Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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18 hours ago, Kolibri said:

I'm not into power boats, but this style always makes me smile for some reason. Maybe it reminds me of "Boaty McBoatface".

 

 

IMG_2973_lr.jpg

or a bob perry cartoon

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29 minutes ago, Trovão said:

or a bob perry cartoon

I realized why I get a kick out of that style of boat and always smile. I had a toy similar to this one as a kid and my mom sent it to my daughters when they were 1 & 3. image.thumb.png.5bafc8e41555db3b4698008ebd4c2733.png

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On 9/3/2020 at 9:27 AM, Bull City said:

Kris, thanks for pushing another one of my buttons. ^_^ I've been admiring a couple of these on Yacht World. The only thing that keeps me in check are the SA/DISP and DISP/LWL.

B.C.

Some of the ‘slowest’ sailboats seem to inspire ‘sailors’.

7:00 am today, a faint southeaster laid a thick coat of dew on the decks.

most of us are content in a warm dry berth or clutching a piping hot mug.

 

this man quietly sailed off his mooring. Drifted by as if on his own current. 

Once clear of the granite gates, he picked up a nice speed as if on flat tracks and dashed off to the southwest. 

BF8F6F66-9410-4F40-A48D-9F239A49395E.thumb.jpeg.dbcb60a35520318a4c30c9f8f513df96.jpeg

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21 hours ago, rstone said:

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1959/sparkman-stephens-original-yankee-2255004/

For those of us that remember the  60's

National Geographic Presents....

_20200906_180537.JPG

That's a real piece of history.  I recently watched a documentary about one of those early trips on Netflix or something like it; just amazing the opportunities the Johnsons gave back then.  And to see a very, very young Sterling Hayden was a trip in itself.

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I've been aboard Hokule'a a few times and met the captain and the crew. I've seen her anchored and under sail. This is an amazing boat, culture and crew that I will always admire.

 

 

hsvkv2.jpg

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ECHO, an Alden Challenger turned 60 this season. The solid GRP hull and deck were formed at the Halmatic yard in the UK in 1959. Alden then shipped the hull and deck to LeComte in the Netherlands, along with 50 some sheets of drawings and specs, to be finished by the Dutch craftsmen there. 

 

Owned by the same family since launch in 1960, I've sailed and rowed by the boat often in 20 years. She seemed to languish most of those years, well cared for but not used, much. Sails askew on the booms, covers off, you know the look. 

 

It was good to see her gleaming with a new topsides job and bright, fresh varnish. But mostly, it's been good to see her out sailing this season. Also, she's had sailors half her age on deck in 2020. Could be the new generation of owners/users? 

 

I watched her deftly sailed into Pulpit Harbor this past weekend. 

 

1409965212_ECHOsailingintoCabotCove.thumb.jpg.01c378361e37a9d3b7d78d8a25dbd435.jpg

 

Further, I watched the crew line her up to sail through the narrow cut in the granite into Cabot Cove, where she's been moored for the last 60 seasons. 

 

707020487_ECHOsailingintoCabotCove-liningup._.thumb.jpg.0369342220f5264a414737b66767eaf3.jpg

And they pulled it off nicely. Real sailors.

 

The future of ECHO, and sailors in general,  looks bright. 

1156421704_ECHOsailingintoCabotCove-inthecut._.thumb.jpg.e32d8545d4ab77ec282fbef7cb0ede22.jpg

 

 

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On 9/8/2020 at 1:25 AM, Priscilla said:

HMS Pickle.

hunt-hmspickle-hr_1800.thumb.jpg.5656cc3bd45f4141702f1dee59276f98.jpg

 

A fantastic painting.

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

A fantastic painting.

Those fine detail lines for the rigging have always impressed me.  Mine always seem wiggly.  :D

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image.png.939a29ee6b80845b132cced4201ef241.png

I think the water, especially the sun on the water, is so well done. Each brush stroke is a gem. Kind of like Sargent.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

image.png.939a29ee6b80845b132cced4201ef241.png

I think the water, especially the sun on the water, is so well done. Each brush stroke is a gem. Kind of like Sargent.

Geoff Hunt is the artist.

IMG_4419-1068x712.thumb.jpg.17125dc038e689c200000df8505db64b.jpg

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On 9/3/2020 at 9:27 AM, Bull City said:

Kris, thanks for pushing another one of my buttons. ^_^ I've been admiring a couple of these [Hinckley Sou'wester 30] on Yacht World. The only thing that keeps me in check are the SA/DISP and DISP/LWL.

