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Coolboats to admire

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The daft electric outboard doesn't help

The side mount outboard is one thing that I like. Easier to deploy and stow than hanging off the transom. Only needed if there's no wind. If she's kept on a swinging mooring, even better. It's there as a get you home when the wind dies, but lives in the locker otherwise. And a Torqeedo (sic) with a separate battery makes great sense. Lighter than a petrol engine, & no leaky fuel worries.

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++++ to that.

 

Here's a boat I really admire--both outside and in--with a new interior layout.

 

http://www.rockportmarine.com/boat_details.php?boatID=21&category=5

 

 

Lovely motor sailer. Wouldn't have the sailing ability to keep me satisfied, but she's beautifully turned out and obviously very comfortable. I love her two dinks on tiers.

 

 

 

62 feet long with twin 125 hp diesels.

 

Masts on a motorboat. It could be a much better motorboat without them.

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++++ to that.

 

Here's a boat I really admire--both outside and in--with a new interior layout.

 

http://www.rockportmarine.com/boat_details.php?boatID=21&category=5

 

 

Lovely motor sailer. Wouldn't have the sailing ability to keep me satisfied, but she's beautifully turned out and obviously very comfortable. I love her two dinks on tiers.

 

 

 

62 feet long with twin 125 hp diesels.

 

Masts on a motorboat. It could be a much better motorboat without them.

 

They're more like stabilisers. They stop a round bottomed girl rolling about....

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The daft electric outboard doesn't help

The side mount outboard is one thing that I like. Easier to deploy and stow than hanging off the transom. Only needed if there's no wind. If she's kept on a swinging mooring, even better. It's there as a get you home when the wind dies, but lives in the locker otherwise. And a Torqeedo (sic) with a separate battery makes great sense. Lighter than a petrol engine, & no leaky fuel worries.

Well, I like the torqueedo too, but the sidemount not so much, both looks and function (what about port side docking for example?). So why not have it an a lazarette on a bracket, centerline mounted. From the pic, it looks like there is a hatch on the fantail already . . .

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A real man would not have a motor on that sweety. Should be a piece of cake to sail that boat in and out of the slip. Unless you are a lubber.

What's the world coming to?

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That's nothing new.

 

Sidewheel_Steamer.jpg

 

With what we know now about wave-making from displacement hulls, don't those paddlewheels seem to be in the least efficient place? Or do these boats never get going fast enough to make a large hole in the wave train?

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A real man would not have a motor on that sweety. Should be a piece of cake to sail that boat in and out of the slip. Unless you are a lubber.

What's the world coming to?

 

To places where, in some marinas, they forbid sailing in and out. And, if you have this boat in Victoria, you are not permitted to sail in the harbor itself.

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Yes there's a guy here built himself a lovely dark harbour something and they (the marina) made him put an eggwhisk on the back

 

The mighty Stiletto (MBBW) has a pad pn the side for an o/b but they never use it. Also has a sculling notch and a pair of sweeps.

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Utterly totally and completely depressing. I can't, just can't accept that. What a bunch of goobers.

 

 

A real man would not have a motor on that sweety. Should be a piece of cake to sail that boat in and out of the slip. Unless you are a lubber.

What's the world coming to?

 

To places where, in some marinas, they forbid sailing in and out. And, if you have this boat in Victoria, you are not permitted to sail in the harbor itself.

 

 

Yes there's a guy here built himself a lovely dark harbour something and they (the marina) made him put an eggbeater on it

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The Pardeys must row in...

 

Row? They tow it in under swim: Larry on the backstroke, Lyn on the breastroke. Or, er, tóther way 'round, can't remember.

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The answer is simple. You find a marina where you can sail in and out. Shilshole works for me. Leshi works for me. Everett works for me. Port Ludlow, Pt. Hudson on and on and on. And those are just the marinas within spitting distance of the shack.

I don't see fleets of Etchels,Stars, I-14's, Tasars, Melges , Lightenings, Thistles etc using outboard motors.

