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What I find interesting is her fake 'stem'.

 

It can't be structural on that pram bow, surely - so what's it doing there? Hardly aesthetic either.

 

That IS a surprise. But she has a certain attraction in a utilitarian kind of way.

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I'd love this if I were a power boat guy:

 

1958 35' Chris Craft Constellation - $105000 (Seattle)

00u0u_eiccW9CpxZh_600x450.jpg

 

$105K? They are asking over a hundred grand and they can't even toss in an interior picture? Pfui, as Nero Wolfe used to say.

 

That's getting pretty close to a Craigslist mocking.

 

Here's one for less, if you'd prefer. I just like the look of the thing, but have no concept of the actual value. link

00m0m_kxsvAuivpve_600x450.jpg

 

I prefer the first one, just because it's been redone (supposedly), and there are no davits or dodger. There must be many of these things around to find two three of them for sale in the Seattle area on craigslist.

 

Edit: I found another

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That is a beauty.

 

Tully_zps38920888.jpg

That's a cool looking tug boat, Bob. Not sure what it is about these cartoons, but they all seem to have real personalities. You can see the unrelenting doggedness written all over this little guy, Tully.

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... and her elbows are too pointy... :P

 

Thick ankles.

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The Swan 53 is amazing too. Ill never forget the first race after we picked her up from the yard after a refit doing the Swan cupin cowes. Windmeter said 34kts and we put up the kite... That was a deel hole She dug.

 

The 65 is absolutely fantastic. I Sailed i believe the successor the 651 (Same hull, one mast like Kings Legend). Pretty powerfful too!

 

651 was drawn by Frers in the mid 1980's, the 65' was drawn by Bob Harris at S&S in 1972. 651 has a foot more beam, something like 8' more waterline length, more draft, sail area, and design displacement was about 10,000 pounds more than the 65. The 65 design was a development of Lynn Williams Dora, which became Ted Turner's Tenacious, and later still War Baby....

 

i stand corrected!

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Sailby:

I did each cartoon with an effort to capture the personality of the friend who would get the cartoon.

 

Tully is Tullus Gordon, ex mercant seaman ( crewed on SAVANAH the first nuclear cargo ship when he was 19 years old.) Tully went on to become a commercial fisherman and eventually a very succesful commercial conrtractor in Seattle. He was a very active racing sailor in Seattle. My 63' WHITE EAGLE was designed for Tully. Tully lost both his beautiful wife and his very beautiful daughter both to cancer some years back. Tully was once a wild man but then he gave up drinking. The story goes, as witnessed by a mutual friend, Garrett, that Sully , aged 70, got into an altercation outside the liquor store in Ballard with three young guys. Legend has it that Tully put them all back in their truck a bit worse for wear. Ok, maybe really a lot worse for wear. " Unrelenting doggedness" is probably a good way to describe Tully. He remains a very good friend.

 

When we were building WHITE EAGLE in Truckee things got heated between the builder and Tully over contractual issues. During one meeting there the builder, 5'9", suggested that he and Tully, 6'3". go out and settle it in the parking lot. I remember sitting there thinking, "Oh, this is not going to be good." But the crisis passed.

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Sailby:

I did each cartoon with an effort to capture the personality of the friend who would get the cartoon.

 

Tully is Tullus Gordon, ex mercant seaman ( crewed on SAVANAH the first nuclear cargo ship when he was 19 years old.)

 

From the days when commercial ships still had style, Savannah getting a fresh coat of paint in Norfolk in 2008.

 

gallery_13136_823_368506.jpg

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That is a beauty.

 

Tully_zps38920888.jpg

 

 

Bob,

 

I saw that same workboat 'Creosote' yesterday and immediately thought of the cartoon of 'Tully's' and mean't to bring it to your attention. I even think I copied the URL to send you but then kept looking and ran across the black double ender and overwrote the tug in my haste to show you the sailboat. Great site, it is worth repeating!

