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Coolboats to admire

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Fugu - I can dig it.

 

This boat is going to look rather pedestrian in the company of the above, and is maybe too grown up to be cool. She's no super-model, but a smart wholesome sensible woman who knows what matters in life: enthusiastic in bed, but you wouldn't have to dread the following morning - you could be sure of some decent conversation, she wouldn't laugh at your wardrobe, and you could take her home to mum.

For sale at http://www.woodenships.co.uk/sailing-yachts/dalzell-43

I can't really see anything wrong with her, and would definitely take her out if she'd have me, and if I wasn't already married.

 

to this neophyte, it's not a bad looking boat overall. I'm not sold on the enormous dorade vents in the cockpit, but I could see how they might be a great feature in equatorial waters. Traveler setup blows for it, though. the control lines snake around them and it all seems a million miles away from the helm. Aesthetically I find the transom a bit too abrupt, like they lopped the ass end of the boat off. The deck is cool. I like that all the halyards were left at the mast, where they should be.

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new entry for consideration: the Riptide 35 from Bieker Boats, built by the capable hands of Jim Betts of Anacortes, WA. I think this boat gets a lot of things right.

 

Drawing 8 and a half feet with a bulb on the bottom, I'd imagine it can carry quite a bit of sail. It just can't do it anywhere near me.

 

That has to be a MkII Riptide 35. And must have been the second one as 1)the first MKII is dry moored at my club. 2)I didn't recognize anyone in that pic and I would know. So were is the 2ndone in that pic? Great boat. Won Straits race overall.

 

I had the privilege to know & sail on Jonathan & Libby McKee's Riptide 44 "Dark Star". We won Div. 1 and a 2nd OA in Straits '12. Designed as a performance cruiser/racer and pretty comfy but we saw the boat do 14 to 15 knots all the time at around 20 WS @ about 140. Rock steady too. Great interior, great build. Not your Dad's Bunter or Bendytoy. Real boat.

 

There's a article on the SA FP years ago ('06 maybe?)and I can't find it sothis will have to do: http://www.biekerboats.com/Bieker_Boats/Riptide_44.html

 

Pretty groovy cruising boat huh?

 

Maxx - that's awesome. Thanks for chiming in on the thread. Can you tell us more about the equalization on the water ballast? How long does it take to switch sides? Is it purely gravity fed or are there pumps? Just curious about the realities of sailing with such a setup.

 

I sailed on the MkI Riptide 35 for a while. The water ballast was a real pain for buoy racing -- it took about 90 seconds to transfer, and transferred via gravity (meaning you had to transfer ballast, then tack). And then you dumped it all at the windward mark, only to immediately start planning to fill. The fill used an electric pump from a thru-hull, and a manual pump. I was the 'manual pump' guy.

 

But for distance races it was awesome. (and the rest of the boat was amazing -- definitely the most fun I've ever had sailing). I think the new boats have a sump with a submerged pump that fills the tanks much quicker. Paul came sailing with us once and described how he'd do the system differently were he to do it again. He struck me as a really nice guy, who was always thinking of the way to do something better. I learned a lot from him that afternoon.

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The main looks pretty much like shit but at $25k they probably don't want to hear that.

 

Trickypig might point out that RT could use a bit less tricky pig, and less jib halyard tension, although I doubt they're racing in that photo.

 

Cali Condor has had the benefit of the designer aboard for most races.

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Trickypig might point out that RT could use a bit less tricky pig, and less jib halyard tension, although I doubt they're racing in that photo.

 

Cali Condor has had the benefit of the designer aboard for most races.

To be fair I think they've just tacked. The mainsheet trimmer is busy grinding and the foredeckie is skirting the headsail.

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new entry for consideration: the Riptide 35 from Bieker Boats, built by the capable hands of Jim Betts of Anacortes, WA. I think this boat gets a lot of things right.

 

Drawing 8 and a half feet with a bulb on the bottom, I'd imagine it can carry quite a bit of sail. It just can't do it anywhere near me.

 

 

That has to be a MkII Riptide 35. And must have been the second one as 1)the first MKII is dry moored at my club. 2)I didn't recognize anyone in that pic and I would know. So were is the 2ndone in that pic? Great boat. Won Straits race overall.

