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Coolboats to admire

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On May 22, 2020 at 3:38 AM, Fleetwood said:

Best of both worlds?

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Is that one of the Taylor's? 

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8 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Buck's is the closest fuel dock to Center Harbor, where I keep my boat. 

Mainly we loved Buck's from 10-15 years back, when our son was young, if we called ahead Lois would make him a pie, and Lord, that boy loved pie. On Cuttyhunk, the locals called him Pieboy.

One of the better outdoor showers, too.

We often stop there when we need to pump the pooper and empty the trash. 

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This just anchored for the night off of our club. 

Is it a Pinkey Schooner? Clipper bow with a very short bowsprit. Roller furl yankee jib, staysail, don’t see boom gaff under sail cover and none on the mizzen so might be Bermudian rigged. 
I hope it’s ther w in the morning so I can row out for better pics.

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57 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

This just anchored for the night off of our club. 

Is it a Pinkey Schooner? Clipper bow with a very short bowsprit. Roller furl yankee jib, staysail, don’t see boom gaff under sail cover and none on the mizzen so might be Bermudian rigged. 
I hope it’s ther w in the morning so I can row out for better pics.

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A ketch, not a schooner, and doesn't have the high pinky stern.

 

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Right. Glad I at least got the mizzen part right, I just forgot to use my brain after that:D. Obviously a ketch...

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Thought it looked like a Parker. Turns out it’s Reuel Parker’s personal yacht Peregrine. It’s his retirement home according to his web site. I hope he’s there in the morning so I can row out and say hi!

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53’ Sardine Carrier Deadrise Motorsailor. 

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On 3/10/2020 at 4:07 AM, Priscilla said:

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Before RC,Free Sailing  Model Yachting had two different kinds of races. Pond Yachts, which raced in special basins like the one in Central Park and in parks all over the world. The skipper and possibly a helper would walk around the pond tacking and or gybing the model as it came to shore.  Alternatively there wereOpen Water regattas where the yachts were chased from skiffs and other light craft.  Courses were generally longer, in many cases the skipper lad only a limited number of “touches” to adjust his boat during the course of the race.

 This is generally the type of model sailing I enjoy the most. It gives me an excuse to row or paddle a little boat close to home.  The simplest rule is that you have to sail back to your starting point. Which can be harder than it sounds.  You can safely swim after models under 24” long, particularly if you have fins.

SHC

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14 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Is that one of the Taylor's? 

Yep, BBY build.

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10 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Thought it looked like a Parker. Turns out it’s Reuel Parker’s personal yacht Peregrine. It’s his retirement home according to his web site. I hope he’s there in the morning so I can row out and say hi!

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She spent a couple of days anchored in front of our house. Very interesting boat. The dinghy/tender is pretty interesting too. That's what caught my eye initially. 

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On 5/24/2020 at 9:08 AM, Elegua said:

She spent a couple of days anchored in front of our house. Very interesting boat. The dinghy/tender is pretty interesting too. That's what caught my eye initially. 

What a gift it was to see. I’m guessing that he had to stop for something that came into deRouville’s Boat Yard. 

On 5/24/2020 at 11:14 AM, Russell Brown said:

Anyone get photos of Reuel's dinghy/tender?

Just for you, buddy! The port tender has the outboard mount about 3’ inboard. Very interesting. I took a few videos around the boat yesterday. I’ll post them to YouTube and post them. It will out me, but no big deal since I’m a nobody.  didn’t bother Reuel if he was aboard and nobody peeked  their head out, so I kept a respectable distance. He’s gone this morning of course, I would have liked to tell him how much I admire his work.

I launched my tender mid restoration to get out there. I didn’t want to take the 11’ Boston whaler near a fine yacht...

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And my cute little tender. 11’ Ellen, restoring it to sell and get either a 15’ Delaware River Tuckup that’s for sale or Save a few bucks and get the PT11. This was a nesting boat that somebody glued up and it’s too heavy to haul-it’s mahogany plywood On white oak keel with oak rails and knees. 
 

