Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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This is a relatively new design and construction by Gannon & Benjamin, on Martha's Vineyard. The simpllicity and elegance of this design really appealed to me... There's just something about it

Sweet.

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From the Facebook Woodenboat porn feed.

 

554962_10152743322260603_1881784162_n.jp

 

It's cool. Actually, pretty in a way. Odd, yes. That's why I like it.

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Anybody like this?

 

Fiberglass hull reinforced with Kevlar and Carbon-Fiber, PVC core, kevlar tanks, CF mast and bowsprit, CF rudder. Wooden Interior and deck. Visit www.astilleronos.cl

Hey, SthnX. Um...sort of, maybe.

 

My first question was, "why?". But then I see it's sort of traditional elements (wooden deck, house and much of the interior) rolled into hi-tech, composite construction.

 

Apparently, she's 34' LOA, with a beam of 10'. Displacement is only, 8,800lbs so she's very light. Which I guess was the object of the exercise and the answer to my question.

 

But I don't like her lines that much I have to say. And for the money spent, a much sweeter boat could have been produced, IMO.

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The dogs have more sheer spring than the boat.

I liked the dogs too, Bob! :D

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Anybody like this?

 

Fiberglass hull reinforced with Kevlar and Carbon-Fiber, PVC core, kevlar tanks, CF mast and bowsprit, CF rudder. Wooden Interior and deck. Visit www.astilleronos.cl

I kinda like it.

It reminds me of Popeye smokin' his pipe...

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http://morleycanoes.com/

 

These are made in Big Fork, Montana on the East side of Swan Lake. Morley has been making them by hand for over 50 years. Takes a long time to make one. He ships all over the world. There's a waiting list.

post-81201-0-62148900-1366752528_thumb.jpg

post-81201-0-61850100-1366752544_thumb.jpg

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Anybody like this?

Fiberglass hull reinforced with Kevlar and Carbon-Fiber, PVC core, kevlar tanks, CF mast and bowsprit, CF rudder. Wooden Interior and deck. Visit www.astilleronos.cl

I kinda like it.

It reminds me of Popeye smokin' his pipe...

I really liked this boat. But maybe I'm missing some things are not as apparent to me. I like the looks of the Channel Cutters and I have always thought it would be nice to have one built of lighter materials with a faster underbody losing the full keel. But that might be difficult to impossible to do when some the faster bottoms have such wide rears... Bob?

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Herreshoff Rocinante, one of the sweetest most magical boats ever. She would sail herself, I saw my old one "Rosemary" in Port Townsend looking amazing.

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I like the looks of the Channel Cutters and I have always thought it would be nice to have one built of lighter materials with a faster underbody losing the full keel. But that might be difficult to impossible to do when some the faster bottoms have such wide rears... Bob?

 

 

YMT! Paging YMT!

 

post-5724-0-61290000-1366808891_thumb.jpg

 

This is a wide-sterned boat, in a way. The deckline keeps the full width all the way to the transom.

 

post-5724-0-44054400-1366808998_thumb.jpg

 

More here: http://www.tantonyachts.com/images5.htm

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The Caledonia Yawl, maybe a bit small for this forum, but I always thought it would be fantastic to camp cruise in it...

 

planking019.jpg

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The Caledonia Yawl, maybe a bit small for this forum, but I always thought it would be fantastic to camp cruise in it...

 

Years ago, in the days of Gardner and Culler, I attended the Small Craft Workshop at Mystic. It was all steam-bent white oak frames and copper-riveted lapstrake planking. Much more recently, I went to one of the gatherings at the Chesapeake Bay Marine Museum and was interested to see how the center of gravity had changed to multi-chine, epoxy taped, plywood planking. The influence of Ian Oughtred on home building is not to be underestimated. The boats are pretty, and very light compared to the traditional construction.

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SemI:

I think I already did a modern Bristol Channel type with Night Runner and Tricky's boat is not far off either. I tried for the look but with modern hull forms. Both boats sail exceptionally well and they don't have ultra broad fannies.

 

I think to make ultra wide transoms work you need either a very light boat or a need to volume, i.e. the modern Euro production boats. They have wide sterns for volume anmd cockpit space.

I'm not too keen on that wide sterned YMT boat. Knowing YMT I'm sure it sails very well but the look doesn't suit my eye. But suiting me was most probably not in the design brief.

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A couple of things about the beam aft.

