Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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Many thanks :)

 

Look like very cool little boats, well set up for adventuring. Had to laugh when I had google translate the nl wiki page and it decided "Oppervlakte fok" (foresail area?) was best translated as "Breeding Area"

 

More fun words :http://www.dorusrijkersgroep.nl/imagesdivers/lelievlet.jpg

And noune fok=jib, verb fokken=breeding, so thats why google translate does not work :)

 

And a Dutch beauty, the rivierenklasse.

2-rivierklasse.jpg

Build by a yard thats 100yrs in family hands, still dedicated to wooden boats, in old style building.

 

My question, how do you call this style of gaff, its almost vertical.

Here its called houari rigging.

 

That's a beauty

 

I would call the spar a "gaff." I's not long nor vertical enough to be a gunter IMHO; there is a thing commonly called a Dutch gaff, part of which is being curved, but Dutch gaffs are much shorter like the ones on botters etc etc.

 

botter3.jpg

 

 

FB- Doug

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Yeah, this high peaked gaff is so you almost have a marconi rig, but still can clear bridges.

So I think its a gunter... thanks, learned something today..
, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunter

 

One fishi9ngboat was an odd one in the Netherlands, bit ugly for some:

for others an inspiration..
Description:
http://mabruin.home.xs4all.nl/en/stav1.htm

 

509%20Haven%20van%20Laaksum,aan%20de%20k

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Jody:

I felt a bit weird posting that one because it really isn't a traditional Dutch type . But it certainly was inspired by the Dutch originals. I did that one for my good pal Jeff when he was going through a squall.

 

Bob Berg (the real life Baba) has put my cartoons together into two calendars for next year. One is all powerboat cartoons and the other ius all sail. They are pretty cool. They are CD sized and designed to sit on your desk.

2014 calendars Bob? Where can one get them?

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Jody:

I felt a bit weird posting that one because it really isn't a traditional Dutch type . But it certainly was inspired by the Dutch originals. I did that one for my good pal Jeff when he was going through a squall.

 

Bob Berg (the real life Baba) has put my cartoons together into two calendars for next year. One is all powerboat cartoons and the other ius all sail. They are pretty cool. They are CD sized and designed to sit on your desk.

2014 calendars Bob? Where can one get them?

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Bob.

Sign me up for a calendar s as well please.

 

LeoV

In bet you Google translate will have no trouble translating " fokken" into English. BTW jib = "Fock" in German.

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Jose:

Not sure but I'll find out soon enough. I'll let you know.

Maybe Santa will bring you one for Chrsitmas.

Wow, you know Santa? Your grandkids are so lucky!

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I've always been a big fan of the Palmer Johnson New York 40 designed by Doug Peterson.

 

4398126_20130625104209849_1_XLARGE.jpg

 

4398126_20130701084702495_1_XLARGE.jpg

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Speaking of DP designs, this one intrigues me. It's been for sale for a LONG time and I don't understand why. It had a great builder and looks gorgeous. Does anyone know anything about it?

 

Look towards the end of the photos for that IOR bustle!

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1975/Contessa--2416262/Warwick/RI/United-States#.UoP7P3AmfVo

 

I'm reasonably fluent in "broker" so let me translate.

 

 

ANDARA, has undergone an extensive structural and cosmetic refit under her current owner of 11 years. The interior was stripped down to the longitudinal stringers and rebuilt with new bulkheads, furniture, water and electrical systems and electronics. A large portion of the cabinhouse and deck was re-cored at the same time. In short, this vessel is one of the most modern and structurally sound Contessa 35’s to be found today. In addition, the hull was stripped below the waterline and barrier coated in 2010 and the topsides refinished with Dupont Imron finish at the same time. This is a beautiful boat to behold and one that can take her new owner around the world or around the buoys with equal ease.

 

The owner spent a $hitload of money gutting and replacing everything inside this boat, recored the soggy deck, and painted the boat. He does not understand that each dollar spent adds a dime to resale value and sincerely hopes you do not either.

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Understood - I did the same thing to my boat over the last 3 years and realize it is, as they say, a sunk cost.

 

But what about that Contessa 35? Good boat? What's one in that condition worth?

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Understood - I did the same thing to my boat over the last 3 years and realize it is, as they say, a sunk cost.

 

But what about that Contessa 35? Good boat? What's one in that condition worth?

 

It's definitely a cool boat; somewhat of a period piece but definitely one of the best of it's type and it's era. I've never sailed one myself but have been around them enough to know that they sail quite well... don't think it's a broach coach (or not much of a one) but not sure.