There are one or two dinghy fleets in the US that sail off docks.

Nobody says you have to motor up to a mooring.

 

Nobody says "You must tie up here!". The government thankfully does not make every decision for us yet.

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The answer is simple. You find a marina where you can sail in and out. Shilshole works for me. Leshi works for me. Everett works for me. Port Ludlow, Pt. Hudson on and on and on. And those are just the marinas within spitting distance of the shack.

I don't see fleets of Etchels,Stars, I-14's, Tasars, Melges , Lightenings, Thistles etc using outboard motors.

There are one or two dinghy fleets in the US that sail off docks.

Nobody says you have to motor up to a mooring.

 

Nobody says "You must tie up here!". The government thankfully does not make every decision for us yet.

 

I'm not saying I approve of the policies. I'm only noting they exist.

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Years ago I visited a shipwright friend in Cape Cod who'd been gifted a Concordia 39 yawl. It was November when I visited but he insisted we go for a sail even though the engine was in bits.

 

There wasn't a soul about and we just pushed the boat out of the pen and pulled up the sails (ala Etchell) and sailed her down the channel. Short tacked her back up the channel (the rums took away any worries) and drifted her back into the pen.

 

My first sail on the Atlantic Ocean was on a Concordia yawl without an engine sipping on a quality rum in November.

 

…doesn't get better than that.

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I am only noting that you do have options.

 

I hate to see that motor hanging of this pretty little boat. But there is no doubt that in fact we have come to this. Some of us anyway.

It's fun to sail in and out of the slip. It can be tricky but with some practice and a small boat it's a blast. I hate to see that level of sailing skill go away. But with that stanky engine hanging there as an option it will go away.

We sailed 6 meters in and out of the slips at Shilshole and they are heavy boats. A little light boat like this one would be very easy to stop.

 

I'd think of oars before I thought of an engine. And, with that big rudder i'd bet you could skull and ooch this boat along in light air far enough to get it into the slip.

 

But I'm an old fart. I don't even know my own cell phone number.

 

I think back to when I raced summer evening races on Lake Washington. As the sun would begin to set the wind would die and we would creep accross the finish line. Usually we would scull or just ghost along on the smooth lake, talking to the other crews and enjoying ourselves and still "racing". Some nights the committee boat would feel sorry for us and pick us up in a long line of tethered dinks. But ghosting in was more fun. At least now, looking back, it seems like it was fun.

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A real man would not have a motor on that sweety. Should be a piece of cake to sail that boat in and out of the slip. Unless you are a lubber.

What's the world coming to?

 

One of my memories of Olin Stephens is watching him sail a fairly large S&S classic up to the dock in a very overcrowded Camden harbor after one of the Castine-Camden classic yacht races since the motor on the boat he was racing on had refused to start. Wish I could remember what boat it was. (Might have been the NY32 Falcon, he raced on her a several times, and they have a very good crew.) He would have been in his mid to late 90s at the time.

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Yes there's a guy here built himself a lovely dark harbour something and they (the marina) made him put an eggwhisk on the back

...

 

 

It happens.

 

1480577_10153633575000089_948112473_n.jp

 

Hah! Snuck the Santa boat into Coolboats!

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Bob, I believe that you and I are in, what my friend used to call, "violent agreement."

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Well, having found myself 2 miles from the mooring in a two ton, engineless boat in a flat calm, I would have really appreciated an engine. Not that paddling back wasn't a reasonable workout.

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Kedge.

A bit tricky single-handed maybe?

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But I'm an old fart. I don't even know my own cell phone number.

 

No worries Bob, I know it and can give it to you next time we see each other.

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We spent over an hour rowing my 24'er up-current to keep her off the rocks when the outboard died, using the winches as thole pins. Luckily I had a decent set of oars aboard. Eventually the current slacked and we rowed all the way back into the slip, about two miles. That was a pissoff.