B.C.

I am still eyeing one of these, one in particular. IMO, 30 feet is not too big for my venue. Tell me what I need to think about.

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6 minutes ago, Bull City said:

I am still eyeing one of these, one in particular. IMO, 30 feet is not too big for my venue. Tell me what I need to think about.

Yeah...there were two that were on my short list as well. Beautiful boats!

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On 9/7/2020 at 8:33 AM, Kris Cringle said:

Some of the ‘slowest’ sailboats seem to inspire ‘sailors’.

7:00 am today, a faint southeaster laid a thick coat of dew on the decks.

most of us are content in a warm dry berth or clutching a piping hot mug.

 

this man quietly sailed off his mooring. Drifted by as if on his own current. 

Once clear of the granite gates, he picked up a nice speed as if on flat tracks and dashed off to the southwest. 

BF8F6F66-9410-4F40-A48D-9F239A49395E.thumb.jpeg.dbcb60a35520318a4c30c9f8f513df96.jpeg

Wonderful photo.

In my mind, this is the a good way to cruise Maine. If you are patient and can handle some moments of drifting and fickle wind, the am usually has light breezes that are often very localized from an East-ish direction and perfect for getting you out to locations where you can pick-up the SW'er that comes in once things start heating up.  You can go a whole day without using the engine. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Matagi said:

Are those on the right sunglasses???

sure looks that way.  And I'm pretty sure that's Nixon on the left.

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I was unsure whether to post this in the "Craigslist: Not Mocking" thread or here. But ultimately, in my mind at least, this is a cool boat to admire. In the early '80s I was in between jobs and spending the summer hanging out in Kingston, Ontario. A friend of mine asked if I would be interested in being a crew member on a local yacht for the Wednesday night races. Up to that point, my sailing experience consisted of a fair bit of sailboarding and a little bit of sailing Albacores. "Sure, why not,"  I said. That summer I learned an incredible amount about big boat sailing during my time on Bagatelle. Owner Don Currie was generous with his knowledge and patient with the newbies on his crew, unless you were seasick. He did not suffer and had no time for those who did. One highlight for me was our foray in the Freeman Cup race, out of Oswego that year. We sailed out from Kingston the day before, partying a bit and feeling good. After a rough crossing, most of the nine crew were sick as dogs, though all but one recovered before the race start. That guy was dead weight for the whole trip and Don wanted to throw him overboard. Bagatelle was an older boat even then, heavy compared the the new boats of the day and slow in light air. But she moved when the wind picked up, and I vividly recall coming up on watch at zero-dark-thirty in the middle of Lake Ontario. The hired gun driver had set the spinnaker and the boat was moving ("don't tell Don," he warned us). We were giddy as we passed boat after boat in the dark. I contemplated what would happen if I fell off. In the morning, the wind died and all the modern boats caught up and passed us. Oh well. Don was philosophic, he knew the boat was not that competitive anymore but he loved to sail and loved to race. Bagatelle was kind of a training vessel for young sailors in the Kingston race scene and I am grateful for my time on her.

cc-redline-41-mkii-sloop.jpg

Now she is for sale. Maybe Don has passed. At the time I did not know the pedigree but I think the description in the listing puts her in the cool boat category:

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1969/c-c-redline-41-mkii-sloop-3167088/

Quote

 

OWN A PART OF CANADIAN MARITIME HISTORY!!

After the resounding success of RED JACKET in 1966 and 1967, Cuthbertson and Cassian again teamed up with Erich Bruckmann to produce the Redline 41 in series production, that is, built out of a mould. BAGATELLE, built in 1969 for Mr. Allan Taylor, was the first of the MkII configurations featuring a filled out back end that was often referred to as a bustle.

In 1969 the Royal Canadian Yacht Club accepted a challenge from the Cleveland Yachting Club for the Canada Cup. The RCYC produced three potential defenders all designed by Cuthbertson and Cassian and built by Erich Bruckmann which were BAGATELLE, TRUE NORTH and MANITOU. MANITOU won the defender trials and went on to decisively defeat the US challenger NIAGARA by a margin of 4-0.

