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There are enough H 12 1/2 s in Annapolis for OD races. One I know lives upstream of the Spa Creek bridge and the owner drops the gaff momentarily to sail under it without waiting for the bridge to open. Beautiful boats!

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5 hours ago, Grey Dawn said:

There are enough H 12 1/2 s in Annapolis for OD races. One I know lives upstream of the Spa Creek bridge and the owner drops the gaff momentarily to sail under it without waiting for the bridge to open. Beautiful boats!

In the 1970s, I sailed from the Coconut Grove Sailing Club in Miami. The Bullseye was a popular class. I think it is loosely based on the H 12 1/2.

This is what the class association says:

"The shape of this hull was designed by Nat Herreshoff in 1914 and built by Herreshoff Manufacturing Co. in wood. Originally named the Herreshoff Bull’s Eye, and nicknamed the 12½ for her water line length, she was available in gaff or Marconi rig with a thin waterway and through the transom tiller. In 1938 she was modified with a wider water way and an above transom tiller, and was named the Fishers Island Sound Bull's Eye. In 1947 the rights to build the Herreshoffs were purchased by Cape Cod Shipbuilding Co., and the jigs, forms, patterns were moved to Wareham. In 1949 work began on a fiberglass model of the Fishers Island Sound Bull’s Eye. The only alterations were the aluminum mast and cuddy cabin, designed by Nathanael’s oldest son Sidney Herreshoff. The fiberglass version with cuddy and aluminum Marconi mast was named the Cape Cod Bull’s Eye and the design has remained unchanged ever since. Today Cape Cod Shipbuilding Co. makes both the fiberglass Cape Cod Bull’s Eye and the fiberglass Herreshoff H-12½. Throughout this evolution of different decks and rigs, the shape of the hull has remained the same, and true to the original wooden frames built and used by the Herreshoff Mfg. Co."

 

bullseye.jpg.37d89b8cd3a811f6b00cc67f33db6010.jpg

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A new Herreshoff recently showed up in our local marina - sweet looking little boat.

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I like Hereshoffs

I have 4th hull up; the 20'Gauntlet

Sails beautifully, planes easily

IMG_4948.JPG

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7 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

A new Herreshoff recently showed up in our local marina - sweet looking little boat.

The Herreshoff facility, now a museum, is around the corner from me so the 12 1/2s have a long history here. Everyone seems to feel strongly about something about them, the minor differences, mostly what is a "true Herreshoff" and about wood or fiberglass.

The Forbes family which includes John Forbes Kerry keep a fleet in Hadley Harbor. They're widely regarded as proper.

14871111.jpg

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The Herreshoff sheer and bows are works of art

IMG_4950.JPG

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Woodenboat had a comparison of the Herreshoff 12 1/2 with near copies by Chuck Paine, Joel White, and one or two others. 

There was a fiberglass version of the H12 1/2 called the Doughdish. It looked as much like the wooden version as they could make it, unlike the Cape Cod Shipbuilding Bullseye which was, in Phil Bolger's term, a more candid adaptation. I was told by a friend that the Doughdish also was based on original Herreshoff molds, and there was some disagreement about which was the better set.

 

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I took some shots of boats sailing the Fox Island Thoroughfare this weekend. Winds in the thoroughfare, funneling over and through tree tops, are flukey. You sail out of holes in the wind only to have your mast top wrenched over a few seconds later. Challenging.  It's one of the best stretches of sailing in the world(I have no doubt). 

This Fox Eye (H 12 1/2) and a bigger boat seemed to be in a race(anyone know what the bigger boat is?). Coming out of a hole here, things are pretty calm. 

east-to-west-1-1-of-1-jpg.139220

Then they enter a wind tunnel, just off our moored boat,  and things heat up. 

east-to-west-3-1-of-1-jpg.139221

Surely it's an illusion of my lens and angle,... 

east-to-west-4-1-of-1-jpg.139222
but,... the little boat appears,.... east-to-west-5-1-of-1-jpg.139223

to kick the big boats ass. In mast furling? :)

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3 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Woodenboat had a comparison of the Herreshoff 12 1/2 with near copies by Chuck Paine, Joel White, and one or two others. 