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We spent over an hour rowing my 24'er up-current to keep her off the rocks when the outboard died, using the winches as thole pins. Luckily I had a decent set of oars aboard. Eventually the current slacked and we rowed all the way back into the slip, about two miles. That was a pissoff.

Now that was a good opportunity for a kedge anchor.

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If you have to have an engine, and you eschew auxiliary sail propulsion, and you prefer riverine routes, it sure is hard not to admire the Chutspah of the old Hudson River sidewheelers.

 

126_Washingtonirving.jpg

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That's nothing new.

 

Sidewheel_Steamer.jpg

 

With what we know now about wave-making from displacement hulls, don't those paddlewheels seem to be in the least efficient place? Or do these boats never get going fast enough to make a large hole in the wave train?

 

I think they were still figuring out the basics at that time - they hadn't even come up with propellers then.

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Yes there's a guy here built himself a lovely dark harbour something and they (the marina) made him put an eggwhisk on the back

...

 

 

It happens.

 

1480577_10153633575000089_948112473_n.jp

 

Hah! Snuck the Santa boat into Coolboats!

 

You could use that to mix margaritas five gallons at a time.

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That's nothing new.

 

 

 

With what we know now about wave-making from displacement hulls, don't those paddlewheels seem to be in the least efficient place? Or do these boats never get going fast enough to make a large hole in the wave train?

 

I think they were still figuring out the basics at that time - they hadn't even come up with propellers then.

 

Actually they knew quite a bit. It was obvious that the "hole in the water" was a problem. The most advanced state of development saw feathering cupped paddles--running on an eccentric. Their propulsive coefficients were better than you might think. But motion in a seaway caused emersion, docking was a problem, and the wheels were large, heavy and complex. The screw propeller goes way back--remember the TURTLE--but it took a long time to get them more efficient than paddlewheels--even though the advantages were obvious. Note also that the propeller added a new challenge: the stuffing box.

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Donn

I'm just poking the dog with a stick.

I know for certain if I had designed that little boat it would not have a motor strapped to it while I was around.

They call them "sailboats".

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Yes there's a guy here built himself a lovely dark harbour something and they (the marina) made him put an eggwhisk on the back

...

 

It happens.

 

1480577_10153633575000089_948112473_n.jp

 

Hah! Snuck the Santa boat into Coolboats!

Love the bottom bearing!

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We spent over an hour rowing my 24'er up-current to keep her off the rocks when the outboard died, using the winches as thole pins. Luckily I had a decent set of oars aboard. Eventually the current slacked and we rowed all the way back into the slip, about two miles. That was a pissoff.

Now that was a good opportunity for a kedge anchor.

 

The physics weren't working for us. It goes from 80' to fuck all in about 80'.

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We spent over an hour rowing my 24'er up-current to keep her off the rocks when the outboard died, using the winches as thole pins. Luckily I had a decent set of oars aboard. Eventually the current slacked and we rowed all the way back into the slip, about two miles. That was a pissoff.

Now that was a good opportunity for a kedge anchor.

 

The physics weren't working for us. It goes from 80' to fuck all in about 80'.

Then thank god for a good ash breeze!

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Yes there's a guy here built himself a lovely dark harbour something and they (the marina) made him put an eggwhisk on the back

...

 

 

It happens.

 

1480577_10153633575000089_948112473_n.jp

 

Hah! Snuck the Santa boat into Coolboats!

You could use that to mix margaritas five gallons at a time.

 

Paint mixer for use with a 55 gallon drum of paint.......

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That thing reminds me of those high speed V-8 "outboards" you see on those lon skinny Malaysian and Thai boats. Not sure what they are called.

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Actually they knew quite a bit. It was obvious that the "hole in the water" was a problem. The most advanced state of development saw feathering cupped paddles--running on an eccentric. Their propulsive coefficients were better than you might think. But motion in a seaway caused emersion, docking was a problem, and the wheels were large, heavy and complex. The screw propeller goes way back--remember the TURTLE--but it took a long time to get them more efficient than paddlewheels--even though the advantages were obvious. Note also that the propeller added a new challenge: the stuffing box.