The 26' (8m) prototype was designed with trailerability in mind and therefore limited in the overall width of the boat to 8'-6"

The offshore version is 12' wider in maximum beam with no change to the original transom. (photo)

More can be seen on my blog under 936 and Kayitsiz.

post-32003-0-32227800-1366825492_thumb.jpg

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Side by side head stays, haven't seen that in a while.

 

A couple of things about the beam aft.

The 26' (8m) prototype was designed with trailerability in mind and therefore limited in the overall width of the boat to 8'-6"

The offshore version is 12' wider in maximum beam with no change to the original transom. (photo)

More can be seen on my blog under 936 and Kayitsiz.

attachicon.gifKayitsiz1.jpg

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The Caledonia Yawl, maybe a bit small for this forum, but I always thought it would be fantastic to camp cruise in it...

 

Years ago, in the days of Gardner and Culler, I attended the Small Craft Workshop at Mystic. It was all steam-bent white oak frames and copper-riveted lapstrake planking. Much more recently, I went to one of the gatherings at the Chesapeake Bay Marine Museum and was interested to see how the center of gravity had changed to multi-chine, epoxy taped, plywood planking. The influence of Ian Oughtred on home building is not to be underestimated. The boats are pretty, and very light compared to the traditional construction.

Hey, Semi. Ian has produced some great little boat designs. I bought a set of Acorn dinghy plans from him a while back, for a project after retirement. Not got around to that one yet, sadly - but I've just about worn out the plans already just looking at her lines and construction detail. There are lots of "How to build" books which have been published for Ian's design too, which are a great help to amateur builders (and dreamers!)

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Not exactly yachty, but, I think it's a cool old boat.

Didn't see much of the boat, AGITC, but I do have a dumb question:

 

Why shovel all those empty/dead oyster shells back over the side - only to pick them all up again on the next run? And the next....and the next....and the next....and the next...and the next? Or can I assume that they would have steamed away, off the beds BEFORE those shells went back over the side? :)

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A couple of things about the beam aft.

The 26' (8m) prototype was designed with trailerability in mind and therefore limited in the overall width of the boat to 8'-6"

The offshore version is 12' wider in maximum beam with no change to the original transom. (photo)

More can be seen on my blog under 936 and Kayitsiz.

attachicon.gifKayitsiz1.jpg

 

Wow. So the offshore version of the 26' boat has a beam of 20'6"?

 

Dayum. Talk about a flying saucer ;^)

 

Kayitsiz2-M.jpg

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A few on display in our local area

 

201211041462300.jpg

 

201211041472416.jpg

 

201211041477926.jpg

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Y-Bar

I thought you photoshopped the 3rd one. The term some obviously brilliant wordsmith coined was cugly, cute+ugly.

 

Actually, when I see a creation like that I honestly wish I could've been there for that 6-pack fueled "what if..." moment.

 

Cool boats.

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Maybe it's modular?

"Do I want the barge section or the racing aft? Maybe I'll put the waterman deck on."

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You can actually see the damaged solar panel still there on the pink lady

Bit of history on the other two

 

Second

Penguin

Penguin is a Torres Strait pearling lugger, built in 1907 on Thursday Island. Originally named Mercia, she was registered as a wooden ketch of 15 tons gross, 46.5ft (14.17m) in length and no engine. Owners were Hodels Limited of Thursday Island and she was used for pearl shell fishing.

She was requisitioned by the Australian Armed Forces during 1941 to 1942, but her utilization is unknown.

Sold when no longer required for service, Mercia returned to Thursday Island. At some time in the 1950's, she was lengthened and fitted with a diesel engine. It is believed that, at this time, she was employed in the collection of trochus shell.

The vessel was acquired by the Commonwealth Government and returned to standard pearling vessel rig. Placed with the Duaun Island Council, she was used as the island's service vessel. Apparently, about this time, the name changed from Mercia to Penguin. When it was decided that Penguin should be replaced by a more modern vessel in 1980, Commonwealth Government officers approached the Museum with an offer from the Duaun Island Council that Penguin be made available to the Queensland Maritime Museum, provided it was maintained permanently with its Duaun Island colours and number.

After several trips to Thursday Island by Association members, it was assessed that Penguin could not be sailed to Brisbane as the hull was in poor condition, taking on water, with an unreliable engine and the sails in poor condition. A plan to bring her to Brisbane on the John Burke, the vessel servicing the islands, had to be abandoned when a suitable cradle could not be located.