 

What's it worth? I dunno, what would you pay for one? As for this particular one, it's really a question of what was done (the "dreaded prior owner"s priorities) and how well it was done. And as Tom says, spending dollars on the front end is utterly meaningless at the back end.

 

FB- Doug

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The broker is on "Folly Landing." Bad sign?

 

Boat "value" is sure hard to judge. If you found another Contessa 35 in the condition typical of a 40 year old boat, you could end up at close to this guy's price bringing it up to comparable condition (just based on the photos).

 

Or you could buy a new 35'er for 3-4 times the price and then add sails, electronics, etc.

 

I better keep what I have for a few more years and amortize the cost of the refit . . .

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That Contessa was a slightly updated or progressed Ganbare hull. It was only a few designs after Ganbare so most "personality" will be very similar I expect. Rogers had a pretty good rep for build quality.

 

$69K is not gonna happen. 1/2 that maybe.

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Understood - I did the same thing to my boat over the last 3 years and realize it is, as they say, a sunk cost.

 

But what about that Contessa 35? Good boat? What's one in that condition worth?

 

 

I don't know the boat and it's been a few years since I was familiar with the market, but a general rule of thumb for 70s and 80s vintage cruisers in that size range is $1,000 per foot. Replacing all the stuff that needs replacing really doesn't change it much. 70k should buy something newer and/or bigger.

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I understand where this owner is. You really like your boat and are the type to want everything just right, so you do what he did. This leads to frequent compliments on your boat's appearance and condition, and you become convinced it translates into greater value. All it really means is you might be able to sell yours for market value while others of the same model just sit.

 

Sailboats might be the worst "investment" known to man. I think powerboats are actually worse, but not by much.

 

 

Now where's that list of "to-dos" for mine...

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I understand where this owner is. You really like your boat and are the type to want everything just right, so you do what he did. This leads to frequent compliments on your boat's appearance and condition, and you become convinced it translates into greater value. All it really means is you might be able to sell yours for market value while others of the same model just sit.

 

Sailboats might be the worst "investment" known to man. I think powerboats are actually worse, but not by much.

 

 

Now where's that list of "to-dos" for mine...

But one, perhaps...expensive European saloon cars.

 

Enough depreciation to create a sizeable inland lake.

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I understand where this owner is. You really like your boat and are the type to want everything just right, so you do what he did. This leads to frequent compliments on your boat's appearance and condition, and you become convinced it translates into greater value. All it really means is you might be able to sell yours for market value while others of the same model just sit.

 

Sailboats might be the worst "investment" known to man. I think powerboats are actually worse, but not by much.

 

 

Now where's that list of "to-dos" for mine...

But one, perhaps...expensive European saloon cars.

 

Enough depreciation to create a sizeable inland lake.

 

 

Hey! You pickin' on my Maybach?

Actually... no. I way thinking way less expensive. But it's relative I guess. A lot like boats, as it happens. :)

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That Contessa was a slightly updated or progressed Ganbare hull. It was only a few designs after Ganbare so most "personality" will be very similar I expect. Rogers had a pretty good rep for build quality.

 

$69K is not gonna happen. 1/2 that maybe.

The Contessa is basically a Ganbare hull tarted up. And yes the quality is there compared to the ones were built locally. However it has a lot of the foibles of a mid '70's IOR design. Pinched VHA station making it a short waterline "static" how the IOR looked at it. A lot of them had bow down trim for that reason when they were measured. When 7 or 8 hairy guys on the rail it was perfect. In light air or up to around 18 knots (Hv.#1 time) upwind it was untouchable for both point and speed. Over about 18 knots downwind it became an issue. By 22 to 25 your were "choked down". In 30? friggin' hang on! They often had a mind of their own. The years of skinny mains and big genoas with the kites to boot. I've got a lot time on them and a lot of different programs and more then a few wins OA over the years but some decided golf was a better sport.

 

We had one that was optimized for 12 knots upwind for it's rating and it had huge batteries around the mast step for that reason. Outstanding upwind but you were ready to wipeout around 15. One Swiftsure had everyone behind the helmsman trying stop the rudder spinning out. Good times - I still have all of my fingers at least.

 

Nice job I guess judging from the pics and I like the elliptical rudder but I'm not sure it helps much. But JonB points out: 69K ? I don't think so. If it's perfect maybe 40.

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If the asking price is $69K, his wife wants it sold but he doesn't.

