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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

8,514 posts in this topic

To add a "down under" flavour I have to put a plug in for the "ranger" class. Very popular harbour racers from a more elegant time, great fun to sail, enough room for weekending on the harbour and perfectly suited to the conditions. I have always thought of them as a cruising "Couta Boat"

 

This one is smokin a Saturday arvo Southerly change and everyone involved is totally into it. Several have done Hobart and one in particular has done a few recently.

 

 

post-9101-0-18947100-1362646705_thumb.jpg

 

 

Interestingly they use exactly the same handling technique as the 18 footers in a blow. Trim the jib and blow the main as necessary.

Nice. Another reef or two in that main would have helped thing along. even more.

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I like quality antiques. I really like CRESSET.

 

As for "antique reproductions"? They never work if you know what you are looking at.

 

I really like SPARK.

 

 

Waaah! That means you won't like this, which while not a reproduction, was not exactly cutting edge when built - launched 1999.

 

Now that is a lovely boat. Hard to see how she could be improved in any way. :)

 

Bob, SBD, thanks for the affirmation.

 

I'll tell the designer - he'll be stoked that such informed people appreciate her. She's our baby, our great gamble, our bit of irrational passion, and our bit of ruthless bottom-feeding in a very distressed wooden boat market over here in Blighty..

 

www.bettyalan.com has some of the story.

 

E

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I like quality antiques. I really like CRESSET.

 

As for "antique reproductions"? They never work if you know what you are looking at.

 

I really like SPARK.

 

 

Waaah! That means you won't like this, which while not a reproduction, was not exactly cutting edge when built - launched 1999.

 

I saw her yesterday from the Dockland Light Railway in London; she's tied up in the Limehouse Basin, minus her mainmast.

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I like quality antiques. I really like CRESSET.

 

As for "antique reproductions"? They never work if you know what you are looking at.

 

I really like SPARK.

 

 

Waaah! That means you won't like this, which while not a reproduction, was not exactly cutting edge when built - launched 1999.

 

I saw her yesterday from the Dockland Light Railway in London; she's tied up in the Limehouse Basin, minus her mainmast.

 

Mainmast with tenth coat of Tonkinois on now, safely in shed. She's used as London apartment in winter - make those boats work for you.

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That's the real bits of timber you can see. It was built as part of the Cultural Olympiad for the London 2012 Games. Over 1200 different donations of timber were incorporated into the design as the build went along. Bits of a Jimi Hendrix guitar, HMS Ark Royal, Victory, the Mary Rose, Lively Lady, the Bank of England, plus loads of personal bits and pieces. You can see the hockey sticks and guitars quite easily.

 

Oh, and it's hit 18 knots downwind....

 

More here if you are interested - www.theboatproject.com

 

Saw her close up at the London dinghy show last weekend. Mark Covell and his team did a really good job. They also had a lot of fun - there's things like a spirit level in there, with the bubbles in place. The very tip of the tiller is made from a woggle of the scout uniform worn by someone when he released doves during the opening ceremony at the 1948 Olympic Games - the "Austerity Games".

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Waaah! That means you won't like this, which while not a reproduction, was not exactly cutting edge when built - launched 1999.

 

Very nice! Congrats on a lovely boat. The guys who sailed her in the America's Cup jubilee had fun - especially when not every other boat in her fleet realised she had a centreboard. Didn't she have a fireplace? If so, is it still there?

 

2 Daring class spinnakers added - one flown sideways, as a mizzen staysail. Taken on the round the island race recreating the original.

 

jb01-1383.jpg

Photo from Tim Wright/Photoaction (yes, really!!).

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Waaah! That means you won't like this, which while not a reproduction, was not exactly cutting edge when built - launched 1999.

 

Very nice! Congrats on a lovely boat. The guys who sailed her in the America's Cup jubilee had fun - especially when not every other boat in her fleet realised she had a centreboard. Didn't she have a fireplace? If so, is it still there?

 

2 Daring class spinnakers added - one flown sideways, as a mizzen staysail. Taken on the round the island race recreating the original.

 

jb01-1383.jpg

Photo from Tim Wright/Photoaction (yes, really!!).