 

As you point out, the propeller is nearly as old as the paddle wheel. Here's a photo of a launch designed by John Stevens built in 1804. She was 25 feet long, 5'6" beam, and could make 9 knots with power delivered through twin counter-rotating propellers. (I can't find an uncropped version of the photo online. I've seen one which shows more of the propellers, which look surprisingly modern. Not the wood screw type that the Turtle had.) 1804 means she was built only 21 years after Pyroscaphe (the first steam boat) and 3 years before Fulton's Clermont.

Page500_257_10.jpg

The engine from Steven's launch is apparently still in existence at the Steven's Institute in New Jersey.

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And since we're talking about old propulsion systems and oars. I like John Fitch's oared powerboats. Fitch experimented with paddle wheels, but eventually settled on independent banks of steam powered oars. He built a few of these starting in 1787, and they worked. One operated as a passenger boat between Burlington and Philadelphia and made 7 knots.

imagep010.png

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Dragon Boats

 

2_18%20Long%20tail%20boat%20motor.jpg

 

IMG_1786_koh_samui_thongtakian_beach_big

 

I understood they were called 'longtails'.

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This conversation reminds me of a Goon show episode (BBC radio)...

 

Seagoon:
Bloodnok and I floundered in the cruel sea.

FX:
[Lapping waves]

Bloodnok:
Fortunately we found a passing lifeboat and dragged ourselves aboard.

Seagoon:
We had no oars, but luckily we found two outboard motors and we rowed with them.

Bloodnok:
Brilliant.

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And since we're talking about old propulsion systems and oars. I like John Fitch's oared powerboats. Fitch experimented with paddle wheels, but eventually settled on independent banks of steam powered oars. He built a few of these starting in 1787, and they worked. One operated as a passenger boat between Burlington and Philadelphia and made 7 knots.

imagep010.png

I'd love to look at one of those in a museum somewhere...

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Kedge.

 

Doesn't exactly get us home. And spending half the night on an unlit boat anchored in the middle of the Solent? No thanks. I'm paddling rather than kedging. (Or hoping for a tow, IRL).

 

I've seen a couple of Dragons with a set up like this. Nicely done - when you take the mount off, there's nothing there but a couple of minor sockets. Infinitely better than stern mounting.

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Looks to me like a hull for a steam launch. Not bad looking but I need to see the stern before making a full asessment. The sheer goes a bit wonky about 5' aft of the stem but maybe some teak toe rail type trim can fair that out.

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Looks to me like a hull for a steam launch.

 

That's what I was thinking, but then I saw that the keel ends at the waterline, without a cutout for a prop. Wouldn't you have the prop a little bit further forward than that? And also wasn't sure if there's enough displacement for boiler and engine.

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Dragon Boats

 

2_18%20Long%20tail%20boat%20motor.jpg

 

IMG_1786_koh_samui_thongtakian_beach_big

 

I understood they were called 'longtails'.

 

Right you are Leka, I thought I had edited that, sorry.

When you named them dragon boats I was thinking:

 

International-Dragon-Boat-Race2.jpg

 

don't really need a motor then, or sails for that matter........

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Ed:

Yeah, I think you are right. That would put the prop pretty far aft. My bad.

I saw it as along skinny hull and now Tom tells us it's a catboat. WTF? Oh well, looks like a nice catboat. Shame to have to have that long keel hanging down there.

 

What is the LOA?

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Looks to me like a hull for a steam launch.

 

That's what I was thinking, but then I saw that the keel ends at the waterline, without a cutout for a prop. Wouldn't you have the prop a little bit further forward than that? And also wasn't sure if there's enough displacement for boiler and engine.

 

Besides that, the stern is much too fine for a steamer. She'd squat terribly.

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Fast:

No, I disagree. You'd only be looking for hull speed. Go back and look at Iren's electric boat. With the deep chest and the long flat run I think this hull would do just fine. There is very little rocker aft.

