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Coolboats to admire

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This boat is so pretty. Atkins Fore and Aft.

 

With that deep forefoot (is that what you call it) would she be a bitch to tack and maneuver? Just wondering.

 

Regardless. She's sexy.

 

ForeAnAft-02.jpg

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Probably wanders aimlessly in reverse regardless of tiller movements, but also probably wants to sail straight.

 

Here's a time-waster. The Punta Gorda Lighted Boat Parade. Most of the boats are not actually cool, but some of the lighting jobs are. The Cowmaran appears just after the 2 minute mark. All those lights are LED and are being run from a crappy little 1400 watt inverter on one battery, which is being fed by the tiny alternator on one 9.8 Tohatsu.

 

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British canal boat and legging boardsimage.jpgsubir fotos

If you are interested in English canal boats, and English contributions to technology, go to YouTube and search on "the boat that guy built".

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Are those like curb feelers?

Canal boats were towed by horses. But to get through tunnels, the bargemen lay on the boards and walked the boat through. The horse was led over the top of the hill. Tough work through Standedge Tunnel, the longest on the canal system at 3.25 miles.

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dscf0053fm3.jpg

 

Here is KINGFISHER, a very gorgeous but untypical canal boat, built as the Inspector's craft for the Grand Union I believe, and also built in Cowes, why may be whay so she's much more "yott-like" that most canal boats, which tend to refer to their work-boat origins.

 

She was built in 1920, and has never been fucked up, and still has many of her original bronze fittings.

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Horse tunnel. The leggers then took control of the barge, the horses were walked thru.

 

image.jpg

subir fotos

 

 

 

In the age preceding mechanical propulsion, where a tunnel did not have a tow path one method of propelling a boat through was by the use of human legs placed against the tunnel roof or (in the case of the Braunston and Blisworth tunnels) the walls. This practice, known as ‘legging’, required two people to perform. Each lay at opposite ends of planks (‘wings’) placed across the bows of the boat. Holding the plank with their hands, they then walked the boat along using their feet against the tunnel walls. Professional leggers were available, who in the early days of the Canal sometimes terrorised the boatmen into employing them, which led to complaints about:

 

“. . . the nuisance arising from the notoriously bad characters of the persons who frequent the neighbourhood of the Tunnels upon the plea of assisting Boats through them.”

Grand Junction Canal Company Minute Book, 10th November, 1825

 

Eventually, in 1827, the leggers were registered and employed by the Company who issued them with brass armlets for identification. They were paid a standard rate of 1s 6d for a single trip, Blisworth men working south and Stoke Bruerne men north. In 1859, the novelist Charles Dickens commissioned John Hollingshead to write a number of travel articles to appear in the periodicals that Dickens published. Among them is an account of a journey that Hollingshead made along the Canal, which includes a description of legging a narrow boat through Blisworth Tunnel (Appendix II.).

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There's a bit in one of the Hornblowers where he has to help do it because the boatman was alone. Describes the process quite well.

 

Travelling on one of those narrow boats would be one of the most serene experiences imaginable. When I was a little kid I spent the day on one of those rivers (the Avon IIRC) rowing with my mom. I still remember it vividly more than 1/2 century later as one of the most peaceful & pleasant days of my life.

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I think this is cool and worth admiring. The price seems pretty good too.

 

 

1996 CORNISH CRABBER Gaff Cutter "New Moon" - $24900 (all Seattle)
00W0W_2SO7imNyJZ0_600x450.jpg

DESCRIPTION:
Sailboat with tiller helm,
Cutter rig with jib, staysail, gaff main and gaff topsail,
6 winches- 4 in cockpit, 2 on cabin top w/ rope clutches for halyards,
Very seakindly/seaworthy/easily handled reproduction of classic UK workboat full keel design,
2nd owner/never chartered,
serious pocket cruiser- sisterships have crossed the Atlantic,
top of the line low maintenance fiberglass construction,
heavy SS hardware,
low engine hrs,
standing headroom 5' 6"- roomy cabin w/ enclosed head,
SS propane gallery stove,
GPS, compass, plow anchor/anchor rode and all the usual equipment,

