Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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Back when I was growing up in the 60s in the SF bay area there was a very cool little boat named Spirit.

She was SS designed 33' 29' wl 8'6" beam.

I came a across an article in an old Woodenboat magazine (156) A few bits from said article.

 

"Spirit didn't have an engine-wasn't built with one-and they wanted to bring her around and do some east coast racing,so they left SF, went south,got someone to drag them through the Panama Canal,and came on up to Florida,arriving just after the start of the Venice race.They spun around on the starting line,having sailed nonstop from Panama,and set off in hot pursuit of the first racers that year in the SORC. Then she came up the East Coast,did the Onion Patch- a series of races leading up to the Bermuda Race- She was allowed to enter the Bermuda race after a letter from Rod Stephens called her a "pretty wholesome boat". After Bermuda she raced the transatlantic to Copenhagen. Spirit spent a winter in Europe then did the Fastnet,Cowes Week and other European races. She sailed back across the Atlantic to do the SORC races then got trucked from Florida to California. Later,she did a couple of transpacs including the Tahiti race and then the Sydney-Hobart."

Most all of this was done with no standing headroom, no engine and a bucket!

 

"In 1964 Spirit won her class in the Acapulco race,the 66 Bermuda race and that years Transatlantic to Denmark. She took first in class and first overall in the 1,700 mile Flemish Cap-to-St. Kilda race in 1966; second in the '67 Burnam week regatta; first in the '67 Fastnet and first in the'68 RORC season championship. In the pacific she sailed to 4th overall in the 1970 Tahiti race, first overall in the Suva to Auckland. They were continuing to kick butt in the '71 Sydney-Hobart until the rudder broke off."

And that my friends, I think, makes for a very cool boat.

If you can get your hands on Woodenboat # 156 do so,it's good read.

The lines for her are in there,I'll try and scan them and put them up

I can vaguely remember she put in a appearance in Auckland.

here is one for sale.

http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts/keeler/auction-820869183.htm

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...To complain about weather helm on one of these catboats is a but like saying, "I love those old MG's but they have such a hard suspension." It's just part of the fun.

 

 

That was my thought upon seeing such a complaint. Of course it has weather helm. It's a catboat and it is sailing!

 

If it gets too bad, get more/fatter guys up on the side. Or reef. But before it gets too bad it is indeed part of the fun. :D

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Posted at the request on Tom Ray. A Gil Smith Great South Bay catboat. Absolutely fabulous ass!

 

 

10750336_10154903269385092_2651713517599

 

I love that pic - that particular issue of Wooden Boat is in the magazine basket in my family reading room. This is the kinda thing we all learned to sail on - no slugs/winches, just wood/rope hoops and blocks. My very first sail was @ 9, in an old crabbing skiff. Got to go on my uncle's skipjack a bit later that summer, after I learned how to stay outta the way.

 

Back to this boat - I LOVE that old catboat, perfect for the shallow water and muddy bottoms of the Eastern Shore.

 

Pics like that are why I say I've never seen a boat that was too beamy for me.

 

To look at anyway.

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Someone's gotta do it. Thanks to Mr. Moon for posting the round catboat for me.

 

There's a coolboat over in the "restore this classic" thread. Steamflyer suggested it should be here and I agree. And its motorboat friend too.

 

... ...

Here is are two of our boats.

041-1.jpg

 

and

 

 

...

For Steamflyer, Dove is a 1946 William Atkins ActiveIII dory ketch. She was built in Connecticut by a man named M. Park. She has Gambel and Hunter sails in the egyptian cottton colored dacron, and all here running rigging is hemp, from Langeman in Holland. She is fairly heavy and needs more than a puff to get going, but an easy boat to sail, and very well behaved in 20 knots of wind.

 

015-4.jpg

 



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Someone's gotta do it. Thanks to Mr. Moon for posting the round catboat for me.

 

There's a coolboat over in the "restore this classic" thread. Steamflyer suggested it should be here and I agree. And its motorboat friend too.

