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Coolboats to admire

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Not a sailboat but you got to admire this design. Think how cool it would be on Lake Union.

 

escargot3.jpg

The 18’6″ x 6′ Escargot is a pedal-powered boat designed by Phil Thiel. I absolutely love the idea of this small, easy-to-build shanty boat as a house.

escargot.jpg

The minimalist design is beautifully simple. Functionally somewhere between a motor-driven cruiser boat and a kayak or canoe — it’s perfect for eco-tourism rentals and slow houseboaters alike.

escargot_pedals.jpg

The boat is aptly named due to the fact that it only goes 3-4 miles per hour at a pedaling rate of 50rpm.

escargot_inside.jpg

91-year-old naval architect Phil Thiel, born in Brooklyn, now in Seattle has created human-powered boats since his teenage years. According to Wooden Boat magazine, he has only driven a car twice in his lifetime. He sells fully detailed plans for $150 by mail.

escargot_layout1.gif

Photo credit: gruene-flotte.de

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That is really cool. I can think of a lot of places where a boat like this would be fabulous... networks of creeks & ponds with little current, canals, the uplands feeders for reservoirs where there no combustion motors are allowed...

 

And you could trailer it easily too

 

FB- Doug

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Pedaling that thing into any wind must be a workout!

 

Why are you always in such a hurry?

 

FB- Doug

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You got to admire this!

 

boatkitchen.jpg

 

Apparently it is a rolling food van!

Just as well it says 'EAT LOCAL". I doubt it would make it out of the hood. Saves 'food miles' I guess. :)

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You got to admire this!

 

boatkitchen.jpg

 

Apparently it is a rolling food van!

Guess they got mixed up restoring one of these. :)

post-50708-0-18961300-1368444439_thumb.jpg

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I like how they cut into the hull for the tires. They were really committed to making this a going concern. No turning back after they cut those slices out of the hull sides for something like mere wheels.

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You got to admire this!

 

boatkitchen.jpg

 

Apparently it is a rolling food van!

 

I am in awe. Did you personally take this photo?

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Pedaling that thing into any wind must be a workout!

Going to windward is a vanity!

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Pedaling that thing into any wind must be a workout!

Going to windward is a vanity!

 

I wonder if it could sail, for some value of "sail".

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Pedaling that thing into any wind must be a workout!

Going to windward is a vanity!

 

I wonder if it could sail, for some value of "sail".

There have been a fair number of Escargots built. Most have a 5hp outboard in place of the Sea-Cycle units. A new outboard is also cheaper than the human powered alternative. I'd love to have one as a marina cruiser, meaning that it never leaves the marina. Looks like a cozy place to hang out.

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Pedaling that thing into any wind must be a workout!

Going to windward is a vanity!

 

I wonder if it could sail, for some value of "sail".

 

Yes, in the same sense that I have "sailed" a 15 Whaler using the Bimini top as a square rig, but you should probably stop this inquiry right there. Down that path lies a mast on a motorboat.

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You got to admire this!

 

boatkitchen.jpg

 

Apparently it is a rolling food van!

 

I think the beer keg is structural.

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That is cool on so many levels!

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Any idea if the boat is a permanent part of the trailer or does it detach and is still useable as a boat? If so, I'd say that the cool factor has gone up a level or two ;)

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That is soooo cool. Only problem I can see is that the boat is the roof, meaning you won't want to be caught at sea when it rains.

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Yep...but probably one of the most unique cool boats in this thread.

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You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

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You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

If that is the extent of your taste, a LONG swim back to port would be a great idea.

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You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

 

Are you referring the red gaff sloop?

 

It looks to me like a Herreshoff Eagle. See: http://www.herreshoffeagle.com/ It's an adaptation of the Herreshoff America Catboat. In the past, I've seen the design attributed to a local Cape Cod boatbuilder whose name I've forgotten. (Hale?) Maybe he did the adaptation from the catboat. It's certainly no uglier nor sillier than the 100-year-old gaff sloops that some English sailors are so proud of.