I had to use the electric outboard since the Shaw and Tenney oars and oarlock bases are being refinished.

 

i was taking on a little water on the way out when I realized that the lower Gudgeon holes were letting water in . If I didn’t have seasonal allergies I would have ahead to turn back but I had a tissue in my pocket and sealed the holes to get to Peregrine.:lol:

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3 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

but no big deal since I’m a nobody.  

Better than being a Loser. 

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3 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

And my cute little tender. 11’ Ellen, restoring it to sell and get either a 15’ Delaware River Tuckup that’s for sale or Save a few bucks and get the PT11. This was a nesting boat that somebody glued up and it’s too heavy to haul-it’s mahogany plywood On white oak keel with oak rails and knees. 
 

I had to use the electric outboard since the Shaw and Tenney oars and oarlock bases are being refinished.

 

i was taking on a little water on the way out when I realized that the lower Gudgeon holes were letting water in . If I didn’t have seasonal allergies I would have ahead to turn back but I had a tissue in my pocket and sealed the holes to get to Peregrine.:lol:

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Sure it's heavy, but I'd have trouble giving that dinghy up, even for a cool Delaware River Tuckup. 

Anyway, I saw her anchored off West Palm for a couple fo days. Beautiful full-deck awning - very different from what I'm used to seeing. 

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2 hours ago, Elegua said:

Sure it's heavy, but I'd have trouble giving that dinghy up, even for a cool Delaware River Tuckup.

Glad I took the time to read that again - I was about to ask what a Delaware River Fuckup was. :D

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That’s me, grew  up on that dirty body of water!

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This takes a crew of 19th century Philadelphia laborers  to handle in a breeze.
 

The Ellen has a nice lug rig, oarlocks and is a charm.

 

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Glad I took the time to read that again - I was about to ask what a Delaware River Fuckup was. :D

I would guess that's what happens most Friday and Saturday evenings on the Delaware in the Summer, but in this case it's a nice classic boat.... 

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A few interesting things on Peregrine

Belaying pins

tube spreaders

tabernacle spars 

 

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Thanks Beer! Reuel's got a dinghy fetish for sure. The big boat is pretty interesting too.

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Apparently, Reuel is going to give living aboard in Maine a shot with Peregrine. Hence the cockpit arrangement. 

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15 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I’ve had a hard on For this boat for 20 years .

I think that would cause back problems.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

I think that would cause back problems.

Not to mention front problems

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13 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

A few interesting things on Peregrine

Belaying pins

tube spreaders

tabernacle spars 

 

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Oddly enough, my boat has tube spreaders as well. The rigger loves them - is copying them for his Mini.

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This Catalina 42 spreader weighs about a pound and a half for a 18,000pound boat. His boat is a lot lighter so the spreader choice is wise for his short rig.
 

Being a motor sailor also helps keep the weight aloft down!

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15 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

A few interesting things on Peregrine

Belaying pins

tube spreaders

tabernacle spars 

06595B72-04A6-4690-97BD-EAF9045B5B99.jpeg

I'm impressed with the day shape. Very seamanlike. (It is a day shape, isn't it?)

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I thought it was a radar reflector. Mine is a little bigger but collapses for storage.

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On 5/22/2020 at 3:53 PM, Cruisin Loser said:

Yeah, people still like B-40's, but the SW-42 is a better boat in every way. The SW-51 is also a terrific boat. Jim McCurdy was one of the great yacht designers.

The BI-40 has always been the better design of the Tripp designed 40s and gives the SWs in the same size range a run for their money as well as the Owens Cutter-derived Competition 41. But it doesn’t have the H on the sails so it’s often overlooked.
 

Then again, I may be partial. 

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16 hours ago, Alaris said:

The BI-40 has always been the better design of the Tripp designed 40s and gives the SWs in the same size range a run for their money as well as the Owens Cutter-derived Competition 41. But it doesn’t have the H on the sails so it’s often overlooked.
 