 

... ...

 

Here is are two of our boats.

 

041-1.jpg

 

and

 

 

>

...

For Steamflyer, Dove is a 1946 William Atkins ActiveIII dory ketch. She was built in Connecticut by a man named M. Park. She has Gambel and Hunter sails in the egyptian cottton colored dacron, and all here running rigging is hemp, from Langeman in Holland. She is fairly heavy and needs more than a puff to get going, but an easy boat to sail, and very well behaved in 20 knots of wind.

 

015-4.jpg

 

 

 

 

Nice.

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Thank you. People walk down the dock and the constant phrase is "It must be a labour of love"..... to which I usually reply "Sometimes it's just a goddamn labour"

 

On really bad days when you hear the phrase more than once, you feel like jamming a sharp chisel into the dark part of the spectators left eye........ :angry:

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Thank you. People walk down the dock and the constant phrase is "It must be a labour of love"..... to which I usually reply "Sometimes it's just a goddamn labour"

 

On really bad days when you hear the phrase more than once, you feel like jamming a sharp chisel into the dark part of the spectators left eye........ :angry:

 

Sharp pencils work just fine, plus you can use the rubber end as a warning.

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Just name the boat Sisyphus and they might get the idea.

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"On really bad days when you hear the phrase more than once, you feel like jamming a sharp chisel into the dark part of the spectators left eye."

 

This is funny.

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Here is cool boat designed by one of Cruising Anarchy's resident designers, Yves-Marie de Tanton.

 

This model is a 12-meter (40') MBCC (Modern British Channel Cutter) that was built in steel in Turkey.

 

http://tantonyachtdesign.blogspot.com/2013/11/launching.html

Shame about that cabin and coach roof design. She definitely could have been much sweeter looking without any loss of functionality, IMO.

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

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Here is cool boat designed by one of Cruising Anarchy's resident designers, Yves-Marie de Tanton.

 

This model is a 12-meter (40') MBCC (Modern British Channel Cutter) that was built in steel in Turkey.

 

http://tantonyachtdesign.blogspot.com/2013/11/launching.html

Shame about that cabin and coach roof design. She definitely could have been much sweeter looking without any loss of functionality, IMO.

 

I kind of like that coach roof, but one ala Boreal would definitely more streamlined.

 

Simple can be cool, people have just gotten used to fancy. Back in the late 1960's I knew people who raked the following design over the coals, because it had telephone poles for masts, and clamps in its rigging, but look what it accomplished with its skipper!

 

jeudi_9_octobre_2008_04.jpg

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

Yves has a Bolgeresque side to him I think, a sort of " it works so what is your problem?" flair.

 

Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

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Hey Olaf:

send me a pm with your mailing address. Santa might be good to you this year.

 

"Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

 

I like that. Kind of reminds me of the advice I was given in college by a short, fat, bald Jesuit, "Get out of my classroom you phony disciple!"

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

post-74863-0-15590700-1418854572_thumb.jpg

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

 

Is that your new ride, Aka?

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Hey Olaf:

send me a pm with your mailing address. Santa might be good to you this year.

 

"Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

 

I like that. Kind of reminds me of the advice I was given in college by a short, fat, bald Jesuit, "Get out of my classroom you phony disciple!"

I sent an email, I think your inbox is full

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

A few years ago, I came across a vessel somewhat like this one anchored off Darien, CT. Absolutely gorgeous! The effect was slightly spoiled by a deckhand dressed in tattered jeans and a T-shirt.

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Hey Olaf:

send me a pm with your mailing address. Santa might be good to you this year.

 

"Reminds me of the advice of one of my teachers " the key to a satisfying life is to be inconsistently inconsistent".

 

I like that. Kind of reminds me of the advice I was given in college by a short, fat, bald Jesuit, "Get out of my classroom you phony disciple!"

Ha. Classic. :)

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I like it too on the right boat. Not sure about sail boats.

andy2007_zps101c2cf4.jpg

+1

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

This boat is actually attractive, Yves' boat, not so much.