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I've been involved with classic boats here for years , typically circa 1900 or so. But sometimes a cool boat isn't so much 'classic' good looking, but its about what its done.

This Birdsall cruiser from 1975, Contour, has grown four families worth of sailers and still doing it. Its been around the world, red sea, Med ,Canal du Midi, Panama, Pacific islands. Just a modest boat sitting at a berth in westhaven , but its capable and been so many places.

 

IMG_5286_4.jpg

 

Some of the classic fleet here,

Thelma 1898, some of you guys will know of her from hawaii or San Francisco( I think ( might have been san Diego?)

 

IMG_1456_7.jpg

 

Crewed on Rawhiti last season, first season after her big restoration. 54 ft Logan 1905.

 

IMG_0474_2.jpg

 

IMG_0142_15.jpg

 

another 1900 and something Logan ,Wairiki, much smaller at about 35 ft or so. My boy , one of those kids in the rigging on Contour just did last season on her.

 

IMG_7737_4.jpg

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I thought that was a gussied-up Herreshoff America....was wondering why it was on Woodenboat. They are usually pretty picky about the "no-fiberglass hulls" rule.

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Even WB can make a mistake. Probably whomever is keeping it up is too young to know and recognize the Herreshoff Eagle and , you know, like, made an Ass- ump - Shun. They need us old guys around to keep 'em straight!

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You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

 

 

Have to agree with Autograph. To my eye, that just looks...disjointed. Bit of a cacophony. No flow. IMHO, clipper bows rarely work on boats below 50', as to really look good, they need very low freeboard. This is one of the few exceptions. Peggy Bawn , by G L Watson. 23' waterline, 36' hull, 42' sparred length. Freeboard of x feet, where x = damp.

 

02Portbeam.jpg

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You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

 

Have to agree with Autograph. To my eye, that just looks...disjointed. Bit of a cacophony. No flow. IMHO, clipper bows rarely work on boats below 50', as to really look good, they need very low freeboard. This is one of the few exceptions. Peggy Bawn , by G L Watson. 23' waterline, 36' hull, 42' sparred length. Freeboard of x feet, where x = damp.

 

 

Just take off all the pretentious shit and you have a nice little sailboat.

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You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

Auto, don't come looking here for the circle that never ends.

 

What do you think the white dot in the black portion and black dot in the white portion of the yin yang symbol are about?

 

The answer may be found in one of your neighboring countries, or come to think of it maybe a little Americana can illuminate your insectitis(grasshopper). Google Kwai Chang Caine

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Have to agree with Autograph. To my eye, that just looks...disjointed. Bit of a cacophony. No flow. IMHO, clipper bows rarely work on boats below 50', as to really look good, they need very low freeboard.

 

I pretty much agree that the "clipper" bow is an affectation and the sloop-rigged Marshall catboats look better without it. Charles Wittholz called that a Noank Sloop. But that doesn't make the Eagle an abomination. I'm too poor to suffer the "that $10,000 boat stinks, get this $100,000 boat" syndrome.

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Another cool boat to admire!

 

CA0810-96382_1.jpg

 

 

cecbd5d20252f481b9fd234e090ab875.jpg

Not so cool but similar idea

post-81201-0-04483600-1368806482_thumb.jpg

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This is moored at the Bell Harbor marina. It's been there all year. It looks...capable.

 

20130517_131001.png

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I'vealways had a thing for the Sprinta Sport, a sweet little IOR 22' racer form the 70s and early 80s. They still have a strong class association in Europe. We have one a our club and it just looks good to my eye everytime I see it. (even with the mast in the water when broaching)

 

9099_2.jpgdehler-sprinta-sport-id61632-59768030111

 

A friend of mine owned one, it was supposed to be a fast little boat but I regularly outsailed it with my Shark, in any wind condition. It had an interesting interior if you liked to lie down while sitting.

 

I think the Sprinta Sport was a quarter tonner and comes up to around 24' or so. Might be the same guy Ish as he lived on the island for awhile. The boat was called "Magic Mushroom" and sailed with him quiet a bit on that boat; and others.