BAGATELLE has had a long and distinguished racing and cruising career sailing out of the RCYC and the Kingston Yacht Club under the ownership of Mr. Don Currie who has cared for her since 1971. Over 20 Redline 41s were built with the Redline 41 CONDOR repeating the RED JACKET overall victory at SORC in 1972.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Matagi said:

And on the far left, is that Malcolm X?

And in the middle under the window, I'm betting that's Joe Stalin.

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On 7/2/2020 at 7:48 AM, Priscilla said:

360B6780-0917-4E6A-B645-FA163FEF9404.jpeg.b1c65e30c49afad46e6e9630f1f59a00.jpeg

Nice to see our chariot pop up here. That was about Jan 19, in June we went to Fiji for 4 months. Designed by LD as a Fast cruiser in 1973, built through 74 and launched 75. Just under 6.5 days Navula pass Fiji to the ninepin in the Bay of Islands ,NZ. Thats a good prompt passage for an old boat, the breeze was 40 to 60 apparent for 5 of those days. So she's still a fast cruiser.

Built by the same guys who later built Tauranga too. Donald brothers of Tauranga,  the town.

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20 hours ago, Elegua said:

Wonderful photo.

In my mind, this is the a good way to cruise Maine. If you are patient and can handle some moments of drifting and fickle wind, the am usually has light breezes that are often very localized from an East-ish direction and perfect for getting you out to locations where you can pick-up the SW'er that comes in once things start heating up.  You can go a whole day without using the engine. 

 

 

By just after 8 am, as you say above, a light easterly began to roughen the glass like Pulpit Harbor. All forecasts were for a Southerly but it was straight East for anyone that wanted to sail out. Two ketches, anchored outside of us,  motored out with the wind at their backs. 

 

1997122251_PulpitMorningair_.thumb.jpg.7095c94ac4de813a8bc305854b0ab829.jpg

 

In fact we were the only other boat to sail out. I simply raised just the mizzen sail and sheeted it tight to raise the anchor. The boat hove to on port tack,  safely upwind of a couple of anchored boats. 

 

Once cleaned up and back in the cockpit(and still safely upwind of a couple anchored boats), I unrolled the genoa and we quietly slipped out through the granite knobs. Easy and lazy. I never needed to raise the main as the Southerly (which of course builds steam as the sun gets higher), carried us on one tack home.

 

Hove to again in the outer harbor, we tidied up and sat for a bit, then started the motor for the first time and powered in. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

By just after 8 am, as you say above, a light easterly began to roughen the glass like Pulpit Harbor. All forecasts were for a Southerly but it was straight East for anyone that wanted to sail out. Two ketches, anchored outside of us,  motored out with the wind at their backs. 

 

1997122251_PulpitMorningair_.thumb.jpg.7095c94ac4de813a8bc305854b0ab829.jpg

 

In fact we were the only other boat to sail out. I simply raised just the mizzen sail and sheeted it tight to raise the anchor. The boat hove to on port tack,  safely upwind of a couple of anchored boats. 

 

Once cleaned up and back in the cockpit(and still safely upwind of a couple anchored boats), I unrolled the genoa and we quietly slipped out through the granite knobs. Easy and lazy. I never needed to raise the main as the Southerly (which of course builds steam as the sun gets higher), carried us on one tack home.

 

Hove to again in the outer harbor, we tidied up and sat for a bit, then started the motor for the first time and powered in. 

 

 

That's the real fun (in my mind) of sailing Maine. 

We had hidden from the previous day's SW'er at Hog Island. Around 8am there was a Westerly breeze. Raised the main while my wife was cleaning up from breakfast and gybed out. The current is strong-ish in the channel, so some attention was required. 

ACtC-3f4SMH6juOYrwBA8SvBV7pspd-b1DWH-Cm8

Got past the point unfurled the genoa as the wind went East and then South 

ACtC-3fnTY1ltXlxmV5Sfvr88AYmb2TDH-GCaAmW

Ended up with a nice strong SW breeze by 10am. 

ACtC-3dWmODT5j1dF4ZRV5_wG_iSw8xEal3FtUpD

Anchored under sail at our next stop. Didn't touch the engine until the batteries needed a charge. Sadly our fridge seems to drink amps like an alcoholic drinks Cisco. 

 

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Oohhh, I don’t know yet. I saw it early today in Westbrook, CT. Had to hit the road before any yard crew showed up or I would have an answer. Someone here will know, I’m impressed.
 