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

I quite like the cabin trunk. It has a sort of irreverent irony to it.

 

The hull and rig indicate a well-thought-out sailing machine, which could have looked quite yachty. But the cabin trunk appears to have taken straight off a fishing boat, squishing that image. It's also a very practical design -- there's a reason fishing boats use that shape.

 

The combination of fine hull design and unrefined coach roof is the sort of thing that some of the British aristocracy do. Let the dog sleep on the antique sofa, wear clothes fit for a scarecrow, eat off chipped and cracked plates and hack the roast meat apart with gardening tools. They can do it because they don't need to prove anything; they still own half the county, so people don't need to be reminded to defer to them. These scruffy toffs actually take pride in being frugal with small things, and look disdainfully at those who they deride as nouveaux riches for "trying too hard" to display wealth.

 

This fishing-boat cabintop would fit perfectly with some of those scruffy toffs.

 

A left-wing English parliamentarian was on TV recently describing her son's experience at the posh private school to which she had sent him (causing outrage among her political allies). Their home is in a fairly poor area of London, although with some gentrification amidst the poverty. Her sons friends at his local primary school all wore expensive branded trainers, and sneered at those wearing cheaper supermarket shoes. This was reversed at the private school, where the children of very wealthy parents wore cheap shoes and laughed at the poorer kids with expensive footwear.

 

Funny old world.

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

I quite like the cabin trunk. It has a sort of irreverent irony to it.

 

The hull and rig indicate a well-thought-out sailing machine, which could have looked quite yachty. But the cabin trunk appears to have taken straight off a fishing boat, squishing that image. It's also a very practical design -- there's a reason fishing boats use that shape.

 

What reason would that be?

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

I like that. For a small country the Dutch have a disproportionate number of nice yachts.

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

I quite like the cabin trunk. It has a sort of irreverent irony to it.

 

The hull and rig indicate a well-thought-out sailing machine, which could have looked quite yachty. But the cabin trunk appears to have taken straight off a fishing boat, squishing that image. It's also a very practical design -- there's a reason fishing boats use that shape.

 

 

What reason would that be?

 

 

Shade from sun glare.

 

I guess water also less likely to lie on glass.

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How did that boat evade proper placement in the Uglyboat Admiration thread?

 

Admittedly not a winner in that thread, but it's in-your-face ugly in a Bolgeresque way: it should look like this because it should be like this.

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The forward raking windshield is very practical. You hardly see a fishing boat in the PNW built in the last 30 years without the forward raked windshield. Given the abrupt and orthogonal ends on YMT's boat I might have been inclined to go with a softer shape to the house but I'll bet you this feature was client driven and chosen for its practicality.

ALISON_zps9fe1b1ca.jpg

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The forward raking windshield is very practical. You hardly see a fishing boat in the PNW built in the last 30 years without the forward raked windshield. Given the abrupt and orthogonal ends on YMT's boat I might have been inclined to go with a softer shape to the house but I'll bet you this feature was client driven and chosen for its practicality.

ALISON_zps9fe1b1ca.jpg

 

20 years ago, even the East Coast Canadian guys in the Maritimes started to adopt that--which went very much against convention but is very noticeably better in terms of glare. It is often referred to as a "Western" windscreen. Haha.

 

Here's one built by a friend of mine:

 

http://www.novimarinebrokers.com/Broker/viewListing/?listing_id=13904&b=1575

fishing_boat_LOBSTER_for_sale_4191.jpg?w

 

 

And Bob, it goes without saying but your cartoons are really really great.

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Rozema is about 40 minutes up the road from me. I stop in from time to time. They build a lot of fishing boats. That trawler yacht is a beauty.

Also consider the forward raked windscreen offers advantages in to interior volume and headroom while adding to available deck space. The conventionally raked windscreen intrudes on available headroom and eats up available deck space.

