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Coolboats to admire

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Over on SA discussion, a YMT design came up. Sniffing around I found this pix of its smaller sister, the Carter 37. Even stick down and on the hard, it looks amazing.

 

70481d1337187643-carter-37-carter-37-mustang-profile0001.jpg

 

Same guys who put the prop & shaft in probably painted the boot stripe too... funny what those fumes will do to you.

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Over on SA discussion, a YMT design came up. Sniffing around I found this pix of its smaller sister, the Carter 37. Even stick down and on the hard, it looks amazing.

 

70481d1337187643-carter-37-carter-37-mus

 

In the words of Butthead: "Boioioinnnggg". That is one great looking boat. I love hoe the pulpit follows angle of the bow. great attention to detail by the builder / designer

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Hope her hull survives the boat mover. I hate those trailers; all that weight concentrated on her quarters, where most boats, especially racing boats, don't have much reinforcement in the way of bulkheads etc. They're OK for chined motor boats.

 

I'd much rather have my boat picked up in a cradle so her weight is carrried by the keel.

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Whinger:

I agree with you. That hull is being suppoorted where there is minimal internal structure. I'd prefer to see some amidships supports.

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Looking good on a trailer with mast down is a neat trick.

 

It looks like the bow support is near centerline and I can't tell what's going on with the aft ones, but if there are only two, why can I see the pad on the far one? It should be up out of view. I'm guessing there are three, with one on centerline, but that leaves me wondering why I can't see the leg on the far one.

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Whinger:

I agree with you. That hull is being suppoorted where there is minimal internal structure. I'd prefer to see some amidships supports.

Agree to all of this... but looking at the picture I think its moving.... being pulled by the towbar.

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Whinger:

I agree with you. That hull is being suppoorted where there is minimal internal structure. I'd prefer to see some amidships supports.

Isn't there at least a bulkhead right at the tail end of the house, about where the pads on the trailer are?

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Zed:

I'd have to dig into my archives to find the drawings for that model. I know I have them. There is probably a bulkhead about 24"/30" forward of the end of the house where the quarter berths start.

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Zed:

I'd have to dig into my archives to find the drawings for that model. I know I have them. There is probably a bulkhead about 24"/30" forward of the end of the house where the quarter berths start.

Major thread convergence.

 

Lines (but not architectural): http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=2140

 

Read up on Carter's shop, including who YMT was: http://sailboatdata.com/view_designer.asp?designer_id=143

 

Sweet looking boats. Lines to photos definitely show the skeg was butchered for the prop :-)

 

I'm not like expecting to find polars for the Carters (prolly could find for Cal 40, no?) but was the 39 at least "really" faster upwind? Or was the Cal all-around better?

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My Ballad and Contessa 33 used to bend alarmingly when picked up on one of those trailers. I wondered what it was doing to the Contessa's balsa core.

 

My current boat is bult like the proverbial brick shithouse, but she's much heavier, but the pads no larger.

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Looking good on a trailer with mast down is a neat trick.

 

It looks like the bow support is near centerline and I can't tell what's going on with the aft ones, but if there are only two, why can I see the pad on the far one? It should be up out of view. I'm guessing there are three, with one on centerline, but that leaves me wondering why I can't see the leg on the far one.

 

 

That's got me puzzled too.

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Most of the trailers I see have a cross beam for the keel to rest on then the pads are raised to the hull for balance. Don't think I would want my boat moved around on that trailer.

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I don't think that dolly is meant for very long trips - more like; pull it, place it, jack-stand it & go get another one.

 

Still would be good to see some sort of strap between the aft-pads. I've seen cored hulls damaged back there in the flanks with point-loading similar to that.

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Zedder:

When I was at Carter's the rest of the worker bee's were YMT, Chuck Paine and Mark Lyndsay.

 

The Carter 39 (the one in the pic is the Carter 37) was most definitely faster than a Cal 40 upwind.