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jkohnen/

 

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7406/10020121356_d819b977c9_o.jpg

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Sailby:

I did each cartoon with an effort to capture the personality of the friend who would get the cartoon.

 

Tully is Tullus Gordon, ex mercant seaman ( crewed on SAVANAH the first nuclear cargo ship when he was 19 years old.)

 

From the days when commercial ships still had style, Savannah getting a fresh coat of paint in Norfolk in 2008.

 

gallery_13136_823_368506.jpg

 

She looks like you could rig and sail her. I thought she had been scrapped years ago - is she a museum piece now?

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When I was a kid, I lived in the Netherlands for about 4 years

 

We went on a school field trip to the Savanah - probably in Rotterdam

 

Toured the whole boat , including the reactor.

 

It was petty cool!

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She looks like you could rig and sail her. I thought she had been scrapped years ago - is she a museum piece now?

 

She was in the mothball fleet and taken to Norfolk for sandblasting and paint. I missed her being towed out freshly painted, without tarps an scrap, by an hour. She was towed to Baltimore where she should still be tied up somewhere. As far as I know plans for the future are in limbo. The nuke plant was taken out years ago.

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Sailby:

I did each cartoon with an effort to capture the personality of the friend who would get the cartoon.

 

Tully is Tullus Gordon, ex mercant seaman ( crewed on SAVANAH the first nuclear cargo ship when he was 19 years old.) Tully went on to become a commercial fisherman and eventually a very succesful commercial conrtractor in Seattle. He was a very active racing sailor in Seattle. My 63' WHITE EAGLE was designed for Tully. Tully lost both his beautiful wife and his very beautiful daughter both to cancer some years back. Tully was once a wild man but then he gave up drinking. The story goes, as witnessed by a mutual friend, Garrett, that Sully , aged 70, got into an altercation outside the liquor store in Ballard with three young guys. Legend has it that Tully put them all back in their truck a bit worse for wear. Ok, maybe really a lot worse for wear. " Unrelenting doggedness" is probably a good way to describe Tully. He remains a very good friend.

 

When we were building WHITE EAGLE in Truckee things got heated between the builder and Tully over contractual issues. During one meeting there the builder, 5'9", suggested that he and Tully, 6'3". go out and settle it in the parking lot. I remember sitting there thinking, "Oh, this is not going to be good." But the crisis passed.

 

"You don't tug on Superman's cape, you don't spit into the wind. You don't poll the mask off the ol' Lone Ranger and you don't mess around with Jim." -- Jim Croce.

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Sailby:

I did each cartoon with an effort to capture the personality of the friend who would get the cartoon.

 

Tully is Tullus Gordon, ex mercant seaman ( crewed on SAVANAH the first nuclear cargo ship when he was 19 years old.) Tully went on to become a commercial fisherman and eventually a very succesful commercial conrtractor in Seattle. He was a very active racing sailor in Seattle. My 63' WHITE EAGLE was designed for Tully. Tully lost both his beautiful wife and his very beautiful daughter both to cancer some years back. Tully was once a wild man but then he gave up drinking. The story goes, as witnessed by a mutual friend, Garrett, that Sully , aged 70, got into an altercation outside the liquor store in Ballard with three young guys. Legend has it that Tully put them all back in their truck a bit worse for wear. Ok, maybe really a lot worse for wear. " Unrelenting doggedness" is probably a good way to describe Tully. He remains a very good friend.

 

When we were building WHITE EAGLE in Truckee things got heated between the builder and Tully over contractual issues. During one meeting there the builder, 5'9", suggested that he and Tully, 6'3". go out and settle it in the parking lot. I remember sitting there thinking, "Oh, this is not going to be good." But the crisis passed.

Nice story, Bob. I think I might like your friend, Tullus Gordon too.

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She remains in Baltimore as of a month ago tied up near USNS Comfort.

 

She looks like you could rig and sail her. I thought she had been scrapped years ago - is she a museum piece now?