The offset companionway will always be my favorite since Bent Brain condemned it!

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On 9/13/2020 at 6:31 PM, Sail4beer said:

Oohhh, I don’t know yet. I saw it early today in Westbrook, CT. Had to hit the road before any yard crew showed up or I would have an answer. Someone here will know, I’m impressed.
 

The offset companionway will always be my favorite since Bent Brain condemned it!

You need to get your shit together!! :)

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On 9/14/2020 at 3:22 AM, valcour said:

What is Spirit?   Looks lovely (offset companionway notwithstanding). 

John G Alden schooner ex Vela ex Discovery III.


2BEBFA7A-500A-4CEE-85F8-5A8F54BE30CB.thumb.jpeg.5d76fb40adc555933c972c430b88fc2d.jpeg

 

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35 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

John G Alden schooner ex Vela ex Discovery III.


2BEBFA7A-500A-4CEE-85F8-5A8F54BE30CB.thumb.jpeg.5d76fb40adc555933c972c430b88fc2d.jpeg

 

I wish my bank account was as deep as my aesthetics.

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3 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I got it together on this cool boat but had to scoot!

0A57C985-BAAE-42F8-B089-CDE12FA5F4C0.jpeg

Sorry but nothing cool about that yoghurt pot.

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25 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

J G Alden Lord Jim.

1456023_10153460896865603_2072736670_n.thumb.jpg.e823b72a4b9287cba59b45f8558d4d29.jpg

473857_10151367390285603_2090695892_o.thumb.jpg.d28185bcaca665b010d9179f6a94e0c7.jpg

429527_10151367421820603_1936132197_n.thumb.jpg.2be3106a38dff59f34671ff0057e2521.jpg

Lord-Jim-port.thumb.jpg.4a47ee08818526b3498825c6bc25730b.jpg

Lord-Jim-2.thumb.jpg.415ec3938fc64ecda752211feedf59f7.jpg

That hurts my soul.

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3 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Sorry but nothing cool about that yoghurt pot.

Ouch.  lol.  

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How about a Cape Dory motorsailer?  My dad has one, wonderful boat with nice lines. Definitely more "motor' than "sail" but for a guy in his 80s, it works.  (this example is  not my dad's)

 

 

 

cdms.jpg

532919ad0cf4ee167a3f63e9312acd44.jpg

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13 hours ago, Priscilla said:

J G Alden Lord Jim.

1456023_10153460896865603_2072736670_n.thumb.jpg.e823b72a4b9287cba59b45f8558d4d29.jpg

473857_10151367390285603_2090695892_o.thumb.jpg.d28185bcaca665b010d9179f6a94e0c7.jpg

429527_10151367421820603_1936132197_n.thumb.jpg.2be3106a38dff59f34671ff0057e2521.jpg

Lord-Jim-port.thumb.jpg.4a47ee08818526b3498825c6bc25730b.jpg

Lord-Jim-2.thumb.jpg.415ec3938fc64ecda752211feedf59f7.jpg

That first shot is gorgeous; very Rosenfeld-esq.  Is that Alcatraz in the background?

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13 hours ago, Priscilla said:

J G Alden Lord Jim.

1456023_10153460896865603_2072736670_n.thumb.jpg.e823b72a4b9287cba59b45f8558d4d29.jpg

473857_10151367390285603_2090695892_o.thumb.jpg.d28185bcaca665b010d9179f6a94e0c7.jpg

429527_10151367421820603_1936132197_n.thumb.jpg.2be3106a38dff59f34671ff0057e2521.jpg

Lord-Jim-port.thumb.jpg.4a47ee08818526b3498825c6bc25730b.jpg

Lord-Jim-2.thumb.jpg.415ec3938fc64ecda752211feedf59f7.jpg

the one that was lost here in brasil? shame...

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3 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

That first shot is gorgeous; very Rosenfeld-esq.  Is that Alcatraz in the background?

it definately looks so...

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Hey, @Bull City, know what this is? She circled us at anchor south of Castine. The owner is the sailing coach at MMA.

IMG_1547.thumb.jpg.3a1dc2dc96d50e38b46fdb195bf661f9.jpg

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14 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Hey, @Bull City, know what this is? She circled us at anchor south of Castine. The owner is the sailing coach at MMA.