 

We tied up cruising on the log booms in Gambier and decided to go below, partake in some BC herbology and get silly. The girls were on my boat having a cocktail and they realized they hadn't seen us for over an hour and very quiet so they boarded. We were doing shadow puppets against the bulkhead with the chart light.

 

We had amused ourselves for quiet some time! :lol:

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I'vealways had a thing for the Sprinta Sport, a sweet little IOR 22' racer form the 70s and early 80s. They still have a strong class association in Europe. We have one a our club and it just looks good to my eye everytime I see it. (even with the mast in the water when broaching)

 

9099_2.jpgdehler-sprinta-sport-id61632-59768030111

 

A friend of mine owned one, it was supposed to be a fast little boat but I regularly outsailed it with my Shark, in any wind condition. It had an interesting interior if you liked to lie down while sitting.

 

I think the Sprinta Sport was a quarter tonner and comes up to around 24' or so. Might be the same guy Ish as he lived on the island for awhile. The boat was called "Magic Mushroom" and sailed with him quiet a bit on that boat; and others.

 

We tied up cruising on the log booms in Gambier and decided to go below, partake in some BC herbology and get silly. The girls were on my boat having a cocktail and they realized they hadn't seen us for over an hour and very quiet so they boarded. We were doing shadow puppets against the bulkhead with the chart light.

 

We had amused ourselves for quiet some time! :lol:

 

 

This was long ago and far away in Saskatchewan, on Lake Diefenbaker. The winds were usually steady and the water flat. I would lash the tiller on Mizrab, my Shark, he would come up astern and I would step onto Tree Toad. We would have a beverage and a Jamaican salad, then we would sail back up to Miz and I would get back on. The boats were well matched for that. I have pictures somewhere...

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This is moored at the Bell Harbor marina. It's been there all year. It looks...capable.

 

20130517_131001.png

Nice, very nice....clean, simple, sturdy. I like it a lot.

Like you say BJ; capable.

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Pretty ain't necessarily cool.

And cool ain't necessarily pretty.

There will be edginess, tension and conflict in the thread. It just hasn't gotten there yet.

But, just to stir the pot....

I'd be all over one of these cool ugly bastards if i could find one for shortish money:

I think a dual station flying bridge sail trawler makes a whole lot of sense.

fales_boat.jpg

 

 

Handsome boat but IMHO a "sail trawler" only makes sense if you enjoy buying both rigging -and- fuel, coping with the snarl of wires & ropes in your way for the sake of a boat that cannot make ground to windward, buying fuel, have to wait for bridges, reduced stability is worth a lot too, oh and buying fuel.

 

Good sailboats don't need a motor. Good motorboats are ruined by having a mast & sails put on them.

 

I wouldn't call Phil Bolger's RESOLUTION an exception

 

Resoutions.jpg

 

but it bends enough rules to be considered a special case.

 

FB- Doug

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This is moored at the Bell Harbor marina. It's been there all year. It looks...capable.

 

20130517_131001.png

 

That boat's been there for quite a number of years. I was working on another boat at Bell Harbor a couple of years ago. At the time, that boat had a multi-generational family living aboard -- there had to be at least 7 people living on it, between grandmother, parents, and kids.

 

One of the daughters was kind of hot. But she never said hi to me.

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I'vealways had a thing for the Sprinta Sport, a sweet little IOR 22' racer form the 70s and early 80s. They still have a strong class association in Europe. We have one a our club and it just looks good to my eye everytime I see it. (even with the mast in the water when broaching)

 

9099_2.jpgdehler-sprinta-sport-id61632-59768030111

 

A friend of mine owned one, it was supposed to be a fast little boat but I regularly outsailed it with my Shark, in any wind condition. It had an interesting interior if you liked to lie down while sitting.

 

I think the Sprinta Sport was a quarter tonner and comes up to around 24' or so. Might be the same guy Ish as he lived on the island for awhile. The boat was called "Magic Mushroom" and sailed with him quiet a bit on that boat; and others.