 

I had the privilege to know & sail on Jonathan & Libby McKee's Riptide 44 "Dark Star". We won Div. 1 and a 2nd OA in Straits '12. Designed as a performance cruiser/racer and pretty comfy but we saw the boat do 14 to 15 knots all the time at around 20 WS @ about 140. Rock steady too. Great interior, great build. Not your Dad's Bunter or Bendytoy. Real boat.

 

There's a article on the SA FP years ago ('06 maybe?)and I can't find it sothis will have to do: http://www.biekerboats.com/Bieker_Boats/Riptide_44.html

 

Pretty groovy cruising boat huh?

 

 

Maxx - that's awesome. Thanks for chiming in on the thread. Can you tell us more about the equalization on the water ballast? How long does it take to switch sides? Is it purely gravity fed or are there pumps? Just curious about the realities of sailing with such a setup.

 

 

I sailed on the MkI Riptide 35 for a while. The water ballast was a real pain for buoy racing -- it took about 90 seconds to transfer, and transferred via gravity (meaning you had to transfer ballast, then tack). And then you dumped it all at the windward mark, only to immediately start planning to fill. The fill used an electric pump from a thru-hull, and a manual pump. I was the 'manual pump' guy.

 

But for distance races it was awesome. (and the rest of the boat was amazing -- definitely the most fun I've ever had sailing). I think the new boats have a sump with a submerged pump that fills the tanks much quicker. Paul came sailing with us once and described how he'd do the system differently were he to do it again. He struck me as a really nice guy, who was always thinking of the way to do something better. I learned a lot from him that afternoon.

 

 

Having sailed on McKee's Dark Star, and with Paul, it's still pretty simple set up and ICBT nailed it: It's not intended for half & hour sausages in the bay. It was intended for more long distant racing or cruising. It's tough to get on top of your PHRF numbers that way. But Jonathan didn't give a ratazz about that. He had a very, very cool ride and went racing around the buoys anyway; he didn't care about PHRF pickle dishes. Dark Star was a evolution from that; a very cool cruiser/racer. Looking at the MKII 35 has evolved with it to a more recent vintage. Better water ballast system (we never had an issue with DS when I sailed her), better foils, better innovations generally. I've been waiting to talk to Paul now he's out of the AC/Oracle stuff for know; he's been a little busy. I'll will try to share with the rest of the class.

 

The new 41 "Blue" is way cool and spent a lot of time on it and my own pics. I'm stuffed today to screw pictures but I will post some from my file when I get a moment.

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I sailed on the MkI Riptide 35 for a while. The water ballast was a real pain for buoy racing -- it took about 90 seconds to transfer, and transferred via gravity (meaning you had to transfer ballast, then tack). And then you dumped it all at the windward mark, only to immediately start planning to fill. The fill used an electric pump from a thru-hull, and a manual pump. I was the 'manual pump' guy.

But for distance races it was awesome. (and the rest of the boat was amazing -- definitely the most fun I've ever had sailing). I think the new boats have a sump with a submerged pump that fills the tanks much quicker. Paul came sailing with us once and described how he'd do the system differently were he to do it again. He struck me as a really nice guy, who was always thinking of the way to do something better. I learned a lot from him that afternoon.

 

Having sailed on McKee's Dark Star, and with Paul, it's still pretty simple set up and ICBT nailed it: It's not intended for half & hour sausages in the bay. It was intended for more long distant racing or cruising. It's tough to get on top of your PHRF numbers that way. But Jonathan didn't give a ratazz about that. He had a very, very cool ride and went racing around the buoys anyway; he didn't care about PHRF pickle dishes. Dark Star was a evolution from that; a very cool cruiser/racer. Looking at the MKII 35 has evolved with it to a more recent vintage. Better water ballast system (we never had an issue with DS when I sailed her), better foils, better innovations generally. I've been waiting to talk to Paul now he's out of the AC/Oracle stuff for know; he's been a little busy. I'll will try to share with the rest of the class.