Apparently.

Hope she doesn't read SA then. :)

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Here is another Doug Peterson beauty. A Modern Classic! "Will o the Wisp" has been racing on the waters of the Pacific Northwest since her launch in 1982 from the well respected boatyard of Jesperson Boat Builders. Absolutely gorgeous. I wonder if Peterson has ever designed an ugly boat?

 

 

3856722_20130713133532661_1_LARGE.jpg

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Here is another Doug Peterson beauty. A Modern Classic! "Will o the Wisp" has been racing on the waters of the Pacific Northwest since her launch in 1982 from the well respected boatyard of Jesperson Boat Builders. Absolutely gorgeous. I wonder if Peterson has ever designed an ugly boat?

 

 

3856722_20130713133532661_1_LARGE.jpg

 

That boat had a bundle spent on it not long ago - lots of carbon, super deep T-keel etc.

 

They can't sell it for $150K - it's been on the market for a long time now.

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Here is another Doug Peterson beauty. A Modern Classic! "Will o the Wisp" has been racing on the waters of the Pacific Northwest since her launch in 1982 from the well respected boatyard of Jesperson Boat Builders. Absolutely gorgeous. I wonder if Peterson has ever designed an ugly boat?

 

 

3856722_20130713133532661_1_LARGE.jpg

 

Here is another Doug Peterson beauty. A Modern Classic! "Will o the Wisp" has been racing on the waters of the Pacific Northwest since her launch in 1982 from the well respected boatyard of Jesperson Boat Builders. Absolutely gorgeous. I wonder if Peterson has ever designed an ugly boat?

 

 

3856722_20130713133532661_1_LARGE.jpg

Ah yes - the Cedar Speeder!

 

A lot of history with that boat for me. It was late for the party for the 2 tonner era. I was racing a SC50 against 2 tonners in the early to mid 80's. There were scads of them from old Admiral Cup campaigns. Buchan's (Bill & John) had a 43 and a 42. Several in BC like Salute, Foxhound a couple of Choat's, a '80's vintage cold molder from Cali too. The list went on. Very competitive for awhile. By the mid to late '80's bloom was off the rose as they were kevlar burners, crew burners (10 to make it work) and money burners for maintenance. When the new age 1 tonners started to show up it was over. The boat was sold into Seattle but a guy named Jerry Caston I believe around '88. Put a wheel on it and a few small items but other than it basically languished until the early '90's. A guy I used to know bought it and we sailed it & had a ton 'o fun for a few years. Epic exploits and stories to fill volumes. And I'll never forget the team van: '75 Dodge shaggin' wagon painted in flat black with side opening doors; no windows and tastefully decorated inside with purple shag carpet and black tufted naugahyde on the ceiling. Darker than the inside of a cow at night.

 

Sadly, one again the maintenance & care took over. The boat was was sold to the Gulf Islands as a cruiser and then as a liveaboard as the owner built a house. That would be late '90's/early '00's when it was sold again. The story goes that guy that bought it again was the son of the original owner as a legacy/tribute for his Dad (don't quote me on that). However there was scads of dough & effort to make it into the boat you see now; well, full stop and up and for sale now a couple of years.

 

Now listed: http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1982/Peterson-Cold-Molded-Custom-Race-Boat-2444860/Victoria-BC/Canada

 

I believe it as listed at 275K (250 anyway) at one point.

 

Not to belittle the situation at all but - wow! Carbon rig, carbon sails, T-bulb etc, etc in 2009.

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Here's a bit of spirit of tradition type boat porn for you to feast your eyes on. Fairlie 55

 

 

With the man hours involved, no wonder it costs a fortune.

 

Um... <drool> Wow.

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5) Check the port bow - the spinnaker pole - wow.

 

That's the BBQ.

 

Edit: Read the whole thread, dumbass! Great minds think alike?

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. And I'll never forget the team van: '75 Dodge shaggin' wagon painted in flat black with side opening doors; no windows and tastefully decorated inside with purple shag carpet and black tufted naugahyde on the ceiling.

 

"tastefully" just makes that sentence worthy of some sort of literary prize. I bow down in honor.

 

Never mind the boat, where are the van pictures?

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Get a copy of "Vans & Vanning" or "Hot Rod" from the mid 70's - but prepare yourself first with some sort of eye protection.