 

We tied up cruising on the log booms in Gambier and decided to go below, partake in some BC herbology and get silly. The girls were on my boat having a cocktail and they realized they hadn't seen us for over an hour and very quiet so they boarded. We were doing shadow puppets against the bulkhead with the chart light.

 

We had amused ourselves for quiet some time! :lol:

 

 

This was long ago and far away in Saskatchewan, on Lake Diefenbaker. The winds were usually steady and the water flat. I would lash the tiller on Mizrab, my Shark, he would come up astern and I would step onto Tree Toad. We would have a beverage and a Jamaican salad, then we would sail back up to Miz and I would get back on. The boats were well matched for that. I have pictures somewhere...

Do they do shadow puppets in Dief lake too? Just curious.

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I'vealways had a thing for the Sprinta Sport, a sweet little IOR 22' racer form the 70s and early 80s. They still have a strong class association in Europe. We have one a our club and it just looks good to my eye everytime I see it. (even with the mast in the water when broaching)

 

9099_2.jpg

I think the Sprinta Sport was a quarter tonner and comes up to around 24' or so. Might be the same guy Ish as he lived on the island for awhile. The boat was called "Magic Mushroom" and sailed with him quiet a bit on that boat; and others.

 

We tied up cruising on the log booms in Gambier and decided to go below, partake in some BC herbology and get silly. The girls were on my boat having a cocktail and they realized they hadn't seen us for over an hour and very quiet so they boarded. We were doing shadow puppets against the bulkhead with the chart light.

 

We had amused ourselves for quiet some time! :lol:

 

 

This was long ago and far away in Saskatchewan, on Lake Diefenbaker. The winds were usually steady and the water flat. I would lash the tiller on Mizrab, my Shark, he would come up astern and I would step onto Tree Toad. We would have a beverage and a Jamaican salad, then we would sail back up to Miz and I would get back on. The boats were well matched for that. I have pictures somewhere...

Do they do shadow puppets in Dief lake too? Just curious.

 

Oh yeah. On a calm moonless night you can project them onto the grain elevators.

 

It's weird sailing along right next to a combine, one of many such interesting things there. .

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Pretty ain't necessarily cool.

And cool ain't necessarily pretty.

There will be edginess, tension and conflict in the thread. It just hasn't gotten there yet.

But, just to stir the pot....

I'd be all over one of these cool ugly bastards if i could find one for shortish money:

I think a dual station flying bridge sail trawler makes a whole lot of sense.

fales_boat.jpg

 

 

Handsome boat but IMHO a "sail trawler" only makes sense if you enjoy buying both rigging -and- fuel, coping with the snarl of wires & ropes in your way for the sake of a boat that cannot make ground to windward, buying fuel, have to wait for bridges, reduced stability is worth a lot too, oh and buying fuel.

 

Good sailboats don't need a motor. Good motorboats are ruined by having a mast & sails put on them.

 

I wouldn't call Phil Bolger's RESOLUTION an exception

 

Resoutions.jpg

 

but it bends enough rules to be considered a special case.

 

FB- Doug

What's happened to Resolution now that Bolger killed himself?

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What's happened to Resolution now that Bolger killed himself?

 

I imagine his widow still owns it. I've see pictures of it parked next to the house. In the original write-up, he said his executors would hate it.

 

Pictures posted on the web show a boat that was crudely outfitted is some ways.

 

There were some posts about whether Bolger admitted his mistakes. He did admit one about Resolution: the propeller is too shallow, and/or the rudder is too small, or perhaps too clever. He had counted on the boat pulling a stern wave that would keep the propeller in the water, but the double-ended hull didn't do that, or didn't do it enough.

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I've been involved with classic boats here for years , typically circa 1900 or so. But sometimes a cool boat isn't so much 'classic' good looking, but its about what its done.

This Birdsall cruiser from 1975, Contour, has grown four families worth of sailers and still doing it. Its been around the world, red sea, Med ,Canal du Midi, Panama, Pacific islands. Just a modest boat sitting at a berth in westhaven , but its capable and been so many places.

 

IMG_5286_4.jpg

 

Some of the classic fleet here,

Thelma 1898, some of you guys will know of her from hawaii or San Francisco( I think ( might have been san Diego?)