UPGRADES:
** 2 mainsails (1 new/never used, 1 tanbark),
*** Headsails newer w/ light use on Harken BigBoat roller furlers,
**** 30 amp shore power w/ battery charger/tender and new batteries (2012),

Dimensions
LOA: 30 ft 6 in
LOD: 24 ft 0 in
Beam: 8 ft 6 in
LWL: 20 ft 9 in
Draft: 3 ft 6 in
Displacement: 7383 lbs

Engine
Engine Brand: Yanmar
Engine Power: 18 HP
Engine Model: 2 GM
Drive Type: Direct Drive

Sail Area 397+ Ft²

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS:
Displacement/Length ratio: 361 (hefty cruiser: 350+)
Sail area to displacement ratio: 16.9 (16 - 20 high-powered)
Comfort: 26.1 (25-40 moderate motion)
Capsize: 1.76 (Down from 2 is considered increasingly quick to recover)
Length-to-beam ratio: 2.9 ( <3 relatively beamy, >3 relatively narrow)

Standard new boat price from £79,950.00+ at:
www.cornishcrabbers.co.uk/index.cfm/boat/Crabber.Crabber24

Located Lake Washington- Kirkland, WA, USA in Carillon Pt. Marina

call 360-six six 8-0930

Email without a phone number will not be answered.

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That does seem well-found, for the right sailor. Nice look - not a lifeline in sight, either - that sure does clean things up.

 

How's the 30 feet of slip-fee for the 20 feet of waterline ? Ouch. Better keep it on a mooring. Or underway.

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There's a bit in one of the Hornblowers where he has to help do it because the boatman was alone. Describes the process quite well.

 

Travelling on one of those narrow boats would be one of the most serene experiences imaginable. When I was a little kid I spent the day on one of those rivers (the Avon IIRC) rowing with my mom. I still remember it vividly more than 1/2 century later as one of the most peaceful & pleasant days of my life.

C. S. Forester's, Hornblower's description of legging it - his legs being "on fire".

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Bowsprit retracts.

 

Ah. Thank you, didn't get that part. Still prefer a boat like that just stayed in perpetual motion - it's such a sight, I'm sure, with the full kit up and a bit on.

 

As for the canal boatmen's 'legging it' I still don't get the drill. I understand the craft has to be propelled through a relatively tight tunnel - I just don't see how laying on the board accomplishes that - they lay on their sides, perhaps ?

 

I'd bet those Unions were interesting social institutions - "notoriously bad characters of the persons" - I say !

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You lie on the board on your side, facing forward, head in, feet against the wall of the tunnel and "walk" the boat along. Takes two - one on each side of the boat.

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standing headroom 5' 6"

 

Should boating vernacular be altered to correct such oxymorons?

 

It is inherent that "headroom" be referring to at least trying to stand.

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Not a Cornish Crapper!! One of the most horrible pastiches built. Knifes through the water like brick through molasses, hurtles sideways at any attempt to take it upwind.

 

Should be used as a suitable boat for a viking funeral.

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standing headroom 5' 6"

Should boating vernacular be altered to correct such oxymorons?

 

It is inherent that "headroom" be referring to at least trying to stand.

Our old First 235 has similar headroom. I never thought to describe it as standing, but....

 

We have several female sailing friends that are shorter in stature. To them is WAS standing headroom. Two of them were a couple and called the boat their 'doll house'. Another looked very nice in her bikini; when we sold the boat we thought about using a picture of her standing straight up downstairs in the ad. Ah, Marketing!

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standing headroom 5' 6"

Should boating vernacular be altered to correct such oxymorons?

 

It is inherent that "headroom" be referring to at least trying to stand.

FSVO "standing". My partner is 5'5"

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standing headroom 5' 6"

Should boating vernacular be altered to correct such oxymorons?

 

It is inherent that "headroom" be referring to at least trying to stand.

FSVO "standing". My partner is 5'5"

 

WTF does that mean?

 

We're getting carried away with the acronyms people. If it ain't the old standards IIRC, ROFLMAO etc., do us old farts a favour and spell it out.

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standing headroom 5' 6"

 

Should boating vernacular be altered to correct such oxymorons?

 

It is inherent that "headroom" be referring to at least trying to stand.

FSVO "standing". My partner is 5'5"

 

 

WTF does that mean?