 

She still hasn't got any proper downwind sails. The inbetween owner did this huge and expensive refit (blank cheque to Berthon, astonishing sums of money), and there are some pictures of her with a huge masthead asymmetric. The asymmetric's not there anymore, and she had a new topmast built shortly after. A silence descended on the gathering when I asked what happened.

 

She's now on her third name in her short life: changing the luck we hope: her builder and first owner died and the second went bust. What's the worst that can happen?

 

Tell us the centreboard story: sounds fun.

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Fidded topmasts. These things happen...

 

page13_350.jpg

Eleanora%20broken%20masts%20c%20Nicky%20Wells%20Sycamore.jpg

 

Perhaps some Jack Aubrey-esque hawsers to the topmast truck are needed. :unsure:

 

There are shallow bits of the Solent. When tacking against a foul tide, you push the edges. If you have enough people onboard, and a centreboard, when you discover that you're a bit too close to the yellow bits on the chart and boatspeed seems to be vanishing, crank up the centreboard a foot or so and tack... I can't remember if they stuck anybody else on permanently, but apparently they did very well that day.

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Fidded topmasts. These things happen...

 

page13_350.jpg

Eleanora%20broken%20masts%20c%20Nicky%20Wells%20Sycamore.jpg

 

Perhaps some Jack Aubrey-esque hawsers to the topmast truck are needed. :unsure:

 

There are shallow bits of the Solent. When tacking against a foul tide, you push the edges. If you have enough people onboard, and a centreboard, when you discover that you're a bit too close to the yellow bits on the chart and boatspeed seems to be vanishing, crank up the centreboard a foot or so and tack... I can't remember if they stuck anybody else on permanently, but apparently they did very well that day.

 

Oh wow, gosh, good photos. At first I didn't notice the shards of top quality former topmasts being spread around the Solent [?].

 

She did win their class that day, and all the photos show her really set up nicely. It was her great day (so far). Tragically, Mark Varvill, the man whose dream she was, was too ill to be aboard and was driven round the Island from vantage point to vantage point to watch her.

 

Apparently while short tacking one man was put on the centreboard strop to feel the slack when touching (the boat doesn't slow down much), then up and away. Takes the fear out of bump tacking.

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But were wicked cool under sail. Below is an E scow.

 

post-22256-0-24173400-1362611622_thumb.jpg

 

 

Isn't that an A scow?

 

 

Yeah your right,my bad. Still damn cool though. :D

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To add a "down under" flavour I have to put a plug in for the "ranger" class. Very popular harbour racers from a more elegant time, great fun to sail, enough room for weekending on the harbour and perfectly suited to the conditions. I have always thought of them as a cruising "Couta Boat"

 

This one is smokin a Saturday arvo Southerly change and everyone involved is totally into it. Several have done Hobart and one in particular has done a few recently.

 

 

post-9101-0-18947100-1362646705_thumb.jpg

 

 

Interestingly they use exactly the same handling technique as the 18 footers in a blow. Trim the jib and blow the main as necessary.

 

That's a great photo worth clicking on. A classic southerly buster, Paps.

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The latest foiling moth, the Exocet. Very cool.....

post-76289-0-42311700-1362711127_thumb.jpg

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Two cool boats side by side...

Seriously cool...both.

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To add a "down under" flavour I have to put a plug in for the "ranger" class. Very popular harbour racers from a more elegant time, great fun to sail, enough room for weekending on the harbour and perfectly suited to the conditions. I have always thought of them as a cruising "Couta Boat"

 

This one is smokin a Saturday arvo Southerly change and everyone involved is totally into it. Several have done Hobart and one in particular has done a few recently.

 

 

post-9101-0-18947100-1362646705_thumb.jpg

 

 

Interestingly they use exactly the same handling technique as the 18 footers in a blow. Trim the jib and blow the main as necessary.

Nice. Another reef or two in that main would have helped thing along. even more.

 

 

To add a "down under" flavour I have to put a plug in for the "ranger" class. Very popular harbour racers from a more elegant time, great fun to sail, enough room for weekending on the harbour and perfectly suited to the conditions. I have always thought of them as a cruising "Couta Boat"

 

This one is smokin a Saturday arvo Southerly change and everyone involved is totally into it. Several have done Hobart and one in particular has done a few recently.

 

 

post-9101-0-18947100-1362646705_thumb.jpg

 

 

Interestingly they use exactly the same handling technique as the 18 footers in a blow. Trim the jib and blow the main as necessary.