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So I showed up in my friend's back yard yesterday and immediately dropped the stuff in my hands and grabbed my iPhone. His neighbor across the canal was taking the wife for a ride in their kid's Picnic Cat. It was blowing about 15-20 straight down the canal as they sailed home, but the wind is pretty broken up down at canal level. The canal dead-ends two doors down from their dock in the last pic, so it gets more and more broken as they come.

picnic-cat-1.jpg

 

picnic-cat-2.jpg

 

picnic-cat-3.jpg

 

picnic-cat-4.jpg

 

picnic-cat-5.jpg

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The cold molded dink is sweet too.

I thought the same. A well loved package all round by the looks, including that highly polished spotlight on the wheel house roof.

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So I showed up in my friend's back yard yesterday and immediately dropped the stuff in my hands and grabbed my iPhone. His neighbor across the canal was taking the wife for a ride in their kid's Picnic Cat. It was blowing about 15-20 straight down the canal as they sailed home, but the wind is pretty broken up down at canal level. The canal dead-ends two doors down from their dock in the last pic, so it gets more and more broken as they come.

 

picnic-cat-1.jpg

 

picnic-cat-2.jpg

 

picnic-cat-3.jpg

 

picnic-cat-4.jpg

 

picnic-cat-5.jpg

Handy bit of short tacking and boat work there by the looks.

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. And I'll never forget the team van: '75 Dodge shaggin' wagon painted in flat black with side opening doors; no windows and tastefully decorated inside with purple shag carpet and black tufted naugahyde on the ceiling.

 

"tastefully" just makes that sentence worthy of some sort of literary prize. I bow down in honor.

 

Never mind the boat, where are the van pictures?

The sailing motto for Wisp was" "Pretty boat - ugly crew". When the owner saw the van, with the flat black paint job, the yellow fog lights on the grill, purple plexi sun visor, side opening suicide doors he had to have it! It was perfect. Someone put name Wisp in dribble art on the port & starboard quarter of the van. Alas, no pics that I know of. But it was a classic. I think he left it across the road from a crew members house where it was on gravel. I think he did the Maui race while he was away and it was raining then but when he picked it up again it was dry so it left I orange circle/outline from rust. Good thing he moved it as the neighbours were starting to complain. The gift that keeps giving. Too funny.

 

We were having a bun fight in a restaurant, with real buns, at WIRW. When on leaving our designated driver (who had as much Sangria as anyone) managed to hang a right into a one way street the wrong way. There was a cop near to intersection so on goes the lights and stopped us. There was probably 10 of us in the back beginning to giggle that we would never see him again. The junior woodchuck cop said have you been drinking sir? Just two glasses of Sangia that's all (he'd been pouring jugs of that shit on his head really). The cop doesn't believe it of course and says: Are you here for the race week I gather? Yes he says - the cop still can't see us except the him and the co-pilot; again it was darker than the inside of a cow in the back. The cop thinks for a minute and says: Well, I suggest you park it the night so everyone is safe.There's grocery store that is closed and you can park across the street. Thank you sir we'll do that very thing. We crossed the road to park and the parking lot was on a downside angle so we could exit gracefully. We opened the side doors and about 8 people rolled out into the asphalt with a sorted collection of empty beer cans in the door wells. Clink, clink, clink as they roll down to the main drag. The cop watched us and made sure that we left and pick up the empties. Then straight into the next bar. The cop shook his head and must muttered under his breath: I hate race week!

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. And I'll never forget the team van: '75 Dodge shaggin' wagon painted in flat black with side opening doors; no windows and tastefully decorated inside with purple shag carpet and black tufted naugahyde on the ceiling.

 

"tastefully" just makes that sentence worthy of some sort of literary prize. I bow down in honor.

 

Never mind the boat, where are the van pictures?

The sailing motto for Wisp was" "Pretty boat - ugly crew". When the owner saw the van, with the flat black paint job, the yellow fog lights on the grill, purple plexi sun visor, side opening suicide doors he had to have it! It was perfect. Someone put name Wisp in dribble art on the port & starboard quarter of the van. Alas, no pics that I know of. But it was a classic. I think he left it across the road from a crew members house where it was on gravel. I think he did the Maui race while he was away and it was raining then but when he picked it up again it was dry so it left I orange circle/outline from rust. Good thing he moved it as the neighbours were starting to complain. The gift that keeps giving. Too funny.