Association members then designed and built a suitable cradle, cables and lifting harness, which were transported, at no charge, to Thursday Island on the John Burke. A request to the Minister of Defence resulted in HMAS Tobruk, returning from the Suez area, being made available to bring Penguin to Brisbane. Then began a frantic and frustrating period, preparing Penguin for the arrival of Tobruk. These preparations were not helped by Penguin often sinking at her moorings! With perseverance, Penguin was ready when Tobruk arrived, was lifted aboard and was on her way to Brisbane.

Since arriving at the Queensland Maritime Museum in April, 1982, Penguin has been completely rebuilt and restored to her pearling days by members of the Association. To satisfy the wishes of the Duaun Island Council, she is painted in the colours and bears the number A61 and the white star in a black spot symbol of the Duaun Island. It is with pride that the Association is able to display Penguin, resting on the cradle the members built to transport her to Brisbane.

 

 

 

The third you will notice has a Canadian maple leaf for a window not photoshopped

Happy 11

 

One of the smallest boats to sail across the Pacific Ocean, Happy II was the second attempt by her owner, Howard Wayne Smith, to solo circumnavigate the world. After departing from the USA east coast, through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific, the first boat was wrecked on a reef off Noumea, New Caledonia. Undeterred, Smith built Happy II and continued on his circumnavigation, eventually making landfall near Ballina, New South Wales. However, Smith had arrived without a visa. Also, Australian Customs imposed a $2 000 bond on the boat to cover import duties. He had no money to pay the bond, but was given a tourist visa for 3 to 6 months, which allowed him to stay in Australia. Smith breached conditions of his visa, for which he faced the courts and was deported. Still unable to raise the bond on Happy II, he would have to forfeit her.

Smith approached the Queensland Maritime Museum with a view to the Museum buying the boat so he could pay the bond to Customs. The Museum declined, so Smith offered to donate it to the Museum. However, Customs would only release the boat when they received payment for the bond. The Museum declined again. Customs allowed Smith to return to Canada and retained the boat.

Just before Expo 88, Customs offered to give Happy II, which was now deteriorating in their store, to the Museum. The Association accepted the offer and Happy II became the property of the Museum. Restored by Museum volunteers, she is displayed in the grounds of the Museum.

Specifications Length (Overall) 13ft 10" (4.22m) Length (Waterline) 13ft 8" (4.17m) Beam 6ft 3" (1.91m) Draft 3ft 7" (1.09m) Displacement 2,240lbs (1,016kg) Sail Area 180sq ft (16.72sq m) Headroom 4ft 10.5" (1.49m)

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Not exactly yachty, but, I think it's a cool old boat.

Didn't see much of the boat, AGITC, but I do have a dumb question:

 

Why shovel all those empty/dead oyster shells back over the side - only to pick them all up again on the next run? And the next....and the next....and the next....and the next...and the next? Or can I assume that they would have steamed away, off the beds BEFORE those shells went back over the side? :)

 

The old shells are part of the food chain. If you take them out of the area you could destroy next seasons fishing.

 

Fucks me off when people only think about "getting fish now and fuck tomorrow".

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Not exactly yachty, but, I think it's a cool old boat.

Didn't see much of the boat, AGITC, but I do have a dumb question:

 

Why shovel all those empty/dead oyster shells back over the side - only to pick them all up again on the next run? And the next....and the next....and the next....and the next...and the next? Or can I assume that they would have steamed away, off the beds BEFORE those shells went back over the side? :)

 

The old shells are part of the food chain. If you take them out of the area you could destroy next seasons fishing.

 

Fucks me off when people only think about "getting fish now and fuck tomorrow".

Really? I'd have thought the NEW shells (shucked) would be part of the food chain. Do they get returned to the beds too? Only asking 'cause I don't know.

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Not exactly yachty, but, I think it's a cool old boat.

Didn't see much of the boat, AGITC, but I do have a dumb question:

 

Why shovel all those empty/dead oyster shells back over the side - only to pick them all up again on the next run? And the next....and the next....and the next....and the next...and the next? Or can I assume that they would have steamed away, off the beds BEFORE those shells went back over the side? :)

 

The old shells are part of the food chain. If you take them out of the area you could destroy next seasons fishing.

 

Fucks me off when people only think about "getting fish now and fuck tomorrow".

Really? I'd have thought the NEW shells (shucked) would be part of the food chain. Do they get returned to the beds too? Only asking 'cause I don't know.

 

Not here in NZ, For some reason that is considered disposing of rubbish.

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A few on display in our local area

 

....

 

201211041472416.jpg

 

...