 

The new 41 "Blue" is way cool and spent a lot of time on it and my own pics. I'm stuffed today to screw pictures but I will post some from my file when I get a moment.

 

 

ICBT and Maxx - thanks for piping in! Makes total sense on W/L courses not being this design's forte. I tend to fantasize about ocean racing and cruising, hence my affinity for these boats. W/L racing just doesn't do it for me.

 

Maxx, I've been all over the photo galleries for Blue. The dual rudders are very sporting! She looks like an amazing boat. When you get a chance, your pics would be well received.

 

cheers

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Here is one,kinda little but one has to admire the fact that it does it's job very well.

I think it was built by a guy who sometimes posts here

 

post-22256-0-27725300-1381166201_thumb.jpg

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Okay dokee - you asked for it! These are my pictures of "Blue". Outstanding, kewl, boat.

 

post-1185-0-52709300-1381175762_thumb.jpgpost-1185-0-80669000-1381175892_thumb.jpgpost-1185-0-84009400-1381175941_thumb.jpg

 

(PS. - There more - I cratered the amount KB's. I'll send some more.

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A couple of the interior detail:

 

post-1185-0-60400800-1381176683_thumb.jpgpost-1185-0-51509400-1381176712_thumb.jpgpost-1185-0-14839900-1381176743_thumb.jpg

 

There's more but I'm pooped doing this. If anyone wants a full gallery for some reason I might be able to make that happen. But not just for the hell of it.

 

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A couple of the interior detail:

 

attachicon.gifIMGP5972 (800x536).jpgattachicon.gifIMGP5973 (800x536).jpgattachicon.gifIMGP5975 (800x536).jpg

 

There's more but I'm pooped doing this. If anyone wants a full gallery for some reason I might be able to make that happen. But not just for the hell of it.

 

Frikken awesome boat. +many.

 

I like how they have it set up so everyone has his/her own beer mug. That must save a lot of trouble figuring out who didn't wash up after themselves and put the mug back in the parking spot. And smart with the double sink to make for more efficient mug washing.

 

I was gonna ask where's the oven so you can cook something other than beer for a change but I realized that was a dumb question.

 

Unrelated: Why all the sleeping bags & tarps taking up space? My wife wouldn't go for that. They need to get organized in there.

 

Seriously Maxx thx for the pretty pix, do you by any change have a sail plan/deck layout?

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Maxx - thanks for Riptide boat porn. will be studying these for a bit here. wow

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A couple of the interior detail:

 

attachicon.gifIMGP5972 (800x536).jpgattachicon.gifIMGP5973 (800x536).jpgattachicon.gifIMGP5975 (800x536).jpg

 

There's more but I'm pooped doing this. If anyone wants a full gallery for some reason I might be able to make that happen. But not just for the hell of it.

 

Frikken awesome boat. +many.

 

I like how they have it set up so everyone has his/her own beer mug. That must save a lot of trouble figuring out who didn't wash up after themselves and put the mug back in the parking spot. And smart with the double sink to make for more efficient mug washing.

 

I was gonna ask where's the oven so you can cook something other than beer for a change but I realized that was a dumb question.

 

Unrelated: Why all the sleeping bags & tarps taking up space? My wife wouldn't go for that. They need to get organized in there.

 

Seriously Maxx thx for the pretty pix, do you by any change have a sail plan/deck layout?

 

Zedboy - here ya go:

 

http://www.biekerboats.com/Bieker_Boats/Riptide_41.html

 

And you have to remember the boat was just launched new coming from Annacortes to WVYC for the Southern Straits race. It was a project in motion when I took the pics and helped out the best I could so it's no wonder it's a little dishevelled at that point.

 

Here's Kurt H's piece about Blue: http://www.nwyachting.com/2013/03/blue-passing-through/

 

One thing about Bieker and Betts they do good work. Innovative maybe but stuff that works.

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Maxx - thanks for Riptide boat porn. will be studying these for a bit here. wow

Your welcome Skol. I've raced the 50 too and knew all about the MK I 35 as it was the first one for McKee. It was pretty innovated at that time.Say '94-'95 maybe? I never had an opportunity to sail on Ripple or Terremoto.

