Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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Didn't this thread appear to get away from all the Bolger boats in the Uglyboat Admiration Society?

Apparently not.

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I was looking thru Craigslist for something to mock when I came across this:

 

00808_43GwsKhsefB_600x450.jpg

 

Now clearly, the guy's hobby interest is different that mine, but you gotta admit this rig has a certain amount and is going to make a statement at the launching ramp.

 

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/4730706031.html

 

That is kinda cool.

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That's pretty cool. Launch the boat, drive the truck onto the boat and you're off.

 

Come to think of it, one could probably find a way to load both the trailer and the truck and be totally amphibious.

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Not sure this belongs here but...

 

100_2698.jpg

 

DSC02664.jpg

OMG that thing is pictured at Mystic Seaport!

I guess it is no worse than the sailboat that was shaped like a dolphin.

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Looks like an aluminum pontoon boat covered in wood veneer. Probably used contact cement. Maybe we'll see it WoodenBoat magazine. :lol:

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I was looking thru Craigslist for something to mock when I came across this:

 

00808_43GwsKhsefB_600x450.jpg

 

Now clearly, the guy's hobby interest is different that mine, but you gotta admit this rig has a certain amount of style and is going to make a statement at the launching ramp.

 

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/4730706031.html

Either the LC or the Deuce need a .50 Cal on a pylon.

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That's pretty cool. Launch the boat, drive the truck onto the boat and you're off.

 

Come to think of it, one could probably find a way to load both the trailer and the truck and be totally amphibious.

And, with a deuce and a half, you can back down the ramp until the driver's seat is awash.

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I was looking thru Craigslist for something to mock when I came across this:

 

00808_43GwsKhsefB_600x450.jpg

 

Now clearly, the guy's hobby interest is different that mine, but you gotta admit this rig has a certain amount of style and is going to make a statement at the launching ramp.

 

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/4730706031.html

Either the LC or the Deuce need a .50 Cal on a pylon.
Both

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I was looking thru Craigslist for something to mock when I came across this:

00808_43GwsKhsefB_600x450.jpg

 

Now clearly, the guy's hobby interest is different that mine, but you gotta admit this rig has a certain amount of style and is going to make a statement at the launching ramp.

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/4730706031.html

Either the LC or the Deuce need a .50 Cal on a pylon.
Both

Yes, both, and it's a pretty cool setup.

 

Not so cool that it can't be mocked.

 

$75,000???

 

And it's for work, shows, and parades?

 

No, it's not for work, certainly not at that price. I'm thinking $17,500, not $75,000.

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I was looking thru Craigslist for something to mock when I came across this:

00808_43GwsKhsefB_600x450.jpg

 

Now clearly, the guy's hobby interest is different that mine, but you gotta admit this rig has a certain amount of style and is going to make a statement at the launching ramp.

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/4730706031.html

Either the LC or the Deuce need a .50 Cal on a pylon.
Both

Yes, both, and it's a pretty cool setup.

 

Not so cool that it can't be mocked.

 

$75,000???

 

And it's for work, shows, and parades?

 

No, it's not for work, certainly not at that price. I'm thinking $17,500, not $75,000.

 

6-bys or deuce-and-a-halfs are very cool vehicles. Unless you own a fuel depot and fleet maintenance facility, it's not a practical daily driver. Apparently you can pick them up all day, in good shape, for ~$15k so Tom's price is right on.

 

They make great swamp buggies although the swamp isn't quite as nice after you're done.

 

FB- Doug

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My brother bought a running one for a lot less than that. It was ugly, old, on its last legs, and smoked a lot, but it was a deuceandahalf.

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For authenticity at parades, it would be a M-60 on the pylon. Ma Deuce is too expensive to put on every little truck, plus the operator should have some training. They stood me behind the M-60 after about 30 seconds of firing time at the range.

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I was looking thru Craigslist for something to mock when I came across this:

 

00808_43GwsKhsefB_600x450.jpg

 

Now clearly, the guy's hobby interest is different that mine, but you gotta admit this rig has a certain amount of style and is going to make a statement at the launching ramp.

 

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/4730706031.html

To bad the trailer needs paint.

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Most of what Philippe pens works for me, his semi-custom boats out of CNB the 60 and 76 are nicely worked out. I got the walk around one hull#39 60 at the Southampton show last year, being pushed by Ancasta - though I note they're not having much joy with the sale follow through? Deflationary assets eh... How ugly can it get?