 

 

 

 

 

Penguin

Penguin is a Torres Strait pearling lugger, built in 1907 on Thursday Island. Originally named Mercia, she was registered as a wooden ketch of 15 tons gross, 46.5ft (14.17m) in length and no engine. Owners were Hodels Limited of Thursday Island and she was used for pearl shell fishing.

She was requisitioned by the Australian Armed Forces during 1941 to 1942, but her utilization is unknown.

Sold when no longer required for service, Mercia returned to Thursday Island. At some time in the 1950's, she was lengthened and fitted with a diesel engine. It is believed that, at this time, she was employed in the collection of trochus shell.

The vessel was acquired by the Commonwealth Government and returned to standard pearling vessel rig. Placed with the Duaun Island Council, she was used as the island's service vessel. Apparently, about this time, the name changed from Mercia to Penguin. When it was decided that Penguin should be replaced by a more modern vessel in 1980, Commonwealth Government officers approached the Museum with an offer from the Duaun Island Council that Penguin be made available to the Queensland Maritime Museum, provided it was maintained permanently with its Duaun Island colours and number.

After several trips to Thursday Island by Association members, it was assessed that Penguin could not be sailed to Brisbane as the hull was in poor condition, taking on water, with an unreliable engine and the sails in poor condition. A plan to bring her to Brisbane on the John Burke, the vessel servicing the islands, had to be abandoned when a suitable cradle could not be located.

Association members then designed and built a suitable cradle, cables and lifting harness, which were transported, at no charge, to Thursday Island on the John Burke. A request to the Minister of Defence resulted in HMAS Tobruk, returning from the Suez area, being made available to bring Penguin to Brisbane. Then began a frantic and frustrating period, preparing Penguin for the arrival of Tobruk. These preparations were not helped by Penguin often sinking at her moorings! With perseverance, Penguin was ready when Tobruk arrived, was lifted aboard and was on her way to Brisbane.

Since arriving at the Queensland Maritime Museum in April, 1982, Penguin has been completely rebuilt and restored to her pearling days by members of the Association. To satisfy the wishes of the Duaun Island Council, she is painted in the colours and bears the number A61 and the white star in a black spot symbol of the Duaun Island. It is with pride that the Association is able to display Penguin, resting on the cradle the members built to transport her to Brisbane.

 

 

 

....

 

 

Trying to put the story with the pics.

 

Thanks for posting this Y-bar. They are all indeed cool boats. The Mercia/Penguin/A61 is a great looking boat, the hull is very nicely shaped. Was she originally rigged with lug sails, this pic looks more like what I would call a gaff ketch.

 

FB- Doug

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The arrow is to remind anyone seeing the boat which way it is going- you can't tell from the speed or motion or shape so it is useful for others.

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Not exactly yachty, but, I think it's a cool old boat.

Didn't see much of the boat, AGITC, but I do have a dumb question:

 

Why shovel all those empty/dead oyster shells back over the side - only to pick them all up again on the next run? And the next....and the next....and the next....and the next...and the next? Or can I assume that they would have steamed away, off the beds BEFORE those shells went back over the side? :)

 

The old shells are part of the food chain. If you take them out of the area you could destroy next seasons fishing.

 

Fucks me off when people only think about "getting fish now and fuck tomorrow".

Really? I'd have thought the NEW shells (shucked) would be part of the food chain. Do they get returned to the beds too? Only asking 'cause I don't know.

The oyster spat (young oysters) need a bed of something solid to affix themselves to - the "dead" shells are shoveled back over to protect the oyster reefs that provide that breeding ground. For a good primer - I'll offer this link: http://www.cbf.org/oysters

 

The boat in the video is the Martha Lewis, she's one of the last 3 skipjacks built in Wingate, MD. The others that were built right alongside her are the Lady Katie and the Rosie Parks. The Rosie Parks is almost finished w/a 3 year restoration at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime museum, and will be relaunched at the Oyster Festival on the first weekend in November of this year. The Lady Katie is still privately owned, and working out of Cambridge, MD.

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Not exactly yachty, but, I think it's a cool old boat.

Didn't see much of the boat, AGITC, but I do have a dumb question:

 

Why shovel all those empty/dead oyster shells back over the side - only to pick them all up again on the next run? And the next....and the next....and the next....and the next...and the next? Or can I assume that they would have steamed away, off the beds BEFORE those shells went back over the side? :)

 

The old shells are part of the food chain. If you take them out of the area you could destroy next seasons fishing.