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Okay, okay.....two more and I'll shut up. The MKII 35 and Blue in anger:

 

post-1185-0-31170700-1381349806_thumb.jpgpost-1185-0-56256600-1381349835_thumb.jpg

 

 

And oops. It's not proper unless I mention Dark Star's pic:

 

post-1185-0-95064700-1381349989_thumb.jpg

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Once again, note the almost total lack of bilge. And this time, more than unusual interior layout - who the heck puts the head in the middle of the salon, with the galley to port?! Oh, of course: we need an excuse for structure to hang the keel off.

 

Very clever.

 

Joe Adams did the same sort of thing, but he used the structure for a daggerboard case.

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Extremely cool Tom.

Damn!! You beat me to it.

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Oyster dredging boat via Woodenboat.

 

I briefly considered putting it in another thread...

 

1376367_10151933168081212_1835693380_n.j

 

Oh c'mon, let's call it by it's name... Chesapeake Bay Bugeye.

 

.

Now I have a suggestion from another thread, and it's a big contrast... in some ways the polar opposite... of the boat Tom R just showed us.

.

 

 

The aptly-named Aphrodite 101, small-ish Yacht with a capital "Y"

Bianca-Aphrodite-101_thumbnail_180574_1_

 

 

Another view, I have seen (and sailed, once) these boats and IMHO they are among the very few that are beautiful from every angle

 

IMG_5368-W.jpg

 

And before we go away, a diagram to show the bones

 

post-30927-0-81503200-1382461729_thumb.jpg

 

There it is

 

FB- Doug

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I always thought the Aphrodite could use a bit more sheer in the bow. In person it looks just a little droopy, but the rest of the boat is nice.

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I'm massively biased and though it has been used for cruising and even a honeymoon - I think the Herreshoff S boats deserve a mention in this thread.

What might add to your consideration is that if any of you are willing to risk the splinters, the Narraganestt Bay fleet will welcome you aboard on for a sail or a race Tuesday nights (One Design) Wednesday nights (PHRF) or at one of our weekend regattas. There are also boats available for charter. More information posted at https://sites.google.com/site/nbhsca/ or please PM me.

Cheers-

 

 

23972_0_2_photo_NYYCRW12df_1371.jpg

23913_0_2_photo_NYYCRW12df_04081.jpg

Argument-2.jpg

Argument.jpg

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Stephano, I sailed out of Jamestown for several years and always loved seeing the S boats. I towed one back to her mooring one Tuesday night when the wind completely died and the tide was going out. I was motoring by and thought the crews' waving at me looked a little more frantic than the usual friendly hello so I went back and gave them a lift. Guess if you're going to get a tow it might as well be from another sailboat!

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Brodie-

I think that was me! Thank you again, you saved us that night. If I remember correctly you had a mooring over at Clark's?

 

Bob-

Class rules permit vangs however the geometry of anchoring it to the mast is poor. There is a history in the class of attempts at vangs however with the length of the boom there is also a history of snapping booms. For a few years the class permitted aluminum booms and masts (due to difficulty sourcing wooden ones) and I believe the aluminum booms took the load better. Presently, most of us are on the lookout for a fat guy who will sit in the main on the downwind legs and trust us not to jibe...

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no vangs is a great way to reduce load and injure people...

 

when sailing neptune rule in the 8mr we sail without a vang too. we do have someone sitting on the boom to keep it down to keep the sail from spilling.

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Paul Rollins built Mickey Finn. 48' Custom Yawl.

 

http://s1348.photobucket.com/user/robdesmaraisdc/slideshow/

 

Can one use photobucket to upload pictures?

 

You should be able to. Go to More Reply Options (under the reply box) and it will let you link pictures in. Can you test post some tits to make sure it works?

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Check this Tahiti ketch out.

 

Apparently she was built of NZ Kauri over 50 years ago and has NEVER been in the water. You could say she is STILL brand new. Aparently for sale as part of a deceased estate, for NZ$20,000.