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Fast:

Yes, the one and the same. Mark was a draftsman and a good one. But he was always showing up with some experimental piece of gear for a 505 dinghy that he had whipped up at home in the kitchen. Back then Mark was more interested in building than designing.

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The Carter 39 (the one in the pic is the Carter 37) was most definitely faster than a Cal 40 upwind.

 

Bob, would love to know your thoughts on why this is true.

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Keith:

Better keel foil

Less wetted surface ( much smaller keel planform)

Sharper angle of entry (better upwind hull shape)

Bigger rig

Better sheeting angles

 

Add to this the fact that the Carter, when I raced on it, had all new sails and the Cal 40's were almost certainly using older sail inventories.

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I came across this in Woodenboat magazine. Not a lot of info but I thought it might fit in here.

Troy class yacht from the River Fowey. 18' lod , 6' beam ,draws 3' 9".

 

post-22256-0-57584500-1365273289_thumb.jpg

post-22256-0-25154300-1365273365_thumb.jpg

post-22256-0-33488800-1365273414_thumb.jpg

post-22256-0-51589500-1365273512_thumb.jpg

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I came across this in Woodenboat magazine. Not a lot of info but I thought it might fit in here.

Troy class yacht from the River Fowey. 18' lod , 6' beam ,draws 3' 9".

 

attachicon.gifteight4.jpg

attachicon.gifteight5.jpg

attachicon.gifsapphire-1-small.jpg

[attachment=191482:BOMR20110818B-006_C

Hey Viktor. I saw a bunch of these cuties racing off Polruan a few years back. Apparently local builder, Marcus Lewis has splashed a few of the newer fleet. More details on: www.woodenboatbuilder.co.uk

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Hope her hull survives the boat mover. I hate those trailers; all that weight concentrated on her quarters, where most boats, especially racing boats, don't have much reinforcement in the way of bulkheads etc. They're OK for chined motor boats.

 

I'd much rather have my boat picked up in a cradle so her weight is carrried by the keel.

Gotta love a nice blue 1970's boat, I'm partial to them myself.

That looks like a prop in the centre aft to me and the bow is either 1 V'd prop( hardly universal) or more likely 2 angled props close together or linked so they can articulate. So that would make 5 supports, 2 forward and 3 aft. the one in the centre aft carrying the weight and the two off set aft to stabilise.

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I went looking for a picture of a Hodgen 21. WoodenBoat called it "the most beautiful of all the daysailers" in one of their pamphlets. There are drawings in the plans store of the WB site, but they don't show much detail.

 

As a kid, I sailed in the Boothbay Harbor area, where we saw both Hodgen 21s and BoothBay Harbor One-Designs. The later are very nice boats, but they don't make quite the statement that the Hodgen 21 does.

 

The designer was Sonny Hodgen, who was a buddy of LFH.

 

This may be one, but I'm not positive.

 

5a5a4k.jpg

 

 

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While poking around, I came across this design by the late, great Gary Mull. I was struck by how modern it looks despite being designed over 25 years ago. Note the wide beam at the transom!

 

post-5724-0-48841500-1365352650_thumb.jpg

 

post-5724-0-16153300-1365352735_thumb.jpg

 

post-5724-0-00036300-1365352771_thumb.jpg

 

post-5724-0-47655200-1365352782_thumb.jpg

 

The article is from a short-lived periodical called Boatbuilder. Jan/Feb 1988 issue.

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The Hodgen is one sweet looking boat. I wish they had used some sweep to the top of the cockpit coaming though. It appears to be parallel to the deck the entire length. That's boring. But I most certainly nit picking.

 

The Mull design shows the drafting of Peter Dunsford. Peter worked for Gary for several years after working for Jay Benford for a few years.

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hmmm...coolboats to admire.