There was a fiberglass version of the H12 1/2 called the Doughdish. It looked as much like the wooden version as they could make it, unlike the Cape Cod Shipbuilding Bullseye which was, in Phil Bolger's term, a more candid adaptation. I was told by a friend that the Doughdish also was based on original Herreshoff molds, and there was some disagreement about which was the better set.

 

Your friend has it backwards, at least in that Cape Cod Shipbuilding bought the Herreshoff molds, not Doughdish.

Around here all fiberglass 12 1/2s are called, with an upturned nose, "Doughdishes" no matter who made them.

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On 7/20/2017 at 5:08 PM, Tucky said:

I'll post the one I have, which was shot on my phone from too low an angle. Hound is a lovely boat, especially when shot in the Fox Island Thoroughfare, her summer home. For those that don't know her, she is  another beautiful K. Aage Nielson , built at Abetting & Rasmussen.

 

597145cf2ccf2_Hound2016.thumb.jpg.3bc46728c96bdc5b33b27f54ef9a6f5a.jpg.

I saw her when she was having some plating replaced and ran into her a couple of times in the Thoroughfare. Once it was one of those Maine Summer days where we both were on reciprocal courses headed at each other, both going downwind maybe 100 yards apart.  We both stalled for a moment next to each other and and hardened up as we got into each others old breeze.  

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7 hours ago, Elegua said:

I saw her when she was having some plating replaced and ran into her a couple of times in the Thoroughfare. Once it was one of those Maine Summer days where we both were on reciprocal courses headed at each other, both going downwind maybe 100 yards apart.  We both stalled for a moment next to each other and and hardened up as we got into each others old breeze.  

You describe well, a typical moment of what it's like to sail the Thoroughfare. Lobster boats pulling traps, ferry boats - big and small - and other sail boats going the other way. It sounds crazy but it's really not. It's just challenging enough, that sailors, have to sail it. 

How often do you see a Bristol 35.5 under sail,.... 

bristol-35-5-1-1-of-1-jpg.139218

pass a lobster boat? 

bristol-35-5-1-of-1-jpg.139219

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14 hours ago, Tom Scott said:

The boat in the background is a Columbia 50. :)

Of course it is! Thanks, Tom.

 

It was too 'new' looking, to be a 60's boat. Old boats (thanks to $), are sometimes the newest looking boats, around here. 

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One of these showed up in Tsehum Harbour a few weeks ago. I thought it looked vaguely familiar...

lERPA7g.jpg

 

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Very cool and yes kinda familiar, except the hard dodger and the wind generator, but I'd probably do other dorky things.

Do you have no tsehums in Tsehum?

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4 hours ago, lasal said:

Very cool and yes kinda familiar, except the hard dodger and the wind generator, but I'd probably do other dorky things.

Do you have no tsehums in Tsehum?

No. Yes we have no no tsehums.

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5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

No. Yes we have no no tsehums.

Well if you no tsehum, how would you know if you have no no tsehums in Tsehum?
 

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Thanks Ish. The CT65 still looks good to my eye after all these years. I spent a lot of time at the yard when we started tat project. Fun times.

BLOODHOUND is spectacular.

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Not cool, but big. We sailed around this 370 foot Russian motor yacht this weekend. To get a sense of the scale of this ship, the sailboat on deck (for fun), launched by davits, is 74 feet long.

 

We sailed within a few hundred feet but any photo I took up close looked odd. You have to get away - pretty far, from a big boat, to take a photo that makes any sense. 

 

36253983046_d4e48331b3_h.jpg

 

Then sailing into our home harbor, there was another big new boat anchored. ELFJE. Recently built for Wende Schmidt (google CEO's partner-or something). As I got closer I took some photos, sailed by, and took some more.

 

None of them looked right. Traditional details like a long counter on a 170 foot boat, are not that pleasing to the eye from the vantage point of a 38' sailboat, just a few feet from the water(I wonder how we look from inside the 170'er?).

The only good shot I got, was from far away. A big boat needs a lot of water around - big sky, maybe a mountain in the background to give it a pleasing scale. Really shows the plumb bow, long counter well, when I had some distance. 

She's a good lookin' yacht from a country mile away. I don't mean that in a bad way.   

 

35461279034_11b32f3dc0_h.jpg

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Probably had to be winched up there.

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3 hours ago, A horse, of course said:

Wonder how big the burgee on their mainmast is?

It was big enough that I could see the symbol on the burgee very well, from far off. It was: 2 white pennants - overlaying each other - and each white pennant had one red dot. 