 

Kind of narrow fanny for a catboat but a really nice set of lines, quite modern looking. I prefer the sheer in the photo to the sheer on the drawings.

 

I need a helper. I am swamped. But living out here in the sticks I'm not likely to find anyone.

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Bob, if you give me your log in information I could take over the internet yak stuff for you so you could get some work done without people worrying.

 

Shitski.

 

Do I get the job?

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I don't think one person is enough, we'll need three or four to keep going round the clock. Shitski.

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When you named them dragon boats I was thinking:

 

International-Dragon-Boat-Race2.jpg

 

don't really need a motor then, or sails for that matter........

 

I see a whole bunch of carbon based motors in each boat.

 

...hiding

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I don't think one person is enough, we'll need three or four to keep going round the clock. Shitski.

It'd probably be preferable if the helpers liked Vegemite….

 

 

 

Aww… shitski!

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You are hired Tuck.

What I really need is a high schoo, kid that can help me get organized. It's Christmas and people want prints of their boats for Christmas gifts. They want them now. They think I'm fucking MacDonalds. "Should I supersize that for you?"

 

Ture story:

One woman emailed me ten days ago and said she wanted a full set of prints for her boat. By Christmas.

I found a tube of drawings but it said Tube No. 1. I knew there were more drawings. I could not find tube no. 2. I searched. Not there.

I emailed her and said i'd give her the option of getting half the drawings and I'd refund half her $500 or I'd send her check back.

Tuesday afternoon she said "Keep the money and do your best to find the other tube." I told her I'd try in the morning again. I made no promise.

I got an email from her this morning asking if I had found the drawings. It was 7am. I told her I hadn't looked yet.

Then I got and email sort of like, "See here Mr. Perry I really need those prints and I suggest you find them now."

I emailed her that I did not like to be presurred and I'll just return her check.

Then she emailed me and accused me of never intending to send the prints in the first place followed by a long, meaningless rant with lots of "fuck this" and "fuck that".

She ended calling me "just another boat bozo".

I actually like that, "Bob Perry, boat bozo". I emailed her and asked her if she minded if I used that, "boat bozo".

 

Then I found the second tube. I got her prints today.

 

Are you sure Olin Stephens went through this?

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You are hired Tuck.

What I really need is a high schoo, kid that can help me get organized. It's Christmas and people want prints of their boats for Christmas gifts. They want them now. They think I'm fucking MacDonalds. "Should I supersize that for you?"

 

Ture story:

One woman emailed me ten days ago and said she wanted a full set of prints for her boat. By Christmas.

I found a tube of drawings but it said Tube No. 1. I knew there were more drawings. I could not find tube no. 2. I searched. Not there.

I emailed her and said i'd give her the option of getting half the drawings and I'd refund half her $500 or I'd send her check back.

Tuesday afternoon she said "Keep the money and do your best to find the other tube." I told her I'd try in the morning again. I made no promise.

I got an email from her this morning asking if I had found the drawings. It was 7am. I told her I hadn't looked yet.

Then I got and email sort of like, "See here Mr. Perry I really need those prints and I suggest you find them now."

I emailed her that I did not like to be presurred and I'll just return her check.

Then she emailed me and accused me of never intending to send the prints in the first place followed by a long, meaningless rant with lots of "fuck this" and "fuck that".

She ended calling me "just another boat bozo".

I actually like that, "Bob Perry, boat bozo". I emailed her and asked her if she minded if I used that, "boat bozo".

 

Then I found the second tube. I got her prints today.

 

Are you sure Olin Stephens went through this?

We're all Bozos on this boat.... or something.

 

Firesign Theater

 

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You are the top bozo. That was the only sailing-anoraky message I've ever read out to Mrs. Ed!

And no, Olin didn't do it that way.

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You are hired Tuck.

What I really need is a high schoo, kid that can help me get organized. It's Christmas and people want prints of their boats for Christmas gifts. They want them now. They think I'm fucking MacDonalds. "Should I supersize that for you?"