 

Didn't say coolSAILboats to admire, so I'm going to open up that can of worms. :)

 

Great Lakes Whaleback

 

2009-2207.jpg

 

YMT Artica and Antartica,

 

post-4721-0-51946500-1365355488_thumb.jpg post-4721-0-42180800-1365355520_thumb.jpg

 

Great Lakes Fishing Tug

 

s_pa180666.jpg

 

 

ok ok, and one sailboat...the obligatory Baba 30:

 

sonadora2.jpg

 

 

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as to the discussion about 'planar sheers'. I stopped reading the gibberish when someone said 'planar sheers are ugly'.

 

Maybe it was explained, not sure. Here's a great discussion on it: http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/sheer-revelation-31241-3.html

 

Note the confusion by the 'knowitalls' including the claim that 'hand drawn sheers are much better than CAD drawn sheers'. yeesh...

 

planar sheers aren't end-all, be-all. And as Bob pointed out, they won't work well on canoe sterns and from the link above you should be able to see why.

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While poking around, I came across this design by the late, great Gary Mull. I was struck by how modern it looks despite being designed over 25 years ago. Note the wide beam at the transom!

 

attachicon.gifSparky_1.jpg

 

attachicon.gifSparky_2.jpg

 

attachicon.gifSparky_3.jpg

 

attachicon.gifSparky_4.jpg

 

The article is from a short-lived periodical called Boatbuilder. Jan/Feb 1988 issue.

This Mull 30 looks nice, anyone know about the one he describes?

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I went looking for a picture of a Hodgen 21. WoodenBoat called it "the most beautiful of all the daysailers" in one of their pamphlets. There are drawings in the plans store of the WB site, but they don't show much detail.

 

As a kid, I sailed in the Boothbay Harbor area, where we saw both Hodgen 21s and BoothBay Harbor One-Designs. The later are very nice boats, but they don't make quite the statement that the Hodgen 21 does.

 

The designer was Sonny Hodgen, who was a buddy of LFH.

 

This may be one, but I'm not positive.

 

5a5a4k.jpg

 

Your missing a D there semi......It's Hodgdon.

 

His name was George I. Hodgdon Jr., he was called Sonny because when he was growing up there were four George Hodgdon's in East Boothbay, not the least of which was his father George I. Hodgdon Sr.

 

I miss Sonny, he passed away in 1995.....here's a bit

 

He was one of the only people in the yacht building business big enough to say, "you did good there".....we respected each other a great deal. I would make a drawing and he'd turn up with the half-model a week later. Or he'd bring a casting pattern for a skeg or rudder by and we'd go over it. L. Francis and Starling Burgess taught him to make half-models, I think there's a great deal of Burgess in the Hodgdon 21. I'm not sure but I would guess she was designed when Sonny carved a half-model. I have an idea he did not make the drawings, I had them once when he asked us to put a modern keel on the boat, but I don't think that idea went anywhere.

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While poking around, I came across this design by the late, great Gary Mull. I was struck by how modern it looks despite being designed over 25 years ago. Note the wide beam at the transom!

 

attachicon.gifSparky_1.jpg

 

attachicon.gifSparky_2.jpg

 

attachicon.gifSparky_3.jpg

 

attachicon.gifSparky_4.jpg

 

The article is from a short-lived periodical called Boatbuilder. Jan/Feb 1988 issue.

This Mull design looks fast. Much like a new crop of home-grown Wednesday Night Racers, which cropped up in Auckland around the same time.

 

But she'd be pretty tender, initially, until she fell on her slack guts - then she'd stand up pretty well and go like a rocket, I'd imagine. A lovely looking boat.

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Tad:

What year was the Hodgdon designed?

 

WoodenBoat says Sonny designed the boat in 1958 using a 20 year old model from his uncle Charles as a basis. Plans are available from them.

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Kathy Bray sells these nice prints if you'd like one for your wall.

 

The rig looks "ample".

 

hodgdon21_enlarge.gif

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Semi:

It's a great looking boat but I don't have room for all the pics I have of my own designs let alone hang the work of others.