 

Check her out here: http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=650627703

 

 

post-76289-0-40410900-1382904888_thumb.jpg

post-76289-0-19785300-1382904900_thumb.jpg

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Yes there was quite a bit of chat about her in another thread and then I saw that ad too. That is American Yachting history right there. About 5 years ago I bought a 1978 Ducati 900ss, owned it for a 18 months then sold it for slightly more money; that's good toy ownership. I wonder if buying `Gunbare' would be a good way to get out sailing and hold a certain amount of resale?

 

 

 

Check this Tahiti ketch out.

 

Apparently she was built of NZ Kauri over 50 years ago and has NEVER been in the water. You could say she is STILL brand new. Aparently for sale as part of a deceased estate, for NZ$20,000.

 

Check her out here: http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=650627703

 

Thats a gem... I hope the right person gets her.

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Wow! Almost 20 knots on a waterbike? The only ones I have ever seen in person were lucky to go 4. Looks like the technology has changed since I last checked almost 20 years ago.

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Wow! Almost 20 knots on a waterbike? The only ones I have ever seen in person were lucky to go 4. Looks like the technology has changed since I last checked almost 20 years ago.

I can easily break four with my non foiling Wavebike...........(BTW, I think they only made four of these before the company folded....)

post-8115-0-36709000-1383055592_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-25442000-1383055597_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-30159900-1383055610_thumb.jpg

post-8115-0-81022100-1383055613_thumb.jpg

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and why are they wearing bike helmets again?

'cause it's a water BIKE!

 

(runs and hides)

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Wow! Almost 20 knots on a waterbike? The only ones I have ever seen in person were lucky to go 4. Looks like the technology has changed since I last checked almost 20 years ago.

I can easily break four with my non foiling Wavebike...........(BTW, I think they only made four of these before the company folded....)

At least we can see where your penchant for skinny boats came from! :P

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I wonder if they could build a rowing eight bicycle on foils.

 

The rowing world would go all foil mad like the sailing world is...

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"BTW, I think they only made four of these before the company folded....)"

 

Can't imagine why.

They are very fast (for a non foiler) and were very expensive new, I bought it from the original owner (a MicroSoftie) and paid pennies on the dollar for it. I am thinking of changing it to a recumbent.

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A long time ago there was an award for making 20 but I don't think anyone did it before the time limit? Or did the MIT airprop hydrofoil do it?

I think Steve Hed hit 17 or 18 with one of the first cycling foilers....

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Wow! Almost 20 knots on a waterbike? The only ones I have ever seen in person were lucky to go 4. Looks like the technology has changed since I last checked almost 20 years ago.

I can easily break four with my non foiling Wavebike...........(BTW, I think they only made four of these before the company folded....)

 

Want.

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And the reason is?

 

Isn't that's a bit like designing the first handsome carriage for 150 years?

 

You'll get used to Jo. Posts boats conceptually from the last century, says nothing.

 

Judging by the frequency of the posts, he's (she's) on an asteroid that comes close enough for internet every year.

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Check this Tahiti ketch out.

 

Apparently she was built of NZ Kauri over 50 years ago and has NEVER been in the water. You could say she is STILL brand new. Aparently for sale as part of a deceased estate, for NZ$20,000.

 

Check her out here: http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=650627703

Wow, beautiful. That was a passion project, no doubt. A shame he never finished her.

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And the reason is?

 

Isn't that's a bit like designing the first handsome carriage for 150 years?

 

I presume it's because of the resurgence of interest in the J class. I know that a number of knew boats have been built. Usually replicas, or to lines that were drawn in the 1930s but never built. When designing Ranger, Starling Burgess and Olin Stephens both drew up a few sets of lines and then compared them to each other. I think a few boats have either been built, or were talked about building, which were based on the unused lines. I suppose it was only a matter of time before somebody tried a new design to the old rule.

 

But I agree, it's a bit (or more than a bit) silly.

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J Class rules prohibit new designs. Any new boat must be from a design from when the Class was an AC Boat. There are modification like materials used and some other exceptions but a completely new design is not going to be able to race in the class. http://www.boatinternational.com/superyacht-design-and-build/superyacht-construction/the-new-j-class-sailing-yacht-lionheart/

 

 

And the reason is?

 

Isn't that's a bit like designing the first handsome carriage for 150 years?