 

We were having a bun fight in a restaurant, with real buns, at WIRW. When on leaving our designated driver (who had as much Sangria as anyone) managed to hang a right into a one way street the wrong way. There was a cop near to intersection so on goes the lights and stopped us. There was probably 10 of us in the back beginning to giggle that we would never see him again. The junior woodchuck cop said have you been drinking sir? Just two glasses of Sangia that's all (he'd been pouring jugs of that shit on his head really). The cop doesn't believe it of course and says: Are you here for the race week I gather? Yes he says - the cop still can't see us except the him and the co-pilot; again it was darker than the inside of a cow in the back. The cop thinks for a minute and says: Well, I suggest you park it the night so everyone is safe.There's grocery store that is closed and you can park across the street. Thank you sir we'll do that very thing. We crossed the road to park and the parking lot was on a downside angle so we could exit gracefully. We opened the side doors and about 8 people rolled out into the asphalt with a sorted collection of empty beer cans in the door wells. Clink, clink, clink as they roll down to the main drag. The cop watched us and made sure that we left and pick up the empties. Then straight into the next bar. The cop shook his head and must muttered under his breath: I hate race week!

 

I always disliked those effete yacht club snobs with their crested blazers and prissy old money attitudes.

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I saw a boat on Martha's vineyard this summer, probably about 40', flush decks except for a streamlined hood/hatch in front of the cockpit. Can't remember if it was a yawl or a sloop. Classic look, Albergian but a bit more fine. I believe they said it was made in Massachusetts, a name that starts with an M, I think. Not much to go on...but it was a really classy looking boat. Any ideas?

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Not:

I think you are correct.

The Mercer 44 was one of those boats I saw when I was 15 years old, maybe 16, and I said, "I want to do that."

Jhiller is a M-44 nut too.

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Oo, aren't they lovely, much nicer sheer (in my arrogant opinion) than the other Tripp boat everyone was going gooey over. There's something so sexy about a flush deck - like those 70s Swans. They must make for a wonderfully gloomy interior however.

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Ed:

I'm not sure about the gloomy interiuor. With that freeboard and the flush deck there was a huge amount of volume below. Maybe just the volume made up for lack of light. A few portlights in nthe hull side would have helped.

 

What I'd like to see now is Tripp's original sail plan for the M-44. There was strength and confidence in the drafting style. I wrote him and pretty much all the othger designers letters when I was a kid. Tripp didn't answer my letter. He was on my shit list right up until he died. I still loved his work. Still do today.

 

mercer_44_photo_zpscdeb34dc.jpg

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

 

All due respect to the maestro and others in the design business but yacht design should have been frozen at the point of those S&S wedge deck Swans.

 

At least above the water.

 

They are the E-Types and Ferrari Daytonas of the boat world - outperformed maybe but never surpassed..

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Having the opportunity to sail a Swan 65 in Swiftsure one year, with one Brad Avery of Orange Coast college, it's a pretty sweet ride. It was a little bumpy on the bank itself: 20ish with a Hv.1 and a reef I think. A rare easterly so it was wet. Around 1 or 2 AM I'd have a kip so I went below. It very quiet; even spooky although it wasn't really that happy on deck. I took my gear off and climbed into a quarter berth (that's a climb inside a 65!) and amazed with the silence. It's like a hotel room on a slant. Forever thus I've dubbed it the "Tilton Hilton". I should have brought my slippers!

 

Incredible boats.

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Sully:

Try a Mercer 44 (?)

Bermuda 40 on steroids w/ a flush deck

But I've been wrong many times before.....

Yup. Nicely done. I'd naw off my pinky with my own teeth to own one along with enough money to maintain it.

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Love the Swan!

 

For $500k US, she could be yours! linky

Oh how I wish I had $500k. Guess I'll have to work harder. sigh.

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Love the Swan!

 

For $500k US, she could be yours! linky

Oh how I wish I had $500k. Guess I'll have to work harder. sigh.

 

My knees are fucked, I'd have to install an elevator.

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

 

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Love the Swan!

 

For $500k US, she could be yours! linky

Oh how I wish I had $500k. Guess I'll have to work harder. sigh.

 

I have a more "modest" dream. Presenting the 80s-90s vintage Swan 53.

 

swan53_3p.jpg

 

gallery_53.jpg1988-nautors-swan-53--1.jpg

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Love the Swan!

 

For $500k US, she could be yours! linky

Oh how I wish I had $500k. Guess I'll have to work harder. sigh.

 

My knees are fucked, I'd have to install an elevator.

Yup mate, it would be the Khyber Pass for you - trust me on that. Many a crew member have slipped down that slippery slope if you weren't careful. I've seen similiar boats with elevators set ups on similiar boats; Atalanta for example.