 

That's a great photo worth clicking on. A classic southerly buster, Paps.

 

 

Indeed Tricky, Sailby, you are right but the "busters" come in so fast out of nowhere that you have to run what you brung, hense the "Sydney technique" Not everyone has the stomach for it but it works a dream.

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Of course at some point you have to find a hole to "get the rag off" which is where the finger wharfs come into play. Mostly restaurants now so a coldy is always available. Screech in, round up, drop everything, and grab a pylon. Someone will always offer you a beverage.

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That's the real bits of timber you can see. It was built as part of the Cultural Olympiad for the London 2012 Games. Over 1200 different donations of timber were incorporated into the design as the build went along. Bits of a Jimi Hendrix guitar, HMS Ark Royal, Victory, the Mary Rose, Lively Lady, the Bank of England, plus loads of personal bits and pieces. You can see the hockey sticks and guitars quite easily.

 

Oh, and it's hit 18 knots downwind....

 

More here if you are interested - www.theboatproject.com

 

Saw her close up at the London dinghy show last weekend. Mark Covell and his team did a really good job. They also had a lot of fun - there's things like a spirit level in there, with the bubbles in place. The very tip of the tiller is made from a woggle of the scout uniform worn by someone when he released doves during the opening ceremony at the 1948 Olympic Games - the "Austerity Games".

 

Well, I didn't want to say anything... but Thank you! ;)

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Wasting away in Martharitaville?

 

Can't belive no one responded to this. Great post. Not that I'm likely to get up that way anytime soon, but if I ever do, I'm damn sure going to have an auxillary. (Sailing in Corpus Christi has spoiled me)

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Wasting away in Martharitaville?

 

Can't belive no one responded to this. Great post. Not that I'm likely to get up that way anytime soon, but if I ever do, I'm damn sure going to have an auxiliary. (Sailing in Corpus Christi has spoiled me)

 

Buffett's story was from the era before Sea Tow and ubiquitous cell phones.

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Of course at some point you have to find a hole to "get the rag off" which is where the finger wharfs come into play. Mostly restaurants now so a coldy is always available. Screech in, round up, drop everything, and grab a pylon. Someone will always offer you a beverage.

 

Ha, ha. So there is method to that flogging rag ritual. Nice one, 'Paps'.

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Wasting away in Martharitaville?

 

Can't belive no one responded to this. Great post. Not that I'm likely to get up that way anytime soon, but if I ever do, I'm damn sure going to have an auxillary. (Sailing in Corpus Christi has spoiled me)

Thanks, I do try.

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Class 40, Cessna Citation, (aka Jasmin Flyer) winner of the 2012 Global Ocean Race, heading for the finish at Les Sables d'Lonne. Now that is a cool ocean racer.

post-76289-0-21515300-1362883867_thumb.jpg

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And while on the subject of cool ocean racers, check out Sir Peter Blake's champion WRTW racer Steinlarger 2. She won all 6 legs of the Whitbread race in '89/'90.

post-76289-0-77168100-1362884490_thumb.jpg

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But I thought ketches were slow?

 

That's quite a forest of spaghetti growing up from that life ring.

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But I thought ketches were slow?

 

That's quite a forest of spaghetti growing up from that life ring.

 

 

Ketches rated slower than they were. There seem to be some odd curves going on in the hull as well.

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But I thought ketches were slow?

 

That's quite a forest of spaghetti growing up from that life ring.

 

 

Ketches rated slower than they were. There seem to be some odd curves going on in the hull as well.

 

I guess it's all relative. 20 years ago, nothing could match her. These days, I doubt she could hang on to an IMOCA 60, blast reaching. But coolness isn't just about speed.

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As I recall Steinlager was designed to the IOR rule and to lump it's "ketch" rig in with other generic ketches is just silly. But don't let me stop you.

I don't care what you call a rig, you should not generalize about a boats performance based upon rig alone.

"All sloops can't,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"

Right.

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So Bob you are saying that my dads Garden porpoise that is ketch rigged wont sail like Steinlager??

Noooooo.. it cant be! I though 4 kts in 22 apparent was pretty fast! Haha

 

Oceaneer

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Ketches rated slower than they were. There seem to be some odd curves going on in the hull as well.