 

We're getting carried away with the acronyms people. If it ain't the old standards IIRC, ROFLMAO etc., do us old farts a favour and spell it out.

For some value of

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It's a powerboat and it's not finished yet, but it is still cool. This is being built my semi-retired pro boatbuilder buddy in Morehead City, NC. Built entirely by eye, but based on the Simmons Sea Skiff, a design he has built at least 30-40 versions. He knows what he's doing.

 

41839898948439401974.jpg

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It's a powerboat and it's not finished yet, but it is still cool. This is being built my semi-retired pro boatbuilder buddy in Morehead City, NC. Built entirely by eye, but based on the Simmons Sea Skiff, a design he has built at least 30-40 versions. He knows what he's doing.

 

41839898948439401974.jpg

Very nice.

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Gorgeous. Obviously owned by a soulful and civilized person as well.

 

Was that built from the plug?

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1504086_10151923047973598_544353957_n.jp

Plenty of beam and tumblehome there.

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It would appear this is the same boat. Yours for only 695,000£.

 

main.jpg

 

http://www.rightboat.com/boats-for-sale/carpenter-65-wooden-hull-sail-boat-112947

Nicely spotted. Check out the marquetry on that chart table. Beautiful interior, as well as brightwork.

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The smart money's on Ish,,,,,,, :rolleyes:

 

One has hull ports and lettering, one has a headstay back from the stem...... not the same boat.

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1504086_10151923047973598_544353957_n.jp

zoom.jpg

 

The seller seems to think they are the same boat. The second photo is from the listing Ish posted. Granted, the hull ports are difficult to spot. Pretty obvious in the interior shots though...

 

A slightly better version of the same photo is here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/71559337@N05/6469653709/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 

6469653709_f57c12a4ac_o.jpg

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1504086_10151923047973598_544353957_n.jp

Plenty of beam and tumblehome there.

And a huge J. That monster headsail is a JIB.

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The smart money's on Ish,,,,,,, :rolleyes:

 

One has hull ports and lettering, one has a headstay back from the stem...... not the same boat.

 

Easy to get confused judging from photos at different angles; but I'd trust the vendors to know what boat they're selling!

 

Here's a photo giving an idea of the beautifully inlaid transom 'fart' (two boats 'passing wind')...

IMG_0914.JPG

https://picasaweb.google.com/adamsdonahue/VanKiPass#5100825115863149506

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Such a gorgeous boat.

 

Indeed - it's almost a shame to put it out in the weather.

 

As to trusting the vendors to know what they are talking about :lol: :lol: :lol: . I've seen ads for $16 million schooners that were listed as ketches among other instances of extreme ignorance.

 

The boats are just units of product to the vast majority of vendors out there.

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Such a gorgeous boat.

 

Indeed - it's almost a shame to put it out in the weather.

...

 

Almost? I don't know how people do it. I'd erect a giant boathouse. That drains. And seals up airtight so nitrogen can be pumped in and filthy fingerprints can be kept out. Basically, I'd be unable to have fun with something so pretty.

 

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Such a gorgeous boat.

 

Indeed - it's almost a shame to put it out in the weather.

...

 

Almost? I don't know how people do it. I'd erect a giant boathouse. That drains. And seals up airtight so nitrogen can be pumped in and filthy fingerprints can be kept out. Basically, I'd be unable to have fun with something so pretty.

 

Hmmmm. A question of whether you want a boat or a shrine I guess. In my case I'd, never measure up as 'worthy'.

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That's part of the charm of workboats. The scars are part of the charm--nee, part of the true reality. Those gouges under the hydroslave are not mere scratches after all. In otherwords you don't have to fret over a scratch--you "embrace" it ahaha.

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Keep it inside in late fall/winter. Works wonders......

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The smart money's on Ish,,,,,,, :rolleyes:

 

One has hull ports and lettering, one has a headstay back from the stem...... not the same boat.

 

Easy to get confused judging from photos at different angles; but I'd trust the vendors to know what boat they're selling!

 

Here's a photo giving an idea of the beautifully inlaid transom 'fart' (two boats 'passing wind')...