 

http://www.philippebriand.com/

 

While on the CNB drool.... Luca Brenta did CHRISCO, she was at the 'Les Voiles de Saint Tropez' last year, and has i think the most beautiful spinnaker I've ever seen...

 

http://www.asvaurien.fr/media/kunena/attachments/95/photo_HD1.jpg

 

 

Though the interior is a tad too glistening white contemporary for my catholic tastes...

 

The Aga Khan's CNB117 once more shows the signature style of Briand's fave RS coachline....

 

http://img.nauticexpo.com/images_ne/photo-g/cruising-sailing-yacht-deck-saloon-custom-20459-5253959.jpg

 

However when I was in Poros back in 2011...(37°29′58.23″N 23°27′9.94″E).....I met the lovely Ägyd Pengg, whom had just docked 'Sarah Key' his Shipman 72, very neatly done double-handed just as the sun was going down... and no his sail partner wasn't wearing a bikini....This was when the hull was still blue, methinks a better colour for her... he's had her repainted all silver, (yuck) not sure about that myself....?

 

http://i.imgur.com/iz9OGUG.jpg

http://www.yc-host.com/upload/images/P4279926.JPG

 

His serious racing creds' however are in no doubt....

 

Tally ho....

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Love that abstract assym but the older I get the less appeal those giant boats have to me. Someone is building a 17,000 Sq. Ft. house near me - same thing. Why don't they just leave their dicks hanging out and be done with it?

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Something a bit smaller. Steamboat Harlequin. Just like the whimsy of the turtle-back cambered foredeck and the dreadnought bow. Plus I've always liked steamboats. Like sailing. Lots of effort for seemingly little reward.

 

ha025000.jpg

 

g2-harlequin1.jpg

 

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The basketwork chairs add that final touch. If I lived on an island I'd REALLY want an African Queen like that. The steam might be a bit impractical for a commuter boat though. :D

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The Center for Wooden Boats, here on South Lake Union, has a really nice little steam launch.

 

I frequently hear her toot her steam whistle whilst cruising around the lake.

 

http://cwb.org/exhibits/truscott-steam-launch/

 

Puffin-for-website-9-630x314.jpg

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Just a bit. Something like an hour (on a good day) between lighting the fire and having enough pressure to set off.

 

It's less than 30 seconds if you have the USB port set up for it.

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I like small too... our family day boat on the Edersee lake, Germany... was only 28'... loads of happy memories on that craft...

 

More locally to me.... the SYOA Salcombe Yawls are great to watch, with a very competitive class group... wooden boats have a real organic sculptural feel...

 

http://www.syoa.co.uk/syoa_wp/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/wpid-Photo-11-Oct-2011-0847-PM.jpg

 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-vJ3ouzyCvX8/T6Yp5lTnxuI/AAAAAAAACTU/LwJemsKewqU/s1600/P1070793.JPG

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The Center for Wooden Boats, here on South Lake Union, has a really nice little steam launch.

 

I frequently hear her toot her steam whistle whilst cruising around the lake.

 

http://cwb.org/exhibits/truscott-steam-launch/

 

Puffin-for-website-9-630x314.jpg

My father grew up running around in a one-lunger make-and-break with a very similar hull and also named PUFFIN.

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We took this picture thsi summer, in the 1000 Islands. The boat is a 1930's style commuter named Zipper and is owned by the Antique Boat Museum In Clayton. It is a fairly frequent sight in the islands as the museum uses the boat to give rides to museum visitors.

 

A more detailed history of the boat can be found here: http://www.thousandislandslife.com/BackIssues/Archive/tabid/393/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/878/Zipper-the-Flagship.aspx

 

post-37611-0-28289100-1416514430_thumb.jpg

 

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Thanks Pom. That is so cool. I have two questions:

Can you find hull lines for any of those boats. I'd really like to see OBERON's lines to see how close the stern shape is to FRANKIE.

How much HP are those steam engines putting out.

 

The magic of long and skinny.

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The club at the lake used an old 6X6 to power the travel lift for years. in fact, it was just retired in favour of an old Case 4x4 tractor this year. 3 or for years ago a member had the 6x6 jump the blocks sending the travel lift and the 6x6 down the ramp. all you could see of the truck was the top few inches of the cab. they hauled the whole mess out, drained and replaced the fluids, let it dry out for a few days and bob's your uncle she fired right up!

 

That's pretty cool. Launch the boat, drive the truck onto the boat and you're off.