 

I remember reading that designers looked into how much time would be spent on each point of sail, and worked out overall performance for a variety of rigs. Ketches did better off the wind and there was enough off-wind work to make them the choice. As noted, it's all performance vs rating.

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4Kts

DDW, so yes VMG.

But damm that was a slow day.. I was going nuts putting extra canvas up where it did not belong to no avail!

 

A oday 22 passed us!

Oceaneer

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And while on the subject of cool ocean racers, check out Sir Peter Blake's champion WRTW racer Steinlarger 2. She won all 6 legs of the Whitbread race in '89/'90.

 

Wow, that's a big hole in the water.

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Come on Ocean. You need to buck up.

Bill never intended the boat to be fast. He just wanted to design a salty craft that was beautiful.

For Bill it wasn't about going fast . It was about having a good time on the water and looking good at it.

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How about the IACC class?

 

Definitely the ultimate lead-bellied money-gobblers, but IMHO they had a look of power & grace.

 

Luna_Rossa_ITA-86.jpg

 

 

Some more so than others, and yeah I don't like the NASCAR look of stickers & emblems & logos everywhere, either. But that's not the boats fault.

 

FB- Doug

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I'm on it. Just as soon as I get back from Tai Chi.

I think the 31' version is best. We need avoid mission creep. Nice big rig. No engine. None.

 

Bob, could you re-use the rig from a Mumm 30, or other, to get access to more readily available rigs and cheap(er) sails? Like using the Farr 40 rig on Sliver.

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How about the IACC class?

 

Definitely the ultimate lead-bellied money-gobblers, but IMHO they had a look of power & grace.

 

Luna_Rossa_ITA-86.jpg

 

 

Some more so than others, and yeah I don't like the NASCAR look of stickers & emblems & logos everywhere, either. But that's not the boats fault.

 

FB- Doug

 

Way too narrow and slab sided by the end...

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Ketches rated slower than they were. There seem to be some odd curves going on in the hull as well.

 

I remember reading that designers looked into how much time would be spent on each point of sail, and worked out overall performance for a variety of rigs. Ketches did better off the wind and there was enough off-wind work to make them the choice. As noted, it's all performance vs rating.

 

IOR used to only rate the mizzen area at something like 50% of actual sail area, so the boat had a lot of extra sail area, so the boat was made longer (by about 5' IIRC) than the sloop maxis for the race but still had a very good SA/Disp ratio. The extra length helped a lot.

Followed the boat into the finish line in Southampton, never seen such a large boat gybe so quickly and so quietly (including dropping and raising the mizzen staysail)

One of the sloop maxis "The Card" was converted to a ketch but was not successful. (extra sail area but no extra length) She also sailed one leg as a sloop due to a slight altercation with a spectator boat at one of the starts

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No reason.. I said 31' because it was half.

 

Now that you suggest it, Kim, I think 41' is a better length. The advantage of the fine shape is that the boat will be fast without the rig being too powerful. It could still be engineless...

 

You mean like a 30 square?

 

...I'd love a 30 square. :(

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No reason.. I said 31' because it was half.

 

Now that you suggest it, Kim, I think 41' is a better length. The advantage of the fine shape is that the boat will be fast without the rig being too powerful. It could still be engineless...

 

You mean like a 30 square?

 

...I'd love a 30 square. :(/>

 

I really enjoyed my 30, only sold her to make room for the Sliver on our dock.

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No reason.. I said 31' because it was half.

 

Now that you suggest it, Kim, I think 41' is a better length. The advantage of the fine shape is that the boat will be fast without the rig being too powerful. It could still be engineless...

 

You mean like a 30 square?

 

...I'd love a 30 square. :(/>

 

I really enjoyed my 30, only sold her to make room for the Sliver on our dock.

 

A 30 square is a thing of beauty, but I think Sliver departs from the 30 square's lines in some significant ways like relative waterline length and rig proportions.

 

Without any rule to design to I wonder how we perceive those proportions should be for a smaller Sliver?

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And while on the subject of cool ocean racers, check out Sir Peter Blake's champion WRTW racer Steinlarger 2. She won all 6 legs of the Whitbread race in '89/'90.