 

I presume it's because of the resurgence of interest in the J class. I know that a number of knew boats have been built. Usually replicas, or to lines that were drawn in the 1930s but never built. When designing Ranger, Starling Burgess and Olin Stephens both drew up a few sets of lines and then compared them to each other. I think a few boats have either been built, or were talked about building, which were based on the unused lines. I suppose it was only a matter of time before somebody tried a new design to the old rule.

 

But I agree, it's a bit (or more than a bit) silly.

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I thank you for bringing up the J-Class. I just blew 30 minutes on the class website. It's all good though.

 

Here is the boat porn pic of the day.

 

313873_980x580fq75.jpg

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Good thing those guys are riding the rail - I'm sure the VMG would plummet if they weren't legs-out hiking like that. Heck, given the wispy-displacement of that boat it'd probably just give up and flip over like an 18-foot skiff without their efforts.

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Nice paint job.

 

I've seen bigger transoms on 28' Bene's.

 

Pretty well removes all temptation to put COTB.

 

I noticed they didn't have a BBQ.

 

Of course, you'd need a big BBQ for a crew of 74.

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1) Do you suppose that big wheel forward was stock?

 

2) Why the boom crutch?

 

3) No lifelines (kidding on that one)

 

4) Are those big speakers on posts at the stern? (or pie warmers?)

 

5) Check the port bow - the spinnaker pole - wow.

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Nice paint job.

 

I've seen bigger transoms on 28' Bene's.

 

Pretty well removes all temptation to put COTB.

 

I noticed they didn't have a BBQ.

 

Of course, you'd need a big BBQ for a crew of 74.

 

Are you kidding? On a boat like that, they have a catering vessel following them.

 

As for COTB, it'd be too far away if they put it all the way at the transom. It's CITM on a boat this size.

 

FB- Doug

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Wow! Almost 20 knots on a waterbike? The only ones I have ever seen in person were lucky to go 4. Looks like the technology has changed since I last checked almost 20 years ago.

 

I can easily break four with my non foiling Wavebike...........(BTW, I think they only made four of these before the company folded....)

Want.

It could arranged, I have considered selling it.

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Nice paint job.

 

I've seen bigger transoms on 28' Bene's.

Here's another view of the transom...

 

Lionheart-03-big.jpg

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1)

 

5) Check the port bow - the spinnaker pole - wow.

That would be the BBQ

 

Telephoto foreshortening.

Still looks like a pretty big Spinnaker Pole...

 

270917_1600x1200.jpg

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Good thing those guys are riding the rail - I'm sure the VMG would plummet if they weren't legs-out hiking like that. Heck, given the wispy-displacement of that boat it'd probably just give up and flip over like an 18-foot skiff without their efforts.

People racing sailboats these days have no idea where else to sit...

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I don't want it because the cove isn't gold leaf.

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I don't want it because the cove isn't gold leaf.

 

What, platinum leaf isn't good enough for you?

 

Edit: WTF is with the lack of fenders?

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1)

 

5) Check the port bow - the spinnaker pole - wow.

That would be the BBQ

Telephoto foreshortening.

Still looks like a pretty big Spinnaker Pole...

 

270917_1600x1200.jpg

 

I think there is a video of ranger gybing, takes 15 minutes to go through the motions. Certainly some serious well thought out sailing going on. I hate to see what happens when it all goes wrong on one of those.

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If it takes 15 minutes to do it right it probably takes an hour or more to recover from doing it wrong.

 

I'd like to see it in fast forward.

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Eleanora was at Cowes last year. She was alongside and there was a crewmember buffing the binnacle or something. There was this huge spindly wooden spinnaker pole stored up the fore mast, which looked a complete nightmare. So I had to ask "How do you gybe her?" and he said "Very carefully".

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1)

 

5) Check the port bow - the spinnaker pole - wow.

That would be the BBQ

Telephoto foreshortening.

Still looks like a pretty big Spinnaker Pole...

 

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I think there is a video of ranger gybing, takes 15 minutes to go through the motions. Certainly some serious well thought out sailing going on. I hate to see what happens when it all goes wrong on one of those.

 

I believe it involves multiple deaths and the loss of personal fortunes.

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