 

IMG_1456_7.jpg

 

Crewed on Rawhiti last season, first season after her big restoration. 54 ft Logan 1905.

 

IMG_0474_2.jpg

 

IMG_0142_15.jpg

 

another 1900 and something Logan ,Wairiki, much smaller at about 35 ft or so. My boy , one of those kids in the rigging on Contour just did last season on her.

 

IMG_7737_4.jpg

Beautiful Logan Bros ride.

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The Schooner Dwyn Wen.

At launch in 1906:

094605802.jpg

sale photo from Sandeman listing:

http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk/details/373/Alexander-Richardson-106-ft-Auxiliary-Schooner-1906/yacht-for-sale/

.

01Undersail.jpg

An attractive enough craft, but it's the list of voyages (again, from Sandeman):

1906: Launched for James Hartley Burton (b. 1865? d. 1937?), of Beaumaris, Anglesey, (Royal Anglesey Yacht Club). He sailed to New Zealand on his maiden cruise. The last entry in Lloyds Register under his name is in the 1915 edition.

1917: Sold to Lt Commander Henry W.A. Adams RN, Southampton (Lloyds UK). The foremast was lengthened during this period and she could now fly a flying jib.

1920: Owned by / chartered to Herbert W. Warden Sr., "Stonehanger", Salcombe, Devon (American, NYYC Member, Living in Salcombe and Palm Beach among other places). Changed registry to US flag in 1921.

1921: Sold to Raphael Emanual "Billy" Belilios (b. c.1881 - d. Nov 28, 1922 in London), He lived in London but had business interests in Hong Kong. He used her on one 2 month cruise then she stood 14 months on a slipway in Hong Kong until purchased by Ellis after the death of Belilios.

1922: Sold to Dr. Robert Hale Ellis 1878-1963, Portland, Oregon, sailed to USA 13th May to 19th July 1923. Ellis cruised her in local waters.

c.1925: Sold to Eugene (Fritz) Overton 1880-1970, Los Angeles, re rigged as staysail schooner. Cruised twice to the South Pacific (1927 and 1938). Atlas-Imperial Diesel installed 1926.

1942: Acquired by US Navy for $20,000 from Eugene Overton. She was operated out of Washington State. Apparently the boom was shortened and a standing backstay installed at this time. For a time she was thought to have been armed with one 50 Calibre machine gun. (good luck).

1946: Owned by James K. Baird, 2503 Fairview Ave. N., Seattle (Lloyds).

1947 - 1951: Owned by H. C. O'Hanlon & J. S. O'Hanlon, Seattle, Washington (Lloyds). The story goes that the O'Hanlon brothers ran guns to Costa Rica in 1948.

1953: William K. Pratt, Seattle (Lloyds) sailed to Hawaii 1953.

1954 - 1955: Dwyn Wen Cruising Club Inc., Coronado, Ca. (Lloyds).

Acquired by Ted C. Kistner, San Marion, California.

Cruised to French Polynesia from Hawaii in 1956. There was a book written about the trip by Rita Kistner (South Sea Adventure Cruise) that can usually be found on the internet.

1957: Acquired by Carlton Peterson, California.

1959 - 1960: Reacquired by Ted Kistner.

1961 - 1969: Byron J. (Jim) Walters, San Pedro (Lloyds).

1963: University of California Oceanographic Expedition to the South Pacific. There is an article and pictures available about the cruise.

1970 - 1972: No owner listed in Lloyds - possibly owned by Parsons at this time.

1972 ?: Sold to Leonard H. Parsons and 'Truck' Campbell. She operated out of the West Indies and later chartered to Travel Services (Seychelles) Ltd., Mahé, Seychelles.

1974: Bought by Travel Services for charter in Seychelles and reverted to British flag.

1977: Sold to John R. Guthrie, refitted and offered for charter in the Maldives and elsewhere in the Indian Ocean & South East Asia.

1984: Underwater body copper sheathed at Vosper Thornycroft, Singapore.
1985: Rammed in the Borneo River. Refitted Bangkok.