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I went looking for a picture of a Hodgen 21. WoodenBoat called it "the most beautiful of all the daysailers" in one of their pamphlets. There are drawings in the plans store of the WB site, but they don't show much detail.

 

As a kid, I sailed in the Boothbay Harbor area, where we saw both Hodgen 21s and BoothBay Harbor One-Designs. The later are very nice boats, but they don't make quite the statement that the Hodgen 21 does.

 

The designer was Sonny Hodgen, who was a buddy of LFH.

 

This may be one, but I'm not positive.

 

5a5a4k.jpg

wow...that is gorgeous!

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I went looking for a picture of a Hodgen 21. WoodenBoat called it "the most beautiful of all the daysailers" in one of their pamphlets. There are drawings in the plans store of the WB site, but they don't show much detail.

 

As a kid, I sailed in the Boothbay Harbor area, where we saw both Hodgen 21s and BoothBay Harbor One-Designs. The later are very nice boats, but they don't make quite the statement that the Hodgen 21 does.

 

The designer was Sonny Hodgen, who was a buddy of LFH.

 

This may be one, but I'm not positive.

 

5a5a4k.jpg

Lovely looking boat, Semi. She looks like she'd be pretty stiff in a breeze. She also looks light and fast. Would that have been cold moulded over stringer construction, perhaps? I like her generous tumblehome and long water line too.

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Lovely looking boat, Semi. She looks like she'd be pretty stiff in a breeze. She also looks light and fast. Would that have been cold moulded over stringer construction, perhaps? I like her generous tumblehome and long water line too.

 

 

From the WoodenBoat Store:

Designed by George Hodgdon, Jr.

LOA - 21' 4"

LWL - 18' 4"

Beam - 5' 9 3/4"

Draft - 3' 5 1/8"

Displ. - 1,875 lbs.

Sail Area - 200 sq. ft.

Construction: Carvel planked over steamed frames

Alternative construction: Cold-molded or strip

Lofting is required

Skill level: Advanced

Plans include 9 sheets.

 

She certainly shows that a boat can have a long LWL and still be pretty.

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That Mull "Sparky" looks just like a Humboldt 30 with a flush deck and maybe a hair less freeboard. Maybe also a touch more flair in the topsides I guess, but not a ton.

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Lovely looking boat, Semi. She looks like she'd be pretty stiff in a breeze. She also looks light and fast. Would that have been cold moulded over stringer construction, perhaps? I like her generous tumblehome and long water line too.

 

From the WoodenBoat Store:

Designed by George Hodgdon, Jr.

LOA - 21' 4"

LWL - 18' 4"

Beam - 5' 9 3/4"

Draft - 3' 5 1/8"

Displ. - 1,875 lbs.

Sail Area - 200 sq. ft.

Construction: Carvel planked over steamed frames

Alternative construction: Cold-molded or strip

Lofting is required

Skill level: Advanced

Plans include 9 sheets.

 

She certainly shows that a boat can have a long LWL and still be pretty.

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Lovely looking boat, Semi. She looks like she'd be pretty stiff in a breeze. She also looks light and fast. Would that have been cold moulded over stringer construction, perhaps? I like her generous tumblehome and long water line too.

That Hodgdon looks a lot like the Yankee One Design in miniature. I do have a love affair with the YOD. Burgess was the reputed 'actual' designer of the YOD, so if Sonny was influenced by him then it makes sense that there would be a family resemblance. I'm still thinking about a 20% larger big sister to the YOD. (And now that my boat appears to be sold, I'm almost ready!)

 

From the WoodenBoat Store:

Designed by George Hodgdon, Jr.

LOA - 21' 4"

LWL - 18' 4"

Beam - 5' 9 3/4"

Draft - 3' 5 1/8"

Displ. - 1,875 lbs.

Sail Area - 200 sq. ft.

Construction: Carvel planked over steamed frames

Alternative construction: Cold-molded or strip

Lofting is required

Skill level: Advanced

Plans include 9 sheets.