 

Ture story:

One woman emailed me ten days ago and said she wanted a full set of prints for her boat. By Christmas.

I found a tube of drawings but it said Tube No. 1. I knew there were more drawings. I could not find tube no. 2. I searched. Not there.

I emailed her and said i'd give her the option of getting half the drawings and I'd refund half her $500 or I'd send her check back.

Tuesday afternoon she said "Keep the money and do your best to find the other tube." I told her I'd try in the morning again. I made no promise.

I got an email from her this morning asking if I had found the drawings. It was 7am. I told her I hadn't looked yet.

Then I got and email sort of like, "See here Mr. Perry I really need those prints and I suggest you find them now."

I emailed her that I did not like to be presurred and I'll just return her check.

Then she emailed me and accused me of never intending to send the prints in the first place followed by a long, meaningless rant with lots of "fuck this" and "fuck that".

She ended calling me "just another boat bozo".

I actually like that, "Bob Perry, boat bozo". I emailed her and asked her if she minded if I used that, "boat bozo".

 

Then I found the second tube. I got her prints today.

 

Are you sure Olin Stephens went through this?

 

JFC, how fucking entitled was this bitch..... jeebus....

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Yes everything I know is wrong!

 

But not in Sector 3! Or was it 10?

 

Hand me the pliers.......

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Yes everything I know is wrong!

 

But not in Sector 3! Or was it 10?

 

Hand me the pliers.......

 

Don't lose that dwarf...

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When you named them dragon boats I was thinking:

 

International-Dragon-Boat-Race2.jpg

 

don't really need a motor then, or sails for that matter........

 

I see a whole bunch of carbon based motors in each boat.

 

...hiding

I totally don't understand the lifejackets.

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When you named them dragon boats I was thinking:

 

International-Dragon-Boat-Race2.jpg

 

don't really need a motor then, or sails for that matter........

 

I see a whole bunch of carbon based motors in each boat.

 

...hiding

I totally don't understand the lifejackets.

Really?

 

How quickly could 20 people be pulled on board after a capsize?

 

They can all swim to save themselves can they?

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You are hired Tuck.

What I really need is a high schoo, kid that can help me get organized.

 

If some kid turned up and reorganised your office I think you'd bitch and moan until time ended. On the bright side every time you then couldn't find something it would be someone elses fault.

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When you named them dragon boats I was thinking:

 

International-Dragon-Boat-Race2.jpg

 

don't really need a motor then, or sails for that matter........

 

I see a whole bunch of carbon based motors in each boat.

 

...hiding

I totally don't understand the lifejackets.

Really?

 

How quickly could 20 people be pulled on board after a capsize?

 

They can all swim to save themselves can they?

Oarsmen (and windsurfers, and surfers) don't wear lifejackets, but dragon paddlers do?

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Rowing shells (now) float when flooded (and you really can't row in a lifejacket or buoyancy aid), and boards are made of foam. AFAIAA, dragon boats don't have enough buoyancy to support the crew when flooded.

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Rowing shells (now) float when flooded (and you really can't row in a lifejacket or buoyancy aid), and boards are made of foam. AFAIAA, dragon boats don't have enough buoyancy to support the crew when flooded.

 

Ask the Leo Blockley Foundation about Shell Flotation...and the stubborn resistance of many in the sport.

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1483560_684218114945214_1907930088_o.jpg

 

Looks like the mizzen is forward of the rudder post. That makes it a ketch, right? ;)

 

Is that an EC boat, Tom?

 

Drascombe Coaster

Dunno if the one in Tom's pic is in the EC but it would be a good pick

 

L-Lake-Harris-030.jpg

 

Definitely a cool boat

 

FB- Doug

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The Drascombe would be good for the EC if you could get it off the beach!

 

I think any boat where the mizzen has less than 1/4 the area of the main should automatically be a yawl.

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L-Lake-Harris-030.jpg

 

That one could also go in the Ugly Dodger thread.