IMG_1547.thumb.jpg.3a1dc2dc96d50e38b46fdb195bf661f9.jpg

What a cool boat! :P I'll look up the coach.

Thanks.

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55 minutes ago, Trovão said:

the one that was lost here in brasil? shame...

 

 

Sincere apologies for such a distressing image Lord Jim was salvaged in Brazil and I believe became embroiled in an argument between the yard and owners I am unaware of her fate.

Maybe someone else could fill in the blanks.

64698_10151367489870603_1297934777_n.jpg.fccdd1cea0606dcfeef4c2e8c2386ad3.jpg

417581_10151364908385603_1278484345_n.jpg.f4078b0f96e8664044b4006d270d5db7.jpg

 

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1 minute ago, Priscilla said:

 

 

Sincere apologies for such a distressing image Lord Jim was salvaged in Brazil and I believe became embroiled in an argument between the yard and owners I am unaware of her fate.

Maybe someone else could fill in the blanks.

64698_10151367489870603_1297934777_n.jpg.fccdd1cea0606dcfeef4c2e8c2386ad3.jpg

417581_10151364908385603_1278484345_n.jpg.f4078b0f96e8664044b4006d270d5db7.jpg

 

yes. some legal unfortunate imbroglio between the owner and the yard... afaik, it stood "impounded" by a court order for years, waiting for the case to be settled and didn't resist, goin down at the mooring.  https://sailbrasil.com.br/2018/05/06/gurucacat-e-o-lord-jim-afundou/ 

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

What a cool boat! :P I'll look up the coach.

Thanks.

He said there are 3 in Castine. 

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4 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

He said there are 3 in Castine. 

That is amazing. I sent him an email.

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11 hours ago, Trovão said:

yes. some legal unfortunate imbroglio between the owner and the yard... afaik, it stood "impounded" by a court order for years, waiting for the case to be settled and didn't resist, goin down at the mooring.  https://sailbrasil.com.br/2018/05/06/gurucacat-e-o-lord-jim-afundou/ 

Christ, that story just gets worse and worse.

12 hours ago, Bull City said:

What a cool boat! :P I'll look up the coach.

Thanks.

Looks Scandinavian.

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On 9/10/2020 at 9:49 PM, Priscilla said:

Geoff Hunt is the artist.

IMG_4419-1068x712.thumb.jpg.17125dc038e689c200000df8505db64b.jpg

Didn’t he do the covers for the Aubrey/Maturin books?

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13 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

The Alden designed Pearson Countess 44. 59 were built between 1965 and 1970. 

156048949_PearsonCountess44_.thumb.jpg.c97554b35aad35681d02c34f3b9919b5.jpg

Those remind me of the Tripp-designed Lecomte Medalist.

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3 hours ago, Bull City said:

Those remind me of the Tripp-designed Lecomte Medalist.

Not really in person. For that you want the Tripp designed Pearson Invicta yawl, 38' and the first fiberglass boat to win the Newport-Bermuda race. The Invicta has the blister doghouse of the Mercer 44. 

The Countess was designed to provide a lot of interior volume, which it did by the standards of the day. 

An Invicta (not my pic):

artemis-sept-26-2004-blck-rck-hrbr-026aaa.thumb.jpg.c24398480023d2ea6323454a45b44531.jpg

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4 hours ago, Black Sox said:

Didn’t he do the covers for the Aubrey/Maturin books?

Yup.

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

Those remind me of the Tripp-designed Lecomte Medalist.

By any modern standard, the Medalist is a very slow bot.

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2 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

By any modern standard, the Medalist is a very slow bot.

No kidding - PHRF about the same as a San Juan 24 :o

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4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

No kidding - PHRF about the same as a San Juan 24 :o

But but but, it's a Tripp design. Why slow?

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9 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Not really in person. For that you want the Tripp designed Pearson Invicta yawl, 38' and the first fiberglass boat to win the Newport-Bermuda race. The Invicta has the blister doghouse of the Mercer 44. 

The Countess was designed to provide a lot of interior volume, which it did by the standards of the day. 

An Invicta (not my pic):

artemis-sept-26-2004-blck-rck-hrbr-026aaa.thumb.jpg.c24398480023d2ea6323454a45b44531.jpg

That makes me ache.

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This could be a new thread: "Bull City is looking." Any way...