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The swan 65 was the finest boat Ive ever sailed. Piston hanks, workable man size mainsail, great erganomics, no hydraulic sail handling, no generator, naked mizzen on transatlantics made a perfect boom tent sun shade.. .........

 

The boat was fast and easy to operate at full power. On an ocean passge under a four sail reach , Your would have hard time keeping up the pace with a small crew on a modern cruising sloop with its broken in boom furler , torn luff tapes, chafed batten pockets, and energy hog hydraulic sail handling systems burning up your generator and reducing your motoring range

 

 

Dont remove the dogger...crew stand watch , feet in the companionway behind the dogger

 

Careful with the diesel engine..it was an odd ball , low profile , horizontal perkins

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The Swan 53 is amazing too. Ill never forget the first race after we picked her up from the yard after a refit doing the Swan cupin cowes. Windmeter said 34kts and we put up the kite... That was a deel hole She dug.

 

The 65 is absolutely fantastic. I Sailed i believe the successor the 651 (Same hull, one mast like Kings Legend). Pretty powerfful too!

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Love the Swan!

 

For $500k US, she could be yours! linky

Oh how I wish I had $500k. Guess I'll have to work harder. sigh.

 

My knees are fucked, I'd have to install an elevator.

Yup mate, it would be the Khyber Pass for you - trust me on that. Many a crew member have slipped down that slippery slope if you weren't careful. I've seen similiar boats with elevators set ups on similiar boats; Atalanta for example.

Atlanta had an elevator because Betty has MS and the lift allowed her to enjoy the vessel along with the rest of us.

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They are lovely boats to look at!

 

Ever since we went to see a film (yes film) about one of the early Whitbread races, I have always has a soft spot (ok, I still drool) for the Swan 65.

 

1974-nautor-swan-65-1.jpg

 

I'd ditch the dodger but keep everything else.

Love the Swan!

 

For $500k US, she could be yours! linky

Oh how I wish I had $500k. Guess I'll have to work harder. sigh.

 

My knees are fucked, I'd have to install an elevator.

Yup mate, it would be the Khyber Pass for you - trust me on that. Many a crew member have slipped down that slippery slope if you weren't careful. I've seen similiar boats with elevators set ups on similiar boats; Atalanta for example.

Atlanta had an elevator because Betty has MS and the lift allowed her to enjoy the vessel along with the rest of us.

I thought you'd chime in Kim. I know the story and Dick had this done - good on them. First time I was aboard I was told about that. Either way, on the Swan 65 or Atalanta, it would be quite a drop to floor boards if that ever happened. I've seen big ass boats with big ass hatches when foredeck crews miss the hole because they were busy cleaning up after a kite drop. It happens - you have to pay attention.

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The swan 65 was the finest boat Ive ever sailed. Piston hanks, workable man size mainsail, great erganomics, no hydraulic sail handling, no generator, naked mizzen on transatlantics made a perfect boom tent sun shade.. .........

 

The boat was fast and easy to operate at full power. On an ocean passge under a four sail reach , Your would have hard time keeping up the pace with a small crew on a modern cruising sloop with its broken in boom furler , torn luff tapes, chafed batten pockets, and energy hog hydraulic sail handling systems burning up your generator and reducing your motoring range

 

 

Dont remove the dogger...crew stand watch , feet in the companionway behind the dogger

 

Careful with the diesel engine..it was an odd ball , low profile , horizontal perkins

 

Shit - now I can't like them anymore.

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The swan 65 was the finest boat Ive ever sailed. Piston hanks, workable man size mainsail, great erganomics, no hydraulic sail handling, no generator, naked mizzen on transatlantics made a perfect boom tent sun shade.. .........The boat was fast and easy to operate at full power. On an ocean passge under a four sail reach , Your would have hard time keeping up the pace with a small crew on a modern cruising sloop with its broken in boom furler , torn luff tapes, chafed batten pockets, and energy hog hydraulic sail handling systems burning up your generator and reducing your motoring rangeDont remove the dogger...crew stand watch , feet in the companionway behind the doggerCareful with the diesel engine..it was an odd ball , low profile , horizontal perkins

Shit - now I can't like them anymore.

shit ? Do you have shit in your pants ?

 

Clean up and learn to wipe...then you can consider boats without spreading your shit around

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Oooooohhh - a rapier like wit on top of being all-knowing about sailboats.