 

 

As an aside, did you know that you can drag images straight into the Reply pane, even from a different tab? I stumbled across that a couple of days ago.

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I need a helper. I am swamped. But living out here in the sticks I'm not likely to find anyone.

 

You know, that would actually be tempting, if it were possible.

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1483560_684218114945214_1907930088_o.jpg

 

Looks like the mizzen is forward of the rudder post. That makes it a ketch, right? ;)

 

Is that an EC boat, Tom?

 

Drascombe Coaster

Dunno if the one in Tom's pic is in the EC but it would be a good pick

 

L-Lake-Harris-030.jpg

 

Definitely a cool boat

 

FB- Doug

 

I was sailing in company with the top boat when that photo was taken during our annual Florida 120 small boat cruise last May. I liked the boat, but gawd I hate boomless rigs! They aren't the swiftest things in the world. Damned seaworthy, however.

 

The mizzen is aft of the rudder post, so it's by definition a yawl. However, even if the rudderpost were aft of the mizzen, the designer's intent still makes it a yawl.

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Rowing shells (now) float when flooded (and you really can't row in a lifejacket or buoyancy aid), and boards are made of foam. AFAIAA, dragon boats don't have enough buoyancy to support the crew when flooded.

 

OK. Let me see if I can approach this in a way that that comes across right.

 

First off, let's accept the "if it's your time it's your time" statement. If it is your time, you are done, finished, gone bye bye. Mikey used to say this in Iraq, to justify taking armor off the pick up trucks when we went on patrol, when he wouldn't wear his ballistic vest because it was "too hot". I put the armor back on the truck and told him I might need him if we were getting shot at and a clean shot to the chest may not kill him outright if he was wearing his up-armored vest. He didn't take the armor off, but he still didn't wear his vest. I hope he survived his tour.

 

That said...

 

I don't accept that one cannot row without a reasonable flotation device. This is also true that I don't accept that one cannot ride a motorcycle without a full coverage helmet -- that it makes it harder, or not worth it. I also happen to like wearing ballistic vests when around people who are carrying and possibly using firearms (even on a range). I used to wear my ballistic vest to go shooting on the range. People also argued (still do) against seat belts in automobiles.

 

I believe all these things for a reason. Yes, if it's your time, it's your time. We cannot control every single factor that may contribute to our demise. We can, however, mitigate many of them.

 

The same reasons rowers use against reasonable flotation sound a lot like the reasons I've heard people put forth against the use of motorcycle helmets and proper riding gear (boots, full coverage, armor) when motorcycling, bicycle helmets when riding, seat belts when driving, safety lines on construction sites, hard hats in the phone company, PFDs when sailing, tethers when sailing...the list is endless.

 

For me, safety gear does not have to detract from activities. It actually can enhance them. I'm doing something, taking an active role, to mitigate risks to myself so I can *continue* to enjoy the sport or activity.

 

A year ago, we watched a rower in Lake Union fall off her shell when a boat wake hit her. It was about 0700. The water was about 60 degrees. She stayed with the boat, then attempted to get back in. She failed. She stayed with the boat and tried to get back in, was almost successful, then failed and fell in again. She tried a third time (Kerry was already on the radio to Seattle Harbor Patrol -- they were on their way) and failed. I was headed to a spare dingy on the dock when Harbor Patrol arrived and got her out of the water.

 

Yes, she stayed with the boat and it was staying on the surface but, for how long in 60 degree water?

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Donn:

W e'd have some fun working together. But I'm easier in small doses.

 

Mistermoon:

Yes, indeed that is a yawl. No question. Nice little craft.

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When you named them dragon boats I was thinking:

 

International-Dragon-Boat-Race2.jpg

 

don't really need a motor then, or sails for that matter........

 

I see a whole bunch of carbon based motors in each boat.

 

...hiding

I totally don't understand the lifejackets.

My guess would be that whoever insured the event pictured insisted that the crews wear them. That group looks like this is just a once in a while thing for them or one and done. No pros or true watermen (waterpeople?) in that pic by the looks of it.