 

Fucks me off when people only think about "getting fish now and fuck tomorrow".

Really? I'd have thought the NEW shells (shucked) would be part of the food chain. Do they get returned to the beds too? Only asking 'cause I don't know.

The oyster spat (young oysters) need a bed of something solid to affix themselves to - the "dead" shells are shoveled back over to protect the oyster reefs that provide that breeding ground. For a good primer - I'll offer this link: http://www.cbf.org/oysters

 

The boat in the video is the Martha Lewis, she's one of the last 3 skipjacks built in Wingate, MD. The others that were built right alongside her are the Lady Katie and the Rosie Parks. The Rosie Parks is almost finished w/a 3 year restoration at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime museum, and will be relaunched at the Oyster Festival on the first weekend in November of this year. The Lady Katie is still privately owned, and working out of Cambridge, MD.

Thanks, AGITC. Very interesting and good to see.

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It's a Canadian boat!

It;s very weird but I have a hard time not liking it.

It's kind of like he had this idea and started welding at the bow, got back a few feet and ran out of money. "OK. that's good. We'll just stop'er there."

Maybe the guy spent his life around seine skiffs and log dozers.

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When I was growing up in Tacoma, Mike Vlahovich lived a block away. He became a fisherman and a boat builder/restorer and ended up restoring some of the skipjacks on the Chesapeake. Here's a video of one of the restorations:

 

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Alden's Malabars always looked amazing, but in my opinion, II was his most beautiful design. Here's a GORGEOUS print by Kathy Bray. I gave this to my girlfriend for a graduation gift... Now she's my fiance :)

 

malabar2_enlarge.gif

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I labeled this as an Alden, but I'm not sure now if I knew that or was just guessing. It's Noank, CT, at the mouth of the Mystic River. At the time, the Seaport sponsored schooner races in the fall. This particular year, it was cold, foggy, and a little rainy.

 

post-5724-0-12083700-1366934060_thumb.jpg

 

It wouldn't be half as interesting a picture if the topsail was white.

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I labeled this as an Alden, but I'm not sure now if I knew that or was just guessing. It's Noank, CT, at the mouth of the Mystic River. At the time, the Seaport sponsored schooner races in the fall. This particular year, it was cold, foggy, and a little rainy.

 

attachicon.gifalden2_rev.jpg

 

It wouldn't be half as interesting a picture if the topsail was white.

Nice. That's one massive driver too, Semi. When boats were working, I guess that provided more than enough grunt for them when hauling dredges?

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I labeled this as an Alden, but I'm not sure now if I knew that or was just guessing. It's Noank, CT, at the mouth of the Mystic River. At the time, the Seaport sponsored schooner races in the fall. This particular year, it was cold, foggy, and a little rainy.

 

attachicon.gifalden2_rev.jpg

 

It wouldn't be half as interesting a picture if the topsail was white.

Looks like a Murray Peterson Coaster, rather then an Alden.

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Alden's Malabars always looked amazing, but in my opinion, II was his most beautiful design. Here's a GORGEOUS print by Kathy Bray. I gave this to my girlfriend for a graduation gift... Now she's my fiance :)

 

malabar2_enlarge.gif

Always liked the first three versions of the Malabars. The first version had two houses, vs the continuous trunk of versions ll & lll.

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I labeled this as an Alden, but I'm not sure now if I knew that or was just guessing. It's Noank, CT, at the mouth of the Mystic River. At the time, the Seaport sponsored schooner races in the fall. This particular year, it was cold, foggy, and a little rainy.

 

attachicon.gifalden2_rev.jpg

 

It wouldn't be half as interesting a picture if the topsail was white.

Looks like a Murray Peterson Coaster, rather then an Alden.

 

+1 http://books.google.com/books?id=uhIFOOW4V9sC&pg=PA75&lpg=PA75&dq=murray+peterson+coaster&source=bl&ots=AOldJ1W5JT&sig=kEr3wM1SSUX1scWbqgkEVyyww20&hl=en&sa=X&ei=9Nd5Ud_8CdS34AOX1oDABQ&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=murray%20peterson%20coaster&f=false

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It's a Canadian boat!

It;s very weird but I have a hard time not liking it.

It's kind of like he had this idea and started welding at the bow, got back a few feet and ran out of money. "OK. that's good. We'll just stop'er there."

Maybe the guy spent his life around seine skiffs and log dozers.

...and then said, hey I'll sail around the world on the money in my ash tray and couch.

 

Admire that mans dream!