 

Saw her in Ft Lauderdale at Pier 66 during the stopover. May have been a lead mine but a good looking boat for her time. Siting on the pier with a cold one thinking how nice it would be to swap places with the crew.

 

Good memories....

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No reason.. I said 31' because it was half.

 

Now that you suggest it, Kim, I think 41' is a better length. The advantage of the fine shape is that the boat will be fast without the rig being too powerful. It could still be engineless...

 

You mean like a 30 square?

 

...I'd love a 30 square. :(/>

 

I really enjoyed my 30, only sold her to make room for the Sliver on our dock.

 

A 30 square is a thing of beauty, but I think Sliver departs from the 30 square's lines in some significant ways like relative waterline length and rig proportions.

 

Without any rule to design to I wonder how we perceive those proportions should be for a smaller Sliver?

 

I love Square Metre boats, but I wanted to go with some modern thinking with the Sliver project. So we have a longer waterline, fin keel and spade rudder.

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I really enjoyed my 30, only sold her to make room for the Sliver on our dock.

 

I test sailed one circa 1930's Knud Reimers. One of the most beautifully balanced boats to windward I've ever sailed

 

http://www.asqma.com/yacht%20profiles/Wings.html

 

The realties of owning such a boat started setting in when I was unable to find insurance for her, so the deal fell through and I bought something more modern.

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I love Square Metre boats, but I wanted to go with some modern thinking with the Sliver project. So we have a longer waterline, fin keel and spade rudder.

 

Kim

 

I will be VERY interested to learn what difference you'll notice in 'feel' between the 30 sq and Sliver. I never felt such a smooth sailing (helm) as I did on my full keel Yankee OD. On the fin keelers w/spade rudders that I've sailed (I've had an ex 1/4 tonner and a J-105, and others) I've often noticed what I would call a 'flutter' in the rudder at various times. Sometimes from kelp or current but often apparently from what I've presumed to be turbulence or eddies coming off either the fin or propeller/strut assembly. Never felt it on the Yankee.

 

This issue is sufficient to keep me only looking for another full keel boat in the future (along the Sq Mtr concept)

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I love Square Metre boats, but I wanted to go with some modern thinking with the Sliver project. So we have a longer waterline, fin keel and spade rudder.

 

Kim

 

I will be VERY interested to learn what difference you'll notice in 'feel' between the 30 sq and Sliver. I never felt such a smooth sailing (helm) as I did on my full keel Yankee OD. On the fin keelers w/spade rudders that I've sailed (I've had an ex 1/4 tonner and a J-105, and others) I've often noticed what I would call a 'flutter' in the rudder at various times. Sometimes from kelp or current but often apparently from what I've presumed to be turbulence or eddies coming off either the fin or propeller/strut assembly. Never felt it on the Yankee.

 

This issue is sufficient to keep me only looking for another full keel boat in the future (along the Sq Mtr concept)

 

The Swede 55 I used to sail had a spade rudder. Never had the flutter problem and she steered very well under all conditions, especially down wind in a blow. Just better handling under all circumstances. YMMV.

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Veegs:

Flutter is usually a function of asymetry in either the keel ( low frequency) or the rudder (higher frequency). It's quite common and often can be corrected witha littkle fine tuning of the trailing edge. I have experinecd flutter on everything from a Valiant 40 to a Laser. It can happen on any boat.

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Bob, thanks for that insight. When I've spoken of it to folks, they often wonder what I'm on about, but I tend to be quite sensitive to detecting it. Nice to know it's fixable.

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Veegs:

I think you would find it almost common on any boat with a good turn of speed.

The technical term is a "collapsing vortex".

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I really enjoyed my 30, only sold her to make room for the Sliver on our dock.

 

I test sailed one circa 1930's Knud Reimers. One of the most beautifully balanced boats to windward I've ever sailed

 

http://www.asqma.com...iles/Wings.html

 

The realties of owning such a boat started setting in when I was unable to find insurance for her, so the deal fell through and I bought something more modern.

 

Nice boat, 'Spoonie'. Great restoration. Something a little bit odd looking about her sheer line though, especially in the last pics. Maybe just as it relates to her very long stern overhang and that camera angle?

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It just occurred to me that one of the tricks to admiring any sailboat is the absence of lifelines and pulpits.

 

Is Sliver getting these? Kim or Bob?