The other thing that is a mystery to me is the port. THE CREEK 

Anybody know? 

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Did you catch what country it was registered in. Most likely not the U.S..

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Bolero in black in June, 2001

I got to varnish the transom

It was a fun couple of days work

 

IMG_5131.JPG

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If I had to pick one "Most Beautiful Boat Ever", Bolero would be on the (very) short list if not the winner by acclamation.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

If I had to pick one "Most Beautiful Boat Ever", Bolero would be on the (very) short list if not the winner by acclamation.

I agree its top 10, but for me "Endeavor" will always be #1 in my book.

394291?k=5418&w=1440&h=1685&q=100&o=s%7B

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6 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Bolero in black in June, 2001

I got to varnish the transom

It was a fun couple of days work

 

IMG_5131.JPG

That varnish has been removed as the transom is now painted as it was originally. I talked to the owners Ed and Marty about it while it was being done during a refit.

The varnish was Ed's idea but Olin Stephens has been vocal about not liking it, had said "My God, it looks like somebody chopped off the stern with a chain saw." 

http://www.yachtingmagazine.com/ageless-beauty-bolero

 

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Kind of remember him saying something similar when he was there.

I'll have to dig out some interior shots I took while they had her in the shop. 

Stunning 

All white now...

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He was a nice guy when I met him. I didn't know that but it's in print and I didn't know he even designed the yacht when I was lucky enough to sail with him on Marilee after doing the Bolero brightwork. I was in my 20's and grew up in the inner city...they don't teach you everything there

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12 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

If I had to pick one "Most Beautiful Boat Ever", Bolero would be on the (very) short list if not the winner by acclamation.

She's pretty alright.

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The transom is beautiful,

31702009730_a532b17618_h.jpg

as is BOLERO. She looked especially good in the old travel lift, kind of maxing it out. They have a new larger travel lift today, that she might not look as good in. 

22735661539_cd12750099_h.jpg

I haunted the dumpster during that refit. I found some great stuff, some of which is still in my shop. Fiddled shelves that had labels like, CREW SHIRTS, etc. I've never found a place for those on my boat :) but they're still sitting there. 

But I salvaged many trim pieces; cut up large, ragged interior bunk front planks that were saw-zalled out. The material was so beautiful I couldn't leave it.

The best piece was a big ragged bulkhead, painted white, that I cut out enough of the plywood for panels to build these two doors(to the right of the original companionway ladder). I had replaced my engine and needed to build new doors. I used the finish A side (and painted white), on the inside of the doors, and used the B side for my finish doors. The veneer on the B side had a beautiful cut pattern, like draped curtains, that finished beautifully.

A little piece of BOLERO. 

24781143703_631154b05d_b.jpg

 

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Doesn't match. Tear it out and do it again

Oh, wait, I'm just jealous I didn't get to it first

I'm a high diver when it comes to dumpster diving in marinas

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How does that travel lift work with the grey cross beam between the mast and the forestays?

Looks like the backstay is already off, do they have to drop the forestays to launch the boat?

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That is one big f--'in winch on the port side of the deck house. It's so massive in relation to where it's mounted, as though it could take off the deck house roof. What's it for?

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2 hours ago, olaf hart said:

How does that travel lift work with the grey cross beam between the mast and the forestays?

Looks like the backstay is already off, do they have to drop the forestays to launch the boat?

Good question

I reckon the forestays are off already and the mast is guyed up with halyards - you see the way the main "forestay" seems to be wrapped through the gunwhale fairleads?

An advantage of muddy creeks is that when they have travel hoists they have these ones attached at the bottom, which drive into the water. No need to mess around with rigging then. 

Wise-hoist.jpg

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I do remember they had to swap stays to get out of the lift. That was a 50 ton lift, the new one is 75 ton. 

Does anyone know this design? About 26' or so(it looks bigger). I rowed close. I believe it has a glass hull and the wooden house is real, not veneer.

It is a pretty boat and nice size. I also like the name, METISSE', def: french, 'a woman of mixed ancestry'.  

 

36184912392_e69c108183_h.jpg

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55 minutes ago, A horse, of course said:

Good question

I reckon the forestays are off already and the mast is guyed up with halyards - you see the way the main "forestay" seems to be wrapped through the gunwhale fairleads?