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When I was growing up in Tacoma, Mike Vlahovich lived a block away. He became a fisherman and a boat builder/restorer and ended up restoring some of the skipjacks on the Chesapeake. Here's a video of one of the restorations:

 

 

Thanks for the link, Jose!

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Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

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Looking through Craigslist for the ad-mock thread, I saw a couple pretty cool boats. I like this one especially.

 

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/boa/3712256840.html

 

3Ke3M43N45Gd5K25H2d4q3a686db923741a9e.jp

 

The designer is said to be John Lindsey. Was he the designer of a much-admired round-stern tender?

That's a sweet looking cat boat.

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Come on B. You forgot to tell them we blew the doors off the Cape George. By the time the Cape George finished we had all the sails furled and were drinking beer and telling funny stories about your composting head.

 

Semi:

No. If you mean the Bartender DE skiffs, then no. Those were designed by George Calkins.

I also find that DE catboat a very handsome craft.

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Yeah, but I didn't want to brag, Bob. I think it had something to do with the new sails, your driving and Tricky's trimming.

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Good point, Bob. Good point.

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Semi:

No. If you mean the Bartender DE skiffs, then no. Those were designed by George Calkins.

I also find that DE catboat a very handsome craft.

 

No, yacht tender as in 8 ft rowboat.

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Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

 

I can't make out what kind of boat Brigadoon is...

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Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

 

Try to get the original, full resolution picture from the photographer. Then you've got a better chance of enlarging and cropping without the picture going to pixels.

 

Obviously, Brigadoon is a mythical Scottish boat that only appears every 100 years.

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Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

 

Try to get the original, full resolution picture from the photographer. Then you've got a better chance of enlarging and cropping without the picture going to pixels.

 

Obviously, Brigadoon is a mythical Scottish boat that only appears every 100 years.

well that's gonna make it hard to get a better picture now isn't it...

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Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

I can't make out what kind of boat Brigadoon is...

Bob Perry designed, Ta Shing built, 1980 Baba 35 (Flying Dutchman) Pilot House Cutter.

 

IMG_6052.JPG

 

 

 

Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

Try to get the original, full resolution picture from the photographer. Then you've got a better chance of enlarging and cropping without the picture going to pixels.

 

Obviously, Brigadoon is a mythical Scottish boat that only appears every 100 years.

I did try to get the original. The photographer who took them, uploaded them to Picasa, then deleted the originals from his camera. For these shots, this is all I have.

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Thanks for Red Herring- definitely a way cool boat- here is what Steve Clark said about her in her own thread-

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=138593

 

Red Herring is my boat!

She was built in 1980 by Goetz Custom (Hull 22) and was the last "solid wood" boat they built.
She is cold mold cedar on stringers and frames.
The keel can be canted and lifted, but not at the same time.
She is 55'long, 8'3" wide and weighs 9500 lbs.
Those of you keeping score at home will recognize that this gives her a displacement length ratio of about 27, which isn't just light, it's super fucking light.
She draws 9' with the keel down and 6' with it pulled up.
We leave it down most of the time.
The keel can be canted 35 degrees, this is done with hydraulics driven by an electric pump with two huge gel cell bater8es. We can sail for just over 24 hours before recharging.
Fastest we have ever gone is 20 knots. It was 0DARK30 during a Solo/Twin when Lars said "Too bad we can't do this when it's light." I replied," If we could see, we would be too frightened and would stop."

Red Herring was designed by David Hubbard. The concept was all Van Alan Clark Jr. He got the germ of the idea from L. Francis Herreshoff's "sailing machine" in the Common Sense of yacht design, but quickly identified the flaws in Herreshoff's proposal and identified a way to address it. As Dave succinctly put it: to segregate the righting moment and lateral resistance functions of the keel into two appendages. Thus she has a strut with ballast on it to keep her upright and a daggerboard to keep her from sliding sideways.

When I was a kid, Dad and I talked about boats all the time. When you have a number of kids ( I'm #4 of 6) you have special things you share with each kid. I was Dad's "boat kid." He drew on the back of paper place mats at Howard Johnson's when we were stopping for a hot dog. As often as not, it as something that would eventually turn into Red Herring. When I brought home my first International Canoe, he went for a short sail and said "That's it. I'm building the skinny boat."