 

She was in the mothball fleet and taken to Norfolk for sandblasting and paint. I missed her being towed out freshly painted, without tarps an scrap, by an hour. She was towed to Baltimore where she should still be tied up somewhere. As far as I know plans for the future are in limbo. The nuke plant was taken out years ago.

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I dreamed (and did little else other than order the plans) of building this boat when I was in high school. I'm not sure if it was at all possible she could get out of her own way. But the idea was cool to me at the time (still sort of is but I realize how uncomfortable that would be after a while).

 

http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/farthing.htm

 

farthi1.gif

Wow...have been looking at this thing since the 90s wondering if it would work but it appears no one has ever built one. I was wondering if it was because it was such a bad idea. I guess we might know now though.

 

resizedimage600397-Seafaith-5.JPG

 

http://coveyisland.com/projects/seafaith/

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Uffa did interesting expriments with rowing shells. They didn't always work but I can understand his thinking. In his time all you had to go on was intuition. He sure hit the nail on the head with his early planing boats.

 

Hard to compare Uffa with Olin. Can't imagine Olin in a sailing canoe. Uffa didn't have big office. I think it was just Uffa and a drawing board. My inspiration for writing my SAILING reviews has always been Uffa Fox.

 

There is a photo of Uffa starkers on the bow of a 30 sq. meter. The caption reads something like this, "Modesty is just one's own sense of imperfection." He came out of Churchill's era. They don't make them like that anymore.

Here's the photo. It's from the book "Sailing, Seamanship and Yacht Construction". I'll offer an apology in advance in case anybody is offended.

uffa_fox.jpg

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The International Folkboat has already been discussed, but I'll bring it up again. This is the one I loved until my wife got jealous.

Grendel.jpg

My love previous to the Folkboat was also very pretty, a 22' Sea Sprite.

freedom_off_hampton.JPG

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post-38-0-48525200-1385303581_thumb.jpgpost-38-0-26516900-1385303606_thumb.jpgIf you want the Swan look without half a million - and are very brave - there's this one

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1973/Huisman-Custom-2380591/ME/United-States#.UpIMb8TCWSq

 

As Prospect of Whitby I ogled and fantasised about her. Amazing to think of her as a "family boat" - still with her 13 winches, two pedestals, and no protection at all by way of cockpit for the crew working the boat, even to trim the headsails.

 

 

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Slug,

 

Great shot of the fishing boats. My grandfather was from Starigrad on the island of Hvar. He came to America in the late 1800s. Do you know if the boats were similar from island to island or were there distinguishing characteristics between boats from for example, Hvar and Vis or Korcula?

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I dreamed (and did little else other than order the plans) of building this boat when I was in high school. I'm not sure if it was at all possible she could get out of her own way. But the idea was cool to me at the time (still sort of is but I realize how uncomfortable that would be after a while).

 

http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/farthing.htm

 

farthi1.gif

 

Wow...have been looking at this thing since the 90s wondering if it would work but it appears no one has ever built one. I was wondering if it was because it was such a bad idea. I guess we might know now though.

 

resizedimage600397-Seafaith-5.JPG

 

http://coveyisland.com/projects/seafaith/

 

One man and a life's dream. An interesting story.

 

In the link to the boat's concept:

 

It's also interesting that 2'8" (her maximum draft) is less than the three feet that is about as close to the surface as coral heads grow. Thus the coral reefs of many favorite areas of ocean voyagers would prove less worrying to Farthing.

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04Above.jpg

 

I'm in love again

 

1967 S&S one tonner Sunmaid V. Built by Berthons. Someone has just bought her in ghost ship condition - almost the day she was launched. That coachroof makes me go all gooey.

 

 

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Boy Ed. Nice find. That is indeed a beauty.

 

Look how the taperede toe rail does not run parallel to the sheer. This is an old S&S trick. You have to have generous side decxks to get away with it.

Love the way the handrail dies into the coaming.

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Great photo and not just because of the sexy boat in the foreground.

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I also dig the Sweden Yacht next to the S&S sailboat, but on looks the S&S is light years ahead.