Come to think of it, one could probably find a way to load both the trailer and the truck and be totally amphibious.


And, with a deuce and a half, you can back down the ramp until the driver's seat is awash.

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My dad owned a 19' Chris Craft Sea Skiff with a Grey Marine engine.

 

I found it to be a nice looking, fun, safe boat.

post-106106-0-13778000-1416583270_thumb.jpg

post-106106-0-21654900-1416583276_thumb.jpg

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Bob, I'm pretty sure all those steam launches are part of the museum on Windermere, a lake in the north of England.

 

http://www.steamboats.org.uk/

 

Dunno about hull lines.

 

A small version of Turbinia with a steam turbine, rather than a reciprocating engine would be fun.

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Bob, I'm pretty sure all those steam launches are part of the museum on Windermere, a lake in the north of England.

 

http://www.steamboats.org.uk/

 

Dunno about hull lines.

 

A small version of Turbinia with a steam turbine, rather than a reciprocating engine would be fun.

 

Hull lines should be around, maybe not easily available. Bob might be able to pry them loose, however.

 

Built 1999-00 by Paul Smith at Kintbury.

Designed by Paul Smith.

Fit-out by Paul Smith.

LOA: 29', LWL: 28', Beam: 5', Draft: 10", Displacement: About 0.9 ton..

Plywood (¼"), epoxy sheathed

Two chine, black hull with varnished mahogany decks and cockpits, wheel steering.

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Bob, I'm pretty sure all those steam launches are part of the museum on Windermere, a lake in the north of England.

 

http://www.steamboats.org.uk/

 

Dunno about hull lines.

 

A small version of Turbinia with a steam turbine, rather than a reciprocating engine would be fun.

 

Y'know, I've thunk that same thought. I even got a small turbine rotor to use some day, but really never got past the vague-plan stage. Other problems include getting a reduction gear (which Turbinia herself did not have, but would vastly improve efficiency) and stability.

 

http://www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk/register/138/turbinia

 

Very cool boat, though

 

FB- Doug

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Especially when you can remember the first Whitbreads taking nearly 200 days. Chichester was Knighted for doing it in 9 months. :D

 

I'll bet that is one miserable 45 days though - like riding a rodeo bronc continuously for 45 days.

Especially after reading the specs.

 

Shower: None

Head: Portable

 

I must be getting old, I'll pass on that trip round the marble.

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Great story.

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

Colin Archer. A boat that shape could only be one of his.

 

See there's a webpage. http://colinarcheremma.com/

 

Under sail

 

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

Colin Archer. A boat that shape could only be one of his.

 

See there's a webpage. http://colinarcheremma.com/

 

Under sail

 

 

The Archer brothers have an interesting history in Queensland Australia where they explored and opened up new land as pioneers there. Colin Archer went there in his early 20s to work with his brothers and was credited with sailing the first vessel up the Fitzroy River to what is present day Rockhampton.

 

A very hot, remote and tough beginning to a working life and a contrast to his boatbuilding/designing career later in Norway.

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Thanks for that one SC. Absolutely breathtaking. I wonder what the combined years of experience are for the crew that put Emma together. In today's age of plastic and carbon boats it is so cool to see people with the knowledge and skills to build one the "old fashioned" way. Just amazing!

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Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

 

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

 

Thanks for that one SC. Absolutely breathtaking. I wonder what the combined years of experience are for the crew that put Emma together. In today's age of plastic and carbon boats it is so cool to see people with the knowledge and skills to build one the "old fashioned" way. Just amazing!

 

Yes, wow. The range of skills displayed by the builder alone were amazing.

 

Thanks for posting, I really enjoyed watching it, moments of "why such a huge winch" to "ah, you're lifting a small tree up a large tree…"

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Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

I bet that thing still sends a tidal wave up the bank though.

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On the topic of coaching launches, the catamarans are cool. Here are two "Stillwater" launches:

25XLvs25Cbw.jpg

 

And here's the Platt-form 19:

 

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This popped up on my radar. Maybe you've seen it. Sorry can't go back through 38 pages.

DYI Dutch built double - ender, from felled trees to sailing on the water. 25 minutes of superb hand craftsmanship. I think the B&W picture in the beginning is the designer. Set to the Brandenberg Concertos. Bob, I think you'll like this one if you haven't already seen it. Hope not.

Colin Archer. A boat that shape could only be one of his.