IMG_0914.JPG

https://picasaweb.google.com/adamsdonahue/VanKiPass#5100825115863149506

That boat won the Newport Bermuda Race back in 2006. The owner at the time ended up getting convicted on fraud charges for running a small ponzi scheme like operation out of Newport. Weird boat with some nice touches throughout.

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That's part of the charm of workboats. The scars are part of the charm--nee, part of the true reality. Those gouges under the hydroslave are not mere scratches after all. In otherwords you don't have to fret over a scratch--you "embrace" it ahaha.

^^^^^ THIS!

 

I love the looks of brightwork as much as the next guy, as long as I'm not paying for/doing the maintenance to keep it looking like it deserves to look. Gray/white porch paint work well for lots of applications!

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Not sure if you guys have seen this before about Morning Cloud II, but watched this last night and enjoyed it.

 

 

 

 

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Gorgeous. One of my all time favourite boats.

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Twelve layers of varnish! I wonder how often it has to be reapplied.

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12 layers is much more durable. Less than 8 is fragile and less than 5 is basically one year and you strip it all rather than sand and refresh with three coats.

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The smart money's on Ish,,,,,,, :rolleyes:

 

One has hull ports and lettering, one has a headstay back from the stem...... not the same boat.

 

Easy to get confused judging from photos at different angles; but I'd trust the vendors to know what boat they're selling!

 

Here's a photo giving an idea of the beautifully inlaid transom 'fart' (two boats 'passing wind')...

IMG_0914.JPG

https://picasaweb.google.com/adamsdonahue/VanKiPass#5100825115863149506

 

Ok look, this is beautiful no question but I'd rather go sailing than vanish and sand, vanish and sand, vanish and sand....................

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If you have the $$$ for a boat like that you pay others to do it when you're not sailing.

 

Plus I'm pretty sure a hull that big gets sprayed so it ain't like you're wearing out badger brushes by the boatload - or creating alliteration in the process for that matter.

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The smart money's on Ish,,,,,,, :rolleyes:

 

One has hull ports and lettering, one has a headstay back from the stem...... not the same boat.

 

Easy to get confused judging from photos at different angles; but I'd trust the vendors to know what boat they're selling!

 

Here's a photo giving an idea of the beautifully inlaid transom 'fart' (two boats 'passing wind')...

IMG_0914.JPG

https://picasaweb.google.com/adamsdonahue/VanKiPass#5100825115863149506

 

Ok look, this is beautiful no question but I'd rather go sailing than vanish and sand, vanish and sand, vanish and sand....................

And just when you've got the varnish done you've got the winch farm to service, and then it's winter again.

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The smart money's on Ish,,,,,,, :rolleyes:

 

One has hull ports and lettering, one has a headstay back from the stem...... not the same boat.

 

Easy to get confused judging from photos at different angles; but I'd trust the vendors to know what boat they're selling!

 

Here's a photo giving an idea of the beautifully inlaid transom 'fart' (two boats 'passing wind')...

IMG_0914.JPG

https://picasaweb.google.com/adamsdonahue/VanKiPass#5100825115863149506

 

Ok look, this is beautiful no question but I'd rather go sailing than vanish and sand, vanish and sand, vanish and sand....................

And just when you've got the varnish done you've got the winch farm to service, and then it's winter again.

 

You must be one of those glass is half empty kind of guys. :P

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What's with this stupid new disparagement, "winch farm"?

 

Do you not realize that when the winch came into wide use, it was thought of as huge progress from blovk and tackle and humans on a capstan?

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"winch farm" is hardly a new knock, it was a common remark of the raceboats of a certain era that had them by the bunches - for better or worse, there were some designs that really seemed to sprout the things EVERYWHERE. I sailed aboard a 1984 Peterson/Choate 48 footer that had 15 Barients on deck - we sure got good at servicing them - but on the upside, with no clutches on the halyards (each had it's own winch) there was little wear-damage to the covers.

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The winch farms happened precisely BECAUSE there were no clutches available at that time. My 1975 Quarter Pounder had some custom stoppers that the PO brought back when he raced his previous boat in France. They were very hot shit back then. People tried all kinds of things like putting Clam cleats in front of winches and so forth until decent clutches (jammers actually) came along.