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I also dig the Sweden Yacht next to the S&S sailboat, but on looks the S&S is light years ahead.

I think that's a Wauquiez, good looking, but IMHO, aped the Sweden Yachts, but was not in the same league for that you know what whow factor as the Sweden Yachts of that generation. Go to www.sweden yachts.se and look at the the 370, 38 and 390 of the previous range section of the site and you might see what I mean.

 

PS I confess a bias as an owner in yesteryear of a 41, which didn't quite work as well with her coachroof as her smaller sisters, but was a magnificent boat.

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Rating rule gone really bad, I think. My guess, anyway.

 

It really looks great in person, kind of a pocket yacht or something. A little jewel. The pictures don't totally do it justice.

 

What happened to the rest of the boom on that pretty boat?

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Yeah, as a matter of fact I was looking at that shapley ass and thinking, "I know that boat."

That is a Carter 37.. Sweet little fanny. Perky and inviting. A little tumblehome where you want it for snuggling. A guy needs to bury his face now and then.

Oh yeah, I know that stern.

 

Am I wrong?

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Yeah, as a matter of fact I was looking at that shapley ass and thinking, "I know that boat."

That is a Carter 37.. Sweet little fanny. Perky and inviting. A little tumblehome where you want it for snuggling. A guy needs to bury his face now and then.

Oh yeah, I know that stern.

 

Am I wrong?

 

You got it. You didn't peek at the listing? I thought that was your era at Carter.

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You mean that photo is NOT run through a wide-angle lens to distort it? It really looks like that?

 

So why do they call it "Arrow"?

 

 

Nevermind . . .

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You mean that photo is NOT run through a wide-angle lens to distort it? It really looks like that?

 

So why do they call it "Arrow"?

 

 

Nevermind . . .

 

Wide-angle lens would give fat ass narrow bmax. Telephoto lens gives that flattened perspective.

 

However, with a listed beam of 18'8' on 37' LOA, that's a L/B ratio of 2:1. That's a beachball. With the official beam of 11'9", it makes more sense.

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i like those fat bottomed boats!

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Ish:

I didn't even notice the link to the listing.

You work with a particular shape for a while and it sticks in your mind.

It does look flattened. Didn't realize a lense could to that. But I'm no photographer.

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If the broker/owner took those pics might have used a wide angle(ish) lens as maybe had finished the interior and that was the last of the series walking away from the boat. With a proper camera you really can't capture an interior unless it's a 50MM or less; like a 50-18MM for my primary, day to day, camers/lens. You can just squeak by using it for interiors so the next step down would be a 35MM f2.4 or so. That would make sense the "photographer" used a f2.4 lenses as he didn't have to use a flash in the interior.

 

Who knows but only "squat" comes to mind. You can use your own connotations if you wish!

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If the broker/owner took those pics might have used a wide angle(ish) lens as maybe had finished the interior and that was the last of the series walking away from the boat. With a proper camera you really can't capture an interior unless it's a 50MM or less; like a 50-18MM for my primary, day to day, camers/lens. You can just squeak by using it for interiors so the next step down would be a 35MM f2.4 or so. That would make sense the "photographer" used a f2.4 lenses as he didn't have to use a flash in the interior.

 

Who knows but only "squat" comes to mind. You can use your own connotations if you wish!

 

With the new digital cameras, you can make up for not having faster lenses by shooting at higher ISO's. My 18-55 is crap wide open but improves markedly stopped down, so I normally shoot at f:11, which is the sharpest aperture on all my lenses. My Nikon D7000 is quite happy shooting at ISO 1600 or higher, especially when the final is only 640X480 @ 72 dpi.

 

And no, that stern is shot with a longer lens. You don't get that compression with a wide. It may be an 18-55 type zoom @ 55mm, which is a moderate telephoto, equivalent to about an 85mm on 35mm format.

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It does look flattened. Didn't realize a lense could to that. But I'm no photographer.

 

Cropping can have the same effect. It depends on how far the subject is from the camera.

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It does look flattened. Didn't realize a lense could to that. But I'm no photographer.