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But I thought ketches were slow?

 

A ketch-rigged sistership to Steinlager won the Sydney to Hobart (Line Honours) in 1992 and again in 1994... beating Brindabella, from memory

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Yeah?

Well we'll see about that.

We have high D foam in the deck in the appropriate places in case Kim changes his mind later.

Of course the boat will look fabulous with that clutter. Lifelines/ Pulpits? Next thing is poodle nets.

If it were my boat I think I would have lifelines from the forward end of the cockpit to the bow. I am no longer agile and sure footed. But I'm still really good looking.

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But I thought ketches were slow?

 

A ketch-rigged sistership to Steinlager won the Sydney to Hobart (Line Honours) in 1992 and again in 1994... beating Brindabella, from memory

 

I was just having a little fun with stereotypes and kind of hoping Nessun Dorma would drop by. I sail a catboat. They are also slow, unless they are not.

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Yeah?

Well we'll see about that.

We have high D foam in the deck in the appropriate places in case Kim changes his mind later.

Of course the boat will look fabulous with that clutter. Lifelines/ Pulpits? Next thing is poodle nets.

If it were my boat I think I would have lifelines from the forward end of the cockpit to the bow. I am no longer agile and sure footed. But I'm still really good looking.

 

Don't listen to him Kim, he likes being contrary. He doesn't mean it, the Tai Chi has affected him.

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Tricky:

I lost that argument over a year ago.

I'll be just fine with my walker doing the foredeck.

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I had a wander around on Steinlager whenever the last boat show was.. sept?.She's tired but the same guys own Lion and I've no doubt she'll be brought right back up.

Saturday night we met up with some Canadian cruisers I'd last seen in Fiji. So we had a guided tour of a saga 43. Its probably the best set up cruiser I've seen to be honest.

Bob , you'd hate the crap on the back but she's power positive and they have everything..... x 2.

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Tricky:

I lost that argument over a year ago.

I'll be just fine with my walker doing the foredeck.

 

Harness and jack lines Bob..........safer than lifelines any day.

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Did someone say 30 square....

 

Once I had the pleasure of this one - Fagel Grip / Sydney Harbour

35fc640c-8942-49bd-b669-8c541efb0259_zps549d6540.jpg?t=1363144849

 

 

And sailed on this one as a young scout - Teal / Sydney Harbour.

 

c6748217-ce7f-457e-8c54-46289ac8aba9_zpsdc7b5b07.jpg?t=1363145263

 

Most beautiful yachts around.

 

Just pure sailing.

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I grew up in Wisconsin.My Dad and sister both had C scows (Dad crewed on an E scow at times).I was only around 7 or 8 at the time and had what was called a Cub boat,kinda like a Snipe.

Anyway The scows weren't much to look at, just sitting in 12" of water.

 

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But were wicked cool under sail. Below is an E scow.

 

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This is a C,like my old man had. He would sneak me out of Sunday school sometimes so I could crew with him and his buddy. Good times. Crap I'm getting a little teary up. He'll be 98 in a few days.

 

post-22256-0-39027900-1362612001_thumb.jpg

 

I sailed C scows on Crystal Lake,MI while working at a sail camp, and crewed for E scow races on Green Lake, WI in college.

Fun boats!

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I've never been bothered by the look of lifelines on a cruising boat. Adele likes to sit up at the bow and hold onto them.

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Did someone say 30 square....

 

Once I had the pleasure of this one - Fagel Grip / Sydney Harbour

35fc640c-8942-49bd-b669-8c541efb0259_zps549d6540.jpg?t=1363144849

 

 

And sailed on this one as a young scout - Teal / Sydney Harbour.

 

c6748217-ce7f-457e-8c54-46289ac8aba9_zpsdc7b5b07.jpg?t=1363145263

 

Most beautiful yachts around.

 

Just pure sailing.

 

God damn, that's sexy.

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for race boats doing W/L courses lifelines are very important. Too much rushing about getting things done. Life lines + those intermediate lines that people run diagonally across the lifelines have kept me on the foredeck on many a race.

 

I could see where they wouldn't be as critical on a classic designed boat doing distance races (especially if you had jacklines and were clipped in), but I'd have to think long and hard about it before racing on a boat without lifelines.

