guess that cockpit is going to be pretty wet and wild with any combination of speed and waves. the idea I think probably is to set a GoPro camera forward in the cockpit to capture your best VOR 70 face to send to the folks back home.

 

As for the interior, I kind of like the forward cabins. They've tried to use a lot of organic shapes to make the plastic look less like the typical race boat coffins without weighing it down with a bunch of wood. I kind of like it.

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The forward cabins remind me of the Capsule Hotels in Japan.

post-37611-0-92293000-1380301583.jpg

 

 

 

And here is a conceptualization of the accomodations for the charter version:

post-37611-0-90415800-1380301627.jpg

 

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a negative row-away factor.

 

Totally. I don't want a boat that would make me want to hide my face while I row away from it.

 

Form should follow function, not be completely eliminated from the equation.

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Anyway I think it's very cool - the galley and nav station rotate, for God's sake - but I don't want one.

Called a JP54.

Rotating them (and do they cant as well?) to windward is interesting.. definitely. But looking at the galley there's a whole lot of form. well, it's different

14123_1_FR_original.jpg

 

and the "toilets" cant? and a dinghy garage?

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Let's run that galley by the french toast gal. Make up the batter and then give it a big spin?

 

 

(I'd rather see her moves than the galley's.)

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tough crowd here. is this thing a dog, too?

 

lb_MG_5817-2.jpg

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it's another one of those boats with a passing-by-you sheer :P a genuinely all American boat. Custom Antrim 49, with a canting keel. built locally at @ Berkeley Marine Center. Designed primarily for the Transpac.

 

4045601266_14b19ec22a_b.jpg

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RT is a hot-looking boat but they seem to have trouble getting it going. No good results yet that I've heard about.

 

I still like the Brewer Nimble I posted awhile back. If it was closer I'd go take a look. I could disappear with that boat.

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It's interesting. The other collaboration boat between Antrim and BMC has been cleaning up. California Condor is a Class 40. She's done well locally at various SF Bay races. She was up on the hard next to me for about 6mos while I was working on refitting my 4ksb. a little angular but overall the package works. it'd be a really fun boat to campaign.

 

lb_MG_5519.jpg

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We'll be racing against California Condor next summer in the Pacific Cup. We are both in the Double-Handed division. Funny thing is we are the second fastest boat in the division after CC, but CC's rating advantage over me is only slightly less than my advantage over the slowest boats in the class (Moore 24, I think). Think about that for a second.

 

Interested to see how it goes.

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Admire this rig!

 

2402hispania_spinnaker.jpg

I don't get it. Why fly a tops'l and add a modern assym kite?

 

It's one or the other - and nothing in between, for me.

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We'll be racing against California Condor next summer in the Pacific Cup. We are both in the Double-Handed division. Funny thing is we are the second fastest boat in the division after CC, but CC's rating advantage over me is only slightly less than my advantage over the slowest boats in the class (Moore 24, I think). Think about that for a second.

 

Interested to see how it goes.

 

Unless more "fast" doublehanders sign up (DWR<550), you'll be racing under NorCal PHRF's "Downwind" ratings. The race will be scored Time-on-Distance using 2,070 nm

 

California Condor rates 471

Your J/120 rates 540 in class configuration*

A Moore 24 rates 636

 

* I would consider:

The 540 rating assumes a weight of 13,900# Most J/120's are closer to 16,000# Get the boat weighed.

Ditch the large class A2 - it's tough to handle double-handed anyway.

Take the three second rating hit and use a JSP-length pole to articulate the spinnaker tack. 10-15 degrees deeper is huge in a Hawaii race.

Then get re-rated.

 

(Okay, back to this cruising thread . . . )

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RT is a hot-looking boat but they seem to have trouble getting it going. No good results yet that I've heard about.

 

...

 

But it's red!

 

Mmmm-mmm colors

 

FBoug

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