 

She certainly shows that a boat can have a long LWL and still be pretty.

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Gaastra. The ultimate in cool, brand advertising. Lots of cool boats too drool over too.

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Check out the gear on some of these yachts. Talk about 'no expense spared'. At 1:35 there's footage of a hand sewn, genuine leather, sheathed block. Holy crap. How the other half sail!

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Hey, cow skin is cheap, these block covers and other chaff protection are usually made up by bored crew, between varnishing and polishing, rigging and painting. And making covers for the covers. I guess my point is, there are very few jobs on these boats that require external experts with computers, autoclaves, a mass of unobtanium deck gear and cordage that comes with a use before date, and a skip full of haz mats following them around the world. Yes, it costs money to maintain these boats, but not as much as, say, an equivalent race boat or wally. Try making some spreader guards in cowskin some time, not difficult, very effective, and will cheer you up every time you arrive at the boat. Better for the soul than a roll of tape.

 

For comparison, look at the J's, all harkies and carbon, more expensive, and nothing left of the tactile experience of an early 20th century racer, more like spirit of tradition.

 

And, of course, it's all about chasing the rating, non original tech gets penalised, originality, in all respects, gets a benefit.

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Do the fenderhooks have an alarm to alert me while I'm wanking along under main only with the fenders hanging over the side?

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The present for the boat that has everything. Fenderhooks.

 

pic1_angle.jpg

 

 

Now that's a coincidence! I just went to Second Wave used boat bits in Seattle and bought these almost new ones for a friend in Sydney.

 

I got the pair for $330. Which,to him, was a bargain.

post-14496-0-89942200-1365537211_thumb.jpg

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The present for the boat that has everything. Fenderhooks.

 

pic1_angle.jpg

 

 

Now that's a coincidence! I just went to Second Wave used boat bits in Seattle and bought these almost new ones for a friend in Sydney.

 

I got the pair for $330. Which,to him, was a bargain.

So all of a sudden a Lee's or toe rail fender knot isn't good enough? Phfffft!

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The present for the boat that has everything. Fenderhooks.

 

pic1_angle.jpg

 

 

Now that's a coincidence! I just went to Second Wave used boat bits in Seattle and bought these almost new ones for a friend in Sydney.

 

I got the pair for $330. Which,to him, was a bargain.

 

So all of a sudden a Lee's or toe rail fender knot isn't good enough? Phfffft!

 

 

Well, it's presumed that the owner of such a vessel is much too busy to learn to tie knots.

 

FB- Doug

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The present for the boat that has everything. Fenderhooks.

 

pic1_angle.jpg

 

 

Now that's a coincidence! I just went to Second Wave used boat bits in Seattle and bought these almost new ones for a friend in Sydney.

 

I got the pair for $330. Which,to him, was a bargain.

 

So all of a sudden a Lee's or toe rail fender knot isn't good enough? Phfffft!

 

 

Well, it's presumed that the owner of such a vessel is much too busy to learn to tie knots.

 

FB- Doug

 

But knots aren't shearling lined... what's the good in that?

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Do not contact the guy from Fenderhooks. The guy has continuously spammed me to buy a set of these crazy things and has even asked to connect via linked in.

 

dude, I don't know you.

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The present for the boat that has everything. Fenderhooks.

 

pic1_angle.jpg

 

 

Now that's a coincidence! I just went to Second Wave used boat bits in Seattle and bought these almost new ones for a friend in Sydney.

 

I got the pair for $330. Which,to him, was a bargain.

 

So all of a sudden a Lee's or toe rail fender knot isn't good enough? Phfffft!

 

 

Well, it's presumed that the owner of such a vessel is much too busy to learn to tie knots.

 

FB- Doug

 

But knots aren't shearling lined... what's the good in that?

Wouldn't match the sheepskin cover on the armchairs on the flying bridge deck I guess. Fair enough. :)

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The present for the boat that has everything. Fenderhooks.