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The Swan 53 is amazing too. Ill never forget the first race after we picked her up from the yard after a refit doing the Swan cupin cowes. Windmeter said 34kts and we put up the kite... That was a deel hole She dug.

 

The 65 is absolutely fantastic. I Sailed i believe the successor the 651 (Same hull, one mast like Kings Legend). Pretty powerfful too!

 

651 was drawn by Frers in the mid 1980's, the 65' was drawn by Bob Harris at S&S in 1972. 651 has a foot more beam, something like 8' more waterline length, more draft, sail area, and design displacement was about 10,000 pounds more than the 65. The 65 design was a development of Lynn Williams Dora, which became Ted Turner's Tenacious, and later still War Baby....

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Thanks Tad. I did not know Bob Harris did any hull lines for S&S. Those tid bits always interest me.

 

Cruising Anarchy?

Shit, I thought this was Cursing Anarchy.

 

Slug:

We like to have a bit of good natured fun here. Why don't you take you vitriol to Anger Anarchy.

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Knowing Bob Harris I did not know that - huh. Most of his designs are were more like Vancouver 27's and 42's etc, etc. Nothing wrong with that really as Bob is a good guy and a great design legacy. But correct me if I'm wrong but I thought the 65's were S&S designs. A lot of earlier ones were.

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Gentlemen this is Cruising Anarchy - clam down and play nice.

Freudian pantaloons...

:) Indeed. Much like slips. Very appropriate too in this instance.

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Max:

I think Tad is saying that Bob was working for S&S when he drew that hull. Bob's one of the good guys.

Fair enough - I thought about it afterwards; maybe just the lines. My bad.

Thanks & carry on.

 

Great rendering of Quill on the other thread. Wow. nice job!

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Max:

I think Tad is saying that Bob was working for S&S when he drew that hull. Bob's one of the good guys.

 

I think Bob started at S&S even before he finished the Westlawn course, perhaps in the late 1940's. He left in about 1959 because Olin would have nothing to do with multihulls and Bob knew they were the future. He then spent time at Grumman working on an experimental USN hydrofoil, then to Derecktor, then back to S&S for a couple of more years. Left again to partner with Frank MacLear starting in 1962, and Harris and Heacock in 66, and then to Vancouver in the early 1970's. I think there was quite a bit of fill in at S&S over many years. Bob also drew the lines for Irving Johnston's last Yankee at S&S, and I believe he did the lines for Kiskaddon's Spirit. Because he had experience at sea (Merchant Marine Mate) and in building boats, I think he was sent out to do a lot of yard inspection, some of it trips with Rod....which leads to some good stories.....

 

I too wrote to all the PNW designers when I was a kid, Bob Harris was the guy who replied with "Come to the office and bring your drawings". We worked together for a while in the late 90's......

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Thank you Maxx.

 

Tad:

Thanks for the history lesson. I'm always interested in the stories of other designers. We are a weird mob.

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That whole discussion about all the major people working for S&S leads me to a question;

 

By the 70's Olin was apparently more of an elder statesman/CEO than an actual designer although he was involved in an oversight capacity on the design work. My question is - who actually came up with the highly cambered decks like Morning Cloud II & III and the Swan wedge decks.

 

Anybody know?

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Max:

I think Tad is saying that Bob was working for S&S when he drew that hull. Bob's one of the good guys.

 

I think Bob started at S&S even before he finished the Westlawn course, perhaps in the late 1940's. He left in about 1959 because Olin would have nothing to do with multihulls and Bob knew they were the future. He then spent time at Grumman working on an experimental USN hydrofoil, then to Derecktor, then back to S&S for a couple of more years. Left again to partner with Frank MacLear starting in 1962, and Harris and Heacock in 66, and then to Vancouver in the early 1970's. I think there was quite a bit of fill in at S&S over many years. Bob also drew the lines for Irving Johnston's last Yankee at S&S, and I believe he did the lines for Kiskaddon's Spirit. Because he had experience at sea (Merchant Marine Mate) and in building boats, I think he was sent out to do a lot of yard inspection, some of it trips with Rod....which leads to some good stories.....

 

I too wrote to all the PNW designers when I was a kid, Bob Harris was the guy who replied with "Come to the office and bring your drawings". We worked together for a while in the late 90's......

Thanks Tad - did know that but now it clicks with the rest of the puzzle. I've found an unassuming man when we have met before but always a hello, how are you not "do you know about my history or what I've done". I don't think it's him. Never had a discussion about design.

 

You learn something every day guess!