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ISAF Offshore Special Regulations require lifelines for Cat 1 to Cat 4 racing - i.e., pretty much any keelboat racing. I haven't come across anybody running handicap keelboat racing that doesn't use the special regs.

 

OTOH, Spirit Yachts (among others) fit removable stanchions. Much prettier for racing in the Med.

 

spirit100_26_800.jpg

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ISAF Offshore Special Regulations require lifelines for Cat 1 to Cat 4 racing - i.e., pretty much any keelboat racing. I haven't come across anybody running handicap keelboat racing that doesn't use the special regs.

 

OTOH, Spirit Yachts (among others) fit removable stanchions. Much prettier for racing in the Med.

 

spirit100_26_800.jpg

 

Interesting. There is a lot of inshore club racing conducted under AYF Cat 7 safety requirements in Sydney.

 

http://www.nsw.yacht...m FJW JOv2.pdf

 

I can imagine there is a risk for someone who is used to lifelines sailing on a boat without them as they may mistakenly grab for them when they are non existent. However I spent a few seasons in sports boats and got quite used to not having them.

 

Cool boat BTW.

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Here's a cool boat that races many Puget Sound long distance races without lifelines. Hell can you even imagine this boat with lifelines? It's Dennis Clark's custom canting keel 1-2 person boat.

 

post-25831-0-43614100-1363200979_thumb.jpg

 

Photo from Sailnut.com

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I think I have seen an occasional 6 Meter out racing PHRF and they have no lifelines either.

 

The last time I went into the drink I went right OVER the lifelines/pulpit.

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Cool boat #1: The old plywood Sailfish I learned to sail on. With the original cotton sail. I think the Sailfish was overcanvassed relative to its later kin the Sunfish. On a broad reach, that thing would just skip along, the daggerboard humming like a little outboard. I gather they are not common anymore.

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Today's cool boat on the woodenboat Facebook page: Arctic Tern.

 

If the image doesn't show up, it's probably because you need to subscribe to the woodenboatporn. ;)

 

5798_10152646522525603_1481916555_n.jpg

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Today's cool boat on the woodenboat Facebook page: Arctic Tern.

 

If the image doesn't show up, it's probably because you need to subscribe to the woodenboatporn. ;)

 

5798_10152646522525603_1481916555_n.jpg

 

It appears that she is flying the Scottish Cross of St. Andrews, so of course it is a cool boat!

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I can imagine there is a risk for someone who is used to lifelines sailing on a boat without them as they may mistakenly grab for them when they are non existent. However I spent a few seasons in sports boats and got quite used to not having them.

 

Think there's a big difference between inshore round the cans stuff, and things like peeling jibs/dropping kites at night 50 miles from the nearest lifeboat.

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OTOH, Spirit Yachts (among others) fit removable stanchions. Much prettier for racing in the Med.

 

spirit100_26_800.jpg

 

You'd have to be pretty pernickety not to like that.

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OK, call me pernickety. That's Mr. Pernickety to you.

 

Here's one that I like better. It's BACCANT a 75 sq. meter class boat. I found this pic over on SA in the "my old sailing photos" thread.

post-2980-0-49655100-1363270243_thumb.jpg

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Me? I tend to be more Persnickety than Pernickety but that's just me...

 

Love those Sq Meters. The 75's are sweet but a touch beyond my maintenance budget.....

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Yeah, that's it, persnickety. I knew "pernickety" didn't quite sound right.

 

Ok, call me Mr. Persnickety.

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BACCANT was the inspiration for Infidel, which became Ragtime, which inspired the West Coast sleds. So there's a link between these square meter boats and SC70s.

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Val:

I did not know that. Thanks. Kind of makes the SLIVER project complete the circle. Low D/L and sq. meter proportions.

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Val:

I did not know that. Thanks. Kind of makes the SLIVER project complete the circle. Low D/L and sq. meter proportions.

 

However, Bob, I believe the word "inspiration" is because the builder of INFIDEL couldn't/wouldn't pay Reimers' licensing, so lofted it from the lines in Uffa Fox's book, so it's a pirate ship really. This based on an article in CLASSIC BOAT a few years ago, and probably slightly garbled by my erratic memory.

 

E

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Fugs:

That's too bad. Designers run that risk when they publish lines. I have had one owner take a set of my study plans and build a custom boat from them. What pissed me off the most was that when he came to Seattle I took him to SYC for dinner.