As originally launched she was a cat ketch with rotating masts and fully battened sails. She had two two centerboards a keel and a rudder. Keel canting was done by winches attached to massive 6:1 block and tackles, and she really didn't work so well. Unfortunately my dad died in 1983 so he never really got to do much in terms of refining the concept. We knew it worked, but really didn't know how well. After Dad died, Dave had her for a few years, and I took possession sometime around 1988. I have been nibbling away at it ever since.
I redesigned the sail plan. Moved the main aft 30" to bring jibs aboard, and a mast head asymmetrical. After a very loud and expensive noise, had GMT make some very nice light carbon masts to replace the heavy aluminum rotating spars.
Next I decided the centerboards were too small, and so installed a deep canard daggerboard. The keel was originally a wood/ composite blade with a fairly low aspect ratio bulb, when I decided I didn't trust it anymore, I had Duncan MacLane and Paul Bogatai design a good one that was machined out of steel with a modern looking bulb. Finally this year, the rudder was upgraded from something that looked OK in the 1970s to a deeper hotter shit blade with a carbon [post that weighs about 1/2 of what the old blade did.
On board accommodation has never been a big feature of the Red Herring experience. Her cross section is a bit smaller than a
J24, so that's about what you get, stretched out a bit. There is a head with a door, but if you are my size, it's a challenge to wipe with the door closed. On the other hand, there is a stove with an oven, which makes hot coffee cake and danishes possible, which is about as civilized as it gets. You cannot stand up in the saloon except in the hatch. There is a nice aft berth under the mizzen, but you can't sit up anywhere except under the hatch. Ezra Smith and I designed some sea hoods this year to make her a bit more habitable in the rain and Blizo and the team at Aquidneck Custom did a wonderful job of fabricating them as well as the new coamings that make it all work as part of our 30 year refit.

On Friday she was sliding along very nicely until the jib blew up. Which means that sailed most of the long beat with the Spandex 130. Not really a jib that goes upwind very well, being too big for the breeze and too stretchy and impossible to sheet in all the way because of the cap shrouds. But what the hell, there are lots worse ways to spend TGIF time.
Red Herring is more of a reaching monster than an upwind device. Usually 40' sloops kick us around uphill, but we get them back the second we can start the sheets a bit. If the wind goes further aft, and we have to really run square, we get crushed again. The only races that are any fun on this boat are ones where there are opportunities for odd angles that modern racing sloops aren't optimal for. Herring has a PHRF rating of -3. On balance I would say that is fair, Once I do the next round of sails, it will probably be lower. I don't really care, the only reason to have a rating is so I can see if any of the changes we make are making the boat faster or slower, and the only way to do that is to race it now and then.

So yeah, she was way ahead of her time, but has been eclipsed by the modern canting keel boats. On the other hand, Dad thought this was the better formula for sailboats, and the performance of the Volvo 70s and others simply confirms that he sure was right about that. Sailing her is one way I remember my old man.
SHC

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Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

I can't make out what kind of boat Brigadoon is...

Bob Perry designed, Ta Shing built, 1980 Baba 35 (Flying Dutchman) Pilot House Cutter.

 

IMG_6052.JPG

 

>

 

Not presuming that Brigadoon belongs here but, that Cape George Cutter reminded me that I need to get a picture of her like that.

 

The closest I have is this, taken at Race Your House, where we beat into 25+ knots, at pretty much right around 7kts+ to the finish line.

 

100_3591.JPG

 

I really have to get a closer shot of her doing this.

Try to get the original, full resolution picture from the photographer. Then you've got a better chance of enlarging and cropping without the picture going to pixels.

 

Obviously, Brigadoon is a mythical Scottish boat that only appears every 100 years.

I did try to get the original. The photographer who took them, uploaded them to Picasa, then deleted the originals from his camera. For these shots, this is all I have.

 

 

And the one you posted, I cropped and straitened, and is still on my computer!

 

post-21762-0-34209100-1367063532_thumb.jpg

 

I do love that shot.

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Thanks for the additional pictures of Red Herring one of my all time favorite vessels, a couple of those shots were new to me, so I appreciate seeing them, thanks.

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Thanks for the additional pictures of Red Herring one of my all time favorite vessels, a couple of those shots were new to me, so I appreciate seeing them, thanks.

I guess comparisons are inevitable, Kimb. But I have to say it - Sliver looks even sweeter. In Red Herring's line drawing, there's a couple of additional appendages shown. Are these dagger boards?

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I paid a lot of attention To RED HERRING's paint job when I laid out the paint scheme for the SLIVER.

I hope we can come close to that simple elegance.

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I paid a lot of attention To RED HERRING's paint job when I laid out the paint scheme for the SLIVER.