See there's a webpage. http://colinarcheremma.com/

Under sail

 

 

Thanks for digging that up. She is lovely, splendid under under sail. Pretty sail plan too. Should I be surprised she moves so well?

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Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

Love it!!

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Ooooh! Long and skinny! I love it!

 

What they use now. 4.3 litre V6. They've got ?4? of the things, built over the years. One of the things about coaching a crew at Henley - you plus a guest get to ride the lauch with the umpire behind you crew.

w

umpire-launch.jpg

 

I guess a V6 makes a lot of sense but I can't help feeling that a boat that looks like that should make "pocketa pocketa' noises

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On the topic of coaching launches, the catamarans are cool. Here are two "Stillwater" launches:

 

25XLvs25Cbw.jpg

 

And here's the Platt-form 19:

 

The catamarans are cool. Here's a different approach for a different purpose.

I'm building a larger version of the Water bug with 20 HP that will allow longer range cruising and sleeping aboard. Water bug has been a great ride for many rears and and lots of long trips.

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Has Innismara been mentioned? 67.5' x 10.3' makes her very narrow. In New Zealand. Trying to find a picture under sail.

 

http://classicyacht.org.nz/cyaforum/topic/innismara-2/

 

Bernie Schmidt began building his own design in a Penrose shed in the early 1960s. He had strong ideas of his own but in many ways this new boat was similar to his earlier Young designed and built 42 foot Shemarra. But the new boat was extremely long in proportion to Shemarra and yet light displacement - and became the 67 foot Innismara. Schmidt built it in strip planked, nailed kauri with convex edges but without fiberglass sheathing which was considered unacceptable construction by local wise men however despite criticisms of amateurism, he worked on and finally finished Innismara nearing the end of the decade. Innismara was radical, very long, thin and flat with a deep draft keel. Young when he first saw the yacht in the Penrose shed thought, Poor old Bernie, looks like this will bend itself in half, going to be a dog but I was wrong. And John Vause, crew on Millers Stewart 34 Pioneer, called her the long pointed tube with sails. The yacht was fast, designed for reaching and running and on these points of sail the long waterline and lightweight hull excelled. Schmidt wanted to take the yacht offshore but official criticism along with rejection of the design and construction destroyed his plans Innismara instead became a regular Gulf racer and performed far beyond what critics believed possible. Again retrospectively, the construction method and design, called dangerously bad by officials, has survived well for Innismara is still alive and has logged many hard miles under its keel.

post-81201-0-85540800-1416978082_thumb.jpg

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This? Masina was designed by Jack Brooke (NZ) for the builder, Noel Barrott (NZ). Actually designed as a 36' but redrawn to 38'.

post-81201-0-71880500-1416978427_thumb.jpg

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Aramoana B23 is a fine classic and one of the last yachts designed by Arch Logan. She was built in 1938 by Bill Couldrey in Northcote, of kauri construction with three skin diagonal hull and double skin deck, with mahogany and teak used in the cockpit and cabin. Aramoana has an illustrious race record with RNZYS B class from her heyday and remains in great condition following major refits in 1989 and 2006 and a complete re-paint in 2013. Berthed with other classics at Heritage Landing, Silo Marina, Westhaven, courtesy of CYA.

 

Construction: Kauri three skin diagonal hull, double skinned deck

Dimensions: LOA 3810, LWL 27, Beam 86, Draft 56

Displacement: 6 tonnes

post-81201-0-13693500-1416979595_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-58710300-1416979613_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-52813800-1416979630_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-46778500-1416979646_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-07821500-1416979659_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-76822700-1416979673_thumb.jpg

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On the topic of coaching launches, the catamarans are cool. Here are two "Stillwater" launches:

 

25XLvs25Cbw.jpg

 

And here's the Platt-form 19:

 

 

The cats are an excellent no wake solution. Wake is a big deal on those rivers.

 

Most people just pick up a shitty old polyprop beach cat and use that as a base these days. I'd agree it now really the same.

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I probably built both of those boats

 

I was looking around for that huge one that Princeton had--designed by some other guy--but couldn't find it. That was quite a rig.

 

I need to get some better photos of mine. There's a reason yacht owners hire Billy Black. His photos are good.

 

 

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+1 @ Southern Cross... that's a cool trailer for what looks like and interesting movie to come, ta for that. When we were anchored off Île-à-Vache, Haiti we saw some pretty basic local built craft, but most seaworthy they were, the lack of physcial cash on the isle means if you don't make it or catch it yourself... you go without.