 

Cropping can have the same effect. It depends on how far the subject is from the camera.

That's true enough. And pretty easy to do by most photo applications. As a matter of fact maybe he got tired dinking with the framing and said good enough.

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Found this somewhere, thought it was pretty cool. Chichester showing off his pilot berth I assume. Not sure what boat. You could velcro a tablet to that bulkhead and knock out a couple of those instruments at least. Sweet bookshelf by his knee. What's the thing with the hoses coming off it?

 

chichester.jpg

 

gypsy_moth4.jpg

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Found this somewhere, thought it was pretty cool. Chichester showing off his pilot berth I assume. Not sure what boat. You could velcro a tablet to that bulkhead and knock out a couple of those instruments at least. Sweet bookshelf by his knee. What's the thing with the hoses coming off it?

 

chichester.jpg

 

gypsy_moth4.jpg

 

Seems to be inside GM IV......here's the same spot today.....

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/uretopia/7166261125/in/photostream/

 

Are the "Hoses" wires off the B&G control head?

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I was on GM IV years ago when it was beside Cutty Sark at Greenwich. It was beautiful but not what one would call yacht finish inside. I seem to recall that it had the rep as a rather ill handling boat (or something else negative).

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It did. Relatively recently It had a bit of a crash in the Pacific and came here to get it buffed out. If I could remember which year it was I could probably find photos. I do recall having a bit of a chat with a bloke inside it at the time. I was underneath looking through a hole about 6 x 4 in size . No , not inches.

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Yeah I'd heard that, I wasn't sure what boat it was about, but apparently IV.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gipsy_Moth_IV

 

I just thought the pilot berth looked pretty cool. That shadow is weird on the bow, it almost looks like it's concave.

 

What's a B&G control head btw?

 

Brookes & Gatehouse, higher-end instrumentation. http://www.bandg.com/en-GB/?culture=en-GB〈=changed

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What's a B&G control head btw?

The old Brooks and Gatehouse instruments (70's) had a grey plastic box which distributed the transducer inputs to the instruments.

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The hole was bigger than I remembered, more like 10 x 4

 

192_9217.jpg

 

191_9199.jpg

 

 

It did. Relatively recently It had a bit of a crash in the Pacific and came here to get it buffed out. If I could remember which year it was I could probably find photos. I do recall having a bit of a chat with a bloke inside it at the time. I was underneath looking through a hole about 6 x 4 in size . No , not inches.

 

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.

what do ya think Bob'oh

 

2.jpg

1.jpg

Weird keel placement, surely?

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.

what do ya think Bob'oh

 

2.jpg

1.jpg

Interesting, what is she?

 

It looks almost like a Reimer's Tumlaren but not quite. The keel profile is not quite the same (the Tumlaren doesn't have that "bite" at the stern), the cabin trunk is too chunk, and the stern profile is more vertical than on the Tumlaren.

Knud+Reimers+Tumlaren+Sail+Plan.gif

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OK - this is definitely cool - even if it won't sail upwind.

 

3861276_-1_20120301064523_0_0.jpg&w=606&

 

Yours for a mere 6.25 mil - but that's the asking price.

 

http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1950/Nantucket-Lightship-WLV-612-2446949/Barnstable-County/MA/United-States#.UpwFi-JllM4

 

(Actually, I'd rather have that little sailboat in the background.)

 

 

 

 

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That's the Shanandoah behind her. Beautiful ship. I sailed my little boat into tarpaulin cove this summer. She was there and the Corwith Cramer out of Woods Hole. Spent the night there and watched her take off in the am. It was pretty awesome.

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.

what do ya think Bob'oh

 

2.jpg

1.jpg

 

 

Its close to a Tumlaren but it's stern is more upright, keel obviously different (slightly deeper?) and slightly more flare in the bow. Also the cabin is a dead ringer for the ones they put on the wooden Top Hats.. I'm thinking since Tumlarens were popular in Melbourne someone wanted a slightly stiffer and drier Tumlaren.