An advantage of muddy creeks is that when they have travel hoists they have these ones attached at the bottom, which drive into the water. No need to mess around with rigging then. 

Wise-hoist.jpg

Makes sense Ed, they can't put it in the lift with the forward end open without dropping the mizzen, must step it out forward using alternating halyards and stays.

Wouldn't want to get that wrong in any sort of wind ...

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22 hours ago, MauiPunter said:

I agree its top 10, but for me "Endeavor" will always be #1 in my book.

394291?k=5418&w=1440&h=1685&q=100&o=s%7B

in mine too!

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5 hours ago, Bull City said:

That is one big f--'in winch on the port side of the deck house. It's so massive in relation to where it's mounted, as though it could take off the deck house roof. What's it for?

That is for the mainsheet. The boat originally had end boom sheeting, but when it was changed to mid-boom sheeting, the large winch became necessary.  

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Evil mid-boom sheeting, and off-set companionways.

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Thanks to all for the eye candy.

Now, can you name those sails....

 

gallery_75266_1131_46873.jpg

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Spinnaker, Yankee, Jib, Staysail, Foresail, Fore topsail, Mizzen Staysail, Mainsail, Main topsail.

no rat tail ...

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21 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Spinnaker, Yankee, Jib, Staysail, Foresail, Fore topsail, Mizzen Staysail, Mainsail, Main topsail.

no rat tail ...

Name dropper.

 

Weren't chutes still called "Ballooners" or balloon jibs when that shot was taken?

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23 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Spinnaker, Yankee, Jib, Staysail, Foresail, Fore topsail, Mizzen Staysail, Mainsail, Main topsail.

no rat tail ...

Not mizzen staysail...that would be a large fisherman staysail. If it was tacked forward and set outside the foresail it would be a gollywobbler. 

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Name dropper.

 

Weren't chutes still called "Ballooners" or balloon jibs when that shot was taken?

Nope. That was how spinnakers originally looked and were set. Balloon jib was a large, lightweight jib set on the topmast stay. It would be called a drifter-reacher today.

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11 minutes ago, RKoch said:

Not mizzen staysail...that would be a large fisherman staysail. If it was tacked forward and set outside the foresail it would be a gollywobbler. 

You are right, I didn't notice it was on the foremast

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This boat could be posted as a comparison to the one posted by madohe, or it could be posted as an entry in most beautiful boat ever along with Bolero, or it could be posted in the metal boats thread because it's steel.

side.sail.14.1100.JPG

A 2004 reproduction of one of Thomas Lipton's Shamrocks designed by William Fife III.

http://hugohein.eu/classic.sail/sunshine/sunshine.specs.htm

 

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Gemini_under_sail.jpg

To me, one of the prettiest 30' out there.. the original Yankee one design..

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You guys kill me....

I got trouble with the five we carry and only two up at a time.

Oh, I swiped the pic from up-thread

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36 minutes ago, Tom Scott said:

...if the person out on the bowsprit fell off, how long do think it would take to get them back on board?

About half a boatlength.

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I will probably be shot for saying this, but none of the J-class hulls do much for me, not even Endeavour.  The monster rigs and ant-like crew are pretty, as are the acres of timber and the insanely low topsides, but those long spindly overhangs look like unbalanced affectations to me.

Bolero's proportions suit my eye much better.  Her overhangs fit much better.

But my #1 is Stormvogel. Her relatively snubby bow combines with a bold sheer to a very purposeful yet elegant result.

Van de Stadt drew many beautiful bows, tho none as perfect as Stormvogel.  It is sad that his successor Cees van Tongeren had such radically different design language.  There  were many fine designs from CvT, but their straightline stems and utterly flat sheers lack magic.  Maybe VdS took the curves with him when he retired.

 

Stormvogelrunning.jpg

 

 

5 hours ago, Trovão said:

 

On 2/8/2017 at 11:17 PM, MauiPunter said:

I agree its top 10, but for me "Endeavor" will always be #1 in my book.

394291?k=5418&w=1440&h=1685&q=100&o=s%7B

in mine too!

 

 

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I was not sure whether to put this in the Uglyboats thread, the Not-Mocking Craigslist thread, or this one... personally I admire it because it is traditional (Howard Chapelle for gosh sake!!) it's shallow draft, it's a SCHOONER... and it looks like a lot of fun

https://annapolis.craigslist.org/boa/d/schooner/6235058132.html

00202_38t3i7sPl36_600x450.jpg

 

Good example of the traditional schooner mast-rake too, the mainmast raked a bit more (maybe they over did it slightly). All kinds of good.