 

'Necessity is the mother of invention', rings very true....

 

The style of the edit reminded me of this movie byy KAAPS....

 

http://vimeo.com/8451943

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Has Innismara been mentioned? 67.5' x 10.3' makes her very narrow. In New Zealand. Trying to find a picture under sail.

 

http://classicyacht.org.nz/cyaforum/topic/innismara-2/

 

Bernie Schmidt began building his own design in a Penrose shed in the early 1960s. He had strong ideas of his own but in many ways this new boat was similar to his earlier Young designed and built 42 foot Shemarra. But the new boat was extremely long in proportion to Shemarra and yet light displacement - and became the 67 foot Innismara. Schmidt built it in strip planked, nailed kauri with convex edges but without fiberglass sheathing which was considered unacceptable construction by local wise men however despite criticisms of amateurism, he worked on and finally finished Innismara nearing the end of the decade. Innismara was radical, very long, thin and flat with a deep draft keel. Young when he first saw the yacht in the Penrose shed thought, Poor old Bernie, looks like this will bend itself in half, going to be a dog but I was wrong. And John Vause, crew on Millers Stewart 34 Pioneer, called her the long pointed tube with sails. The yacht was fast, designed for reaching and running and on these points of sail the long waterline and lightweight hull excelled. Schmidt wanted to take the yacht offshore but official criticism along with rejection of the design and construction destroyed his plans Innismara instead became a regular Gulf racer and performed far beyond what critics believed possible. Again retrospectively, the construction method and design, called dangerously bad by officials, has survived well for Innismara is still alive and has logged many hard miles under its keel.

Wow. She looks stunning again.

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I am checking out SA while nursing an injury. Found one of my own boats in post 2941 on this thread . (kutter/socks).

Here is my main ride...Venus Ketch .

1935087_1102616932528_7835062_n.jpg?oh=eI built her 30 years ago , sailed her about 60,000 miles,still own her .

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I've posted a few videos on the "lost art" of wooden sail boat building techniques around the world. They pop up on my account for some reason. Not sure if this one will be of interest.

 

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Nice indeed.

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Those Currie boats look good. I believe they are a development of a Quarter tonner he built in the late 70's. Always wondered how they'd stack up against a SJ 24 - they look very similar.

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I didn't see anything on google except the Currie's FB page.

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Those Currie boats look good. I believe they are a development of a Quarter tonner he built in the late 70's. Always wondered how they'd stack up against a SJ 24 - they look very similar.

 

We could set a derelict adrift in a Currie and see if he beats Rimas to Samoa.

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I've never been a huge fan of the whaler Morgan at Mystic Seaport. I do understand that it's probably their most important artifact, but frankly, i'm just not that much into whaling. That said, I think the Seaport deserves big props for getting the boat into something like seaworthy condition and sailing it around New England. Especially because they did sail it, and not just gingerly tow her around in calm weather. So good for them!

 

 

 

Morganonroutetonewport.jpg

 

The Seaport sent a self-congratulatory ("Epic Voyage!") brochure out to their members (and why not) which includes a little map of the voyage. I was surprised to see that it includes a passage through Quick's Hole on the passage from Vineyard Haven to New Bedford. If they really did do that, I'm surprised. It's not so much that it's difficult or dangerous, but that they really would have been second-guessed if anything had gone wrong. It's fairly tight, there rocks (which are marked), and the current can be strong. I assume they had a fair wind.

 

1-screen_shot_2012-11-11_at_9.59.14_pm.j

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Back when I was growing up in the 60s in the SF bay area there was a very cool little boat named Spirit.

She was SS designed 33' 29' wl 8'6" beam.

I came a across an article in an old Woodenboat magazine (156) A few bits from said article.

 

"Spirit didn't have an engine-wasn't built with one-and they wanted to bring her around and do some east coast racing,so they left SF, went south,got someone to drag them through the Panama Canal,and came on up to Florida,arriving just after the start of the Venice race.They spun around on the starting line,having sailed nonstop from Panama,and set off in hot pursuit of the first racers that year in the SORC. Then she came up the East Coast,did the Onion Patch- a series of races leading up to the Bermuda Race- She was allowed to enter the Bermuda race after a letter from Rod Stephens called her a "pretty wholesome boat". After Bermuda she raced the transatlantic to Copenhagen. Spirit spent a winter in Europe then did the Fastnet,Cowes Week and other European races. She sailed back across the Atlantic to do the SORC races then got trucked from Florida to California. Later,she did a couple of transpacs including the Tahiti race and then the Sydney-Hobart."