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I knew somebody would ask that FB. It's tricky to envision (I could show you in a sketch in 5 seconds) but imagine a wheel position and where the helmsman would sit or stand. You need some room ahead of the wheel for installation of gear and you need headroom over the helm position allowing for normal human movement. So fix that headroom point over the helm position, add some tolerance for normal movement and start your conventionally raked windscreen from there. It goes well forward till it intersects the deck plane. This eats up available deck area while converting it to overly generous and useless "dashboard" area inside. Sometimes this "dashboard" area is used as a chart table. The reverse rake is a win/ win in both of these areas. It does not intrude forward into the available deck space and it provides even more headroom inside, measured fore and aft to give a feeling of spaciousness and getting rid of the feeling that you might smack your head on the windscreen in a sea.. And,,,it reduces glare and looks salty as hell.

 

I sincerely doubt that this has anything at all with wealthy English people indulging in shabby chique.

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Maybe it's me at the tail end of a long week, but how does it add to available deckspace?

Because for a given minimum useable pilothouse area, you have more area outside the pilothouse. With a conventionally sloped windscreen, the area under the windscreen is unusable. Obviously there is some dependence on the specifics of the arrangement and especially where electronic equip is located etc but that's the basic idea.

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Raspy:

 

I agree. The Portuguese bridge and reverse rake windscreen is like Stilton and vintage port, a perfect combination.

I'm pretty sure Rozema does all in house design. I'd stop by and offer them my design services but they do such a great job on their own I don't think I can contribute anything. Shitski! Their fish boats are beautiful.

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Some owners insist on the conventional windscreen and you just have to go with them:

 

3882629603_cdf9d049ea_b.jpg

See the helmsman standing there? See all that wasted space forward? See how all there is is a toe-space to walk around? Cleaning the windows is difficult. But the look is important to this boat. The customer wanted it that way.

Here is an example where the sloping windshied is a departure from a traditional vertical one. In this case, it cuts into the walking space outside the pilothouse a bit, but not much. Again, this was client-driven. The glare factor is really important. (But not to all operators--see previous).

4906459822_a4845416e2_b.jpg

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AKA, how far out does the sprit go on your yacht? It really is a cool looking "retro" BCC in my rather uneducated view. In profile it is rather similar to Curlew and Lark

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As much of a YMT fan as I am I think I'll go with Sailby on that cabin trunk. That forward raking windshield is a very strong design element and has to be done with finesse and care. It's subjective. I can assure you that this will be a very good sailing boat and that's objective.

I quite like the cabin trunk. It has a sort of irreverent irony to it.

 

The hull and rig indicate a well-thought-out sailing machine, which could have looked quite yachty. But the cabin trunk appears to have taken straight off a fishing boat, squishing that image. It's also a very practical design -- there's a reason fishing boats use that shape.

 

The combination of fine hull design and unrefined coach roof is the sort of thing that some of the British aristocracy do. Let the dog sleep on the antique sofa, wear clothes fit for a scarecrow, eat off chipped and cracked plates and hack the roast meat apart with gardening tools. They can do it because they don't need to prove anything; they still own half the county, so people don't need to be reminded to defer to them. These scruffy toffs actually take pride in being frugal with small things, and look disdainfully at those who they deride as nouveaux riches for "trying too hard" to display wealth.

 

This fishing-boat cabintop would fit perfectly with some of those scruffy toffs.

 

A left-wing English parliamentarian was on TV recently describing her son's experience at the posh private school to which she had sent him (causing outrage among her political allies). Their home is in a fairly poor area of London, although with some gentrification amidst the poverty. Her sons friends at his local primary school all wore expensive branded trainers, and sneered at those wearing cheaper supermarket shoes. This was reversed at the private school, where the children of very wealthy parents wore cheap shoes and laughed at the poorer kids with expensive footwear.

 

Funny old world.

 

Only in England you say?

 

Those tiresome status games are a specialty of the Brits - they long ago raised status gradations to an art form. It's an essential component of that moronic class system they insist on clinging to.