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Rowing shells (now) float when flooded (and you really can't row in a lifejacket or buoyancy aid), and boards are made of foam. AFAIAA, dragon boats don't have enough buoyancy to support the crew when flooded.

 

Ask the Leo Blockley Foundation about Shell Flotation...and the stubborn resistance of many in the sport.

 

Well aware of the campaign, and of Carl's efforts to refute luddism and stupidity in the sport. AFAIAA, BR now require new boats to comply with FISA's floatation rules: When full of water a boat with the crew seated in the rowing position should float in such a way that the top of the seat is a maximum of 5 cm (2 inches) below the static waterline. But yes, it is outrageous that they don't have a timeframe for all boats to be compatible.

 

don't accept that one cannot row without a reasonable flotation device.

.

.

 

A year ago, we watched a rower in Lake Union fall off her shell when a boat wake hit her. It was about 0700. The water was about 60 degrees. She stayed with the boat, then attempted to get back in. She failed. She stayed with the boat and tried to get back in, was almost successful, then failed and fell in again. She tried a third time (Kerry was already on the radio to Seattle Harbor Patrol -- they were on their way) and failed. I was headed to a spare dingy on the dock when Harbor Patrol arrived and got her out of the water.

 

Yes, she stayed with the boat and it was staying on the surface but, for how long in 60 degree water?

 

The only sort of wearable floatation that's compatible with rowing (as in rowing racing shells) is the bumbag/fannypack type. Don't know how easy they are to deploy when you're in the water.

 

But frankly, there is a recognized method for self rescue in a single. If the water is so cold that it's likely the sculler won't be able to perform this, then they shouldn't be out there in a boat where flipping isn't unknown without rescue cover.

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Donn:

W e'd have some fun working together. But I'm easier in small doses.

 

Oh, I can see it now.

 

"Donn, get the hell out."

 

"Yes, Bob. I'll be back in a while."

 

**************

 

"Bob, I think you need a break from me and me from you. I'll be back in 20."

 

"Ok, Donn. See ya then. Take the dogs, willya?"

 

"Sure thing, Boss." :)

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Ture story:

One woman emailed me ten days ago and said she wanted a full set of prints for her boat. By Christmas.

Tuesday afternoon she said "Keep the money and do your best to find the other tube." I told her I'd try in the morning again. I made no promise.

...

 

Then she emailed me and accused me of never intending to send the prints in the first place followed by a long, meaningless rant with lots of "fuck this" and "fuck that".

...

 

Then I found the second tube. I got her prints today.

 

Are you sure Olin Stephens went through this?

People are SUCH a delight this time of year, aren't they ? She might well be an otherwise rational person (though one kinda doubts it...) but come DEADLINE TO THE HALLOWED GIFT DAY there is some reptilian function that really bares it's claws come mid-December.

 

Many years back, I worked at a friend's mail-order fulfillment start-up and one of the many lines we shipped were simple trinket from the Polynesian Cultural Center ( a division of Mormon, Inc.) - anyway they had an issue with THIER vendor on some items and there were back-order delays, which we dealt with forthright "The piece you ordered has been delayed, you may cancle your order with no fees or await shipment in 2-3 weeks" - this was met with a response more appropriate to us having told them that their pets were going to be shredded tomorrow to make Taliban prayer shawls - screeching lunacy would be putting it nicely, - this over a fifty-dollar necklace pendant the size of a penny, purchased FROM THIER OWN CHURCH.

 

So no, Bob - your experience doesn't surprise me and you've again displayed Zen-like maturity at not hanging up on her, ripping up her check and sending her a nasty-gram saying "Lady (and I use that term loosely) I don't need this, go gripe at somebody that has to put up with your guff, 'cause I sure don't. Perhaps you could predict the oncoming of the holdays by looking into a thing called a "Calendar" But no, you are WAY better than that - which is what I would have done.

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Picture framing is always a joy this time of year as well. Everyday there is more to do and less time to do it in. People can be so great.