Then again, I may be partial. 

I've been on one of the Migrator built BI 40's. Really an incredible build. I forget Eric's last name who built it, he was aboard. 

They will probably beat a SW-42, certainly on handicap, on a reach because of the low aspect yawl rig, but stand no chance upwind. I know this because maybe 15 years ago I overhauled a group of them on the way to Block Island, appropriately, coming from miles behind and passed them all upwind with my SW-42. 

I will say, the boat I was on was beautifully thought out, beautifully laid out, superb build. They were docked next to me in Bermuda after the 2011 Marion-BDA race. We spent a lot of time going back and forth between the boats admiring the different ideas and solutions.

A long time ago a guy I had known from a certain Quaker school in Providence was restoring one of them. 

 

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I need some help here. I've been trying to upload photos of a beautiful visitor to our club guest dock, a Morris 53, taken more than a week ago but it won't work. I think perhaps the files are too big. I've tried everything I can think of, including printing as a pdf and then trying to copy but not getting it to work. Any suggestions gratefully accepted. She's just gorgeous.

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16 minutes ago, kinardly said:

I need some help here. I've been trying to upload photos of a beautiful visitor to our club guest dock, a Morris 53, taken more than a week ago but it won't work. I think perhaps the files are too big. I've tried everything I can think of, including printing as a pdf and then trying to copy but not getting it to work. Any suggestions gratefully accepted. She's just gorgeous.

Try resizing the files or upload to say Imgur and copy as BBCode(forums)

Morris 53? sure it's not a M52.

Look forward to seeing her.

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2 hours ago, kinardly said:

I need some help here. I've been trying to upload photos of a beautiful visitor to our club guest dock, a Morris 53, taken more than a week ago but it won't work. I think perhaps the files are too big. I've tried everything I can think of, including printing as a pdf and then trying to copy but not getting it to work. Any suggestions gratefully accepted. She's just gorgeous.

Where's your club? Does your club have guest moorings and drinks? I'm always looking to visit places like that. B)

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19 hours ago, kinardly said:

I need some help here. I've been trying to upload photos of a beautiful visitor to our club guest dock, a Morris 53, taken more than a week ago but it won't work. I think perhaps the files are too big. I've tried everything I can think of, including printing as a pdf and then trying to copy but not getting it to work. Any suggestions gratefully accepted. She's just gorgeous.

Try uploading to a hosting site (I use Google Photos and Imgur) and link to that.

gZ9hjdhOtnFoFhmWCHqAKx6bjwn0CG6JhODRPpP6

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2 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Try uploading to a hosting site (I use Google Photos and Imgur) and link to that.

gZ9hjdhOtnFoFhmWCHqAKx6bjwn0CG6JhODRPpP6

Jeeze Ish, whipping out your junk like that. 

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ok, Guys, here you go. I guess it's a Mo 52. One of the guests standing around on the deck said it was a 53. Guest dock and clubhouse of SDYC in the background.

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----and yeah, Cruis'n, looking right across the back deck and into the bar. C'mon by and I'll buy.

 

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23 hours ago, kinardly said:

----and yeah, Cruis'n, looking right across the back deck and into the bar. C'mon by and I'll buy.

 

Hmm, sort of the other coast, but thanks for the invite.:rolleyes:  You have the same offer at a couple of east coast clubs, plus I'll take you for a sail. 

I don't know how many of those they've built, but that looks like one I went aboard a few years ago. A very nice boat. 

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On 6/4/2020 at 8:24 PM, paps49 said:

Wow, that's a bit of a glamour, I wonder what they mean by "sensibly priced"?

Sensibly priced means that even in these Covid 19 apocalyptic times you make the most obvious insensible decision to buy one stunning log of wood. 

The worst sensible thing I ever did was part with mine.

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On 6/4/2020 at 1:24 AM, paps49 said:

I wonder what they mean by "sensibly priced"?