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But that class system has many fans - at least on Downton Abbey. There are some "socialists' in the TV series as well.

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The Bolger view on windshield rake:

 

Any boat steered from inside a deckhouse has a problem with the view from the helm. .... In Quest, the prospective master of the boat specified the far-forward, forward-raked windshield, the door beside the wheel, and the chart table handy to the helm. I don't much care for the forward rake because when you have to shelter a hatch in the deck, such a rake greatly increases the volume and wind resistance of the house. However, I did sympathize with his desire to see where the lobster pot buoys were. 30-Odd Boats, page 123.

 

Quest was a 38', steel utility vessel for a research institution. The drawings show a rather moderate forward rake to the pilothouse windows.

 

There is a sort of "compared to what?" issue here. As Bob described, the forward rake to the windshield reduces the size of the area to be sheltered for a given amount of headroom.

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We often use the exterior space under the forward raked windows to store the required emergency batteries for the navigation equipment.

 

post-24214-0-51273200-1418925319_thumb.jpg

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

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Buba's BBQ in Cape Hatteras is best southern BBQ I ever had.

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I am equal opportunity when it comes to BBQ (don't think I've met a style of BBQ I didn't like), though I am partial and biased toward our Eastern NC vinegar-based variety. I'd say the best we have here in Washington is Hog Heaven. You might also have ended up at Boss Hog's. Can't go wrong with either.

 

But 20 minutes away in Greenville is B's Barbecue, which is a roadside dive I'd put up against any Q, anywhere. Skylight Inn in Ayden isn't far away either and has been on its fair share of Best BBQ lists.

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That ferry looks great. I could cartoon that.

BLUEPETER_zps27975f29.jpg

 

 

Reminds me a bit of the old 'Vapurs' that ply the Bosphorus in Istanbul by the dozens

post-39772-0-82967000-1418939005_thumb.jpg

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

 

Wilbur's in Goldsboro used to be the tops. Haven't been there in a few years (wtf!!).

There's a great spot in Grifton just down the road from Washington. I'd be interested to know where 2ndW goes forBBQ.

 

What's hard to figure out about hush puppies??!?

 

FB- Doug

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

 

Wilbur's in Goldsboro used to be the tops. Haven't been there in a few years (wtf!!).

There's a great spot in Grifton just down the road from Washington. I'd be interested to know where 2ndW goes forBBQ.

 

What's hard to figure out about hush puppies??!?

 

FB- Doug

 

 

I am equal opportunity when it comes to BBQ (don't think I've met a style of BBQ I didn't like), though I am partial and biased toward our Eastern NC vinegar-based variety. I'd say the best we have here in Washington is Hog Heaven. You might also have ended up at Boss Hog's. Can't go wrong with either.

 

But 20 minutes away in Greenville is B's Barbecue, which is a roadside dive I'd put up against any Q, anywhere. Skylight Inn in Ayden isn't far away either and has been on its fair share of Best BBQ lists.

 

Ayden! Not Grifton! Sorry, the Skylight is very good, that's what I was thinking of. I don't really know where stuff is, I just know how to drive there.

 

I will try B's although we don't spend much time up in G-ville. Moore's here in New Bern is pretty darn good, and as a bonus it's almost next door to West Marine.

 

FB- Doug

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wait, I'm confused, again....

 

BBQ, ugly cattle boats.

 

Isn't this the cool boats thread? or am I lost again.

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wait, I'm confused, again....

 

BBQ, ugly cattle boats.

 

Isn't this the cool boats thread? or am I lost again.

 

I hear ya. It's anarchy.

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wait, I'm confused, again....

 

BBQ, ugly cattle boats.

 

Isn't this the cool boats thread? or am I lost again.

No. You're right on track.

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Coming from a guy in Washington NC, that says a lot! What is the name of your local BBQ hotspot? I went there with Bob P and the guys at PSC for lunch. Fun to watch Bob's introduction to NC BBQ and fixin's. He liked pretty much everything but had a hard time understanding Hush Puppies. He might have got it if we had gone to a fried Catfish joint.