FB- Doug

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I'm with Leggs on the J Boat thing. Big and boring. But STORMY has always been one of my favs. Lots of character in that design,

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My current object of attraction.  The sheer was trimmed slightly out of the mold, the bowsprit was leveled out, etc.  Makes her an understated beauty IMO:

Millie

 

Millie.jpg

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Needs more sheer spring to be perfect.

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16 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

But my #1 is Stormvogel. Her relatively snubby bow combines with a bold sheer to a very purposeful yet elegant result.

Van de Stadt drew many beautiful bows, tho none as perfect as Stormvogel.  It is sad that his successor Cees van Tongeren had such radically different design language.  There  were many fine designs from CvT, but their straightline stems and utterly flat sheers lack magic.  Maybe VdS took the curves with him when he retired.

 

Stormvogelrunning.jpg

 

 

 

Along with Kialoa III, the Ocean 71 production versions of Stormvogel are the only ship sized sailboats I have ever seriously lusted after.

If Bolero was glass it would be #1

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21 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Needs more sheer spring to be perfect.

That's part of the reason I like it better than the stock Cape George - but then I own a J Boat (not one of the big ones!) so I'm used to a flatter sheer.

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5 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Needs more sheer spring to be perfect.

I think the understatement of the sheer is just brilliant.   The conventional approach would certainly have been to give more spring, but this shallower spring is stunningly executed.

The result is that depending on the angle of view, the sheer looks either flat or traditional.  I like that.

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Along with Kialoa III, the Ocean 71 production versions of Stormvogel are the only ship sized sailboats I have ever seriously lusted after.

If Bolero was glass it would be #1

As a teenager, I had the pleasure once of going on board an Ocean 71.  She was fitted out like a ship, rather than as a gentleman's yot.  I loved it.

I am not a fan of the aft-extended Ocean 75.  The slightly anemic-looking narrow aft section of the 71 is it only aesthetic weakness, and the 75 exaggerates that flaw.

Bolero is definitely prettier from the rear than Stormvogel.

So when we both become squillionaires, I'll admire the stern of your glass Bolero from the deck of my 71. You'll need to sail her hard to stay ahead :)

 

 

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On August 3, 2017 at 10:22 PM, TwoLegged said:

I will probably be shot for saying this, but none of the J-class hulls do much for me, not even Endeavour.  The monster rigs and ant-like crew are pretty, as are the acres of timber and the insanely low topsides, but those long spindly overhangs look like unbalanced affectations to me.

Bolero's proportions suit my eye much better.  Her overhangs fit much better.

But my #1 is Stormvogel. Her relatively snubby bow combines with a bold sheer to a very purposeful yet elegant result.

Van de Stadt drew many beautiful bows, tho none as perfect as Stormvogel.  It is sad that his successor Cees van Tongeren had such radically different design language.  There  were many fine designs from CvT, but their straightline stems and utterly flat sheers lack magic.  Maybe VdS took the curves with him when he retired.

 

Stormvogelrunning.jpg

 

 

 

Yah, great looking boat. Unusual spinnaker...looks to be quilt-cut. Note also the spin and mizzen staysails are vertical-cut.

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Long overhangs look great on the really big boats...look a bit out of place on small boats. Keep in mind the J's were designed to a measurement formula, and their purpose was day-racing in somewhat protected water. The overhangs were unsuitable for open ocean. Shamrock V was badly damaged when they encountered a storm sailing back to England after AC. Irving Johnson wrote a great account of it.

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I think that white Cape George cutter was the one I was involved with. Pretty sure. What was the original name? Was the boat ever black?

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Rasaper: Yes, I fully understand that but one owner brought me in to make some mods to make the boat better looking. I think it was that boat. The original name was something like "LION,,," The original owner was Steve  Something.

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2 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

She looks like a beautifully kept yacht. Thorough maintenance detail supplied. Pretty good buy at around that price I'm thinking.

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4 hours ago, RKoch said:

Yah, great looking boat. Unusual spinnaker...looks to be quilt-cut. Note also the spin and mizzen staysails are vertical-cut.