 

Maybe Ron Swanson drew this for someone...

 

Do you know it's history, Gybeset?

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That's the Shanandoah behind her. Beautiful ship. I sailed my little boat into tarpaulin cove this summer. She was there and the Corwith Cramer out of Woods Hole. Spent the night there and watched her take off in the am. It was pretty awesome.

 

My friends family owns Shenandoah. Such a great boat. Not sure if you know but Cpt Douglas's son Robbie had the world speed record for sailing this year on a kite surfer. Old school nautical family and they own the Black Dog on Martha's Vineyard. Great memories....

 

344.jpg

 

IMG_5301.JPG

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.

what do ya think Bob'oh

 

2.jpg

1.jpg

 

 

Its close to a Tumlaren but it's stern is more upright, keel obviously different (slightly deeper?) and slightly more flare in the bow. Also the cabin is a dead ringer for the ones they put on the wooden Top Hats.. I'm thinking since Tumlarens were popular in Melbourne someone wanted a slightly stiffer and drier Tumlaren.

 

Maybe Ron Swanson drew this for someone...

 

Do you know it's history, Gybeset?

for sale on seabreeze the weather site

 

It's a 1920s Halvorsen, cabin is a later add-on

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.

what do ya think Bob'oh

 

2.jpg

1.jpg

 

 

Its close to a Tumlaren but it's stern is more upright, keel obviously different (slightly deeper?) and slightly more flare in the bow. Also the cabin is a dead ringer for the ones they put on the wooden Top Hats.. I'm thinking since Tumlarens were popular in Melbourne someone wanted a slightly stiffer and drier Tumlaren.

 

Maybe Ron Swanson drew this for someone...

 

Do you know it's history, Gybeset?

for sale on seabreeze the weather site

 

It's a 1920s Halvorsen, cabin is a later add-on

Could someone explain how that rudder/tiller works? With the curve in the leading edge it looks to me like it pivots around 2 different planes (you know what I mean) but obviously it doesn't.

 

I knew the Douglas's back in college. They were on our sailboard team for a while. Couldn't lay off the partying though and wound up booted.

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The gudgeons for the rudder are well down the "leading edge" where they can be aligned. When you put the tiller over the rudder head swings through a big arc and can look a bit weird.

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The gudgeons for the rudder are well down the "leading edge" where they can be aligned. When you put the tiller over the rudder head swings through a big arc and can look a bit weird.

Thanks, that is what I figured but it just seems so odd to me

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You think that is odd. Not as odd as when the client for my second design pointed out that the way I had the gudgeons the rudder would not turn. Now that made me feel odd and stupid! But I was a kid.

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You think that is odd. Not as odd as when the client for my second design pointed out that the way I had the gudgeons the rudder would not turn. Now that made me feel odd and stupid! But I was a kid.

Ah.... One of those moments. :)

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the pilot berth looked pretty cool. That shadow is weird on the bow, it almost looks like it's concave.

 

What's a B&G control head btw?

I still have the blueprint of the accommodation plan from my time at the Illingworth and Primerose office. The accommodation plan was clever for the purpose. Yes, the bow has a slight flair ie; concave. The boat had problems, being of light displacement, the deadrise should not have been so deep, resulting in a very tender boat with directional and stability questions.

B&G really precursors to the marine electronic world.

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I love it. Not keen on the green deck though.

 

The boat could really use a more sensitive paint job all the way around.

well heres some earlier, different cosmetics !

6837571.jpg6837573.jpg

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Looks like a S&S design, but I am an amateur at this. :)

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Looks like a S&S design, but I am an amateur at this. :)

Not an S & S.

 

I'll give you a clue:

It was originally built in 1924*

 

 

*This is a rebuild / restoration only insofar as some of the original is retained, but very, very little. She was sunk for a long time.

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It shouldn't take long to work it out from this sweet ass-shot

gallery_12748_832_84728.jpg

 

I don't care what people say, there's nothing sexier than a classic

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Those woodies give me a woody.

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