1991: Arrived Durban for refit prior to chartering. There is a Sea Breezes Article May 92 by William Bolton about the History of the DWYN WEN.

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I walk by this boat every time I go to raid the chandlery at Barker's Island.

You guys probably know about this boat. I shouldn't have to explain ...

post-4721-0-81685100-1369682760_thumb.jpg

post-4721-0-65304700-1369682774_thumb.jpg

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I don't. I thought' Mull' when I saw the photo. Whats the story Sons?

I walk by this boat every time I go to raid the chandlery at Barker's Island.

You guys probably know about this boat. I shouldn't have to explain ...

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>>>You Americans......

 

Is cool like a circular thing, i.e. it is so far toward the not cool end, it somehow falls across the dividing line it falls back into cool? I would rather swim into port than be seen on that thing.

 

 

Have to agree with Autograph. To my eye, that just looks...disjointed. Bit of a cacophony. No flow. IMHO, clipper bows rarely work on boats below 50', as to really look good, they need very low freeboard. This is one of the few exceptions. Peggy Bawn , by G L Watson. 23' waterline, 36' hull, 42' sparred length. Freeboard of x feet, where x = damp.

 

02Portbeam.jpg

 

 

 

Do a search on Friendship sloops. They've come that way with all the pretentious bits since the late 1800's. They are fat because they were originally work boats in Maine.

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I've always been partial to the looks of the Cherubini 44s. It started when I read Ferenc Mates' Best Boats book 20 years ago and I still like the looks of these boats. If I ever won the lottery and, through some miracle could affort one, it would have to come with a varnish guy who would show up very 6 months to maintain the finish.

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I've always been partial to the looks of the Cherubini 44s. It started when I read Ferenc Mates' Best Boats book 20 years ago and I still like the looks of these boats. If I ever won the lottery and, through some miracle could affort one, it would have to come with a varnish guy who would show up very 6 months to maintain the finish.

Schooner rigged of course.

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Someone please deal with the flapping leach!!!

 

oh, like you've never flapped a leach before...

 

flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap....ahhhhh.

 

"was it as good for you as it was for me, baby?"

 

"no"

 

:P

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Someone please deal with the flapping leach!!!

 

oh, like you've never flapped a leach before...

 

flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap....ahhhhh.

 

"was it as good for you as it was for me, baby?"

 

"no"

 

:P

*Facepalm* :huh:

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Someone please deal with the flapping leach!!!

 

oh, like you've never flapped a leach before...

 

flap flap flap flap flap flap flap flap....ahhhhh.

 

"was it as good for you as it was for me, baby?"

 

"no"

 

:P

When my leach flaps I do something about it, kinda like when I realize my fly is open......

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That really hits waaay too close to the bone...

 

:)

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How about Cool Setups To Admire?

 

4015148_-1_20120711071452_7_0.jpg&w=241&

 

COTB winner! (CAT on the back, that is.)

 

I do wonder how you are supposed to fish around it.

 

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this showed up on the mocking ads on craigslist thread. I think it belongs here.

 

http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/boa/3844533250.html

 

 

My neighbor was getting ready to throw one away and I intercepted it and refinished it for our grandson. He barely noticed it and found the dog far more interesting. Hard to compete with a dog.

 

rockin-dory.jpg

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this showed up on the mocking ads on craigslist thread. I think it belongs here.

 

http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/boa/3844533250.html

 

 

My neighbor was getting ready to throw one away and I intercepted it and refinished it for our grandson. He barely noticed it and found the dog far more interesting. Hard to compete with a dog.

 

rockin-dory.jpg

Nice refurb job, Tom. That boat probably pitches a fair bit, I reckon. By the way, what's on the bronze plaque?

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this showed up on the mocking ads on craigslist thread. I think it belongs here.

 

http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/boa/3844533250.html

 

 

My neighbor was getting ready to throw one away and I intercepted it and refinished it for our grandson. He barely noticed it and found the dog far more interesting. Hard to compete with a dog.