I hope we can come close to that simple elegance.

If that 3D computer graphic is accurate (in terms of paint scheme) Bob, you've achieved that objective too. She reminds me of a top line, Audi saloon car - understated, stuffed full of technology, design and build excellence and quick with it.

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Thanks a lot Sailby. I have considered the Audis to be the best looking cars for some time. Wish I could afford a nice big one.

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Thanks for the additional pictures of Red Herring one of my all time favorite vessels, a couple of those shots were new to me, so I appreciate seeing them, thanks.

I guess comparisons are inevitable, Kimb. But I have to say it - Sliver looks even sweeter. In Red Herring's line drawing, there's a couple of additional appendages shown. Are these dagger boards?

I really like the Red Herring but I expect the Sliver to be a better boat in many ways. But given that RH was one of my inspirations for the project one would hope we could stand on their shoulders and improve on the concept. I believe Bob has done so.

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Thanks for the additional pictures of Red Herring one of my all time favorite vessels, a couple of those shots were new to me, so I appreciate seeing them, thanks.

I guess comparisons are inevitable, Kimb. But I have to say it - Sliver looks even sweeter. In Red Herring's line drawing, there's a couple of additional appendages shown. Are these dagger boards?

I really like the Red Herring but I expect the Sliver to be a better boat in many ways. But given that RH was one of my inspirations for the project one would hope we could stand on their shoulders and improve on the concept. I believe Bob has done so.

+ 20 knots?

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Thanks for the additional pictures of Red Herring one of my all time favorite vessels, a couple of those shots were new to me, so I appreciate seeing them, thanks.

I guess comparisons are inevitable, Kimb. But I have to say it - Sliver looks even sweeter. In Red Herring's line drawing, there's a couple of additional appendages shown. Are these dagger boards?

The Red Herring thread has all the details. They are daggerboards as the keel cants. Originally Van Allen Clark wanted dual canting boards but was talked out of it- go figure.

 

The whole sequence from LF Herreshoff's concept through Arion, Sidney Herreshoff's design, Fiery Cross- the NZ boat actually built with the screw type canting keel and on to Sliver is a great one.

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Thanks for the additional pictures of Red Herring one of my all time favorite vessels, a couple of those shots were new to me, so I appreciate seeing them, thanks.

I guess comparisons are inevitable, Kimb. But I have to say it - Sliver looks even sweeter. In Red Herring's line drawing, there's a couple of additional appendages shown. Are these dagger boards?

I really like the Red Herring but I expect the Sliver to be a better boat in many ways. But given that RH was one of my inspirations for the project one would hope we could stand on their shoulders and improve on the concept. I believe Bob has done so.

+ 20 knots?

 

I don't think that's one of the ways Kim is talking about, but...

 

Her cross section is a bit smaller than a J24, so that's about what you get, stretched out a bit.

 

That probably isn't either!

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^

I guess it was a little rude only asking about speed for such a delicate, refined & elegant design like Sliver; like asking a nobel lady about her age?

 

Coolboat 30m2 KAA

 

 

 

 

 

 

post-50708-0-86263300-1367166864_thumb.jpg

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post-50708-0-19365900-1367166937_thumb.jpg

post-50708-0-12698800-1367166960_thumb.jpg

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I think Kim or Bob posted projected polars for the Sliver over in that thread. It will be fast for a monohull. ;)

 

Those are nice pics. That's some overlap on the genoa.

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Thanks Tom, I'll search for the polars although I'm not very worried Sliver won't be fast.

Instead of posting more pictures of those beauties some links.

 

30m2:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/30-m2-sk%C3%A4rg%C3%A5rdskryssare/140439956019762

 

HSS:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/HSS-Classic-Yacht-Committee/125970234086680

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Ooooo, I'd like to be aboard for one of those 14-knot reaches. That would be fun.

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Here you go.

Thank you Bob, really appreciated.

Let me tell you... wait, let me go to the Sliver thread.

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Very long time ago I owned an even smaller one, no cabin, length must have been around 13 ft.

They are called Midget Oostzeejol here and go up to 31 ft.

post-50708-0-36103600-1367591259_thumb.jpg

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Beyond cool

 

Stiletto. Kim Holman design, Whisstocks built. c. 1964. "Standing headroom for a bottle of gin".

 

Really, as good as it gets.

 

 

post-38-0-48643300-1368008558_thumb.jpg

post-38-0-47079900-1368008583_thumb.jpg

post-38-0-44158000-1368008750_thumb.jpg

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