"Sensibly Priced, "Call for price" and "POA" all mean the same thning

"The price is so ridiculous that we can't post it or no one will even call".

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16 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

"Sensibly Priced, "Call for price" and "POA" all mean the same thning

"The price is so ridiculous that we can't post it or no one will even call".

Or "I don't know what its worth so I'd like you to give me an idea with an offer."

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On June 6, 2020 at 12:22 AM, Priscilla said:

Sensibly priced means that even in these Covid 19 apocalyptic times you make the most obvious insensible decision to buy one stunning log of wood. 

The worst sensible thing I ever did was part with mine.

Besides marrying the most beautiful girl at my college, the most sensible thing I ever did was buy a beautiful boat. Next most sensible thing was to replace it with and even more beautiful wooden boat. 

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Many of the oldest boats in our harbor - come spring, are the newest looking boats in our harbor.

I find that ironic. 

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Nothing like a finish that's been lovingly hand-rubbed with $100 bills.

 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Many of the oldest boats in our harbor - come spring, are the newest looking boats in our harbor.

I find that ironic. 

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Having a wooden boat myself, and I know her current status, that really helps my inferiority complex. Thank you very much ;)

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Look who finally got out of bed :)

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Tre Sang, having finished her refit at Robbe&Berking. Like new, surely a look to behold.

Credits: R&B FB page

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16 minutes ago, Matagi said:

Look who finally got out of bed :)

102598338_2984196338368063_8371613924211

Tre Sang, having finished her refit at Robbe&Berking. Like new, surely a look to behold.

Credits: R&B FB page

They should be ashamed of themselves for putting that out in the weather.

It might get wet.

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Red Herring looks even better now with her new sails. Absolutely cool. A bit out of this world, but cool.

Here is one design that I have admired since I was ca. six years old. A Hanseat 68/69, the yard was from Glückstadt, near Hamburg. This is one of their earlier models and it features this distinctive arrow slit cabintop.  That was the first time in my life that as design feature on a sailboat really struck me. I still find this design cool, back then I wouldn't have known, but today it reminds me a bit of a Stormtrooper helmet. Also quite practical for more headroom, light and forward visibility from below.

They also feature wooden masts and some owners have them until today, kind of the same school of thought as Folkboat owners, I guess. 

Although it was the time, they were not designed after IOR, and I think it shows in the hull shape, The max beam is way forward and some even came with keel/Cb configuration, which is handy on the Elbe and the German bight.

Dimensions (m): length: 10,2, beam: 2,98, draft: 1,4 . 

They also keep their prices up, as they are often very well maintained. Gut in Schuss, as we say in German.

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4 hours ago, Matagi said:

Red Herring looks even better now with her new sails. Absolutely cool. A bit out of this world, but cool.

Here is one design that I have admired since I was ca. six years old. A Hanseat 68/69, the yard was from Glückstadt, near Hamburg. This is one of their earlier models and it features this distinctive arrow slit cabintop.  That was the first time in my life that as design feature on a sailboat really struck me. I still find this design cool, back then I wouldn't have known, but today it reminds me a bit of a Stormtrooper helmet. Also quite practical for more headroom, light and forward visibility from below.

They also feature wooden masts and some owners have them until today, kind of the same school of thought as Folkboat owners, I guess. 

Although it was the time, they were not designed after IOR, and I think it shows in the hull shape, The max beam is way forward and some even came with keel/Cb configuration, which is handy on the Elbe and the German bight.

Dimensions (m): length: 10,2, beam: 2,98, draft: 1,4 . 

They also keep their prices up, as they are often very well maintained. Gut in Schuss, as we say in German.

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a_Gluckstadt68-2.jpg

a_Suederpiep.gif

with such a fine boat, i am not surprised people would be happy in Happytown ;)

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On 6/3/2020 at 2:25 PM, kinardly said:

 

 

ok, Guys, here you go. I guess it's a Mo 52. One of the guests standing around on the deck said it was a 53. Guest dock and clubhouse of SDYC in the background.