I have been pretty happy with the H-Boat on our lake. The only system is the running and cabin lights. No inboard, no plumbing. The H-Boat has SA/DSIP 19, DISP/LWL 161. I like the performance.

That said, I could get interested in a boat up to 30 or 32 feet, provided it was very simple. A diesel inboard would be OK (I think I can locate a mechanic) but no plumbing, or holding tanks. 2 burner stove would be nice, place for a porta-potty. The J100 is pretty simple, but it's not right for a number of reasons. A Center Harbor 31 could work, but they're pretty pricey. Maybe a cabin heater. Tiller. Companionway could be off-set. :rolleyes: Simple interior. A table would be nice. Standing headroom OK but not required.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

B.C.

 

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12 minutes ago, Bull City said:

This could be a new thread: "Bull City is looking." Any way...

I have been pretty happy with the H-Boat on our lake. The only system is the running and cabin lights. No inboard, no plumbing. The H-Boat has SA/DSIP 19, DISP/LWL 161. I like the performance.

That said, I could get interested in a boat up to 30 or 32 feet, provided it was very simple. A diesel inboard would be OK (I think I can locate a mechanic) but no plumbing, or holding tanks. 2 burner stove would be nice, place for a porta-potty. The J100 is pretty simple, but it's not right for a number of reasons. A Center Harbor 31 could work, but they're pretty pricey. Maybe a cabin heater. Tiller. Companionway could be off-set. :rolleyes: Simple interior. A table would be nice. Standing headroom OK but not required.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

B.C.

 

Laser 28

C&C 27 Mk V

Lecomte Medalist 33

321329.5d7ff7dbdf306503d7fc7bd0.xl.jpg

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1 hour ago, Bull City said:

But but but, it's a Tripp design. Why slow?

Don't actually know but 1) built early in the fiberglass era, 2) lots of beautiful woodwork below, 3) built in proximity to the North Sea.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

This could be a new thread: "Bull City is looking." Any way...

I have been pretty happy with the H-Boat on our lake. The only system is the running and cabin lights. No inboard, no plumbing. The H-Boat has SA/DSIP 19, DISP/LWL 161. I like the performance.

That said, I could get interested in a boat up to 30 or 32 feet, provided it was very simple. A diesel inboard would be OK (I think I can locate a mechanic) but no plumbing, or holding tanks. 2 burner stove would be nice, place for a porta-potty. The J100 is pretty simple, but it's not right for a number of reasons. A Center Harbor 31 could work, but they're pretty pricey. Maybe a cabin heater. Tiller. Companionway could be off-set. :rolleyes: Simple interior. A table would be nice. Standing headroom OK but not required.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

B.C.

 

WHAT?!? Say it ain't so, I thought the H-boat was the girl of your dreams?

The J100 is a good boat, IMHO they're pretty, they fun to sail, relatively simple, and not the torture boxes that some Js are.

I have only seem those LeComtes around, not even sailed in close enough company with them to have an idea if they're really slow. They're one of the best looking fiberglass boats I know of, that has to count for something.

FB- Doug

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

But but but, it's a Tripp design. Why slow?

Because it's ancient.

Probably wasn't slow more than 1/2 century ago.

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9 hours ago, Bull City said:

This could be a new thread: "Bull City is looking." Any way...

I have been pretty happy with the H-Boat on our lake. The only system is the running and cabin lights. No inboard, no plumbing. The H-Boat has SA/DSIP 19, DISP/LWL 161. I like the performance.

That said, I could get interested in a boat up to 30 or 32 feet, provided it was very simple. A diesel inboard would be OK (I think I can locate a mechanic) but no plumbing, or holding tanks. 2 burner stove would be nice, place for a porta-potty. The J100 is pretty simple, but it's not right for a number of reasons. A Center Harbor 31 could work, but they're pretty pricey. Maybe a cabin heater. Tiller. Companionway could be off-set. :rolleyes: Simple interior. A table would be nice. Standing headroom OK but not required.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

B.C.

Where you are: I see rather a bit big gap between the slim H-boat and the next step. There is currently an Aphrodite 101 in New York state, other than that... A not so well in shape Abbott 33, and I like the Pearson 10m, but they are on the rather big side.