Then he ripped me off.

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Let's just be friends...with benefits.

 

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Few years ago now, but I did love sharing a racecourse with 3 65 square metres, and a couple of 12s. Including the German Navy's matched pair of enginless, tiller steered 12s - Ostwind and Westwind. Ostwind was subsequently restored, and (re)named Sphinx - her original name. http://www.sphinx-12mr.de/en/history/

 

Particularly loved Gerdny. No lifelines!

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ISAF Offshore Special Regulations require lifelines for Cat 1 to Cat 4 racing - i.e., pretty much any keelboat racing. I haven't come across anybody running handicap keelboat racing that doesn't use the special regs.

 

 

Think there's a big difference between inshore round the cans stuff, and things like peeling jibs/dropping kites at night 50 miles from the nearest lifeboat.

 

Yeah but yeah but yeah ... you did say those things in the first quote so I thought you meant pretty much any keelboat racing has lifelines and that may have been something peculiar to the waters of the British Isles.

 

I couldn't agree more about night time offshore and while you're at it, throw in an inflatable PFD/harness.

 

I can imagine Sliver would ship a few across the foredeck in a big breeze and short seas of something like the Van Isle race in the Pacific Northwest.

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Is there any boat of the Sq Meter type that's generally available in the US?

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BACCANT was the inspiration for Infidel, which became Ragtime, which inspired the West Coast sleds. So there's a link between these square meter boats and SC70s.

 

Maybe Fidelis came in there somewhere. I believe she came before Infidel, but I may have it backwards. Fidelis was in Hobart for the AWBF recently, looking pretty fast, especially for a 'leaner'. .http://www.asqma.com...es/Fidelis.html

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BACCANT was the inspiration for Infidel, which became Ragtime, which inspired the West Coast sleds. So there's a link between these square meter boats and SC70s.

 

Maybe Fidelis came in there somewhere. I believe she came before Infidel, but I may have it backwards. Fidelis was in Hobart for the AWBF recently, looking pretty fast, especially for a 'leaner'. .http://www.asqma.com...es/Fidelis.html

 

I was invited out for a race on her when I was in Sydney recently. In light airs she `sticks' a little through tacks etc so she is in one division down from the biggest boats, but as soon as a breeze builds she flies. We had a reach from Shark Island down to the Squadron mark in a fresh nor easter and I swear we were never under 10 knots. Like the saying goes she `reached like a witch'. We won by a margin that afternoon.

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I'd been meaning to post pictures of this under the general cool boat thread, but the invasion of the thread by Scandinavian style boats has prompted me to go questing for photos from the owner's website.

 

She may be the coolest boat I know in my neck of the woods (or at least the coolest new build): she's a really outrageous 70 foot take on a Tumlare, designed and built by her owner, who seems to be one of those people who can do a million things before lunch - start a corporation, have a family, design and build a boat . . . Anyway, a boat that conforms to nothing at all, just wants to go faster and look better. Makes the Spirit boats (to whom she's a neighbour) look like conformist consumer items.

 

She's been for sale for a while, but you can just imagine the equation that the average boat buyer makes between berthing fees, accommodation etc. http://www.keme.net/...ine/WEB1/madam/

 

If I didn't have the second coolest new build wooden boat on the East Coast . . .

 

 

E

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post-38-0-70612700-1363284953_thumb.jpg

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Fugs:

Great find. Lovely boat. Very similar to the SLIVER project. Too bad the cabin trunk is so long. But it does buy headroom forward. My taste woud be for a flatter sheer to take some of the Banana look out of the boat. That photo from the starboard aft quarter shows how just a few degrees of heel can exagerate the sheer spring. But like the owner says, it may not be perfection buit it's close. I agree.

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Shields. Olin Stephens design from the early 60s. The most beautiful boat on the planet, IMHO.

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post-11923-0-41790800-1363289849_thumb.jpg

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Today's cool boat on the woodenboat Facebook page: Arctic Tern.

 

If the image doesn't show up, it's probably because you need to subscribe to the woodenboatporn. ;)

 

5798_10152646522525603_1481916555_n.jpg

 

Wow. Now that is a boat I'd be proud to sail. Very cool.

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