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Okay, need my drool bucket to catch the envy tears.  Damn, that is sweet and great slip, you can crawl from SDYC bar back to your yacht.

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Anyone know what kind of boat this is? Stumbled across it while exploring on Google Maps.

Seems like a massive rig for what looks like a 40ish'er

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A location might help. Have you tried using Google Maaahnevermind. ;)

Yes, that is certainly not original. Looks more like a two-tonner / 50-Footer rig.

Or it is a converted two-tonner, deckshouse looks a bit odd...

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Is this the boat with which they re-enacted Shackleton's voyage? The mere thought of it... .

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On 6/9/2020 at 5:38 PM, Student_Driver said:

Dear Santa.  

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Sophie?

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On 6/10/2020 at 11:53 PM, zenmasterfred said:

Okay, need my drool bucket to catch the envy tears.  Damn, that is sweet and great slip, you can crawl from SDYC bar back to your yacht.

Yeah, drinking heavily then trying to find a mooring can be tough. 

Reminds me of the story of the lobsterman who'd been drinking at a poker game on Islesford (Little Cranberry). He left to row home a little bit before the game broke up. When the others got down to the dock they found him blissfully rowing away, stern still tied to the dock.

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3 hours ago, Matagi said:

Is this the boat with which they re-enacted Shackleton's voyage? The mere thought of it... .

As if that 800 mile trip wasn't incomprehensible enough - when they reached South Georgia they had to cross this to get to the whaling station. :blink:

image.png.0d9bccc22d5a51ca559d77c77b896ee1.png

Hard to believe that trip was possible by mere humans.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

As if that 800 mile trip wasn't incomprehensible enough - when they reached South Georgia they had to cross this to get to the whaling station. :blink:

image.png.0d9bccc22d5a51ca559d77c77b896ee1.png

Hard to believe that trip was possible by mere humans.

If they were smart, they have brought string to tie together a bunch of those penguins. Then they could FLY over those mountains! Oh wait.......

Seriously, the James Caird is definitely a cool boat.

FB- Doug

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4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Sophie?

Did not catch the name but it looks very new and high tech. That retracting keel is not a cheap feature.  

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9 hours ago, Student_Driver said:

Did not catch the name but it looks very new and high tech. That retracting keel is not a cheap feature.  

Yes the boat is Sophie... Bruce King design, sails out of Martha’s Vineyard.   

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Check out this new(ish) schooner, built to a Howard Chapelle design. Quite a bit of boat for $90,000. Not sure about the cut of her foresail though. Something looks a bit odd to my eye.

http://www.cityofsailsmarine.co.nz/listing/howard-chapelle-design-traditionally-built-schooner-for-sale-onet-cc/

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On June 12, 2020 at 9:33 PM, Student_Driver said:

Did not catch the name but it looks very new and high tech. That retracting keel is not a cheap feature.  

She's a quarter century old, but always beautifully maintained.

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On June 12, 2020 at 7:55 PM, SloopJonB said:

As if that 800 mile trip wasn't incomprehensible enough - when they reached South Georgia they had to cross this to get to the whaling station. :blink:

image.png.0d9bccc22d5a51ca559d77c77b896ee1.png

Hard to believe that trip was possible by mere humans.

The highest point in the Shackleton Traverse is "only" 3000', but it can be one of the most miserable times on earth, accord to Dave Hahn, who'se done it 5 times I think. Given that he's summitted Everest 15 times, he should know miserable.

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21 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The highest point in the Shackleton Traverse is "only" 3000', but it can be one of the most miserable times on earth, accord to Dave Hahn, who'se done it 5 times I think. Given that he's summitted Everest 15 times, he should know miserable.

I suspect it wasn't quite as miserable as that boat trip though. :D

The fact they chose to climb across the island rather than continuing to sail around to the other side speaks volumes IMO.