 

Wilbur's in Goldsboro used to be the tops. Haven't been there in a few years (wtf!!).

There's a great spot in Grifton just down the road from Washington. I'd be interested to know where 2ndW goes forBBQ.

 

What's hard to figure out about hush puppies??!?

 

FB- Doug

They're shoes, right?

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

 

Any more info about this beauty? Looks like a great merging of classic and modern lines.

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A little different approach to a MBCC or MBPC(modern Bristol pilot cutter)

 

By the way ,i like that forward raking windshield it has his own character

 

Any more info about this beauty? Looks like a great merging of classic and modern lines.

 

Here is a link to Aka's blog

http://alu56.blogspot.it

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Maybe not a cool boat in the "Coolboat" sense, but a cool boat for sure.

 

That is indeed cool.

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Maybe not a cool boat in the "Coolboat" sense, but a cool boat for sure.

 

 

Very cool - sails better than a lot of full size boats.

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that would put a smile on my face! like sailing an RC yacht

 

Maybe not a cool boat in the "Coolboat" sense, but a cool boat for sure.

 

Very cool - sails better than a lot of full size boats.

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That ferry looks great. I could cartoon that.

BLUEPETER_zps27975f29.jpg

Another winner of a painting.

 

As long as we have posted "cattle boats" as someone referred to them, I might as well post a favorite of mine and one of my kids:

 

Sabinomain.jpg

 

By the way, credit for the general overall design of the AUCOCISCO III goes to John Hunter. She was designed at Seaworthy Systems back in the early 2000s.

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There was a mini 12 meter that was much like that - used bags of lead shot for ballast IIRC.

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That ferry looks great. I could cartoon that.

BLUEPETER_zps27975f29.jpg

Another winner of a painting.

 

As long as we have posted "cattle boats" as someone referred to them, I might as well post a favorite of mine and one of my kids:

 

Sabinomain.jpg

 

By the way, credit for the general overall design of the AUCOCISCO III goes to John Hunter. She was designed at Seaworthy Systems back in the early 2000s.

Nice ferry. But how would they launch that ship's boat, just out of interest?

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By the way, credit for the general overall design of the AUCOCISCO III goes to John Hunter. She was designed at Seaworthy Systems back in the early 2000s.

Nice ferry. But how would they launch that ship's boat, just out of interest?

 

Good question!

 

Like this, perhaps?

 

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

post-32003-0-02909000-1419111590_thumb.jpg

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

I like it

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

I like it

I do too......

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Re Pilothouse.

Typically.The owner came with a photo of a 44 footer from NL with a raking forward windshield. The object was to reduce the size of the boat to 40' for European regulations purpose. In order to visually minimize the size of the pilothouse I placed angled corners and many windows. The result gives a "chiseled" looking boat.

 

I like it

I do too......

It's still not pretty.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

 

When I show boats to my wife she says "do whatever you want, love."

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

You got to be kidding me, that is a beautiful boat!

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Kim:

ND's wife likes what we have. It's just what she wanted. The model she hated was the plumb bowed version. ND and I liked it but in a project like this it's very important to keep the wife engaged. I just look at it as part of the overall challenge. I like a tough client. The trick it get them to articulate exactly what they want. That is not always easy until they see what they don't want. It's a process of elimination.

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Sailby:

I think there are feminine "pretty" boats and there are masculine "handsome" boats. I do my best to be gender neutral but I'd consider the PSC a feminine looking boat. I think YMT's boat is a masculine, handsome boat. We tried a similar approach on ND's boat, PSC 63, and we called it the "You talkin' to me" look. ND showed it to his wife one weekend. I called him Monday and asked how she liked it. He said, "She could not have hated it more."

Thanks, Bob. I hadn't ever thought of that gender alternative angle. Interesting. I'm a grumpy old fart it's true, but happily still learning.

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