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"winch farm" is hardly a new knock, it was a common remark of the raceboats of a certain era that had them by the bunches - for better or worse, there were some designs that really seemed to sprout the things EVERYWHERE. I sailed aboard a 1984 Peterson/Choate 48 footer that had 15 Barients on deck - we sure got good at servicing them - but on the upside, with no clutches on the halyards (each had it's own winch) there was little wear-damage to the covers.

Yep, I occasionally used to race an old 3/4 tonner that had too many winches. We'd be short tacking up the river when one would give up from lack of attention and try to break someones wrist. We'd continue tacking up the river with some crazy cross winching arrangement while someone grabbed a hammer and screwdriver for some emergency maintenance. We'd then spend the evening drinking on the boat while dealing with all the other winches. No a big job for the whole crew, but a pretty daunting one to do on your own.

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And then the Barlow halyard winch drum would break out of its plastic case on the mast and fly around the boat attached to a loaded wire halyard.

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And then the Barlow halyard winch drum would break out of its plastic case on the mast and fly around the boat attached to a loaded wire halyard.

 

That sounds exciting.

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I think what you guys missed on the winch farm was harvest season. :P

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And then the Barlow halyard winch drum would break out of its plastic case on the mast and fly around the boat attached to a loaded wire halyard.

Olaf, those captive winches can be used again with Dyneema. Every rigger's yard has a top shelf full of them.

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And then the Barlow halyard winch drum would break out of its plastic case on the mast and fly around the boat attached to a loaded wire halyard.

Olaf, those captive winches can be used again with Dyneema. Every rigger's yard has a top shelf full of them.

It was the moulded plastic shell that was the problem.

 

The last one I had was years ago, and cracked. I used the plastic as a base and made a carbon / epoxy shell over it, then bolted it back on.

 

It was fine when the boat was sold.

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Not sure if you guys have seen this before about Morning Cloud II, but watched this last night and enjoyed it.

 

 

 

 

Amazing restoration.

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Covers on the fenders and then a pad on the hull so the covers on the fenders don't leave a mark?

Imagine what they will make you wear on your feet.

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Covers on the fenders and then a pad on the hull so the covers on the fenders don't leave a mark?

Imagine what they will make you wear on your feet.

Like any mere mortals are allowed to set actual foot on her???

 

We can only wish.

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I'm not a fan of having something so beautiful, so fragile, that I'm so afraid of marring, that it reduces my willingness to use to full enjoyment.

 

If I'm afraid of scuffing it, it removes the fun.

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Like my buddies new on/off road bike, I got it covered in mud so he could enjoy it.

 

True story.

 

To HELP him.

 

honest..

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Like my buddies new on/off road bike, I got it covered in mud so he could enjoy it.

 

True story.

 

To HELP him.

 

honest..

I threw my buddies off a small cliff so he would quit worrying, shut up, and ride the thing!

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Yea, I threw my two year old into the ocean. To remove her fear of course. True story. :P

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Yea, I threw my two year old into the ocean. To remove her fear of course. True story. :P

 

How old was she when she found you?

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Covers on the fenders and then a pad on the hull so the covers on the fenders don't leave a mark?

Imagine what they will make you wear on your feet.

You obviously don't have one of these for your car Bob:

 

post-25831-0-92621300-1389235846_thumb.jpeg

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Covers on the fenders and then a pad on the hull so the covers on the fenders don't leave a mark?

Imagine what they will make you wear on your feet.

You obviously don't have one of these for your car Bob:

 

attachicon.gif92427.jpeg

 

He sure doesn't have one of these for the interwebs:

 

Cone%2Bof%2BSilence.jpg

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They threw me into the water at Cabaretta Saturday mornings. Salt water pool. I think it is still there in Sydney.

Dawn was my swimming teacher's name. She had a face like a Koala bear.They just threw me in and watched me. I bobbed around. I guess. The memories of it are not all positive.

Today I am a very competant swimmer. No, I am a very good swimmer.

The old ways may have been harsh but they were effective.

 

Raining hard now. Perfect for going to bed. Rain beating down on the metal roof of my shack on the beach. It's my favorite song. Spike is singing to me.

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I bobbed around. .

 

:rolleyes::lol: You didn't mean to do that did you?