In Europe I would say the H-323 (pic) or H-35, the Senorita Helmsman, the Omega 10m or the Link 30 aka Mystery 30, from top down:

H323-630x452.jpg

Senorita-Helmsman.jpg

lightbox-bat31702.jpg?1300219710

vartmpgallery_migration_83_temp_dirgalle

Other than that: the H-Boat is such a capable small boat, I would keep it and find a solution for stove and head.

I particularly like 'Bert', a modified example, competing with a nice set of sail in the Solent (see pic at original source):

http://www.sailingscenes.co.uk/media/c1ae178a-e99a-4690-b522-f128fb903ba5-bert-gbr7601r-h-boat-round-the-island-race-2019-20190629992/fs

 

 

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11 hours ago, Bull City said:

This could be a new thread: "Bull City is looking." Any way...

I have been pretty happy with the H-Boat on our lake. The only system is the running and cabin lights. No inboard, no plumbing. The H-Boat has SA/DSIP 19, DISP/LWL 161. I like the performance.

That said, I could get interested in a boat up to 30 or 32 feet, provided it was very simple. A diesel inboard would be OK (I think I can locate a mechanic) but no plumbing, or holding tanks. 2 burner stove would be nice, place for a porta-potty. The J100 is pretty simple, but it's not right for a number of reasons. A Center Harbor 31 could work, but they're pretty pricey. Maybe a cabin heater. Tiller. Companionway could be off-set. :rolleyes: Simple interior. A table would be nice. Standing headroom OK but not required.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

B.C.

 

Companionway: Dead Center. 

JOY_.thumb.jpg.4343642c3a95cc2bd4e2a5d614657a7c.jpg

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13 hours ago, Bull City said:

This could be a new thread: "Bull City is looking." Any way...

I have been pretty happy with the H-Boat on our lake. The only system is the running and cabin lights. No inboard, no plumbing. The H-Boat has SA/DSIP 19, DISP/LWL 161. I like the performance.

That said, I could get interested in a boat up to 30 or 32 feet, provided it was very simple. A diesel inboard would be OK (I think I can locate a mechanic) but no plumbing, or holding tanks. 2 burner stove would be nice, place for a porta-potty. The J100 is pretty simple, but it's not right for a number of reasons. A Center Harbor 31 could work, but they're pretty pricey. Maybe a cabin heater. Tiller. Companionway could be off-set. :rolleyes: Simple interior. A table would be nice. Standing headroom OK but not required.

Suggestions?

Thanks,

B.C.

 

I was just looking for a place to put this. I think it's cool but not exactly what you're looking for. Someone invested a shit ton of money, work and love into it.

https://www.sailboatlistings.com/photographs/88249

main.jpg

 

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I got to wondering what boats in the YRA/LIS PHRF list would seem likely contenders for Bull. I filtered for appropriate length and narrowness and got a short list. Note that almost all these boats are open daysailors.  Apparently, I'd have to relax my Length/Beam ratio criterion a bit to get actual cruising boats. The inclusion of the Dragon, and of course the H-boat, suggest that Scandinavia is the place to look.

2020-09-17_09-47-02.png

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2 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

I got to wondering what boats in the YRA/LIS PHRF list would seem likely contenders for Bull. I filtered for appropriate length and narrowness and got a short list. Note that almost all these boats are open daysailors.  Apparently, I'd have to relax my Length/Beam ratio criterion a bit to get actual cruising boats. The inclusion of the Dragon, and of course the H-boat, suggest that Scandinavia is the place to look.

2020-09-17_09-47-02.png

That's a list of great boats. A lot of them are boats I've dreamed of owning.

He's got an H-boat now, we know about that.... the Herreshoff "S" is kinda funny looking and tiny inside and maintenance intensive. I personally found them a blast to sail but that was in the context of racing with a fleet (I think Watch Hill? It was a long time ago). The Dragon and the Rozinante have either tiny cabins or just a cuddy.

The Esse 850 doesn't seem like it would have the interior he wants, and is expensive as hell. Gorgeous boats, though (judging by pics, I've never seen one in person)

The Knockabout, Etchells, Ultra, Shields, most Six Meters (a few have tiny cabins), and 11 Metre, don't have cabins at all.

The Mega is a cool boat in many ways but very few if any think it's a good-looking boat. Not sure Bull will like the Hobie 33 either.

That leaves the Abbott 33, the E 33, the Aphrodite, San Juan 33 (why not a Tartan Ten?), and Knarr 30, to consider.