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

I suspect it wasn't quite as miserable as that boat trip though. :D

The fact they chose to climb across the island rather than continuing to sail around to the other side speaks volumes IMO.

Maybe the lack of windward sailing ability and possibility of being blown away from the island (certain death) drove the decision.

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1 hour ago, Panope said:

Maybe the lack of windward sailing ability and possibility of being blown away from the island (certain death) drove the decision.

That's certainly what Frank Worsley wrote in his book, and he was there. 

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12 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:
1 hour ago, Panope said:

Maybe the lack of windward sailing ability and possibility of being blown away from the island (certain death) drove the decision.

That's certainly what Frank Worsley wrote in his book, and he was there. 

Zackly. All kinds of horribleness in that story, with the supreme ultimate goodness that they survived and went on to rescue their fellow crew. I believe it was Worsley that also wrote he could remember the exact shape of every single ballast rock, because of trying night after night to find a spot to sleep on them.

Finding the island was an amazing feat of navigation.

FB- Doug

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I wish Ron Howard would make one of his "accurate to the last detail" movies about it.

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There's a great documentary, coupled with vintage footage from the original cinematographer brought along on the voyage, on Amazon Prime: Shackleton's Captain.

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On 6/13/2020 at 8:14 AM, Priscilla said:

02473BB3-A719-44E6-8E0A-97193AF50245.thumb.jpeg.e65e60336c6ea66520dbcd743271c40b.jpeg

284E4D19-C29A-4DBF-99F4-BB674CA0C39E.thumb.jpeg.9526bedfb2e1f5a2b92c9dfc3afc3ae0.jpeg

 

Actual people on board give this a sobering perspective, add to that just how cold the water is down at those latitudes combined with the normally nasty waves and winds, it’s a wonder they made it at all.

Respect.

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Watched the documentary, a fool's mission but miraculously they completed the re-enactment.  Didn't look like much fun down below and then the VHF puked and they lost touch with the escort vessel.  Probably seemed a little too real at the time.

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23 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Check out this new(ish) schooner, built to a Howard Chapelle design. Quite a bit of boat for $90,000. Not sure about the cut of her foresail though. Something looks a bit odd to my eye.

http://www.cityofsailsmarine.co.nz/listing/howard-chapelle-design-traditionally-built-schooner-for-sale-onet-cc/

unnamed.jpg

Offset companionway.....death trap!

Actually I love it but the maintenance required would preclude me ever considering ownership. 

 

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14 minutes ago, Orion Jim said:

Offset companionway.....death trap!

Actually I love it but the maintenance required would preclude me ever considering ownership. 

 

Lots of work for sure, Jim. Well overdue too, looking at the listing pics. She's a pretty smart yacht though, with a very easily driven hull by the looks. 

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On 6/13/2020 at 8:14 AM, Priscilla said:

02473BB3-A719-44E6-8E0A-97193AF50245.thumb.jpeg.e65e60336c6ea66520dbcd743271c40b.jpeg

284E4D19-C29A-4DBF-99F4-BB674CA0C39E.thumb.jpeg.9526bedfb2e1f5a2b92c9dfc3afc3ae0.jpeg

 

I came across a replica of the James Caird in The Bookshop in Oamaru, North Otago, NZL five or so years or so. Pretty amazing feat of seamanship, alright.

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23 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Check out this new(ish) schooner, built to a Howard Chapelle design. Quite a bit of boat for $90,000. Not sure about the cut of her foresail though. Something looks a bit odd to my eye.

http://www.cityofsailsmarine.co.nz/listing/howard-chapelle-design-traditionally-built-schooner-for-sale-onet-cc/

unnamed.jpg

Good lord that is a cool boat to admire. 

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23 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

The highest point in the Shackleton Traverse is "only" 3000', but it can be one of the most miserable times on earth, accord to Dave Hahn, who'se done it 5 times I think. Given that he's summitted Everest 15 times, he should know miserable.

I read that the descent down the north side is more dangerous now because the ice has been rotted out by climate warming. 

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