 

rockin-dory.jpg

Nice refurb job, Tom. That boat probably pitches a fair bit, I reckon. By the way, what's on the bronze plaque?

 

Drool and dog snot.

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this showed up on the mocking ads on craigslist thread. I think it belongs here.

 

http://portland.craigslist.org/clk/boa/3844533250.html

 

 

My neighbor was getting ready to throw one away and I intercepted it and refinished it for our grandson. He barely noticed it and found the dog far more interesting. Hard to compete with a dog.

 

rockin-dory.jpg

Nice refurb job, Tom. That boat probably pitches a fair bit, I reckon. By the way, what's on the bronze plaque?

 

Drool and dog snot.

:D

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In addition to the dog drool, it says it's a Rockin' Dory and gives a hull number. I think it says where they are made, but can't really remember. I took some pictures of the thing (boat or chair?) taken apart and during refinishing. I can't believe I did not take a picture of the plaque.

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If ya don't like replicas, turn away now. Check out this beautiful 30' gaff cutter, designed by Paul Gartside. I know our, Bob isn't so keen, but even he might agree this is a sweet looking boat, I think.

 

 

post-76289-0-93272100-1370469256_thumb.jpg

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If ya don't like replicas, turn away now. Check out this beautiful 30' gaff cutter, designed by Paul Gartside. I know our, Bob isn't so keen, but even he might agree this is a sweet looking boat, I think.

 

It is beautiful.

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Sailby:

Don't be so sure you know my taste and preferences I am a man of many fawcetts.

In fact I think that Gartside design is a great looking boat. It's a very nice copy of a type that has been done a thoudsand times.

 

I will be taking time off next week to write Beethoven's 5th symphony. I'm certain you will like it.

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Writing the symphony is genius, one that on paper, I'm told by my betters, is beautiful.

I, however, can only appreciate mr. Beethovens work when I hear it.

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Sailby:

Don't be so sure you know my taste and preferences I am a man of many fawcetts.

In fact I think that Gartside design is a great looking boat. It's a very nice copy of a type that has been done a thoudsand times.

 

I will be taking time off next week to write Beethoven's 5th symphony. I'm certain you will like it.

 

 

Ah good, I've been waiting for that

 

Make sure you give it a strong opening.

 

FB- Doug

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If ya don't like replicas, turn away now. Check out this beautiful 30' gaff cutter, designed by Paul Gartside. I know our, Bob isn't so keen, but even he might agree this is a sweet looking boat, I think.

 

 

That's a beauty

Don't see any rigging for a TOPSAIL though !!!

 

FB- Doug

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If ya don't like replicas, turn away now. Check out this beautiful 30' gaff cutter, designed by Paul Gartside. I know our, Bob isn't so keen, but even he might agree this is a sweet looking boat, I think.

 

 

That's a beauty

Don't see any rigging for a TOPSAIL though !!!

 

FB- Doug

She's certainly designed to carry one, Doug looking at her sail plan. Pretty difficult to bend on and fly solo though, I'd imagine. Saw lots of tops'ls flying in Falmouth, UK and they seem to be mostly multi-coloured panels. Very appealing I recall.

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Sailby:

Don't be so sure you know my taste and preferences I am a man of many fawcetts.

In fact I think that Gartside design is a great looking boat. It's a very nice copy of a type that has been done a thoudsand times.

 

I will be taking time off next week to write Beethoven's 5th symphony. I'm certain you will like it.

I hear ya, Bob. Just remember, there's hardly ever any such thing as a new idea - just different combinations of old and maybe not-so-old ones.

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Sailbye:

I hear you;. I have borrowed many times. BuI always try to give i my own spin. I'm not interested in recreating the past.

 

Nico:

Welcome to our group.

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Sailbye:

That's bull shit. You could say the same thing about Shakespeare. It's a very convenient way to put down the efforts of the innovators. I suppose I owe all my efforts to Frederick the Great. Charlemagne?

You can't ignore or erase the past. Yes the Beatles owe it all to Buddy Holly. What a crock. Some people move things ahead. Others just stamp in the same place.

post-2980-0-63141000-1370487206_thumb.jpg

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Ha, ha. Had another think about that one, Bob? Granted there are one or two real inventors out there. But they are few and far between in history, IMO. Innovators are a similar breed, but more common.