 

pic1_angle.jpg

 

 

Now that's a coincidence! I just went to Second Wave used boat bits in Seattle and bought these almost new ones for a friend in Sydney.

 

I got the pair for $330. Which,to him, was a bargain.

 

So all of a sudden a Lee's or toe rail fender knot isn't good enough? Phfffft!

 

 

Well, it's presumed that the owner of such a vessel is much too busy to learn to tie knots.

 

FB- Doug

You have to presume that the owner of such a vessel has somebody to tie knots for him

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friday-dopamine-dump-3.jpg?w=500&h=597

Let's hope he's unplugged! :rolleyes:

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I think he's steering wirth the whammy bar.

 

Just got my son's Larivee guitar back from the factory today. It had a split bridge. I gave him this axe about 15 years ago for Christmas. It's a very good guitar. I called the factory and they said send it on down. I did. Total cost of repair $50.

That doesn't include shipping which was $150 round trip. The Larivee people are good people and did a great job on the repair.

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Sailed by this beautiful driftwood yesterday - equal parts Stratovarius & salty cruiser. Very elegant boat. An ideal many would consider perfect.

 

DSC_5629.jpg

 

DSC_5628-1.jpg

That boats top on a bottom done like Nightrunner would be near perfect.

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Those are sweet, Ish. That blue one appears to me to have a big nose.

She does have a bit of a bob. (Not you, Bob).

 

r2.jpg

 

 

WHL will be along shortly to wax rhapsodic. ;)

 

Nice. Any idea where that anchorage is? Talk about the ideal set-up. Wow.

 

That is on the way out of my marina in Tsehum Harbour, just north of Sidney, BC. South end of Vancouver Island. Those boats were on a borrowed dock. You're right, it's a beautiful location. I'll see if I can pull up a decent Google Earth image of it.

R boats is correct.

Those "letter" boats are the only boats I've ever seen that I thought had too much bow overhang (from a strictly aesthetic point of view)

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I'm not keen on antiques except to look at. But I think I could enjoy that boat. How could you not? It's a sweetie.

I love the way the external chainplates totally destroy and hope of the sheerline being preserved.

Reminds me of a beautiful 20 year old with mutilple piercings in her face.

" could you please sit over there honey. You are throwing my compass off."

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When I was a kid my favorite powerboats were the Huckins Fairform Flyers. They looked like small PT boats.

They have some PT boats here: http://www.battleshipcove.com/index.asp Not much of an interior. Just big engines in a light shell.

What else do you need?

 

IIRC the "Fairform Flyer" hull either WAS the PT hull design for the boats Huckins built or was developed from it.

 

I once read a quote from a broker talking about a "yacht" conversion of a WW II PT - "Just another freak PT conversion, roll you sick on a wet lawn and you couldn't shoot gas out of a firehose as fast as she'd suck". Must have been fun on a sunny day with Uncle Sam paying the tab though.

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Sailby:

That is the ultimate in sailing cool.

 

I agree with you. But I'm 66 years old and I'm not sure I can handle that boat. I like to think I can. Maybe I can. I'm pretty certain I can.

 

But nobody is going to bring one to the beach for me to try out.

I'm pretty sure I could do that. That guy makes it look easy.

Ha, ha. I'm not far behind you at 62, Bob and I'm damned sure I can't handle a foiling month (as in flying gybes and tacks, especially). But I'd sure like to give it a go!. Here's a guy 'a bit closer to our ages' - so sure, why not, eh? Check out that one-hand style! He's just too cool as well. :)

Why am I suddenly thinking of unicycles on tightropes?

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Another little beauty that I fell for in Newport, R.I. - Downeast Peapod

post-15704-0-72466900-1365818934_thumb.jpg

post-15704-0-88158000-1365818945_thumb.jpg

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Those are sweet, Ish. That blue one appears to me to have a big nose.