  Yes, RKoch, that is odd.

But Stormvogel was launched in the very early days of synthetic sailcloths.  Maybe sailmakers were still experimenting with how to use it?

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3 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:
2 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

She looks like a beautifully kept yacht. Thorough maintenance detail supplied. Pretty good buy at around that price I'm thinking.

Yes, stunning boat at a fair price.  But still a boat only for an owner willing to continue spending heavily on maintenance.

Not as spendy as a wooden-hulled boat, but still a much bigger commitment of time and money than an all-glass boat

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

  Yes, RKoch, that is odd.

But Stormvogel was launched in the very early days of synthetic sailcloths.  Maybe sailmakers were still experimenting with how to use it?

IIRC Ratsey developed the double-Luffed (symmetrical) spinnaker in the20s...seams parallel to luffs in an inverted V. Upper girths were limited because of the construction and weight, so the sails were essentially triangular. After WW2, synthetics were more available. Hood came out with the classic horizontal cut, with the seams at 90 deg to luffs, about 1950.  Most of the shaping was by the center seam, but shaping the outer ends of the seams allowed much greater luff round. Sailmakers do experiment...looks like sailmaker of that spinnaker was adopting both methods...likely looking to get more control over shape and stretch. Quilt cut was seen occasionally in genoas about 35 years ago. First time I'd seen it in a spinnaker.

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Yes, a motorboat. But nice (IMHO).

The Cowes ice cream boat. Frequently seen in Osborne Bay (a popular anchorage East of Cowes, near Queen Victoria's weekend pad), in the summer, dispensing cheer and ice cream. 

16387009_1533960596632439_24370043942701

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Hope this one did not appear 40 (or 80) pages ago and I missed it but I find the Sakonnet 23 to be a beautiful, little boat. It was designed by Joel White and built by Edey and Duff who made a fascinating group of votes. No idea how well it sails.

Sakonnet23.jpg

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7 hours ago, sean9c said:

The Perry designed Capaz used to live in Anacortes, always thought it was a good look. Just noticed it was for sale and the interior is as interesting as the exterior. 

Lots of pics to look at. IMO the dodger could use a rethink, but other than that as cool as I remembered.

http://swiftsureyachts.com/products/capaz-perry-pilothouse-48-2/

Yes, the dodger is a bit of a visual mess.  And to my eye, the pilothouse side-windows don't work.

I wanted to like that boat, but so far I can't

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2 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Hope this one did not appear 40 (or 80) pages ago and I missed it but I find the Sakonnet 23 to be a beautiful, little boat. It was designed by Joel White and built by Edey and Duff who made a fascinating group of votes. No idea how well it sails.

Sakonnet23.jpg

I used to own one. It sails just fine. Nice little vessel.

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CAPAZ is a great sailing boat and a fine motor sailer with very good visibility. The boat is surprisingly close winded and fast. Once again, this was a custom design never intended to please everyone. The original owner and subsequent owner have enjoyed the boat. That dodger does not fit the boat. The pilot house windows are designed for function and visibility not arbitrary aesthetics.

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Very pretty.

Boats like that Sakonnet 23 have a lot going for them. Not too much to maintain, light loads, easy to just "go for a sail".

A lot of people who lug around lots of accommodation might be better served by a boat like this

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7 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

CAPAZ is a great sailing boat and a fine motor sailer with very good visibility. The boat is surprisingly close winded and fast. Once again, this was a custom design never intended to please everyone. The original owner and subsequent owner have enjoyed the boat. That dodger does not fit the boat. The pilot house windows are designed for function and visibility not arbitrary aesthetics.

If it keeps its owners and crew happy, that's all that matters.

Just not my sort of boat, and to my eye, nowhere near as pretty as Yoni. :)

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I think CAPAZ is pretty good looking. Pilothouse is well-proportioned. The cockpit enclosure looks pretty tacky.

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I always saw CAPAZ as a "sailing tugboat". It can do 9 knots under power an 8 knots upwind under sail. Quite impressive for a ketch. It's all DWL.

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3 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Very pretty.

Boats like that Sakonnet 23 have a lot going for them. Not too much to maintain, light loads, easy to just "go for a sail".

A lot of people who lug around lots of accommodation might be better served by a boat like this

Very true, although it is nice to have at least a small cabin for a nap, or an escape from the rain or sun.  

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