 

I CAN say the same thing about Shakespeare. He was a writer. Nothing new about writing - or language. Just maybe put together in a new, innovative and dramatic style. Romanticised and immortalised by the Victorians of course, but he was writing poetry plays and sonnets, as were his contemporaries.

 

That is not to say, that creative people like Shakespeare do not move things forward. Of course they do. But usually by combining bits of old ideas in different ways, as I said.

 

Now, what in that slow cooker?

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One of the reasons that Bolger was so proud of his Birdwatcher design is that he thought it really was a novel idea to combine cockpit and cabin into one space. He freely admitted that most of his boats, however unusual they looked, were adaptations of old ideas.

 

bw2_small_FRidge.jpg

 

He was a historian, especially of nautical things. He also liked reaching back into the deep past to revive something forgotten.

 

Re: the Gartside design. There can be good reasons for making a new version of an old type. Modern construction is going to yield a better boat than, say, galvanized-iron-nail-fastened carvel planking, and it will often be light enough to require a change in the lines plan. Then you are going to be tempted by a modern keel and rudder arrangement. A lot of new thinking can go into a boat that looks 100 years old at first glance.

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Sailbye:

Sure. And michelangelo was all about chisels and marble. Right.

 

Semi:

I reviewed the Gartside boat in SAILING. I like the design. It's very nice.

I just prefer to put my own stamp on my designs. I had at least two design commissions that went south when the clients insisted I do a "reproduction".

 

As for Bolger, I like just about everything he ever did. I think I have covered my admiration for his work in other threads.

 

If I am going to do a traditional type I'd pefer to make it like this:

post-2980-0-78541300-1370531119_thumb.jpg

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The rig on that Birdwatcher doesn't look quite right. It normally flies a taller leg'o'mutton sail of 125 square feet or an even taller solent lug with 150 square feet and a small jib. That one looks like it's got a smaller sail on the shorter solent lug mast. It's not laced on either, which is just weird. All that being said, I think Birdwatcher is a seriously cool boat and would very much like to have one. I bought plans a few years ago intending to build, but built a power boat instead. Maybe someday...

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If I am going to do a traditional type I'd pefer to make it like this:

Which craft is that?

 

On paper Beethoven's 3rd has a smudge on the cover where the dedication was changed. Still sounds pretty.

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Bob, your posting of Night Runner put me in mind of Sunstone, just because of the bright finish.

 

I don't think she's been nominated for Cool Boat yet, but I don't think you can find cooler, for what she is and for what she does.

 

She beat the modern racing boats, and now out-cruises the Chelsea Tractor "Expedition yachts"

 

post-38-0-53461900-1370535579_thumb.jpg

 

 

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The rig on that Birdwatcher doesn't look quite right. It normally flies a taller leg'o'mutton sail of 125 square feet or an even taller solent lug with 150 square feet and a small jib. That one looks like it's got a smaller sail on the shorter solent lug mast. It's not laced on either, which is just weird. All that being said, I think Birdwatcher is a seriously cool boat and would very much like to have one. I bought plans a few years ago intending to build, but built a power boat instead. Maybe someday...

 

I agree about the rig. It looks very short, even for a boat with limited stability. I found quite a number of pics via Google Images, and used this one because it showed the hull the best.

 

By the way, the appearance of these boats depends a lot of the material use for the "windows." Here they are clear, often they are smoked.

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Sailbye:

Sure. And michelangelo was all about chisels and marble. Right.

 

Semi:

I reviewed the Gartside boat in SAILING. I like the design. It's very nice.

I just prefer to put my own stamp on my designs. I had at least two design commissions that went south when the clients insisted I do a "reproduction".

 

As for Bolger, I like just about everything he ever did. I think I have covered my admiration for his work in other threads.

 

If I am going to do a traditional type I'd pefer to make it like this:

Bob. Let me put it to you another way. Where do YOUR creative ideas come from?

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