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before he finished the Westlawn course

 

I always wanted to take those classes. i used to dream of being a yacht designer but instead am a software engineer. Owell. I guess I could still do it for fun. I actually draw boats using Adobe Illustrator as a hobby. Pretty sure none of them could float. :) I also had a fantasy of retiring and joining the International Yacht Restoration School in Newport just for fun.

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The only career path more littered with broken dreams is acting in Hollywood.

 

Or the NBA, or pro football, baseball, hockey, pro musician or songwriter, or downhill skier.....and a few other things...... ;)

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Thank you Maxx.

 

Tad:

Thanks for the history lesson. I'm always interested in the stories of other designers. We are a weird mob.

Harris was still at S&S in March 71. Moonlighting with Heacock at night on Cats.

I believe that Spirit drawings are by Al Mason at S&S.

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Max:

I think Tad is saying that Bob was working for S&S when he drew that hull. Bob's one of the good guys.

 

I think Bob started at S&S even before he finished the Westlawn course, perhaps in the late 1940's. He left in about 1959 because Olin would have nothing to do with multihulls and Bob knew they were the future. He then spent time at Grumman working on an experimental USN hydrofoil, then to Derecktor, then back to S&S for a couple of more years. Left again to partner with Frank MacLear starting in 1962, and Harris and Heacock in 66, and then to Vancouver in the early 1970's. I think there was quite a bit of fill in at S&S over many years. Bob also drew the lines for Irving Johnston's last Yankee at S&S, and I believe he did the lines for Kiskaddon's Spirit. Because he had experience at sea (Merchant Marine Mate) and in building boats, I think he was sent out to do a lot of yard inspection, some of it trips with Rod....which leads to some good stories.....

 

I too wrote to all the PNW designers when I was a kid, Bob Harris was the guy who replied with "Come to the office and bring your drawings". We worked together for a while in the late 90's......

Thanks Tad - did know that but now it clicks with the rest of the puzzle. I've found an unassuming man when we have met before but always a hello, how are you not "do you know about my history or what I've done". I don't think it's him. Never had a discussion about design.

 

You learn something every day guess!

 

Give him a call and ask for a copy of his autobiography, Tracks on the Water (self published). The forward is by Dick Newick. While Dick certainly had an ego of his own, he looked up to Bob as a multihull pioneer. When you understand that Bob designed and built his first cat in 1948 (Naramatac) one can see it. There's another good story about Bob teaching Dick how to design a mast(For the 40' cat Ay-ay) from his sickbed. That was the first time they met in 1956 I think. One of bigger events in my life was a dinner in Atlantic City in the late 90's, Bob Harris, Dick Newick, Meade Gougeon, John Marples, and myself...... :D......a lot of other peoples engineering got trashed that night......

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I'd love this if I were a power boat guy:

 

1958 35' Chris Craft Constellation - $105000 (Seattle)

00u0u_eiccW9CpxZh_600x450.jpg

 

When I was a kid, my doctor had a model of a ChrisCraft something like that. When I was about HS age, I capsized our dinghy while racing on the Cooper River in Camden, and was obliged to go see him to get some shots, e.g. typhoid. He hold me a story about taking his boat up channel in Barnegat Bay and having a small sailboat capsize in front of him. While maneuvering to avoid, he caught a propeller on the side of the channel. Repairs ensured. He wasn't quite bitter.

 

That's as close as I ever go to a about like that.

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Thanks Tad. I'll get his book. Can I just Google his phone number?

Bob,

He's retired I believe and I didn't want to disturb him from a home number although I think he lives very close to his old office on Granville Is. There is someone taking care of his legacy so try this: http://www.andrewdandridge.co.uk/pheon/robert_buckman_harris.htm

 

And there's this I found: http://www.vancouver.org.uk/pdf/Vancouver_history_1%200.pdf

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In another place, I cam across the a flickr collection from what I assume is a wooden boat gathering in the PNW. If you can't find a coolboat to admire in the group, you have no soul.

 

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkohnen/

Some sweet boats there alright. I was especially enamoured with those two 'keg' dinks. :)

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In another place, I cam across the a flickr collection from what I assume is a wooden boat gathering in the PNW. If you can't find a coolboat to admire in the group, you have no soul.

 

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkohnen/

Some sweet boats there alright. I was especially enamoured with those two 'keg' dinks. :)

 

I'm confused. I think I found an Uglyboat to admire. What thread is this again?

 

10020173466_98e47111f5.jpg

 

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