She does have a bit of a bob. (Not you, Bob).

 

r2.jpg

 

 

WHL will be along shortly to wax rhapsodic. ;)

 

Nice. Any idea where that anchorage is? Talk about the ideal set-up. Wow.

 

That is on the way out of my marina in Tsehum Harbour, just north of Sidney, BC. South end of Vancouver Island. Those boats were on a borrowed dock. You're right, it's a beautiful location. I'll see if I can pull up a decent Google Earth image of it.

R boats is correct.

Those "letter" boats are the only boats I've ever seen that I thought had too much bow overhang (from a strictly aesthetic point of view)

I've had the thrill and honour of racing or sailing on three of the R boats - Lady Van, Aloha (the blue one) and ACE. Each is a stunning boat, beautifully restored, unique and lovingly cared for. A highlight for me was racing on Lady Van in the Classics race in Port Townsend (& winning the event). Sleek, fast and so exciting to sail on. :wub:

I can not help but think of the boat that Kim is building. I know that it will feel incredibly sleek, smooth and fast underway. Poetry, music and art in motion.

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John B:

Just keep quoting yacht brokers. That will do a lot for your credibility.

IIRC he was trying to talk someone out of buying it so I figured it was O/K. :rolleyes: I liked the firehose bit too - can you imagine trying to feed avgas to a couple of 12 cylinder Packards or Libertys at 40 knots? Yikes - People think they have big fuel bills in a 40 footer nowadays.

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Jon:: you are right.

Those engines would be devils today. But I try to appreciate those boats were what they were in their day.

Nothing is what it was.

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Kim:

I have that way with women.

."

Its true-- I have been to the farm store with Bob. Women swoon.

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post-21762-0-74606900-1365923828_thumb.jpg

 

Just kool, at anchor taking photos of the kids team sailing, with the mizzen sail up, to keep it stable.

 

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Kool, because I used to crew on this boat. Right time, right place. Owner now has some cool shots of him sailing it.

 

 

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From the Facebook Woodenboat porn feed.

 

554962_10152743322260603_1881784162_n.jp

 

Now I would have posted this in the uglyboat thread.

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From the Facebook Woodenboat porn feed.

 

554962_10152743322260603_1881784162_n.jp

 

Now I would have posted this in the uglyboat thread.

 

 

Why? THat's a great-looking little boat. Needs a sail or two, and that's not the color I would paint it; but it sure is shapely

 

ANd think how practical it is to be able to ram an enemy going in forward or reverse!

 

FB- Doug

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I'm with Steam on the canoe. I love it. Not sure how it works but I like the shape. Probably works just fine. I would be inclined to do a small cast bronze ramming head on the bow though. I have watched Ben Hur.

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Looks like the hole would be below the waterline where it could do some good too! ;)

 

 

I'm with Steam on the canoe. I love it. Not sure how it works but I like the shape. Probably works just fine. I would be inclined to do a small cast bronze ramming head on the bow though. I have watched Ben Hur.

 

You could really only sink other fabric canoes though.

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Tricky:

Wouldn't that depend on how fast you paddled?

 

I would paint an eye on the bow also.

momentum = mass x velocity.

 

So a heavy bloke paddling fast may sink a Laser (sorry... Torch).

 

The eye would certainly make it more menacing.

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Nothing cool about that 'vanilla pod' canoe. Maybe as a 'concept' to hang on a wall in a gallery - but as a serious water craft...no way. Definitely in the wrong thread, IMO.

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I thought it was cool because it's a canoe and yet it looks like you could paddle it solo without the wind blowing your bow every which way.

 

I almost got my father's really nice canoe blown into the dam down the creek one day. I was barely able to force the bow into the wind in time. I was considering letting the bow blow on downwind and getting away by paddling backwards. Shortly after that experience, I gave him his canoe back and took up kayaking. ;)

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It looks more like modern design than a canoe. That wave-piercing bow is going to be very wet in a chop.

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