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They threw me into the water at Cabaretta Saturday mornings. Salt water pool. I think it is still there in Sydney.

Dawn was my swimming teacher's name. She had a face like a Koala bear.They just threw me in and watched me. I bobbed around. I guess. The memories of it are not all positive.

Today I am a very competant swimmer. No, I am a very good swimmer.

The old ways may have been harsh but they were effective.

 

Raining hard now. Perfect for going to bed. Rain beating down on the metal roof of my shack on the beach. It's my favorite song. Spike is singing to me.

 

 

1604837_10152531787739251_1260247389_n.j

My daughter had a flinging good time.

 

 

 

398682_316846121754018_1161082702_n.jpg

 

and has turned into quite the water bug. :D

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They threw me into the water at Cabaretta Saturday mornings. Salt water pool. I think it is still there in Sydney.

Dawn was my swimming teacher's name. She had a face like a Koala bear.They just threw me in and watched me. I bobbed around. I guess. The memories of it are not all positive.

Today I am a very competant swimmer. No, I am a very good swimmer.

The old ways may have been harsh but they were effective.

 

Raining hard now. Perfect for going to bed. Rain beating down on the metal roof of my shack on the beach. It's my favorite song. Spike is singing to me.

 

 

1604837_10152531787739251_1260247389_n.j

My daughter had a flinging good time.

 

 

 

398682_316846121754018_1161082702_n.jpg

 

and has turned into quite the water bug. :D

She's a cutie.

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Must be winter and cold in Hawaii. Nice tuque.

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It may be 40 degress here but it's always 85 degs in my pool and Violet goes swimming everytime she comes up.

 

Maui: That water looks beautiful. Very cute little girl too.

Violetdolphin1_zps02a8c1bb.jpg

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My dad would toss me out in the Chesapeake! It was only arms length but I thought I was drowning.

 

Good times, good times...

 

I was at a landscape supply one time when a man bought a load of mulch. He asked to have it delivered, the owner said it would fit easily in his pickup.

 

"No, I don't want to scratch the bed liner."

 

He may have been wearing booties, I wasn't paying attention.

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My dad would toss me out in the Chesapeake! It was only arms length but I thought I was drowning.

 

Good times, good times...

 

I was at a landscape supply one time when a man bought a load of mulch. He asked to have it delivered, the owner said it would fit easily in his pickup.

 

"No, I don't want to scratch the bed liner."

 

He may have been wearing booties, I wasn't paying attention.

 

so, what is the point of having a bed liner?

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My dad would toss me out in the Chesapeake! It was only arms length but I thought I was drowning.

 

Good times, good times...

 

I was at a landscape supply one time when a man bought a load of mulch. He asked to have it delivered, the owner said it would fit easily in his pickup.

 

"No, I don't want to scratch the bed liner."

 

He may have been wearing booties, I wasn't paying attention.

 

so, what is the point of having a bed liner?

so, what is the point of having a pickup truck? If you don't scratch your truck/jeep or get it dirty, you're doing something very very wrong IMHO.

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My dad would toss me out in the Chesapeake! It was only arms length but I thought I was drowning.

Good times, good times...

I was at a landscape supply one time when a man bought a load of mulch. He asked to have it delivered, the owner said it would fit easily in his pickup.

"No, I don't want to scratch the bed liner."

He may have been wearing booties, I wasn't paying attention.

 

so, what is the point of having a bed liner?

so, what is the point of having a pickup truck? If you don't scratch your truck/jeep or get it dirty, you're doing something very very wrong IMHO.

Exactly. Bed liners are for pussies.

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As much as I admire fine yachts maintained to a 99 and 44/100ths level of perfection, I'll be damned if I ever want to own one or even sail one. The stress of being so fastidious so as to keep from damaging the boat in any way would so diminish my enjoyment of the experience of sailing the boat that it wouldn't be ever be worth it. I'll be the first to admit all my boats are a little shabby and sometimes not all that clean. I don't sweat scratches and dings acquired in ordinary use. I'd rather be on the water than anything else and polishing and varnishing eat into my already limited sailing time. My little wooden dinghy had bright finished decks until last year when I painted over them. I don't regret making my my life easier and better even at the expense of a little vanity.

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