Progress made!

FB- Doug

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34 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

That's a list of great boats. A lot of them are boats I've dreamed of owning.

He's got an H-boat now, we know about that.... the Herreshoff "S" is kinda funny looking and tiny inside and maintenance intensive. I personally found them a blast to sail but that was in the context of racing with a fleet (I think Watch Hill? It was a long time ago). The Dragon and the Rozinante have either tiny cabins or just a cuddy.

The Esse 850 doesn't seem like it would have the interior he wants, and is expensive as hell. Gorgeous boats, though (judging by pics, I've never seen one in person)

The Knockabout, Etchells, Ultra, Shields, most Six Meters (a few have tiny cabins), and 11 Metre, don't have cabins at all.

The Mega is a cool boat in many ways but very few if any think it's a good-looking boat. Not sure Bull will like the Hobie 33 either.

That leaves the Abbott 33, the E 33, the Aphrodite, San Juan 33 (why not a Tartan Ten?), and Knarr 30, to consider.

Progress made!

FB- Doug

The Tartan 10 is a touch beamier than the LOA/Beam limit of 3.75 which I used. 

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4 minutes ago, SemiSalt said:

The Tartan 10 is a touch beamier than the LOA/Beam limit of 3.75 which I used. 

The T-10 is a just tad too big in the butt for them to be as good-looking as the others. Great sailing boats and as practical as any..... not standing headroom though.

The big butt makes them great off-wind performers, they punch 'way above their weight IMHO.

FB- Doug

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I've always been partial to another Bill Tripp design: the Seafearer 31.  The sloop, not the ketch version.  Very sweet sailing (if not the quickest boat in the fleet), and very, very sweet looking. Most of them will have a head with a holding tank, but that's easy enough to take out and put in a porti-pottie.  I've been told that some of the early models even had the head plumbed to go directly into a seacock with no tank.

Rosebud

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13 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

I meant yawl, not ketch....

You're forgiven ;)

Tripp's have such an elegant look, even the small oned. I was on a Sailmaster 26 some years ago and it had many features I really liked. The centreboard slot in the long keel tended to turn mud into concrete, though. But other than that: surprisingly large below.

windancer-a-classic-sailmaster-26-219206

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26 minutes ago, Crash said:

Wow indeed.  Along those same lines (no pun intended), check out Tim's efforts on an old Triton hull that he stripped bare and made into a day sailer.  Tim used to have an entire website devoted to the project.  The link is still on his page, but it appears to be dead.

ds90705-41.jpgds2006-2-1000.jpgds2006-3-1000.jpg

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Methinks that Bull will be quite interested in the Omega 10 DS.  We have similar tastes.  The Center harbor is too rich for both of us, otherwise....

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Scandinavia is the place to look.

I think SemiSalt has hit on it.

We have had many weeks of humid, gloomy weather. We are now under the pitter patter rain of the remnants of Sally. Next week will be glorious: night time low in the upper 50s, daytime highs in the upper 70s. Mrs. Bull and I will be embarking on our first overnight "cruise" on the H-Boat. A pot of Andalusian beef stew and a bottle of Spanish red will tell the tale.

Our last cruise was on a Cape Dory Typhoon (18 feet) in Biscayne Bay 45 years ago. Then it was Budweiser and KFC chicken. We have progressed.

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18 hours ago, Matagi said:

Where you are: I see rather a bit big gap between the slim H-boat and the next step. There is currently an Aphrodite 101 in New York state, other than that... A not so well in shape Abbott 33, and I like the Pearson 10m, but they are on the rather big side.

In Europe I would say the H-323 (pic) or H-35, the Senorita Helmsman, the Omega 10m or the Link 30 aka Mystery 30, from top down:

H323-630x452.jpg

Senorita-Helmsman.jpg

lightbox-bat31702.jpg?1300219710

vartmpgallery_migration_83_temp_dirgalle

Other than that: the H-Boat is such a capable small boat, I would keep it and find a solution for stove and head.

I particularly like 'Bert', a modified example, competing with a nice set of sail in the Solent (see pic at original source):

http://www.sailingscenes.co.uk/media/c1ae178a-e99a-4690-b522-f128fb903ba5-bert-gbr7601r-h-boat-round-the-island-race-2019-20190629992/fs

 

 

That H323 is leaving a very smooth, undisturbed wake

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