Most all of this was done with no standing headroom, no engine and a bucket!

 

"In 1964 Spirit won her class in the Acapulco race,the 66 Bermuda race and that years Transatlantic to Denmark. She took first in class and first overall in the 1,700 mile Flemish Cap-to-St. Kilda race in 1966; second in the '67 Burnam week regatta; first in the '67 Fastnet and first in the'68 RORC season championship. In the pacific she sailed to 4th overall in the 1970 Tahiti race, first overall in the Suva to Auckland. They were continuing to kick butt in the '71 Sydney-Hobart until the rudder broke off."

And that my friends, I think, makes for a very cool boat.

If you can get your hands on Woodenboat # 156 do so,it's good read.

The lines for her are in there,I'll try and scan them and put them up.

 

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Back when I was growing up in the 60s in the SF bay area there was a very cool little boat named Spirit.

She was SS designed 33' 29' wl 8'6" beam.

I came a across an article in an old Woodenboat magazine (156) A few bits from said article.

 

"Spirit didn't have an engine-wasn't built with one-and they wanted to bring her around and do some east coast racing,so they left SF, went south,got someone to drag them through the Panama Canal,and came on up to Florida,arriving just after the start of the Venice race.They spun around on the starting line,having sailed nonstop from Panama,and set off in hot pursuit of the first racers that year in the SORC. Then she came up the East Coast,did the Onion Patch- a series of races leading up to the Bermuda Race- She was allowed to enter the Bermuda race after a letter from Rod Stephens called her a "pretty wholesome boat". After Bermuda she raced the transatlantic to Copenhagen. Spirit spent a winter in Europe then did the Fastnet,Cowes Week and other European races. She sailed back across the Atlantic to do the SORC races then got trucked from Florida to California. Later,she did a couple of transpacs including the Tahiti race and then the Sydney-Hobart."

Most all of this was done with no standing headroom, no engine and a bucket!

 

"In 1964 Spirit won her class in the Acapulco race,the 66 Bermuda race and that years Transatlantic to Denmark. She took first in class and first overall in the 1,700 mile Flemish Cap-to-St. Kilda race in 1966; second in the '67 Burnam week regatta; first in the '67 Fastnet and first in the'68 RORC season championship. In the pacific she sailed to 4th overall in the 1970 Tahiti race, first overall in the Suva to Auckland. They were continuing to kick butt in the '71 Sydney-Hobart until the rudder broke off."

And that my friends, I think, makes for a very cool boat.

If you can get your hands on Woodenboat # 156 do so,it's good read.

The lines for her are in there,I'll try and scan them and put them up.

 

Info here on S&S blog..

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I wasn't certain where to post this, but it's cool, and I like it so it's going here. I wonder if he has peddles in this thing?

 

boat2.jpg

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I wasn't certain where to post this, but it's cool, and I like it so it's going here. I wonder if he has peddles in this thing?

 

boat2.jpg

Add a mast ... Its the same guy?

post-47735-0-68493200-1417916123_thumb.jpg

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I wasn't certain where to post this, but it's cool, and I like it so it's going here. I wonder if he has peddles in this thing?

 

boat2.jpg

Add a mast ... Its the same guy?

 

They do look like they're the same boat, don't they?

 

However, the sailing version certainly wants to become a submarine. Dive, Dive, Dive... aooga, aooga, aooga

 

Personally, I prefer the "cuddy cabin" powerboat/peddle-boat version.

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Those Currie boats look good. I believe they are a development of a Quarter tonner he built in the late 70's. Always wondered how they'd stack up against a SJ 24 - they look very similar.

Fabulous little boats. I'm not sure Clint (Cletus) Currie was really looking to make it into a quarter tonner and those boats would kill a SJ 24 etc in a heartbeat. Clint won his division in his own boat years & years. He sold it too a friend and it just kept going. I'm going to say there were only 2 built, maybe 3, but great performance & quality. Why someone hasn't grabbed that boat yet is anybody's guess. Maybe it's a little bit of an orphan but? There are a hell of lot lesser boats at the size and price.

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I wasn't certain where to post this, but it's cool, and I like it so it's going here. I wonder if he has peddles in this thing?

 

boat2.jpg

Add a mast ... Its the same guy?

Hah... That's a friend of mine in the Frosty. Definitely not the same people. Funny dude.

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